Topics - B-29s - Losses/Damage (B-29 aircraft & flight crews)*

 
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[KWE Note: The information found on this page covers only B-29s in operation during the years of the Korean War, but encompasses B-29s that were not only lost or damaged in the Korean War zone, but also those that were lost or damaged while in operation in other zones throughout the world.  Out-of-theater accidents happened in the USA, Lybia, Guam, Newfoundland, and Azores.  The B-29s are listed by alpha order or serial number sequence.]

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  • Ace in the Hole/SAC's Appeal (#44-61872) - On April 22, 1952, this aircraft was damaged by AAA during a raid against Sinanju.  It crash landed at K-14 and was written off as damaged beyond repair.
     
  • Apache (#44-61902) - According to Earl "Mac" McGill, Apache was heavily damaged but survived.  His website states: "Although KORWALD lists this tail number as unknown, a crewmember who was flying his last mission wrote that Apache was severely damaged by AAA and MiG cannon fire while bombing the Kwakson RR Bridge on 10 June 1952. This was the same night that two other B-29s, Hot to Go and Miss Jackie the Rebel were shot down over the same target. In March 2006 Bill Colvin verified (with photo) that Apache made it to Kimpo (K-14) with wounded aboard and was, in fact, the B-29 reported, sans tail number. Bill’s e-mail and photo finally brought all of the pieces of the puzzle together. Information received in April 2005 confirmed that this was also the tail number of our assigned B-29. We had planned to paint “Clusterphobia” on the nose, depicting four buxom SYTs prominently displaying their Air Medals. Alas, the lasses fell victim to Lemon Drop Kid, which took priority--and our artist’s free time. Clusterphobia became only a memory.  “Apache” was also a nickname for the Indian on the 28BS insignia.

    Some online resources state that Apache took a direct hit from enemy fire, exploded, and it and its crew were disintegrated.  However, MacGill told the KWE, "The information I posted on my web site (above) was well-researched and as correct as can possibly be established. This was a night mission and most of the crewmembers saw it hit, assumed that Apache did not survive past the target, when in fact it made it into K-14 (according to several accounts, including one from a ground observer)."

    The 11 crew members included (not all names found to date):
     
    • Blake, 1Lt. Ernest L. "Ernie" (bombardier) - WIA (severely wounded)
    • Gordon, Verne W. Jr.
    • Perry, George (pilot)
       
  • Atomic Tom (#44-27288) - "Atomic Tom" was one of four Superfortresses that bombed the Seoul railway station and Han River bridges on the afternoon of 28 June 1950 - fully six hours before US president Harry S. Truman gave the approval for offensive operations to begin in Korea. A veteran of numerous combat missions during the Korean War, it suffered major battle damage on September 10, 1950.  It was repaired and returned to service.  This aircraft was attacked by MiG-15s on April 12, 1951. Despite the communist fighters inflicting significant battle damage, "Atomic Tom" was eventually repaired and returned to operations.  This aircraft was the first B-29 to drop bombs on North Korea when the war broke out.
     
  • B-29 - crashed at Yokota Air Base Japan during take off when the engine quit.  The plane broke into two pieces, caught fire, and 30 of its load of 38 bombs exploded.
     
  • B-29 (#42-65392) - This aircraft collided in mid-air with (#44-61908) on February 01, 1952, five miles off Bolo Point, Okinawa.  All of the crew of 42-65392 survived, but there were no survivors on aircraft 44-61908. 
     
  • B-29 (#42-65353) - From the 98BG, this B-29 had engine trouble on October 05, 1950 and the crew had to bail out due to engine fire.  The aircraft was a loss. [KWE Note: Not listed on KORWALD.]  The pilot was Karl C. Asherfeld, Jr.  Location: Yokota AB, 95 miles NW, Japan (10 miles west of Wakamatsu, Korea).
     
  • B-29 (#42-93974) - Aircraft loss occurred during a night leaflet dropping mission.  At 0025 hours on November 09, 1951, this aircraft was hit by flak but stayed aloft long enough to allow the crew to bail out over the friendly island of Paengyong-do.  All but one crew member was rescued.
     
    • Bigham, Capt. Donald Gaile - He was seen bailing out with a dinghy attached. POW - not returned
    • Bryan, 1Lt. Richard M. - rescued
    • Clancey 1Lt. Donald R. - rescued
    • Garcia, 1Lt. Raymond B. - rescued
    • Heitsenrader, Pfc. Vernon - rescued
    • McKinney, SSgt. Winston P. - rescued
    • LaFleur, Cpl. Joseph R. - rescued
    • Lipsky, SSgt. David - rescued
    • Livingston, Pfc. Ben f. - rescued
    • Pershica, Pfc. Joseph P. - rescued
    • Northey, Sgt. William J. - rescued
    • Vance, 1Lt. Daniel R. - rescued
       
  • B-29 (42-94032) - Charles F. Berry was pilot of this aircraft when it was involved in an accident 30 miles west of Alexander City, Alabama, on July 24, 1950, while stationed at MacDill AFB, Florida.  In World War II, the B-29 with tail number 42-94032 was known as "My Gal II". #42-94032 was SAC's last B-29 bomber retired to the aircraft storage facility at Davis-Monthan AFB.
     
  • B-29 (42-94045) - shot down over Namsi Air Field on Black Tuesday, October 23, 1951.  See Black Tuesday.   The aircraft crashed on a mud flat and was found on October 29, 1951. The remains of three crew members were recovered. Lt. Walter J. Kurtz, 0948814, interrogated the partisan troops who found the aircraft. There were two bodies under the tail of the crashed aircraft. One was unrecognizable and the other was in good condition, except for three holes in the head. Kurtz surmised that one person was shot after parachuting safely and was then placed near the aircraft by North Korean troops. Crew members included:
     
    • Gallant, A/2c James Alvin - MIA

    • Hays, A/2c Melvin Blaine "Spud" - MIA

    • Horner, 2Lt. John Joseph  - MIA

    • Hudson, 2Lt. Laurence Harold - MIA

    • Johnson, Pfc. Gerald Emmett - POW

    • Johnson, TSgt. Johnny Menlo - POW

    • Krumm, Capt. Robert Mitchell (pilot) - MIA

    • Marshall, A.3c Isreal Jr. - KIA

    • McAdoo, A/1c Ernest Robert - MIA

    • Newswanger, TSgt. Quentin L. - KIA

    • Nutting, Capt. John Mainard - KIA

    • Osborne, Pfc. Jesse Alex - POW

    • Poynor, 1Lt. Con Foley - MIA
       

  • B-29 (42-94072) - Superfortress Bomber with the 371st Bomber Squadron, 307th Bomber Wing based a Kadena Air Base, Okinawa. On September 8, 1950, while returning from a bombing mission over Korea, this aircraft crashed into the East China Sea five miles north of Okinawa, killing eight crew members.  The crew included:
     
    • Blalock, 1Lt. Thomas E. - injured
    • Brine, SSgt. Donald Edward - KIA
    • Foshee, 1Lt. Billy B. - not injured
    • Haynes, Capt. Nathan Jr. (pilot) - KIA
    • Jackson, 1Lt. John Johnson - KIA
    • Kates, SSgt. Clarence Sears - KIA
    • Kennedy, MSgt. Jack Earl - KIA
    • O'Marrah, MSgt. William B. - injured
    • Stanley, Sgt. Otha Paul - KIA
    • Strieff, SSgt. Leon Charles - KIA
    • Wade, SSgt. Charles Clifton - KIA
       
  • B-29 (42-65272) - Franklin T. Bettencourt was the pilot of this B-29 out of McClellan AFB, California when it was involved in a taxiing accident on July 28, 1952 at Andersen AFB, Guam.
     
  • B-29 (44-21773) - This aircraft suffered structural failure over Ein-Bach, Germany on October 10, 1952.  The pilot was Rubin K. Weiss.
     
  • B-29 (44-27261) - This aircraft crashed on takeoff from Wheelus Air Base, Tripoli, Libya on February 2, 1953. The cause of the crash was because an engine that had recently been replaced had a missing piston and the engine didn't have enough power.  All 15 onboard were killed.  The fatalities included:
     
    • Armstrong, 1Lt. Lonzo P.
    • Bellette, AMN Harold D.
    • Bolstad, TSgt. David W.
    • Corvelli, Lt. Daniel D.
    • Eley, Capt. Charles Wayne
    • Grant, MSgt. William H.
    • Hackbarth, Lt. John Thomas
    • Jones, SSgt. Frederick Joe
    • Kloster, AMN Talmadge Lavern
    • Lovvorn, AMN Frank J.
    • McDowell, AMN James Clark
    • Willis, AMN Ray Ogden
    • Wilson, AMN Donald V.
    • Young, Lt. Frederick William
    • Yuvan, AMN James A.
       
  • B-29 (44-27262) - crashed 2 miles north of Suwon AB on January 27, 1953 on a combat mission. The aircraft suffered major damage.  Among the crew members were:
     
    • Brown, MSgt. Cleo A. - KIA/body recovered
    • Francis, 1Lt. Edward R. - KIA/body recovered
    • Phy, 1Lt. Ralph Irwin, Pilot - KIA/body recovered
    • Sharpe, Lt. Ernest W. Jr. - rescued
       
  • B-29 (44-27314) - Attached to 307th Bomb Wing, one engine went out after take-off and crashed five miles east of Kadena AB, Okinawa on December 04, 1951.  There were nine fatalities.  The crew members were:
     
    • Colyer, 1Lt. Howard T.
    • Dent. Cpl. L.S. - rescued
    • Evenskaas, SSgt. George E.
    • Groves, Sgt. H.J. - rescued
    • Hogan, 1Lt. David H.
    • Hooper, 1Lt. Ralph U.
    • Kaufman, SSgt. Robert Lee
    • Lint, Cpl. Charles E. - rescued
    • McLain, 1Lt. William Jr.
    • Rood, 1Lt. Raymond J.
    • Salisbury, Maj. George R.
    • Stokes, Sgt. Sherrill L.
       
  • B-29 (44-27347) - crashed at Kimpo, October 23, 1951. Loss of aircraft but no fatalities.  See Black Tuesday. The crew members were:
     
    • Cartwright, 1Lt. Oma B. - not injured
    • Cummings, T/Sgt. Archibald M. - flight engineer - not injured
    • Dickerson, Cpl. Paul S. - right gunner - not injured
    • Galloway, Cpl. Jack - left gunner [KWE Note: Not listed on KORWALD as a crew member.]
    • Griner, Maj. William R. - pilot - not injured
    • Iantorno, Cpl. Charles S. - radio operator - not injured
    • Laird, 1Lt. Deane F. - not injured
    • Markle, Maj. Carroll B. - not injured
    • O'Deneal, 1Lt. Pinkney B. - not injured
    • Slagowski, S/Sgt. Clyde L. - central fire controller - not injured
    • Stainbrook, Cpl. Paul - left gunner (traded places with Sgt. Carl Webb)
    • Thornton, 1Lt. Glenn S. - WIA
    • Turner, Cpl. Dewell E. - left gunner - not injured
    • Whitaker, Sgt. Bill N. - tail gunner - not injured
       
  • B-29 (44-61544) - This aircraft, based at Randolph AFB, had a ground accident at Goodfellow AFB, Texas on December 2, 1952.  The pilot was Samuel H. Henton.  The condition of the plane and names of other crew members are not known by the KWE.
     
  • B-29 (44-61739) - This aircraft had mechanical failure four miles south of Blowing Rock, North Carolina on June 05, 1953.  The pilot was John R. Diepenbrock.
     
  • B-29 (44-61747) - This B-29 was with the 375th Bomber Squadron, 308th Bomber Wing stationed at Hunter AFB. Georgia.  On March 29, 1953, the B-29 departed from Lajes Fielld, Azores, en route to Hunter AFB.  Shortly after takeoff it crashed near Praia, Terceira Island, Azores, killing six airmen.  The crew included:
     
    • Abcock, Maj. Hugh S. Jr. (pilot) - fatality
    • Bowen, Capt. Louis Carl (pilot) - fatality
    • Browder, A/2c Daniel L. - seriously injured
    • Caillouette, A/1c Charles M. Jr. - seriously injured
    • Cherry, A/1c Jimmie R. (radio operator) - fatality
    • Daniel, T/Sgt. Issac M. (flight engineer) - fatality
    • Devlin, S/Sgt. Wilmer R. (passenger) - fatality
    • Locklin, A/2c James F. - injured
    • Maschner, A/2c Fred W. - seriously injured
    • Mickler, S/Sgt. Yulee - injured
    • Minter, 1Lt. Thomas W. - injured
    • Pederson, 1Lt. William J. - seriously injured
    • Sundermann, 1Lt. William R.- seriously injured
    • Turk, A/2c Arthur L. Jr. - injured
    • Wallace, 1Lt. Roy Wesley (navigator) - fatality
       
  • B-29 (44-61802) - Attached to 307th Bomb Wing, 372 Bomb Sqn, USAF, this B-29 was shot down by MiG damage in the Yalu River area, North Korea on January 10, 1953.  The crew bailed out and the aircraft may have crashed into water.  One crew member was MIA/KIA and the other 12 were taken POW and were repatriated during Big Switch after the truce was signed.  The crew included:
     
    • Barmes, 1Lt. George F. Jr. - POW
    • Cuno, 1Lt. Francis T. - POW
    • Forsythe, 1Lt. Frederick W. Jr. - POW
    • Gaines, A/1c Edgar B. - POW
    • Gary, SSgt. Rex E. - POW
    • Hansen, A/1c William V. - POW
    • Heise, Capt. Arthur - MIA
    • Johnson, SSgt. Berger L. - POW
    • Kaufman, MSgt. Richard M. - POW
    • Krauel, A/2c Richard W. - POW
    • Massenberg, 1Lt. Samuel E. - POW
    • Seaver, 1Lt. Albert L. - POW
    • Storkson, A/1c Robert K. - POW
       
  • B-29 (44-61884) - This "spook" outfit was from the 580 Air Resupply and Communications Squadron.  It was lost on June 13, 1952. [KWE Note: There is no KORWALD reference to the lost personnel.]
     
  • B-29 (44-61908) - aircraft collided in mid-air with #42-65392 five miles off Bolo Point, Okinawa on February 01, 1952 on a routine training flight.  (See also Airplane Crashes page of the KWE B-29 Sea of Japan.)  All crew members of 42-65392 survived and returned to base safely, but the crew members of 44-61908 were all lost:
     
    • Dugger, Cpl. Robert B. Jr. - tail gunner
    • Hoag, Capt. Eugene Maurice - navigator
    • Lennox, Cpl. Kenneth - CFC gunner
    • McCook, TSgt. Wade - flight engineer
    • Pitt, Cpl. Jimmie W. - left waist gunner
    • Sedler, Cpl. Mark A. - right waist gunner
    • Smith, Capt. Hal R. - co-pilot
    • Sundstrom, Capt. Roy Arnold - radar observer
    • Supplee, Sgt. George W. Jr. - radar operator
    • Tabor, Capt. Marvin T. - bombardier
    • Tullius, Lt. Roy C. - pilot
    • Weeks, Lt. Charles B. - aircraft commander
       
  • B-29 (44-61934) - This aircraft was involved in a ground accident on January 09, 1952 in front of Hangar 5 at McClellan AFB, California.  The pilot was Hobert W. Morton.  The condition of the plane and names of other crew members are not known by the KWE.
     
  • B-29 (44-61940) - MiGs shot the left wing off the plane on October 23, 1951.  When the plane engine caught fire, the B-29 headed for safety, but before it could get back to base the crew had to bail out in the Yellow Sea.  Of the crew of 13, one was picked up after landing in the Yellow Sea by an Australian destroyer, one man's body was found the next day washed ashore.  Five of the men were taken prisoners of war and returned in 1953.  The remaining men were not heard from again.  See Black Tuesday.

    Crew Members

    • Black, Cpt. Wayne Forrest - MIA (radio operator)
    • Botter, TSgt William Joseph - MIA/POW (flight engineer)
    • Cogswell, Maj. Robert Whitney - MIA/POW
    • Foulks, Cpt. James Arch Jr - MIA/KIA  (commander-pilot)
    • Coffey, Cpl. Arthur G. - KIA (tail gunner) (KIA/body recovered)
    • Beissner, 1st Lt. Fred Jr. - (rescued at sea) co-pilot (died July 28, 2015)
    • Fuehrer, SSgt Alios Anton  - MIA/POW
    • Jones, Sgt James H. - POW returned '53 (left gunner)
    • Kisser, TSgt Kenneth E.  - POW returned '53 (gunner)
    • MacClean, Cpl Gerald Charles - POW returned '53 (right gunner)
    • Mooradian, 1st Lt.  Ara - POW/MIA (bombardier)
    • Strine, TSgt John T. - POW returned '53 (radio operator)
    • Wentworth, 1st Lt. Lloyd G. - POW returned '53 (navigator)
       
  • B-29 (44-61797) - On December 3, 1951, (#44-61797) of the 3417th AMS, 3415th AMG, Lowry AFB, Colorado, piloted by James W. Shanks,[ trying to reach Lowry Air Force Base in Denver, Colorado, with one motor not working crashed into a row of residential homes, killing eight airmen. At least one civilian* and five airmen were injured. Five houses were damaged—four of them demolished.  The crew included:
     
    • Ablondi, Pfc. William J. (gunnery student) - fatality
    • Allen, Pfc. Teddy D. - survivor
    • Jarvis, TSgt. Robert F. (gunnery instructor) - fatality
    • Oeser, T/Sgt. Herbert (gunnery instructor) - fatality
    • Servic, Pfc. John R. - fatality
    • Shanks, Capt. James W. (pilot) - survivor
    • Snure, 1Lt. Robert H. - survivor
    • Snyder, Pfc. James E. (gunnery instructor) - fatality
    • Surber, Pfc. Baxter (gunnery student) - fatality
    • Widner, Cpl. Ray E. - survivor
    • Wiersma, Pfc. Ronald W. (gunnery) - fatality
    • Wiggins, Pfc. Joe D. - survivor
    • Yukob, Cpl. Richard P. (gunnery instructor) - fatality
    • Zippel, S/Sgt. William A. - survivor

    *The civilian who received major injuries was a housekeeper named Mrs. Murphy Tinsley.
     

  • B-29 (44-62011) - This aircraft was downed by MiGs and crashed 25 miles north of Pyongyang on December 30, 1952 during a mission to bomb the Choak-Tong ore processing center in North Korea.*  Its crew (six bailed out and were taken POW) was:
     
    • Coplan, 1Lt. Harold (spare bombardier) - POW/returned to military control
    • Differ, MSgt. Patrick Michael (flight engineer) - died while POW/remains not returned
    • Foster, 1Lt. Robert Richard (Aircraft commander) - KIA
    • Heer, 2Lt. David T. (navigator) - KIA
    • Nikles, A/1c Rudolph (C.F.C. gunner) - KIA
    • O'Toole, A.2c Damian F. - KIA - executed on the spot while POW for refusing to provide information to enemy
    • Orr, 1Lt. Otho (pilot) - POW/returned to military control
    • Rehm, 1Lt. Harry Marshall (bombardier) - KIA
    • Rodney, A/2c Daryl Erwin "Rod" (left gunner) - KIA
    • Swalls, A/2c Donald G. (tail gunner) - POW/returned to military control
    • Van Slyke, A/2c Leland H. (radio operator) - POW/returned to military control
    • Wilcox, 1Lt. Paul I. (radar observer) - POW/returned to military control

    According to a composite narrative by Bud Farrell:

    "Lt. Foster's/Patrick Differ's Crew was a standby crew for the mission and was ordered into the air upon the takeoff abort of one of the other Squadron Aircraft. The target was near the Yalu River and the area known as Mig Alley, but recent greatly increased Mig Activity at night through the Fall of 1952 had drawn the support of Marine Night fighter cover by Marine Squadron VMF(N) -513, flying the tandem seat F3D-2-Skynight with excellent results in keeping the Migs at bay. On this night however, due to some foul-up, the Marine F3D's didn't show and the enemy was out in force and virtually unopposed by other than the B-29 gunners trying to defend their virtually desperately obsolete slow lumbering aircraft against one of the newest state of the art Jet Fighters in the world ... the MIG-15!

    Foster's ship was one of the last over the target which afforded enemy ground radar, the latest Russian S-Band Radar, a pretty good fix on their track and could not be jammed, resulting in their being locked or "coned" in the enemy ground searchlights, illuminating them as targets for the orbiting Migs ... now known and documented by the RUSSIANS, to have been FLOWN by Russian mercenaries ... The HONCHOS! In the middle of the bomb run, with bomb bay doors open, the B-29's could not take any evasive action and the Migs made seven passes and hit them three times before they could drop their bomb load, knocking out one engine and leaving the Left Gunner Rodney mortally wounded. The Tail Gunner, Donald Swalls, is credited with shooting down one of the 8 attacking Migs, the explosion of which may be what John Greening on Captain Charlton's crew may have seen rather than the explosion of Lt. Foster's ship. With the bomb bay doors now inoperable, ailerons shot out, and several on- board fires, they knew they were going down. Lt. Foster made a valiant effort to get his plane south across the front lines at the 38th Parallel since he knew that his Left Gunner -Darryl Rodney - would not be able to bail out, and the shortest route south took them over the heavily defended Capitol of North Korea, Pyongyang, where Antiaircraft fire (from now proven Soviet Antiaircraft batteries), FLAK, hit their center wing tank with another major fire started and bailout ordered. Just minutes from possible safety, the right wing, on fire, apparently came off, and most of the crew remaining in the front compartment never got out. Lt. Foster and Patrick Differ had stayed with the aircraft in a desperate effort to get their wounded crewmate and aircraft to safety. Of the six who bailed out and were captured, one, Right Gunner Damian O'Toole, was executed on the spot, in front of a crewmate, supposedly for refusing to give his local militia captors information on the rest of the crew, and on the whereabouts of his so called "personal Walkie-Talkie radio", equipment which none of us ever had or know anything about! Lt. Foster and Patrick Differ had apparently sacrificed their lives to save their aircraft and a fellow crewmember, and Damian O'Toole gave his life trying to protect his other downed crewmates ... for which their families, and we, should all be very proud!"
     

  • B-29 (44-62057) - Richard O. Barnes was the pilot of this B-29 out of Lowry AFB when it was involved in a gunnery accident at Split Rock Gunnery Range, Wyoming on May 03, 1952.
     
  • B-29 (44-62073) - aircraft hit by anti-aircraft fire on night mission & crashed on November 08, 1952.  Its crew members were either MIA or POW.  They were:
     
    • Evans, 1Lt. Emmett O. - MIA
    • Fleming, 1Lt. James W. Jr. - MIA
    • Garrison, Capt. Fred Herren - MIA
    • Hall, A1c Franklin H. - POW/repatriated during Big Switch
    • Hammon, TSgt. Keith E. - MIA
    • Hill, 1Lt. Charles M. - POW/repatriated during Big Switch
    • Jensen, SSgt. Wayne Frederick - MIA
    • Kelleher, A1c Robert P. "Pat" - MIA
    • Kirk, 1Lt. Charles F. - MIA
    • Schluter, A1c Clyde E. - POW/repatriated
    • Schmitt, A2c Warren W. - MIA
    • Schneidt, Capt. Norman W. - MIA
       
  • B-29 (44-62078) - This aircraft, based out of March AFB, crashed at Prairie Bay, Azores, on December 07, 1951.  The plane was on its way home for Christmas when it got caught in tail winds and crashed into the sea shortly after takeoff.  The men had been in England for three months on a routine training mission.  The crew members were:
     
    • Berg, 1Lt. Howard A. - fatality
    • Cowles, S/Sgt. Glenn Richard - fatality
    • Dingeldein, S/Sgt. Fred "Fritz" - fatality
    • Gray, M/Sgt. Kenneth Albert - fatality
    • Harrison, Sgt. Joseph - fatality
    • Johnston, S/Sgt. Robert Allen Jr. - fatality
    • Kirk, 1Lt. James Wheeler - fatality
    • Laird, 1Lt. Archibald - fatality
    • Murphy, Capt. William - fatality
    • Richardson, Cpl. Robert - fatality
    • Schafer, Sgt. John - fatality
    • Sorensen, T/Sgt. Gale Lloyd - fatality
    • Svelmoe, 1Lt. Robert - fatality
    • Wight, Capt. Harry Emmett (pilot) - fatality
    • Winthrop, Capt. Paul - fatality
    • Wojtowicz, M/Sgt. John - fatality
       
  • B-29A (44-62082) - Superfortress Bomber with the 28th Bomber Squadron, 19th Bomber Group. On July 28, 1950, while on a combat mission, an engine caught fire. The bombs were released and some crew members bailed out. The aircraft finally landed safely at Haneda Air Base, Japan. The crew included:
     
    • Herr, SSgt. George - KIA due to bailout
       
  • B-29 (44-62083) - Attached to the 207th Bomb Wing, this aircraft left Kadena AFB on a routine combat mission on January 31 1952.  Last contact with the plane was at 302154L, 100 miles north of Kadena.  According to the son of Capt. Robert Richard Hebert, "He was my father. His hometown was San Bernardino, California. He was pilot of a B-29 stationed in Okinawa during the Korean War. He was Caucasian. He was declared MIA when his B-29 was lost on a training mission in the Sea of Japan. Speculation among others stationed in Okinawa was that bomb aboard the aircraft detonated accidentally in route to their target killing everyone onboard."  The crew members were:
     
    • Adams, Capt. Robert Henry - MIA
    • Allen, 1Lt. Charles Edward Jr. - MIA
    • Bristol, 2Lt. Richard Graves - MIA
    • Hebert, Capt. Robert Richard - MIA
    • McLain, Cpl. James William - MIA
    • Moldafsky, 1Lt. Irwin - MIA
    • Owens, Cpl. Leonard Grady - MIA
    • Reiche, 2Lt. Paul Richard - MIA
    • Ruska, MSgt. James - MIA
    • Schuman, TSgt. Arthur Henry - MIA
    • Stinnett, Pfc. Clem Lee - MIA
    • Threlkeld, Capt. William Earle - MIA
    • Williams, Cpl. Merlyn Keith - MIA
       
  • B-29 (44-62093) - USAF Strategic Air Command experimental project MX-1018, Project Tip-Tow, an attempt to extend fighter escort for bombers on long-range missions by coupling a pair of Republic F-84s onto bomber wingtips, suffered a setback when EF-84D, 48-641, lost control, rolled upside down, and hit the wing of Boeing ETB-29A-60-BN Superfortress 44-62093, sending both aircraft down to crash in Peconic Bay, New York, on April 24, 1953. The program was immediately cancelled. The B-29 had five crew members and fatalities.  The pilot of the colliding F-84 was Maj. John M. Davis, who also lost his life.  The names of the crew members of the B-29 were:
     
    • Clarkson, Sgt. John R.
    • McClanahan, Capt. Herbert C.
    • Schemp, M/Sgt. Claude Desault Jr.
    • Shaffer, M/Sgt. Don D.
    • Vapenick, Capt. James J. (pilot)

    You can read newspaper articles collected by the Cutchogue New Suffolk Free Library about the crash HERE.
     

  • B-29 (44-62164) - On April 3, 1952, this aircraft crashed at night. Suspected reason – Fuel line issues. The B-29, which was carrying a crew of 14, was from Forbes AFB in Topeka. The crew bailed out over a farmer's field eight miles (13 km) north and five miles west of Onaga, Kansas. It crashed near the Lloyd Robbins farm, landing west of a barn on the Aug. Haug farm, striking and demolishing a large cottonwood tree about two feet in diameter.  It careened across the road into the Lloyd Robbins pasture, where it struck a herd of White-Faced cattle, killing ten of the animals belonging to Mr. Robbins.  The plane caught fire but only partially burned.  Leo Mars and Bud Bonjour were the first to arrive at the scene.  Dr. Fleckenstein of Onaga was called to treat the injured.  The captain (Roberts) died in the crash and one airman perished when his parachute failed to open (Filittoni). The surviving crew was fired at by the farmer, who believed them to be invading "ruskies".  Names of crew members not yet found.  Those who perished were:
     
    • Filittoni, A2c Charles - right gunner
    • Roberts, Lt. Col. Thomas Stanley - captain

    [KWE Note: Information about this crash was provided courtesy of Ivy Rash of the Onaga Public Library System and Mrs. Bud (Margaret Lars) Bonjour of Centralia, KS.]
     

  • B-29 (44-62223) - This aircraft was rammed by B-29 (44-87774) on March 12, 1952 near San Antonio, Texas.  Neither aircraft survived the mid-air collision and all personnel were killed.  The cost of this aircraft loss (just this one B-29) was $783,143.00.  The fatalities on 44-62223 were as follows:
     
    • Hall, Pfc. Arthur L - student gunner
    • Hovis, MSgt. Ward W. - engineer
    • Martin, Cpl. Patrick H. - instructor gunner
    • Meyers, MSgt. Harrell B. - instructor engineer
    • Neu, 1Lt. Robert D. - student aircraft commander
    • Rottier, Capt. Donald L. - instructor pilot
    • Seals, 1Lt. Moses G. - pilot

    See B-29 (44-87774) for the list of fatalities on that aircraft.  The government's official accident report was sent to the KWE by Frank "Bud" Farrell of Texas.  Click HERE to read it.
     

  • B-29 (44-62279) -  This aircraft developed an engine fire in the climb after takeoff.  Steps taken to maintain flight caused the bombs on board to detonate and sever the control wires, and the plane crashed into the China Sea off the coast of Okinawa on October 19, 1950.  There were numerous fatalities.  #44-62279 was the only B-29 loss of the 22d Bomb Group.  Its crew included:
     
    • Anderson, SSgt. Clarence D. - injured
    • Archerd, MSgt. James O. - body recovered
    • Brandon, SSgt. N.Y. - body recovered
    • Davis, Capt. George Arthur Jr. (co-pilot) - body recovered
    • Edgington, SSgt. Richard - injured
    • Gandin, Capt. David (navigator) - body recovered
    • Kusel, SSgt. Harold L. - body recovered
    • LeMaster, MSgt. Lester E. - body recovered
    • Martin, Maj. John G. - body recovered
    • Stowers, Capt. Frederick P. - injured
    • Wohlgemuth, SSgt. Edward Jerome
    • Willis, Maj. Robert F. - body recovered

    There is a website at www.JustaJoy.com that is selling photographs (possible the last ones taken) of the following crew members: Archerd, LeMater, Wohlgemuth, Willis, Edgington, Martin, Anderson, Brandon, and Stowers.  Joy, who tells us that her website has the largest searchable index of family heirlooms, kindly shared images of these brave men with the KWE.

    Captain Gandin's niece, Louise Feinberg of California, sent a packet of photos and information to us about Captain Gandin's loss.  Included with it was a faded letter dated 27 October 1950, sent to her father, Dr. Morris M. Gandin (David Gandin's brother) from Lt. Col. Willard W. Wilson.  The letter fives further insight into what happened that fateful day:

    "Dear Dr. Gandin - I am taking the liberty of writing you on behalf of myself and the members of the 33d Bomb Squadron in order that we may express our heartfelt regret for the loss of Captain David Gandin, who, in our opinion, was one of our finest officers. I have served with many officers in my service in two wars, but none can measure up to the standard set by Captain Gandin.  His place can never be filled in this Squadron for his equal does not exist.

    It is my belief that you desire some detail on the nature of cause of the accident.  Briefly this is what happened: On 19 October 1950 Captain Gandin took off as a member of Major Martin's crew for a combat mission against North Korea at approximately 04:17 a.m.  Shortly after take off some sort of trouble developed in their number one engine which required that they salvo their bombs to lighten the aircraft, which action would have enabled them to return to the base.  Although the bombs were dropped in a safe condition, some of them exploded on impact with the sea.  Fragments of the bombs severely damaged the airplane to the extent that it was necessary to ditch in the sea about five miles from the end of the runway.  Our Air Rescue Service was at the scene of the accident only a few minutes after it occurred.  Unfortunately David was not one of the three survivors.

    Let me assure you that Major Martin was one of the most skillful pilots with whom I have been privileged to serve.  Investigation has revealed that every course of action taken by him to avoid the accident was proper and in accordance with existing approved procedures.  Why the bombs exploded we cannot explain except to say that high explosive is at best unpredictable when roughly handled or released from a fast moving aircraft even though every safety precaution is taken.  I can also assure you that David did not suffer in any way.  I was personally near the scene of the accident a few minutes after it occurred.

    We of the Squadron are starting our return trip to March Air Force Base beginning tomorrow morning, 26th October.  I would consider it a distinct honor if you would permit me to call on you should you still be in the vicinity of Riverside.  I believe I could answer any additional questions you may have.  Again, let me express our bereavement over this irreplaceable loss.  No finer officer has ever fought for the cause of humanity."
     

  • B-29 (44-62287) - This aircraft was damaged by AAA at Pyongyang on May 07, 1951.
     
  • B-29 (44-62971) - This aircraft was damaged by MiGs on October 27, 1951, and crash landed near Seoul with five wounded personnel onboard.  The MiG pilot was Lt. Dmitri Samoylov.  The plane was written off because it was damaged beyond repair.  Crew members were:
     
    • Cheek, Maj. John D. - WIA
    • Eversole, Cpl. Leonard R. - WIA
    • Fierro, Capt. Vito J. - rescued*
    • Gale, 1Lt. William R. - rescued**
    • Joslyn, Cpl. Ross E. - rescued
    • Lutz, Capt. Thomas L. - WIA
    • Mantzaris, Cpl. John - rescued
    • McConnell, Cpl. Henry - WIA
    • Miller, Sgt. Donald R. - WIA
    • Nellis, 1Lt. Raymond J. - WIA
    • Todd, SSgt. John H.L. Jr. - WIA

    *Captain Fierro received a Silver Star for his actions that day (Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders Nol. 562 - 30 November 1951) and the citation states what happened that day:

    "The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Vito J. Fierro, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy on 27 October 1951 as a B-29 Aircraft Commander, 30th Bombardment Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group (Medium, Fifth Air Force. On that date, Captain Fierro flew deputy lead in an element of eight aircraft in a daylight formation raid on the vital railway bridge at Sinanju, North Korea. The aircraft was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire, resulting in the loss of rudder and all controls. Aggressive attacks by at least 20 enemy fighters rendered all turret systems inoperative, started a serious fire in one engine and severely wounded seven crew members. The extent of these injuries made a bail out attempt impractical. At this time, Captain Fierro flew his damaged aircraft away from the main formation to prevent a possible air collision, even though he fully realized this would make him more vulnerable to attack. His skillful maneuvering of the aircraft to stay under the formation as much as possible afforded his crew the best possible protection. Captain Fierro headed for Kimpo Air Field where medical aid would be available to the wounded. The landing was made without brakes or flaps and with the engine still burning. By his gallantry Captain Fierro, at the risk of his life, distinguished himself in action against the enemy. His composure and superior judgment in a situation of great danger reflect the highest credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force."

    **Lieutenant Gale received the Distinguished Flying Cross for his actions that day:

    "First Lieutenant William R. Gale distinguished himself by extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight as a B-29 Bombardier, 30th Bombardment Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group, Medium on 27 October 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Gale flew on a daylight-bombing raid on the important railway bridge at Sinanju, North Korea. During the bomb run the aircraft was subjected to accurate antiaircraft fire and repeated attacks by approximately 20 enemy fighters. The damage inflicted by the enemy rendered most of the control cables and all gun turrets inoperative. All inter-plane communications were disrupted and seven crewmembers were wounded. Lieutenant Gale made an excellent bomb drop, then damaged two enemy aircraft before his turret became inoperative. Lieutenant Gale then assumed the duties of the wounded Navigator and despite a serious fire in one engine, directed the aircraft to Kimpo Airfield near Seoul, Korea, where medical aid was available. His exceptional courage and coolness materially aided in the successful return of the aircraft. Lieutenant Gale’s skill, perseverance and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force."
     

  • B-29 (44-62320) - After departing Travis Air Force Base in California on October 08, 1952, on a "round robin" training mission for a mock target to Portland, the bomber was "intercepted" by F-86 fighters dispatched from McChord Air Force Base in Washington. On one of the mock passes at the bomber, one of the F-86's struck the outer wing of the B-29. It spiraled out of control and crashed south of Wilsonville, Oregon, claiming the lives of all eleven crewmembers aboard. The errant F-86 returned to McChord safely, the pilot being unaware of what had occurred.  The crew members of the B-29 included:
     
    • Butler, Sgt. Billy Edward - fatality
    • Cullen, Capt. William E. - fatality
    • Daily, A/1c Glen P. - fatality
    • Goodall, Capt. Parker A. - fatality
    • Head, Maj. Robert W. - fatality
    • Huffman, Lt. Orval L. - fatality
    • Jobe, Maj. Robert Cleveland (pilot) - fatality
    • Krohn, S/Sgt. Clarence - fatality
    • Wovries, A/2c Charles E.

    •  
  • B-29 (44-62328) - This B-29 piloted by Robert W. Hess collided with an F-94 fighter piloted by Philip W. McIntosh on August 10, 1952.  It crashed 1.5 miles from Wilsonville, Arkansas.  There were no survivors.  The names of the crew members have not yet been located.
     
    • Hess, Robert W. (pilot) - fatality
       
  • B-29 (44-69817) - Crashed (ramp accident) at Kadena on February 05, 1952.  A B-29 with this tail number flew combat missions in World War II as the "City of Roanoke" or "Ready Bettie". No further information found.
     
  • B-29 (44-69866) - This aircraft was damaged by three KPAFAC Yak-9 fighters near Seoul, Korea and the crew bailed out over the Yellow Sea on July 12, 1950.  It was the first B-29 loss to enemy fighters in the Korean War.  The plane was written off as too damaged to repair.  The crew members were:
     
    • Apodaca, Sgt. Jose A. - rescued
    • Barone, SSgt. Anthony J. - rescued
    • Brous, 1Lt. Donald N. - rescued
    • Bryant, MSgt. William L. - rescued
    • Cain, Cpl. Richard B. - rescued
    • Codling, 1Lt. Horace G. - rescued
    • Hardway, Pvt. Everett G. - rescued
    • Layton, 1Lt. Robert Hollis (pilot) - died while POW
    • Liggett, Cpl. David L. - rescued
    • Lutz, Pfc. Howard Jr. - rescued
    • Miller, A2c Paul Luther - died while POW
    • Owens, SSgt. Eugene E. - rescued
    • Ridenour, Capt. Paul R. - rescued
       
  • B-29 (44-69977) - One of ten American aircraft purportedly damaged by Russian MiGs on March 01, 1951.  According to Russian reports, this particular aircraft was hit by AAA at close range by Soviet pilot Porfiriy Borisovich Oysyannikov.  The aircraft was not destroyed.  No further information found.
     
  • B-29 (44-70048) - Charles L. Simmons was the pilot of this B-29 out of Farstenfeldbruck Air Base, Germany when it was involved in a taxiing accident at the Farstenfeldbruck AB on July 25, 1952.
     
  • B-29 (44-70055) - Emergency landing 1952 at Kimpo due to 37mm damage.  Pilot = Duckworth.  No further information found.
     
  • B-29 (44-70007) - accident at Pusan-East Air Base on June 18, 1951 [Not listed on KORWALD.]  No further information found.
     
  • B-29 (44-70113) - This aircraft was involved in a mid-air collision six miles south of Eglin AFB, Florida on October 13, 1952.  The pilot was John F. English. Status of plane and crew not known by the KWE.
     
  • B-29 (44-70153) - Crashed on approach to Misawa in a heavy snowstorm on March 28, 1951.  No further information found other than the fact that the pilot was William V. Thayer.
     
  • B-29 (44-83985) - This aircraft crashed "with terrific force" in a marshy swamp about seven and a half miles south-southwest of Hunter AFB, Savannah, Georgia, home base of the B-29, on July 10, 1953.  The B-29 was on a training mission, and an explosion was believed to be the probable cause.  The B-29 slammed into the  muck alongside Rock Fish Creek, and the wreckage was spotted about 9:25 a.m. the next day by a Navy helicopter which joined in the search being conducted by search parties pushing through swampland on flatboats.  It was found near the mouth of the Ageechee River.  All ten crew members were killed.  They included:
     
    • Ahigrim, A/2c Howard K.
    • Baurichter, 1Lt. Ralph R.
    • Fiser, Capt. Leonard E.
    • Furnberg, A/1c Courtney O.
    • Gassaway, A/2c George J.
    • Glantz, 1Lt. Wilburt E.
    • Malone, S/Sgt. Donald Francis
    • Olsen, A/3c Walter F.
    • Shipman, A/2c Joseph R.
    • Stoddard, Maj. Robert W.

    According to Major Stoddard's son: "According to Major Stoddard's son: "In July 1953, my Dad's KB-29P (a tanker) took off from Hunter AFB, GA and immediately lost an engine. When they were in the pattern to land, the pilot turned into the dead engine and the plane went in, killing all aboard. I have a copy of the complete accident report. Accident board called it pilot error. My Dad was a major flying as a "radar observer." He flew as a bombardier in B-24s during WWII and was a lead bombardier trained to use the Norden bomb sight."
     

  • B-29 (44-84085) - This aircraft was involved in a taxiing accident at RAF Brize, Norton, England, on December 06, 1952.  The pilot was James D. Douglas Jr.
     
  • B-29 (44-84094) - Piloted by Wilbur C. Pensinger (April 17, 1921-June 01, 1996), this B-29 out of Maxwell AFB crashed at Lajes Field east of Azores on October 27, 1951.  The fate of the crew and the plane is unknown by the KWE. The names of other crew members are not yet known.
     
    • Pensinger, Wilbur C.
       
  • B-29 (44-86268) - This aircraft was on a combat mission over North Korea on April 07, 1951. F-84s escorting, when it was damaged by two MiGs.   Two engines went out, the pilot ordered bail out, and the aircraft crashed into the water four miles off NW North Korea. Seven fighter aircraft and three SAR aircraft participated in SAR effort.  One crewman was rescued.  The crew members were:
     
    • Akins, Sgt. Larry B. - MIA
    • Buckner, 1Lt. John Lennon - MIA
    • Degolyer, Sgt. David Elmer - MIA
    • Gonteski, Cpl. John Stanley - MIA
    • Howard, Capt. Melvin John - MIA
    • Jones, PFC James Lewis - POW/MIA
    • Phillips, 2Lt. Duane Martin - MIA
    • Shallenberger, 2Lt. Charles - Rescued
    • Thomas, SSgt. Lewis Albert Jr. - MIA
    • White, 2Lt. Claude Vincett - MIA
       

  • The crew of B-29 44-86327
    (Click picture for a larger view)

  • B-29 (44-86270) - Based at Wright-Patterson AFB, this B-20 was piloted by Norman J. Glenn when there was an explosion and fire during a Round Robbin from Wright-Patterson.
     
  • B-29 (44-86327) - On June 1, 1951, while bombing a railroad bridge at Kwaksan, North Korea, this aircraft was attacked by MiGs, setting its wing on fire. The pilot of the Russian MiG was Yevgeny Mikhailovich Stelmah.  Some crewmen were able to parachute into enemy lines. The crew members were:
     
    • Crocker, SSgt. Charles William - MIA/KIA
    • Farler, Capt. Hugh P. - remains recovered
    • Fredericksen, Capt. Robert - returned to military control
    • Goodman, 2Lt. George M. - MIA
    • Hobbie, Capt. Jack Melvin - MIA
    • Hunt, TSgt. Melvin Joseph - remains recovered
    • Kehr, Sgt. Dean Deloss Jr. - remains recovered
    • Korstjens, Capt. Joseph L. - MIA
    • Little, Capt. David L. - remains recovered
    • Mueller, 1Lt. Wilbur John - MIA
    • Mullins, SSgt. James Jr. - remains recovered
    • Munroe, Cpl. Irving - MIA
    • Seagoe, TSgt. Richard David - MIA
       
  • B-29 (44-86328) - This aircraft crashed on take off at the China Sea end of the airstrip at Kadena on September 15, 1950.  The resulting explosion demolished the firefighters' crash equipment, and blew the station apart as well as the control tower.  One crew member was killed and two firefighters lost their lives trying to extinguish the fire.  There were 11 occupants in the plane that day.  Partial crew list:
     
    • Cooper, Sgt. James Phillip "Jimmy"- radio operator - killed in crash
    • Smith, 1Lt. Charlie R. - aircraft commander

    The two firefighters who lost their lives were:
     

    • Morris, Cpl. Jack
    • Patterson, S/Sgt. Richard D. [J.?], Ohio
       
  • B-29 (44-86346) - This aircraft was severely damaged by pilots of the Soviet's 303rd IA on October 24, 1951.  It landed at Yakota Air Base, and was written off.
     
  • B-29 (44-86351) - George A. Myers was the pilot of this B-29 based at March AFB, California when it was involved in a gunnery accident at UU Gunnery Range on March 10, 1952.
     
  • B-29 (44-86357) -The crew bailed out after their aircraft was shot down by AAA near Sunchon, Korea, on August 24, 1951. The aircraft then exploded 11 miles west of Sunan, North Korea (between Sunan and Kowan-ni).  The crew members were:
     
    • Beale, 1Lt. George W. - POW repatriated
    • Brown, Cpl. Glenn W. - POW repatriated
    • Brown, Cpl. Herbert D. - POW repatriated
    • Dean, SSgt. Burl D. - POW repatriated
    • Gibbens, 1Lt. Edward M. - POW repatriated
    • Kennedy, Sgt. Jack D - POW repatriated
    • Mullins, MSgt. Charles L. - POW repatriated
    • Murray, 1Lt. Jack Lew9s - MIA
    • Ring, SSgt. Jesse C. - POW repatriated
    • Warner, 1Lt. Robert L. - POW repatriated
    • Wright, 1Lt. William J. - POW repatriated
       
  • B-29 (44-86371) -Attached to 98th Bmb Wg. Hit by AAA over Pyongyang on May 07, 1951, damaged No. 3 & 4 engines hit which possibly caused explosion, lost wing, 4-5 chutes observed, Navy SA-16 and USS Bataan fighter aircraft conducted SAR effort with negative results.  Its crew members were:
     
    • Adler, 1Lt. James M. - MIA
    • Bacon, Cpl. Raymond R. - MIA
    • Black, Lt. Col. Vance E. - taken POW.
    • Chapman, Capt. Dewey L. - MIA
    • Chesnowsky, TSgt. Frank J. - MIA
    • Collins, 1Lt. John S. - MIA
    • Erickson, SSgt. Lee E.
    • Hawes, 2Lt. Richard E.
    • Jones, SSgt. Richard M. - returned to military control
    • McTaggart, Will Jr. - returned to military control
    • Rice, Sgt. John A. - MIA
    • Smith, SSgt. Ellsworth E. - returned to military control
    • Stoll, Sgt. Edward J. - MIA
       
  • B-29 (44-86382) - An aircraft with the 7th Radar Calibration Squadron, this aircraft was destroyed in a post-crash fire on December 18, 1953 when the pilot and co-pilot mistook Ogden MAP, Utah for nearby Hill AFB, put down on a much shorter runway, overran the threshold, bounced across a deep ditch and canal, crossed the highway, and came to rest in pieces.  It immediately caught fire.  One crew member was killed and two were injured.
     
    • Gerwick, James A. (pilot)
       
  • B-29 (44-86452) - AAA damage over Pyongyang on May 07, 1951.  No further information found.
     
  • B-29 (44-87596) - Soviets claim this aircraft as being damaged by MiGs on the night of December 30, 1952.  It landed safely at Suwon (K-13)FF.  No further information found.|
     
  • B-29 (44-87619) - This B-29 suffered structural failure over Galveston, Texas on September 19, 1952.  Based at Randolph AFB, Texas, the aircraft was piloted by Brimmer Walrath Sherman.
     
  • B-29 (44-87651) - On 5 August 1950, this B-29, crashed, burned, and exploded five minutes after takeoff from Fairfield-Suisun AFB, CA, causing fatal injuries to 12 crewmen and passengers. Eight crewmen and passengers received minor injures. Extensive damage to private and government property and injuries to both civilian and military personnel were caused by a subsequent explosion of the bomb on the aircraft. At the time of the crash, the aircraft was carrying a significant bomb load. 

    Non-crew members who lost their lives included Pfc. John Hastings Boyles, Pvt. Emil G. Bender Jr., Pvt. Edward Goins, Cpl. Doyle Dennis Hansted, SSgt. John Edens McCollum, Sgt. Paul Prosper Ramoneda, and Pfc. William R. Vetter.

    The crew included:
     
    • Braz, 1Lt. William G.- bombardier - survivor
    • Brotherton, 1Lt. Robert G. - survivor
    • Cox, Capt. Jack R.- survivor
    • Gould, Pfc. Jack Lloyd - fatality
    • Johnson, 1Lt. Carter W. - survivor
    • Judd, Pfc. Merritt Donald - fatality
    • Knapp, S/Sgt. Lloyd Francis - fatality
    • Maconi, S/Sgt. Joseph - fatality
    • Mclelland, M/Sgt. James Land - fatality
    • Midura, 1Lt. Matthew A. - survivor
    • Moore, TSgt. Donald W. - survivor
    • Prachinack, S/Sgt. Joseph - fatality
    • Reeve, Pfc. Leonard Andrew - fatality
    • Sellers, Pfc. Roy - fatality
    • Steffes, Capt. Eugene Q. - pilot - crawled out of the window and was rescued
    • Stubblebine, 1Lt. James Arthur - fatality
    • Travis, General Robert Falligant - rescued alive from the cockpit area but died of wounds en route to the hospital - fatality
    • Tucker, Cpl. John L. - fatality
    • Vanderpool, Sgt. Richard D. - fatality
    • Voyce, 1Lt. Charles J. - aid to General Travis (1921-2003)
       
  • B-29 (44-87704) - This B-29 out of Walker AFB, New Mexico crashed at Lajes Field, Azores on April 26, 1951.  It was piloted by Robert J. Luebke.  The fate of the crew and the plane is not known by the KWE.
     
    • Luebke, Robert J. (pilot)
       
  • B-29 (44-87754) - This aircraft had taken off from Guam on its way to its base near Mountain Home, Idaho when one of the engines failed about 15 minutes after takeoff and the crew turned around to go back to Guam, which is 3,700 miles west of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean. During emergency landing at Andersen AFB, Guam, on December 17, 1953, the plane failed to reach the runway and crashed into an officers housing area at the base, demolishing ten homes and damaging three more.  Nine of the 16 crew members were killed, as were seven on the ground--an officer, his wife, and five children.  The plane was damaged beyond repair and written off.  The crew members were:
     
    • Backman, A/1c William J. - tail gunner - survivor
    • Christopher, 1Lt. Dominick J. - navigator - fatality
    • DeBoer, 1Lt. Howard L. - bombardier - fatality
    • Duran, A/2c Roberto - passenger - survivor
    • Graham, A/2c Nelson H. "Nub" - passenger - survivor
    • Jensen, A/2c Robert L. - electronic counter-measure operator - survivor
    • Larsen, 1Lt. Sophus E. "Eddie" - co-pilot - fatality
    • Leard, Sgt. Fred - passenger - fatality
    • Murray, A/2c Francis L. - passenger - fatality
    • Newby, A/2c Walter R. - passenger - survivor
    • Oetgen, 1Lt. Henry G. - pilot - fatality
    • Patton. 1Lt. Jack - radar officer - survivor
    • Pickrell, SSgt. Homer A. - left gunner/scanner - fatality*
    • Reilly, T/Sgt. John M. - flight engineer - fatality
    • Van Doren, A/1c Donald C. - waist gunner/scanner - survivor
    • Wagner, A/3c Donald J. - passenger - fatality

    *Homer Pickrell risked his life to save that of Bob Jensen.  He died of injuries the following day.  In 1958 his father accepted the Soldiers Medal posthumously for his heroism.

  • B-29 (44-87774) - This aircraft rammed B-29 (44-62223) on March 12, 1952 near San Antonio, Texas.  Neither plane survived the mid-air collision and all personnel were killed.  The cost of this aircraft loss (this B-29 only) was $796,701.00.  The fatalities on 44-87774 were as follows:
     
    • Arnold, MSgt. Clyde L. - instructor engineer
    • Bertog, Cpl. Wallace L. - engineer
    • Jameson, Pfc. Donald L. - student gunner
    • Johnson, 1Lt. Lester H. - pilot
    • Kerner, Pvt. Sanford L. "Sandy" - student gunner
    • Padgett, Maj. Robert W. - student aircraft commander
    • Reynolds, Pfc. William E. - student gunner
    • Scott, 1Lt. Dale W. - instructor pilot

    See B-29 (44-62223) for the list of fatalities on that aircraft.  The government's official accident report was sent to the KWE by Frank "Bud" Farrell of Texas.  Click HERE to read it. 

    The following letter was sent to the KWE by David Streett.  During his flying career Mr. Streett flew a C-47, B-25, B-29, B-50, B-66 B/C/D, and B-52 B/D/F/G/H.

    ---

    Reference: 4 November 2007 Letter, March 12, 1952 B-29 crash

    Dear Mr. De Waelsche:

    This letter is a thank you and follow-up regarding the information you provided me regarding the two Randolph B-29s that collided in midair and crashed on March 12, 1952. Let me first give you some background as to why I wanted the information you sent me on November 4, 2017. I was stationed at Randolph during that period and three of the fifteen crewmen were part of my chew. I never was told what happened or whose fault it was for the accident. With the help of the copies you sent me I have been able to get the accident reports from the Department of the Air Force library at Bolling AFB, Washington, DC.

    My interest in the issue is that I was supposed to be on the B-29 that had the tail chopped off. The training to be able to fly combat in Korea works like this. In the beginning of forming a crew five people are chosen consisting of a pilot, co-pilot, engineer and two gunners. The crew practices takeoff and landing procedures ahead of the next step which is to form a complete crew of eleven members. On March 12, 1952 the specific training mission was to include seven crew members on one plane and eight on a second plane. Our pilot Major Padgett, 1/Lt Johnson and Cpl Hertog were to fly with instructor pilot 1/Lt Scott, a second engineer and two gunners. Major Padgett instructed me and the other gunner (Roy Emberland) to take the day off and go into San Antonio and visit the Alamo, etc. As young gunners Roy and I wanted to be the two gunners on the flight as flying was so exciting when you are eighteen that we wanted as much time in the air as possible. But we were overruled so ended up stopping at the alligator farm and spending the rest of the day in San Antonio.

    We had no knowledge about the accident until we returned to the base that evening. We never saw any of the newspaper reports. So until you sent me the reports I had no idea what really happened. I want to mention that the job of the gunners on the flight is to identify and report over the intercom any aircraft in the close vicinity to their own aircraft. If I’m sitting on the left side and I see another B-29 at five o’clock, I would report “B-29 at five o’clock low (or high)”. In discussing the accident, Roy and I have always thought that the gunner sitting in the left blister wasn’t doing his job and that if we had been the two gunners on that flight there would have been no accident. Of course we will never know but a close reading of the accident report seems to confirm what Roy and I have always thought.

    I have enclosed a copy of the accident report for your achieves in case you ever receive any further inquiries on the accident. With your help, and the help of the Air Force library, Roy Emberland and I have found the daughter of Major Padgett who was three years old at the time of the accident. She and her mother knew nothing of the details of the accident. Roy and I stayed around Randolph and eventually formed up with a new crew, went to Okinawa and flew twenty-seven combat missions. Roy and I left the service in 1953. I went back in the service in 1955 and stayed until 1975 when I retired. Service was good for me as I was able to complete a Batcher of Arts at the University of Maryland and a Master’s Degree in Computer Science. From 1955 until 1966 I continued flying in the B-66 in Europe and the B-52 here in the US. In 1966 I quit flying and went into the computer field. Altogether I spent ten years in Europe. Perhaps the most important point in my life was getting married in April of 1959 to a blue eyed blond who spoke English, French, German and Luxembourgish. We are about to celebrate our fifty-seventh year together.

    ---
     

  • B-29 (44-87782) - This B-29 crashed and burned as it attempted to reach Davis-Monthan Air Force Base.  The plane radioed the Davis-Monthan tower that one of its engines was dead and that it was returning to the base to land  It crashed minutes later, killing the crew of eight.  It crashed and exploded five miles southwest of the base at 2:30 p.m.  The fatalities were:
     
    • Cardinal, Pfc. Kenneth P. - crewman
    • Friend, 2Lt. Lysle Vance - pilot
    • McKeown, 1Lt. Thomas J. - navigator
    • Murdoch, 1Lt. Richard - observer
    • Richards, Capt. Norman Orin - aircraft commander
    • Rochelle, Cpl. Burton Harold - crewman
    • Springer, T/Sgt. Ellsworth - engineer
    • Turner, Pfc. George P. - radio operator
       
  • B-29 (45-21771) - Returning to Randolph Air Force Base, Texas, after a seven-hour training flight, this aircraft crashed ten miles southwest of Seguin, Texas on January 11, 1951. At 8,000 feet the pilot, Captain Norman A. Bivens, cut off the automatic pilot and began descending through an overcast, flying on instruments. Bivens reported losing all flight instruments and the aircraft became uncontrollable. Six of the crew members were killed, while five others parachuted to safety.  The crew members included:
     
    • Arp, Capt. Howard E. (bombardier) - survivor
    • Barns, S/Sgt. James J. (flight engineer) - survivor
    • Bennett, Cpl. Bruce Bolen (right gunner) - fatality
    • Bivens, Capt. Norman A. (pilot) - survivor
    • Calkins, Capt. Leonard H. (navigator) - fatality
    • Cameron, Cpl. Donald James (tailgunner) - fatality
    • Howey, S/Sgt. Roderick Allen (central fire control) - fatality
    • Kintner, Capt. Otho V. (navigator) - survivor
    • Schwarz, Cpl. Ralph T. (radio operator) - survivor
    • Shaw, 2Lt. James Earl III (radio operator) - fatality
    • Wilson, 1Lt. Robert Leo (co-pilot) - fatality
       
  • B-29 (45-21814) - This aircraft was shot down by MiGs about seven miles southwest of Kusong, North Korea while on a bombing mission near the Yalu River on November 10, 1950.  This B-29 of the 307th BW, 371th BS was part of a formation of seven and had a escort of F4U Corsairs. 45-21814 was shot down by one MiG-15 of the 139th GIAP flown by Maj. G.I. Kharkovskii. His wingman St/Lt Akimov also claimed a second B-29, but was the same aircraft attacked by Kharkovskii.  Wreckage sighted. 45-21814 was the second B-29 destroyed by MiGs in November 1950. Its crew members were:
     
    • Aaronson, SSgt. Philip - (gunner) POW repatriated
    • Brendle, SSgt. Dillman L. - POW/remains recovered
    • Burke, 1Lt. Robert E. - returned to military control
    • Dodd, 1Lt. Lyle E. - POW/repatriated
    • Edwards, TSgt. James H. - returned to military control
    • Foote, Sgt. Victor G. - died while POW/remains recovered
    • Foshee, 1Lt. Billy B.* - POW/returned to military control
    • Hinrichs, TSgt. August Henry Jr. - MIA
    • Johnston, 1Lt. Frank Stanley Jr. - died while POW/remains recovered
    • MacGhee, Maj. David F. - returned to military control/died September 13, 1992)
    • Rose, Cpl. Leon Wilbur - POW/MIA
    • Sanders, Sgt. James Richard Jr. - died while POW

    *[KWE Note: Billy B. Foshee also survived an earlier crash on September 08, 1950 in #42-84072.]
     

  • Bait Me (44-69802) - On September 13, 1952, while on a combat mission, the aircraft's wings iced up and caused the aircraft to stall and crash 21 miles southwest of Kangnung, South KoreaOnly one crew member was rescued.  The remains of the others were recovered.  The crew members were:
     
    • Ayers, 2Lt. Merle Truman - KIA
    • Dreese, 1Lt. John Longcoy - KIA
    • Gerrato, MSgt. Alphonse Jr. - Rescued
    • Heath, MSgt. Ralph Roosevelt - KIA
    • Houston, 1Lt. Raymond Burl - KIA
    • Jones, A2c George Dewey Jr. - KIA
    • Kahanek, A2c Jimmie Leon - KIA
    • McCormick, A2c James - KIA
    • Michel, A1c Richard Thomas - KIA
    • Roberts, Capt. John Luverne - KIA
    • Sanders, Maj. Earl J. Jr. - KIA
    • Temples, A2c Amos Cleveland - KIA
       
  • Bigham (42-93974) - While on a night leaflet dropping mission on November 09, 1951, this aircraft was hit by AAA near Chongju.  The crew bailed out over Paengnyong-do.  All were rescued except one crew member, who was taken POW.  The crew members were:
     
    • Bigham, Capt. Donald G. - POW
    • Bryan, 1Lt. Richard M. - WIA
    • Clancey, 1Lt. Donald R. - WIA
    • Garcia, 1Lt. Raymond B.
    • Heitsenrader, Pfc. Vernon D.
    • LaFleur, Cpl. Joseph R.
    • Lipsky, SSgt. David N.
    • Livingston, Pfc. Benjamin F.
    • McKinney, SSgt. Winston P.
    • Northey, Sgt. William J.G.
    • Pershica, Pfc. Joseph P. - WIA
    • Vance, 1Lt. Daniel B. - WIA
       
  • Black Sheep or City of Jackson (#42-65369) - This aircraft crashed and burned at Kadena following the Yalu River Bridge mission on April 06, 1951.  Its gear failed.  Capt. Jack W. Frost was the pilot.  Every crew member was injured but there were no fatalities.  The crew members were:
     
    •  Anderson, 1Lt. Henry N.
    • Banchiera, 1Lt. Charles N.
    • Clements, Cpl. Edward F.
    • Frost, Capt. Jack W.
    • Hobbs, Sgt. Floyd T.
    • King, MSgt. Owen M.
    • Lehman, 1Lt. Paul D.
    • Liberatore, 1Lt. Francis J.
    • Matt, 1Lt. Charles W.
    • Nys, 1Lt. Pierre E.
    • O'Flynn, SSgt. John L.
    • Prewdzik, Capt. Stanley N.
    • Protiva, Cpl. Thomas H. Jr.
    • Tutt, Sgt. John B.
       
  • B.U.B. (44-61815) - Also known as Daijobu/Moon's Moonbeam/Sunbonnet King.  B.U.B. stood for Beat Up Bastard. - See "Sunbonnet King" for details.
     
  • Bugs' Ball Buster (44-61638) - Damaged July 19, 1950 by a Yak-9.  Only one crew member was wounded.  He received a Silver Star for his actions during this incide and his citation explains what happened that day.
     
    • Edenbo, Capt. John W. - WIA

    Silver Star citation - Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 149 - 26 December 1950

    "The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain John W. Edenbo, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 19 July 1950, in Korea, by pressing home a bombing attack on the west railroad bridge at Seoul, Korea. As the lone bomber aircraft was committed to the bomb run it was subjected to repeated and determined attacks by enemy fighters attempting to defend the target, an important link in the supply routes of the aggressor forces. On the third of these attacks, an enemy YAK-9 inflicted damage on the B-29 and wounded Captain Edenbo. Although bleeding profusely about the face, neck and hands, he refused a sedative for relief of his pain and directed the bombardier to continue the bomb run. Thirty seconds from the bomb release point, anti-aircraft fire was encountered. In spite of the strong defense by the enemy and without regard for his own wounds, Captain Edenbo persisted in the attack which resulted in direct hits on the bridge. The gallantry and courage of Captain Edenbo in the face of determined resistance and despite his painful wounds, reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service."
     

  • Bust 'N The Blue (44-62167) - aircraft crashed on August 30, 1952, four miles north of Taegu.*  All 12 crew members died.  Their bodies were recovered.  The crew members (all of whom but Barnes were married) were:
     
    • Barnes, Capt. Bernard Eugene
    • Buckley, 1Lt. John Harrison
    • Buss, A2c Donald Henry
    • Hill, 2Lt. William Frances
    • King, MSgt. William Don
    • Koehler, 1Lt. Victor August
    • Maslin, A2c John William
    • McAnelly, Capt. Robert Winfred
    • McMann, A2c John Gerald
    • Prasnikar, A2c James Clarence
    • Roper, Maj. Hillard Marshall
    • Slavicek, A1c Glen Leroy

    [*For further crash details see Personnel Losses - Barnes, Capt. Bernard Eugene.]
     

  • Charlie's Wagon/September Song (44-69746) - There were six occupants when this aircraft received MiG damage from 15-20 MiGs over Sinuiju at 1300L on March 30, 1951.  It landed at Itazuke Air Base with wounded and was written off as damaged beyond repair, but there were no fatalities.  The crew members were:
     
    • Gallagher, 1Lt. Bernard A. - WIA
    • Kergan, 1Lt. Frank D. - WIA
    • McGowan, TSgt. George N. - WIA
    • Morrison, A1c James I. - WIA
    • Nicholson, TSgt. Eugene C. - WIA
    • Rummel, 1Lt. Leonard H. - not injured
       
  • Chief Spokane: The Red Eraser (#44-61925) - This aircraft crashed at Kadena AFB on January 30, 1952 following an in-flight fire in its #1 engine.  The aircraft was destroyed by fire.  One crew member died in the fire.  The crew members were:
     
    • Badzik, John Rudolph - IP
    • Carey, John T. - CFC
    • Cayson, Wayman Adolph - navigator
    • Easter, Joseph Warren Jr. - right gunner
    • Foster, Harold Kenneth - IVO
    • Goudice, Daniel Edward - bombardier
    • Hamm, Joseph Grinnell Jr. - engineer
    • Leone, Anthony Jr. - radio operator - He was the only fatality in the fire/crash.
    • McCowen, William Irving - pilot
    • Rose, Joe B. - left gunner
    • Withun, Robert R. - tail gunner
    • Wolfert, Frederick Edwin - VC
    • Wynn, Donald Dewey - aircraft commander

    For more information about this crash, view the Airplane Crash page B-29 Okinawa on the KWE.
     

  • Cream of the Crop (44-61656) - Shot down by Lt. Col. Alexsandr D. Smorchkov, Russian MiG pilot.  The Silver Star citation awarded to the pilot of this aircraft provides an explanation of what happened to it and its crew on October 22, 1951.  (See below.)  All crew members were rescued.  They were:
     
    • Bennett, SSgt. Jack R.
    • Birch, 1Lt. Donald A.
    • Bordeaux, Capt. Lyle B. - injured - pilot
    • Burleson, TSgt. William J.
    • Collins, Cpl. Michael J.
    • Cook, Sgt. William
    • Davis, 1Lt. Richard L.
    • Hanback, SSgt. Floyd D.
    • Piranien, Sgt. Jack
    • Price, Capt. Frank E.
    • Walkup, Capt. John B. Jr.
    • Word, 1Lt. Charles E. - WIA

    Silver Star citation:

    Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
    General Orders No. 551 - November 26, 1951

    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Lyle B. Bordeaux, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 22 October 1951 as a B-29 Aircraft Commander, 30th Bombardment Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group (Medium), FIFTH Air Force. While on a strike against the vital Taechon airfield in Korea. Captain Bordeaux's aircraft was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire. Displaying outstanding flying skill, Captain Bordeaux retained control of the aircraft and managed to drop his bombs on the target. Shortly afterwards, several members of the crew were wounded when the aircraft was hit by enemy fighters. With two engines out, Captain Bordeaux unable to maintain altitude, and with almost all flight controls shot away, piloted his crippled aircraft to a friendly island near Seoul, Korea, in order to avoid abandoning the plane over enemy lines. Steadily losing altitude, Captain Bordeaux circled the small island until all members of the crew had parachuted to safety. At that time, with the aircraft impossible to control, Captain Bordeaux bailed out at an altitude of less than 1,000 feet. His skillful handling of this critical situation resulted in the rescue of all twelve crew men without serious injury. Captain Bordeaux's courage, skill and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
     

  • Deal Me In (44-69805) - A B-29A Superfortress Bomber with the 325th Bomber Squadron, 92nd Bomber Group, on October 14, 1950, while on a bombing mission, the aircraft was damaged by anti-aircraft fire.  Its engines caught fire and the crew was ordered to bail out. Later, the fire was extinguished and the order was cancelled, but not before SSgt. Bullman had bailed out. This aircraft was reclaimed at Tinker AFB, Oklahoma on August 08, 1954.  The crew members included (incomplete listing):
     
    • Bullman, SSgt. Robert E. - He bailed out, landed in Sagami Bay, and drowned. His remains were recovered.
    • Cronin, Maj. William R. - pilot (not injured)
    • Horangic, 1Lt. Nicholas P. - not injured*

    *In 1963 Horangic was one of three survivors of the crash of B-52 (57-0018) in the mountains of northern New Mexico.
     

  • Double Whammy (44-87734) - This aircraft crashed into the Sea of Japan between Okinawa and southern Korea north of Chinnampo on January 23, 1952 after a run-away propeller sheared and cut the fuselage.
     
    • Argetis, 1Lt. James - MIA
    • Bell, A1c James Lloyd - MIA
    • Caldwell, SSgt. Richard Bruce - MIA
    • Carter, 1Lt. Bartus H. - POW/repatriated (1917-1996)
    • Conn, Cpl. Roderick G. - POW/repatriated (1932-1983)
    • Eyres, 1Lt. Thomas Llewellyn Sr.  - POW/repatriated (1923-1974)
    • Fisher, Capt. William Royal - pilot - MIA
    • Hodges, MSgt. Carrell Thomas - POW/repatriated (1922-1977)
    • Kubicek, Capt. Garold B. - POW/repatriated (1917-1978)
    • Law, SSgt. Asa Lawrence - MIA
    • Lewis, Pfc. David - POW/Repatriated
    • Thomson, 1Lt. Hugh Ker - MIA
    • Wedsworth, Cpl. George A.  - POW/Repatriated (1928-2009)
    • Weldon, Cpl. Travis C. - POW/repatriated
       
  • Down's Clowns (44-86284) - Battle damaged in 1951 by MiGs and considered an operational loss, even though salvaged in the USA. No further information found.
     
  • Dragon Lady (44-61835) - During the Yalu Railroad Bridge mission, this aircraft took a hit on the left side of the cockpit, killing the pilot and bombardier.  The co-pilot continued to fly the plane, continuing on to drop its bombs on target.  He then flew the plane back to Suwon.  The one injured and two fatalities that day included:
     
    • Sproul, Capt. Harold R. (bombardier) - KIA
    • Umholtz, 1Lt. Willis E. - WIA
    • Wright, 1Lt. Gene E. (pilot) - KIA

    Six months later, on Halloween Eve 1951, the Dragon Lady blew up shortly after take-off, 40 miles north of Kadena, when its #3 engine caught fire and a wing blew off.  All but two crew members perished in the 10/31/1951 crash.  They included:
     

    • Ashcroft, MSgt. Floyd Denver (fatality)
    • Barrentine, Maj. George T. (fatality)
    • Bowden, SSgt. Arthur J. (fatality)
    • Dale, Capt. James L. (fatality)
    • Daily, 1Lt. Harold L. (survivor)
    • Levy, 1Lt. Ben Preston (fatality)
    • Murray, Cpl. James Brooks (fatality)
    • Parkman, 1Lt. James J. (survivor)
    • Panepinto, SSgt. Carl John (fatality)
    • Parr, Cpl. Charley O. (fatality)
    • Rohan, Cpl. Edmond H. (fatality)
    • Ruble, 1Lt. Winfred L. (fatality)
       
  • DYachenko (44-70151) - This B-29 (the lead bomber in a bombing mission at the Yalu River on October 23, 1951) was damaged by MiG #141 near Namsi Airfield and the crew bailed out in the Chinnampo/Inchon area (Yellow Sea).  (See Black Tuesday.) Loss.  Thirteen occupants, nine fatalities.  Crew members and their fates were:
     
    • Dougherty, S/Sgt. Joseph Steven - MIA

    • Goldbeck, Capt. Emil - bombardier - rescued

    • Gross, Capt. William A. - gunner - rescued

    • Hamblin, M/Sgt. Robert Warren - flight engineer - POW/MIA - held in Russia

    • O'Neal, Lt. Col. Julius - observer - MIA/POW held after the war.

    • Penninger, Capt. Roger William - co-pilot - MIA/POW held after the war

    • Shields, Capt. Thomas Lester - pilot - MIA

    • Smith, Capt. Ted - navigator - rescued

    • Stainbrook, A/2c Paul E. - gunner - WIA/rescued

    • Vretis, Lt. James George - KIA

    • Wahlgren, Capt. Edward Charles - MIA/POW

    • Webb, A/1c Edward Arvil - MIA/POW

    • West, Cpl. Carl Emmons - MIA/POW held in Russia
       

  • EB-29B (44-84111) - This aircraft, piloted by Tom F. Clayton, was involved in a ground accident at AFAC Ramp, Eglin AFB, Florida on December 05, 1952.
     
  • Eight Ball/Tondemonai (44-62237) - See Tondemonai.
     
  • Every Man a Tiger/Myasis Dragon (44-61830) - This aircraft was attacked by six to nine MiGs on March 01, 1951 at Kogungong-dong.  The B-29 was badly damaged, but was repaired and in formation when MiGs attacked again on April 12, 1951 during the Yalu River Bridge mission.  It was not scrapped until 1954.
     
  • Fireball (44-62281) - . Damaged by AAA over Pyongyang on May 07, 1951, recovered at Yokota AB, Japan.  Its crewmembers observed loss of 44-86371 and three chutes leaving that aircraft.  "Fireball" was first assigned to the 345th about 1947-48 and flew with the 98th to Okinawa in 1948 and to Sculthorp, England in 1949. It deployed to Yokota in 1950 and survived two years of combat.  It returned to the U.S. in 1952 and was dropped from inventory as surplus in February 1957.
     
  • Fujigmo (44-62166) - aircraft caught fire northeast of Ocho-o, South Korea and crashed at Taegu on July 22, 1952, killing all 13 crew members.  The fatalities were:
     
    • Angstman, 1Lt. Forrest B.
    • Aschenbrenner, Capt. Leroy E.
    • Garza, Capt. Osbaldo N.
    • Heney, TSgt. Leroy A.
    • Ingrim, A2c Lloyd W.
    • Jacobs, A2c Michael L.
    • Meredith, Capt. David N.
    • Miles, A2c David E.
    • Ross, Capt. Paul C.
    • Scites, A2c Clifton E.
    • Spain, A2c Charles O.
    • Thomas, TSgt. Keith D.
    • Yduate, A2c Manuel J. Jr.
       
  • Heart's Desire (44-86400) - also known as The Big Gass Bird and Chotto Matte.  Four minutes after take-off this aircraft struck a small hill near the village of Daimon, six miles northwest of Yokota AB, Japan and burned.  The crew members included the following:
     
    • Ardoin, Cpl. Sherley B. - fatality, body recovered
    • Cline, Cpl. Norman F. - injured
    • Evert, 1Lt. William Frank - fatality, body recovered
    • Fitzwater, TSgt. Charles R. - fatality
    • Lemons, 1Lt. Earl H. - fatality
    • Marchand, SSgt. Wayne L. - fatality
    • Rackley, Cpl. Carroll L. - fatality
    • Richards, 2Lt. Harold G. - fatality
    • Robie, 1Lt. Norbert Leo - fatality
    • Sample, Sgt. James H. - injured
    • Stevens, 1Lt. John G. - fatality
       
  • Heart's Desire II (44-69656) - Attacked by 6-9 MiGs while hitting bridge at Kogungong-dong, North Korea.  Number 1 and 3 engines knocked out on March 18, 1951.  There was a partial bailout.  Crew members included:
     
    • Blythe, Capt. John J. - rescued
    • Dwyer, A/1c John G. - rescued
    • Haas, Capt. John Lincoln - KIA
    • Jahr, A/1c Kenneth O. - rescued
    • McNamee, 1Lt. Michael W. - rescued
    • Morrow, A/3c Gordon J. - rescued
    • Strahm, SSgt. Warren G. - rescued
    • Thomas, Capt. Glenn P. - rescued
       
  • Heavenly Laden/Destination Known (45-21822) - On January 29, 1952, the engine of this aircraft caught fire and the crew bailed out near Yokohama.  All of the crew members were rescued.  They included:
     
    • Abercrombie, Capt. Norman
    • Chaoto, 1Lt. Cecile C.
    • Gilbert, Sgt. Bruce H.
    • Guinane, 2Lt. James
    • LeJeunesse, Capt. Raymond
    • Meadows, Capt. Julian C.
    • Murry, Sgt. Jerry M.
    • Price, MSgt. Clarence C.
    • Robinson, Cpl. Loyal
    • Rynot, Sgt. Franklin E.
    • Thomas, Pfc. Donald H.
    • Wood, Col. Delmore P.
       
  • Hot Box (44-69682) - When 15-20 MiGs attacked this aircraft during the Yalu River Bridge Mission on April 12, 1951, its #2 engine caught fire, and then the entire wing caught fire.  The aircraft exploded and crashed into a mountain near Sinuiju.  The tail gunner of B-29 6323 observed the crash and saw no parachutes, but there is strong evidence that some of the crew survived the attack and were taken POW.  Crew members were:
     
    • Aaron, 1Lt. George N. - New York, New York - born July 16, 1917.  Remains returned 1994.  Reports stated that he died April 22, 1951 during friendly fire strafing.
    • Bergmann, Sgt. Louis Henry - St. Paul, Minnesota - born May 01, 1926
    • Bevans, Sgt. Robert Warren - San Rafael, California - born December 18, 1913
    • Bullock, 2Lt. Elmer Trombly - Portsmouth, New Hampshire - born November 19, 1922.  Remains recovered 1994.
    • Elsman, Sgt. Ralph Jr. - Los Gatos, California - born August 07, 1924
    • Hatfield, Lt. Col. Douglas Hampton - Shenandoah, Virginia - born August 07, 1919.  He was a POW, held after the war and not returned in Big Switch.
    • Simpson, Capt. Richard Harold - Fairhaven, Michigan - born July 25, 1923
    • Wilson, 1Lt. James Swayne Jr. - Memphis, Tennessee - born September 21, 1921
       
  • Hot to Go (44-62183) - This aircraft was one of two B-29s shot down near Kwakson, North Korea, during a night mission on June 10, 1952, by Russian MiG pilot Anatoly Karelin.  All but one crew member was missing in action.  Captain Brom was repatriated during Operation Big Switch in 1953.  The crew members were:
     
    • Adams, 1Lt. John Howard - POW/MIA
    • Barrington, A/1c Edgar Foy - MIA
    • Baumer, 1Lt. Robert Black - MIA
    • Brom, Capt. Anton Jr. - POW, only known survivor (died 8/28/1975, Sheboygan, Wisconsin)
    • Canning, SSgt. William Alfred - MIA
    • Gorrell, Capt. Louis Paul - MIA (He was from West Virginia.)
    • Holmes, 1Lt. Harold Ray - MIA
    • Hudson, 1Lt. Robert Edward - MIA
    • Kellstrom, A/2c Paul Kenneth - MIA
    • Mandell, 1Lt. David - MIA
    • Pettit, A/2c Thomas Junior - MIA
    • Reid, A/1c Elbert Josephus Jr. - POW/MIA
    • Ross, A/2c Robert Lewis - MIA
       
  • Hoxie's Hoax (44-61983) - Six crew members of this aircraft were fatalities on July 13, 1950 as the result of an explosion onboard at Oki-Gunto and crashed near Dogo Island, Japan.  Lance Hoxie, the son of Capt. Thomas Hoxie provided this insight into the accident:

    "Captain Thomas Hoxie was an aircraft commander in the 9BG, headquartered at Fairchild AFB in Spokane, WA in 1950 when the group was deployed to the Far East. Captain Allen (Tommy) Thomas, a member of the Hoxie’s Hoax crew, was also rated as a “pilot.” Hoxie and Thomas took turns as aircraft commander on missions, with the other serving as co-pilot. During an early mission to Korea, Hoxie’s Hoax (serial #44-61923) was lead aircraft in the attacking squadron with Thomas Hoxie in the left (A/C's) seat. At some point over the Japan Sea (on the way to the bombing run) Hoxie’s Hoax lost an engine, dropped out of the formation and began a return to its base. In order to maintain altitude, the bomb load was salvoed over the Sea. One 500 lb bomb hung up in the racks. While attempting to release the bomb, it detonated either within the bomb bay or immediately beneath the belly of the plane. The five who survived, including Hoxie and Thomas, salvaged a raft (no one knows how it got out of the plane, since it required a human effort to do so) and spent 36-48 hours at sea before a Japanese fishing vessel picked them up near Dojo Island. While official records may not comment on this, I recall that Dad indicated that they were never sure whether the bomb explosion was a result of a defect or that it had been sabotaged prior to the mission," adding, "The last plane on the mission, allegedly saw the explosion, broke radio silence and notified the authorities. When the message was received in the radio shack, a Reuters reporter was there and immediately sent the report out. It was received by the Grand Rapids, MI newspaper (my Dad’s home town) and published before my Dad’s parents (our grandparents) were officially notified. The title of the article in the newspaper was something to the effect of “Hometown Hero Missing in Action.”

    The crew members were:
     
    • Bear, SSgt. Gilbert - rescued
    • Chapman, 1Lt. Neil Adelbert - KIA
    • Engler, SSgt. Claude Melvin Jr. - body recovered
    • Hoxie, Capt. Thomas - rescued
    • Hughes, SSgt. Jesse M. - body recovered
    • McGeough, Capt. Leo Francis - KIA
    • Miller, 1Lt. Donald D. - rescued
    • Thomas, Capt. Allan - rescued
    • Ursini, Cpl. Jerry - KIA
    • Utz, Sgt. Hanson - rescued
    • Wallan, SSgt. Kenneth P. - KIA
       
  • KB-29M (44-27282) - This B-29 based at Yakota AB, Japan, was involved in a taxiing accident at Atsugi AB, Japan on June 02, 1953.  The pilot was Walter C. Pindell.
     
  • KB-29P (44-84015) - This B-29 out of Walker AFB, New Mexico was piloted by Gordon G. Deal when it was involved in a taxxing accident at Langley AFB, Virginia.
     
  • Lady in Dis-Dress (44-86446) -  This aircraft was damaged by MiGs on December 30, 1952, had a wing fire, and crashed in Tokyo. No further information has been found other than the plane was repaired and scrapped in 1954.
     
  • Lil' Darlin (44-86273) - This aircraft crashed into the Yokota Bowling Alley and Clothing Sales while returning from a combat mission on October 14, 1951.  The crew members were:
     
    • Beal, Maj. Lawrence W. - fatality
    • Borum, 1Lt. Ralph L. - fatality
    • Hawkins, Sgt. Albert A. - injured
    • Hildebrandt, 1Lt. Warren - fatality
    • Lewis, Pvt. Elijah - injured
    • Mantor, Sgt. Philip W. - fatality
    • Mason, 1Lt. Kenneth C. - fatality
    • McNutt, SSgt. William H. - fatality
    • Morris, Sgt. Garnet R. - injured
    • Oracion, 2Lt. Marquis H. - fatality
    • Stimer, 1Lt. Richard Roy - injured (died 1/07/2013)
    • Trautmann, 1Lt. Arthur Adolph - fatality
    • Whitener, Sgt. Joe "Jodie" Bailey Jr. - fatality
    • Winston, 1Lt. Wesley A. - injured
       
  • Little Red Ass (RB50G-47145) - This RB-50 flew from Honshu on a mission in North Korea and was shot down over Sea of Japan southeast of Vladivostok at 42-17N, 133-15 East, by two Soviet pilots (Yablonskiy and Rybakov) in the region of Cape Gamor on July 29, 1953 while on a secret mission. Declassified U.S. government documents state that the aircraft was on a "routine navigational mission in air space over the international waters of the Sea of Japan".  Total time elapse between the time the attack started until components of the aircraft fell into the water was approximately two minutes.  There was a crew of 17 - 1 survivor, 2 remains recovered, 1 KIA, 13 MIA.  Declassified documents list the names of the crew members, but none of their names show up on the government's official KORWALD list as having been killed, missing, or lone survivor.  The co-pilot was the only crew member recovered.  He was rescued by an American ship 40 miles from the Soviet coast to the south of Cape Povorotny.  The pilot and co-pilot bailed out at the same time.  The co-pilot assumed the rest of the crew bailed out, too.  A search and rescue aircraft dropped a life raft to other survivors.  At least four of them (and possibly more) were seen sitting in the raft.  Also seen were nine Soviet PT-type boats in the area and at least six of them were heading to the location where debris from the aircraft was later discovered.  A Soviet trawler was also spotted in the approximate area.  The crew members were:
     
    • Beyer, 1Lt. Frank Ernest - MIA
    • Brown, M/Sgt. Francis Luther - flight engineer - badly injured, shocked, and over exposure in the Sea of Japan resulted in his death.  Body recovered.
    • Czyz, 1Lt. Edmund Joseph - MIA
    • Gabree, SSgt. Donald Wayne - MIA
    • Goulet, A/1c Roland Edgar
    • Hill, SSgt. Donald George - MIA
    • Keith, 1Lt. James Gordon - navigator - He was situated in the nose of the aircraft and was thrown from his position and mortally wounded. - KIA.
    • O'Kelley, Capt. Stanley Keith - aircraft commander - died of exposure in Roche's presence while waiting in the water for rescue - body recovered
    • Radelin, A/2c Earl Wilbur Jr. - MIA
    • Roche, Capt. John Ernst - co-pilot - He was rescued the next day on July 30, 1953.
    • Russell, A/2c Charles Joseph - MIA
    • Sanderson, 1Lt. Warren John - MIA
    • Stalnaker, 1Lt. Robert Elbon - MIA
    • Tejeda, Maj. Francisco Joseph - MIA
    • Ward, Capt. John Cyrus - MIA
    • Wiggins, 1Lt. Lloyd Clayton - MIA
    • Woods, A/2c James Edwin - MIA

    Insight into the mission of RB-50G was found in a memorial to crew member Robert Elbon Stalnaker on a website entitled, "West Virginia Division of Culture and History":

    "Robert Elbon Stalnaker was born March 4, 1922, the youngest son of Randall H. and Lula [Elbon] Stalnaker of Webster Springs, West Virginia. Randall, a schoolteacher in Webster County, and Lula were divorced in 1923 and Lula found work as the matron of the IOOF Home in Elkins, West Virginia, where she met A. J. Wilkinson of Huntington. A. J. and Lula were married about 1925, and they had a daughter Mary.  Robert graduated from Huntington High School in 1939. He attended West Virginia Business College in Huntington, and after graduation worked as a clerk for the West Virginia State Road Commission in Huntington.

    On January 7, 1942, Robert enlisted as a private in the Army Air Corps at Fort Thomas, Kentucky. He received his commission as lieutenant at Deming Officer Training School in Deming, New Mexico, in January 1943, where he also received training in navigation. In May 1944 Robert transferred to Hunter Army Air Field near Savannah, Georgia, for training aboard a B-17G and was assigned to Crew 122 as a bombardier. Robert went to England with the 8th Air Force in June 1944.

    On July 16, 1944, Robert was a bombardier/navigator of a B-17 that participated in a bombing mission over Germany. Failing to return, he was declared missing in action. According to his sister Mary Childers, the plane was shot down over Germany and Robert was captured. He was among a group of prisoners being transported by truck to a POW camp when they were rescued by German partisans and helped across the French border. With the aid of the French underground they crossed the Swiss border, where they stayed until they were freed in an exchange of German POWs. On August 11, 1944, Robert's parents were notified that he was alive and safe. After his ordeal, Robert received a 21-day leave to visit home before returning to England, where he continued his service with the 8th Air Force until the war was over. Robert Stalnaker in Switzerland

    Robert left the Air Force after WWII and returned home. After attending Marshall University for a year or so, in January 1948, Robert re-enlisted in the Air Force as a captain. He updated his previous training at Lackland Air Force Base near San Antonio, Texas, and went to Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana for further training in reconnaissance and surveillance. Robert was stationed at Biloxi, Mississippi in July 1950, where he received radar training.

    On December 29, 1951, Robert married Betty [James] Frazier, a girl he had known since high school. They got married in Pikeville, Kentucky, and traveled throughout southern Kentucky on their honeymoon. After the trip, Robert returned to Biloxi and was then transferred to Forbes Air base near Topeka, Kansas. At Forbes, he received training as an electronics specialist and became a crew member of a US RB-50G with the 343rd Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron of the 55th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, which was attached to the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron based at Yokota Air Base, Japan.

    On July 29, 1953, Robert Stalnaker was one of a 17-member crew on a US RB-50G that was given a special assignment over the Sea of Japan. Another West Virginian, Airman 2nd Class James E. Woods from Upshur County, was also a member of the crew. Robert and five other crewmen were electronics specialists known as Ravens, and on that day one of their assignments was to investigate radar facilities along the Soviet border. The best way to do that was to provoke the Russians into turning on their search and control radar, which was usually done only when the early warning radar detected a potential threat. This risky maneuver was known as ferreting because the goal was to ferret out information about the capabilities of the Soviet equipment. The Russians understood the game and tried not to be lured into turning on their equipment, which would expose the capabilities of their system to the United States.

    After completing the mission at about 6:15 AM, the US RB-50G was returning to the base at Yokota when it was intercepted and unexpectedly fired upon from the rear by two Russian MiG-17 fighter planes. The gunfire from the MiG-17 at the rear disabled the RB-50G’s No. 1 engine and set the No. 4 engine on fire. The attack also tore off part of the tail section and destroyed the wing. The tail gunner, James E. Woods, was able to return a brief burst of fire at the MiG-17, but to no avail, and commander Captain Stanley O'Kelley ordered the crew to bail out. The plane lost altitude quickly and crashed into the sea. The attack occurred two days after the armistice ending the Korean War was signed on July 27, 1953.

    The US conducted a thorough search of the area by air and sea, and was assisted by an Australian ship near the crash site. Halted due to dense fog and approaching darkness, the search was resumed on the morning of July 30, 1953. Captain John Roche, co-pilot of the plane, was wounded but survived the crash by holding onto pieces of the wreckage. He was picked up by the Navy ship USS Picking in the early morning hours of July 30, 1953 after floating in the Sea of Japan for about 22 hours. No other survivors were found. The bodies of Captain Stanley O'Kelley and Master Sergeant Francis Brown were later recovered along the coast of Japan. The remaining 14 members of the crew, which included Robert Stalnaker, were never accounted for.

    The United States State Department officially released information that the US RB-50G was the victim of an unprovoked attack by two Russian MiG-17 fighters while on a routine navigational training exercise in international airspace over the Sea of Japan. In fact, the US RB-50G was involved in a ferreting operation, and in order to provoke the Russians, had flown into the danger zone of the harbor at Vladivostok, which was home to the Soviet's Pacific fleet.

    The Soviet government maintained that about 6:00 AM on the morning of July 29, 1953, a US Air Force RB-50G aircraft violated the boundary of the USSR in the region of Cape Gamov and flew through their airspace to the area of Ajton Island near Vladivostok. The Soviets claimed that two Russian MiG-17 fighter aircraft approached the US RB-50G with the intention of showing the crew that they were within the boundaries of the USSR and urging them to leave Soviet airspace. The Soviets stated that the US RB-50G aircraft was last seen flying out to sea and they had no further knowledge of the fate of the plane or its crew. However, according to Captain Roche, several Russian boats were in the area immediately after the crash, and crew members of the rescue planes searching the site also reported sightings of Russian boats and planes in the area that may have picked up other possible survivors or remains.

    Throughout the 1950s and early 1960s the US government made repeated requests to the Soviet Foreign Ministry for information regarding the July 29, 1953 attack on the US Air Force RB-50G plane but received little no response. In June 1992 Russian President Boris Yeltsin admitted that the Soviets had shot down nine US planes during the 1950s and held twelve of the survivors prisoner. It is not know whether any of these prisoners were crew members aboard the US RB-50G which was shot down in 1953. In November 1955, Robert Stalnaker was officially pronounced dead by the US Air Force.

    Robert Stalnaker is survived by his sister Mary Childers. His mother Lula [Stalnaker] Wilkinson passed away in 1966. His older brother Randall Harold had died in 1939, and his father passed away in 1934. At the time he was shot down, Robert Stalnaker left his wife Betty [James] Frazier and a stepson James Frazier."
     

  • Loaded 'Leven (44-69803) - At 1612 hours on February 28, 1952, this plane departed on a bombing mission.  The #2 engine was smoking heavily at takeoff.  Five minutes after coast-in, #2 began vibrating.  Excessive vibration continued and one engine burst into flames.  The order was given to bail out at 14,000 feet.  The plane crashed 15 miles southwest of Kaesong, North Korea at 2042 hours.  The crew members were:
     
    • Baker, SSgt. Thomas C. - remains recovered
    • Carlisle, Capt. Osborne Tomee - aircraft commander, MIA
    • Carney, 1Lt. James W. - rescued
    • Denn, A/2C Willard Martin - MIA
    • Happ, 1Lt. Carl G. Jr. - radio operator - remains recovered - KIA after bailout
    • Hendricks, Sgt. James W. - rescued
    • Lincoln, Sgt. Theodore G. - rescued
    • Manion, Capt. Joseph R. - rescued
    • Mowder, 1Lt. William R. - rescued
    • Nelson, 2Lt. Lawrence Archie - MIA
    • Smith, Sgt. Lloyd D. - rescued
    • Vonderkall, SSgt. Herbert - rescued
       
  • Lubricating Lady (44-61751) - Flew its fourth combat mission on October 31, 1952.  On the mission the plane lost three engines and was ditched nine miles northwest of Kadena Air Base.  There were only three survivors.  B-29 flight crew member Frank "Bud" Farrell believes this aircraft had more than four missions.  He stated, "We were the last crew to successfully fly it before its loss...a “jinxed aircraft , flew it a few times, combat, test hops, and last time 93rd Bomb Squadron."  Its crew on October 31, 1952 included:
     
    • Adams, Capt. Donald Lester - MIA
    • Bochnovic, 2Lt. Michael - navigator - MIA
    • Froisness, 1Lt. Gordon Nowell - MIA
    • Harvey, Capt. Robert Gordon - MIA
    • Haun, 2Lt. John Henry - bombardier - MIA
    • Hopkins, A2c Robert Q. - MIA
    • Knox, Lt. James E. - spare bombarbier - rescued
    • LeMaster, Edward B. - radio operator - rescued
    • Phalen, 1Lt. Robert Francis - MIA
    • Peoples, A2c Harry Thomas Jr. - MIA
    • Rees, Charles H. Sr. - top gunner - rescued
    • Sides, A1c Jimmy Carter - KIA
    • Sleppy, MSgt. Marvin Elwood - MIA
    • Wilson, A2 Donald H. - MIA

    See also Topics - Airplane Crashes Okinawa 10/1952 on the Korean War Educator.
     

  • Lucky Dog (44-86370) - Aircraft was hit in a MiG attack, The #1 engine of this aircraft caught fire and the aircraft ditched at sea on April 12, 1951.  Debris and an oil slick were found, but no parachutes were observed and all but one of the 12-man crew remain missing in action:
     
    • Burch, Sgt. Hugh Maynard - New Carlisle, Indiana - born April 22, 1930
    • Carlson, MSgt. Albert Bertie - Lebanon, Missouri - born October 08, 1918
    • Connolly, 1Lt. James Joseph - Jersey City, New Jersey - born April 29, 1921
    • DeCesare, Maj. Anaclethe Patrick - Providence, Rhode Island - born January 13, 1918
    • Delgado, Capt. Raymundo - El Paso, Texas - born March 15, 1919
    • Dinger, SSgt. Allen Charles - Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania - born June 21, 1929
    • Goodwin, 1Lt. Bobbie Alfred - Ada, Oklahoma - born April 11, 1926
    • Henson, SSgt. Shields Taylor - Cincinnati, Ohio - born May 20, 1927
    • Higgins, SSgt. George W. - Morristown, Tennessee - born February 22, 1928.  His remains were recovered on April 17, 1951 by a surface vessel.  They were returned to the USA and interned at Jarnagon Cemetery on January 02, 1952 with full military honors by the USAF from Dalton AFB in Greenville, South Carolina.
    • Kirby, SSgt. Fred Stephenson Jr. - Richmond, Virginia - born July 12, 1925 
    • Rudat, Capt. Fred Otto - Columbus, Nebraska - born July 11, 1920
    • Winters, Capt. Melvin Percy - Tecumseh, Oklahoma - born February 19, 1925
       
  • Mais Oui/Miss Behavin (44-86436) - Flying in a three-ship formation, this plane had its left wing damaged by AAA approximately three miles south of Kwangju, Korea on June 20, 1951.  The pilot's name was Nash.  The plane was written off as battle damaged.
     
  • Miss Jackie The Rebel (44-61967) - This aircraft was shot down by Soviet pilot Studilin on June 10, 1952 in the region of Sensen-Tetsyuzan (near the railroad bridge at Kwakson, North Korea).  The Soviet aircraft attacked "Miss Jackie" four times.  The first attack was unsuccessful due to distance.  On the second attack the engine on the left wing caught fire.  After the fourth attack an engine on the right wing caught fire.  "Miss Jackie" exploded and crashed 15-20 kilometers southeast of the Tetsyuzan peninsula into the sea.   All crew members were missing in action:
     
    • Attinger, A2c Douglas Earl
    • Bonney, A1c Buddy Joe
    • Cessna, Capt. Marvin Jr.
    • Earns, 1Lt. William Sidney
    • Errington, SSgt. John Harrison
    • Flaherty, A1c John Francis
    • Friedman, 1Lt. Richard Melvin
    • Hadley, Maj. George Allen
    • Jenkins, A1c Carl August
    • Lewis, 1Lt. Wilbur Eugene
    • Miller, 1Lt. John Richard
    • Skinner, 1Lt. Preston
    • Stagg, A2c Westervelt Charles Jr.
    • Thompson, SSgt. Elwood John
       
  • Miss Manukie/Squeeze Play (44-86415) - On September 19, 1951, while on a leaflet dropping mission, this aircraft developed engine problems and it was ditched in the Sea of Japan.  Its crew members are all MIA:
     
    • Bichard, Sgt. Robert O'Neal of Orlando, Florida
    • Colombel, Sgt. Rexford Lagel of Balboa Island, California
    • Erickson, Pfc. Dean John of Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • Holland, TSgt. Carl Charles Jr. of Burgettstown, Pennsylvania
    • Howard, 1Lt. Arnold Sherman of Hannapin, Minnesota
    • Jones, Capt. George Madison of California
    • Lavoie, 1Lt. George Albert of Massachusetts
    • Marshall, Capt. James Doyle of California
    • McHorney, Sgt. William Lloyd of Missouri
    • Ries, 1Lt. Dale Richard of Santa Rosa, California
    • Riley, Cpl. Donald Louis of Illinois
    • Rocklage, Capt. Harry William Jr. of St. Louis, Missouri
       
  • Miss Spokane/Miss Minooky (44-27332) - Damaged by anti-aircraft over Sunan, North Korea on October 13, 1951.  On board was Jim Lucas, Scripps-Howard correspondent, who filed his report in the San Francisco News. Crew members were:
     
    • Daughert, Pvt. Everett of Fostoria, Ohio
    • Fasules, Lt. Col. Pomas B.
    • Gill, 1Lt. Dick of Cochranton, Pennsylvania
    • Hudson, Pvt. Ferdinand of Memphis, Tennessee
    • Koropsak, 1Lt. Stanley of West Palm Beach, Florida
    • Leach, Capt. Walter Leach of Fort Lauderdale, Florida
    • Lumsden, SSgt. Tom of Memphis, Tennessee
    • Nance, Pvt. Charles of Dallas
    • Ravis, Pvt. Howard of Blossburg, PA
    • Schuler, 1Lt. Norman of Chicago
    • Sherman, Cpl. Leigh of Salt Lake City

    Research on the internet indicates that #44-27332 had structural failure on June 16, 1954 at Kadena AFB.  At that time the B-29 was piloted by Luther Erwin Armstrong, Jr. (1923-2005).
     

  • Miss Tampa/TDY Widow (44-86335) - This aircraft's fuel cell and wing were damaged by AAA on March 01, 1951 and caught fire.  It landed at K-2 and was written off.
     
  • M.P.I. (44-86247)** - A B-29 type aircraft from the 344th Bombardment Squadron, 98th Bombardment Wing (M), Fifth Air Force, crashed while taking off on an operational mission with a full complement of bombs.  The aircraft had a maximum load of 500 pound demolition bombs and gasoline when it lost power.  After an unsuccessful attempt was made to stop, the aircraft crashed at the end of the runway and burst into flame. The aircraft commander was Captain John P. Brennan, USAF.  After he left the burning aircraft, he noticed two crew members, apparently in a state of shock, standing at the aircraft amidst burning gasoline and exploding machine gun shells.  Although Captain Brennan knew the fuses of the bombs were of a delicate nature and would explode at any moment, he immediately rushed back and guided the crew members to safety.  Shortly thereafter, the first of a series of four explosions occurred, and Captain Brennan was struck in the ankles.  When he observed another crew member near the aircraft, Captain Brennan, once again disregarding his own well being, made an immediate rescue.  He received the Soldier's Medal for heroism. Airman Third Class Herman Breeding, Jr., USAF, also received the Soldier's Medal for his heroic actions while serving with a crash rescue crew from the 6161st Air Installations Squadron, Yokota Air Base.  After rushing to the scene of the above mentioned crash, and in spite of his awareness of the danger of an explosion of high octane fuel and bombs, Airman Breeding attempted to enter the burning aircraft to remove crew members whom he believed were trapped in the wreckage.

    Rescued were:
     
    • Almack, 1Lt. Robert B.
    • Brenna, A3c John C.
    • Bushby, TSgt. John
    • Emerson, 1Lt. Robert C.
    • Foye, Sgt. Raymond D.
    • Harter, Sgt. Loren F.
    • Miyose, Sgt. Morito
    • Moore, Sgt. Garland A.
    • Plumley, SSgt. William R.
    • Reiss, 1Lt. Eli B.
    • Wolfe, Lt. Col. John P.

**[KWE Note: Although all the crew members were rescued, ten base firefighters (3 US airmen and 7 Japanese nationals) lost their lives in this fiery crash.  A memorial to the firefighters was re-dedicated in February 2011 after it was relocated to the new fire department facility at Yokota.]

  • Myakinas (44-62108) - While on a night intruder mission against Sinanju/Kunu-ri, two engines failed and the aircraft crash landed at Taegu on April 10, 1951.  The B-29 was a total loss due to battle damage.  Some crew members were not injured, while others were wounded in action or killed during the crash landing.  The crew included:
     
    • Andrews, Sgt. Elberon G. - WIA
    • Bayer, 2Lt. Oscar N. - WIA
    • Carroll, Cpl. Gregory S. - not injured
    • Ehrlich, 1Lt. Edgar A. - body recovered
    • Finnegan, SSgt. William N. - not injured
    • Gordon, Sgt. Donald B. - WIA
    • Hampton, TSgt. Theron D. - WIA (died May 27, 2011)
    • Lewis, 1Lt. Robert C. - body recovered
    • Miller, 1Lt. Raymond - body recovered
    • Perry, Capt. Marshall F. - not injured
    • Thornburgh, Sgt. Billie G. - not injured
    • Trackberger,* Capt. Otto C. - body recovered

    [*Trackberger is found in some DoD records as Trakberger.]
     

  • Nipp-pon-ese (44-61617) - Crashed while making an emergency landing at Miho AB on September 09, 1950.  No KORWALD.  Names of crew members unknown.
     
  • No Sweat (44-87618) - Attacked by MiGs during the Yalu Railroad Bridge mission on April 12, 1951.  Landed safely in Seoul, but was struck by a jet while on the ground.  No personnel losses.  See Yalu Railroad Bridge section of this page.  Names of crew members unknown.
     
  • Our Gal (44-61932) -  When 40 to 70 MiGs attacked a B-29 formation, aircraft 44-61932 was damaged to the degree that the  crew bailed out over Wonsan Harbor near Tri-yom-do on October 24, 1951.  US Navy aircraft flew RESCAP over the crew.  All but two were rescued.
     
    • Abplanalp, Sgt. B0bby D. - rescued
    • Dorsey, Cpl. L.W. - rescued
    • Foster, MSgt. Wilbur (flight engineer )- KIA
    • Fyffe, 1Lt. Luke Cole "Billy" (pilot) - KIA/MIA
    • Haberle, 1Lt. William Joseph (radar operator) - KIA/MIA
    • Harig, 1Lt. James W. - rescued
    • Johnson, Sgt. James A. (radio operator) - KIA
    • Manley, Capt. Melvin C. - rescued
    • Simon, Cpl. Harvey - tail gunner - rescued
    • Singleton, Cpl. R.L. - rescued
    • Zierler, 1Lt. A. - rescued
       
  • Over Exposed (44-61813) - Damaged by MiG-15 on November 09, 1950.  Two engines were shot out.  The aircraft overshot the runway on return to Johnson Air Base, Japan.  The air frame broke into five major portions.  Five crew members died and the plane was written off.  Seven crew members were:
     
    • Green, MSgt. Avery - flight engineer
    • Gunhus, SSgt. Orvis J. - crewman
    • Laden, Capt. Robert Edward - pilot - unknown status - KIA
    • Lavene, Cpl. Harry J. - not injured - (credited for shooting down the first MiG in the Korean War)
    • Mitchell, 1Lt. Robert A. - co-pilot
    • Schooley, 1Lt. James M. - weather officer and navigator
    • Warren, SSgt. ___ - not injured
       
  • Police Action* (44-86295) - This B-29 was shot up at Namsi and crash landed at Kimpo Airfield, South Korea on October 23, 1951.  The navigator was the only crew member killed in action. Loss of aircraft.  See also Black Tuesday.  The crew members were:
     
    • Bisson, Sgt. N.T. - Wounded in action
    • Carroll, Col. John W. - observer
    • Charnall, Capt. John F.
    • Edwards, Capt. Morton G. - navigator  - the only fatality
    • Gretchen, Sgt. J.E.
    • McQuade, Capt. James R.
    • Reeter, Lt. William E. "Bill" Reeter - pilot**
    • Richards, Cpl. D.D.
    • Turpin, Cpl. Randy
    • Walters, Sgt. H.L. - Wounded in action
    • Williamson, Capt. Monte C.
    • Wilson, Sgt. E.L.
    • Victor, Sgt. Russell B.

    *It should be noted that there were two B-29s with the name "Police Action" in the Korean War.  This one was the first one.  According to Kenneth Russell, a crew member of the later version of "Police Action", the second one (tail number not known) was brought over from the States in June of 1952.  Its new crew was the crew of "Trouble Brewer", a B-29 that had crash-landed earlier that year.  A sexy female sheriff was painted on the later "Police Action".

    **Bill Reeter received a Silver Star for actions associated with the first "Police Action" on October 23, 1951.  The citation (General Orders: Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 14, January 8, 1952) reads:

    "The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William E. Reeter, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action as Aircraft Commander of a B-29, 372d Bombardment Squadron, 307th Bombardment Wing, FIFTH Air Force, on 23 October 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Reeter flew in a strike against the key enemy airfield at Namsi, North Korea. While on the bomb run, the formation was attacked by approximately 150 enemy MIG-15 jet fighters. In the ensuing battle, Lieutenant Reeter's aircraft was severely damaged and he and seven crew members were injured. Three separate fires developed in the aircraft, but with Lieutenant Reeter's aid and supervision, they were extinguished. Damage sustained included numerous gaping holes in the fuselage, wings, and tail surfaces, severed aileron cable and fuel lines. In spite of his wounds, Lieutenant Reeter elected to fly his crippled aircraft to an emergency airfield in Korea rather than attempt a bailout of his wounded crew members. By remaining in formation, he afforded greater firepower and protection to the other damaged aircraft. A successful landing was made with no further injury to his crew. The courage, skill and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Reeter reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces and the United States Air Force."
     

  • Rapid Rabbit (44-61776) - The aircraft lost #1 and 4 engines en route to a secondary target on April 01, 1952, and the crew bailed out successfully approximately three miles north of Kansong.  They were all rescued.
     
    • Alexander, Capt. Richard L.
    • Bader, Capt. Morton W.
    • Ballash, 1Lt. Joseph C.
    • Burns, Sgt. Stanley S. Jr.
    • Carbine, Cpl. Ray P.
    • Cowart, TSgt. Ray J.
    • Dickson, Cpl. James D.
    • Herstrom, 1Lt. Arthur C. Jr.
    • Hyatt, Capt. Bland B.
    • Scoggins, Cpl. Albert D.
    • Wilbur, Sgt. Max M.
  • RB-45 - caught fire and crashed on June 06, 1952 near Yokota Air Base.  #3 engine blew up on take off, #4 engine flamed out, crew successfully bailed out.
     
  • RB-45 (21725) - After a combat mission on April 06, 1951, this aircraft crashed at Naha AB Okinawa due to bad weather.  Only one crew member was injured.  The crew included:
     
    • Ammons, TSgt. James H. (injured)
    • Aurigemma, Capt. ___
    • Carter, 2Lt. Paul E.
    • Creamer, SSgt Robert P.
    • Dempsey, Capt. Peter (pilot)
    • Grainger, Cpl. Harry A.
    • Hood, SSgt. Richard E.
    • James, 1Lt. Paul J. Jr.
    • Krarup, 1Lt. Walter J.
    • Reed, TSgt. Roy R.
    • Willson, SSgt. Malcolm R.
       
  • RB-45 (21749) - Attached to 19th Bomb Wing, two of its engines went out and it was lost over the East China Sea northwest of Okinawa on March 29, 1951.  The 2nd ARS Squad, Flight C, participated in Search and Rescue (SAR) effort with negative results.  This aircraft was carrying a 12,000 pound VB-13 Tarzon bomb.  When the engine failed, the bomb was salvoed over the ocean.  The concussion from the detonation caused the the B-29 to go down.  All crew members were MIA.  The crew included:
     
    • Buttler, Cpl. Leland Louis
    • Domaleski, Cpl. Robert Paul
    • Harris, 1Lt. Charles William
    • Harview, Cpl. Keith Joseph
    • Hoffman, Sgt. Theodore J
    • Jardine, 1Lt. Ray Frank
    • Jennings, Col. Payne
    • Kingsbury, Cpl. Deloraine Mickey
    • Nosk, 2Lt. Kenneth Leroy
    • Ritter, SSgt. Thomas Warren
    • Vogt, 1Lt. Leonard Paul
    • White, SSgt. Merle Edwin

    RB-45C (48015) - This US spy plane was on a photo recon mission along the Yalu River when it was shot down by MiGs on December 04, 1950.  Crew was from the 19th BW, Langley AFB, TDY to the 91st SRW. This was the first RB-45C lost in combat in Korea.  It was from the USAF's 323rd Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron.  All four crew members became fatalities.  They were:
     

    • Lovell, Col. John Raymond - observer - beaten to death while POW - was on the 71 List as captive of Soviets
    • McDonough, Maj. Charles Edward - pilot - POW of Soviets, beaten to death while POW
    • Picucci, Capt. James Jerome - navigator - KIA, body not recovered
    • Young, Maj. Jules Edwin - co-pilot - KIA, body not recovered
       
  • Sad Sac (T.D.Y.) (44-61676) - Piloted by Tollson and Collins, this aircraft was damaged by MiGs on November 14. 1950.  It was able to make it to Kimpo, but crashed into a parked aircraft.  Three crew members were injured.  The KWE believes that "Sad Sac" was one of nine B-29s sent to drop 1,000 bombs on a bridge at Sinuiju on that date.  Two of the nine B-29s were damaged.  The following day a much larger contingent of B-29s was once again sent to the Yalu River to try to destroy the bridge.  The mission was not accomplished. 
     
  • SB-29 (44-69982) - This search and rescue plane of the 52d Air Rescue Squadron, 6th Air Rescue Group, based at Harmon Air Force Base, Newfoundland, was sent out to assist in search efforts on March 18, 1953 to find a missing B-36 bomber (Convair B-36H 51-13721). The B-29 disappeared shortly before landing, crashing into St. Georges Bay, a few miles from the runway, killing all ten crew members. They were:
     
    • Coggins, A/3c James E.
    • Errico, 1Lt. Robert
    • Jones, A/3c Sammy O.
    • Kerr, A/3c Michael Jr.
    • Kimbrough, S/Sgt. David E.
    • Montgomery, AMN Robert J.
    • Null, Lt. Rodger Dean
    • Quinn, Capt. Francis Xavier
    • Rash, A/1c David Elton
    • Roy, Capt. William A.
       
  • SB-29 (44-84124) - An SB-29 Superfortress rescue aircraft with the 3rd Air Rescue Squadron, U.S. Air Force, on January 31, 1951, while on a rescue mission, engines three and four failed and the electric system of this B-29 went out. The aircraft crashed three miles south of Johnson Air Base.  The crew members were:
     
    • Cooper, Sgt. Jackie W. - injured
    • Curran, Cpl. Robert G. - fatality, died of wounds, body recovered
    • Goodale, Cpl. Gordon E. - injured
    • Hagerty, Capt. Edward D. - fatality, body recovered
    • Harrawood, 1Lt. Donald E. - injured (died 4/28/2010)
    • Paterson, SSgt. Ralph C. - injured
    • Reed, Cpl. Otis L. - injured
    • Sherwood, Sgt. Dilworth R. - injured
    • Stark, Capt. Robert J. - injured
    • Tovsen, MSgt. Donald Eugene - fatality, body recovered
    • Ward, Sgt. Roger D. - injured
       
  • September Song/Charlie's Wagon (44-69946) - See Charlie's Wagon.
     
  • Shady Lady/Double or Nuthin' (42-65357)* - Shot down by MiGs at night 10-12 miles south of Pyongyang (18 miles east of Sariwon) on January 29, 1953.  (Persons on the 71 List were interrogated by Soviets and held after the war.) Its crew members were:
     
    • Ashley, 1Lt. Gilbert Lamour - aircraft commander, POW - "Ashley Five"/"71 List"
    • O'Meara, A2/C James Joseph - first mission as ECM operator, POW  - "71 List"
    • Turner, 1Lt. Harold Peter - POW - "Ashley Five"/"71 List"
    • Shaddick, 2Lt. John Philip - POW - "Ashley Five"/"71 List"
    • Olsen, 1Lt. Arthur Robert - POW - "Ashley Five"/"71 List"
    • Ishida, A2/C Hidemaro Saito - POW - "Ashley Five"/"71 List"
    • Henry, 1Lt. Dewey Rosenhall - POW/"71 List"
    • Schwab, A2/C Edward Anthony - POW/"71 List"
    • Pope, A2/C James Dean - POW/"71 List"
    • Stevenson, A2/C Frank James - POW/"71 List"
    • Weinbrandt, A2/C Robert L. - POW, repatriated during Little Switch
    • Abrahamson, A2/C Gerald D. - POW, repatriated during Big Switch
    • Miller, SSgt. Lee H. - POW, repatriated during Big Switch
    • Stopa, 2Lt. Dewey - died on March 3, 1953 in a POW camp

    *Further information about some members of this crew can be learned by Googling either "Ashley Five" or "71 List" on the Internet.
     

  • Short Time Only (44-69951) - Salvaged (junked) in South Korea after an emergency landing due to battle damage.  No further information found.
     
  • Slick Chick (44-61874) - Forced down at Kimpo in 1952.
     
  • Snugglebunny (44-69667) - This plane flew 34 missions with the 6th Bomb Group before being assigned to the 98th Bomb Group and flying 78 missions during the Korean War.  It was damaged March 1, 1951 by AA or premature explosion of own bombs, but was again present in the formation attacked by MiG's on April 12, 1951.  The aircraft was scrapped in 1954.
     
  • So Tired/Seven-to-Seven (RB-29A - 44-61727) - shot down by MiG while on a photo reconnaissance mission over Sinanju, North Korea on July 04, 1952.  11 crew survived/2 missing in action (presumed dead).  Eight of the 13-man crew became POWs that were eventually released.  A Soviet transcript report stated, "...elements of the 351st lAP encountered a USAF B-29 while on a combat sortie. At 2246 hours, Major Anatoly Karelin (Russian Ace) observed one B-29 in the searchlight beams near Khakusen at an altitude of 7200 meters and attacked it. Orienting on the flaming aircraft, the pilot conducted three more attacks and shot down the B-29. The bomber started to break up midair and fell two kilometers west of Khakusen. Four engines and the burnt fuselage were found at the crash site. Eight crew members of the B-29 were taken prisoner by our Chinese comrades."  The crew members were:
     
    • Albright, SSgt. Richard Louis - POW/MIA/possibly KIA
    • Mast, A/1c Clifford Henry - POW/MIA (possibly transferred to prison in China)
    • Strieby, 2Lt. Francis A. - co-pilot - POW, repatriated
    • Brazil, 1Lt. Kenneth S. - POW, repatriated
    • Koski, A1c William B. - POW, repatriated
    • Harris, Capt. Theodore R. - POW, repatriated
    • Hand, A2c Donald L. - POW, repatriated
    • Evers, A1c Eugene B. - POW, repatriated
    • Rivers, SSgt. Bernard F. - POW, repatriated
    • Johansen, SSgt. Charles V. - POW, repatriated
    • Moreland, 1Lt. Joseph B. - POW, repatriated
    • Combs, A1c Edwin D. - POW, repatriated
    • Bass, A1c Kenneth H. - POW, repatriated
       
  • Southern Comfort (44-61749) - On November 07, 1950, this aircraft crash landed at Itazuke AFB in Japan following an in-flight fire.  The plane was written off because it was damaged beyond repair.  Two crew members were injured in the accident on November 07, 1950.
     
    • Goss, MSgt. Jack Morrison - injured*
    • Hardison, Capt. James A. - injured

    Jack M. Goss died in March of 2007. A newspaper article written at the time of his death provides some details about the crash of the "Southern Comfort":  "While flying aboard the plane Southern Comfort, it was hit and seriously damaged by enemy fire. Though severely burned on his hands and face and suffering from shock, Mr. Goss used his forearms to crank down the bomber's damaged wheels, enabling the plane to land. Mr. Goss spent two years in a burn unit and underwent 14 skin graft operations to repair his injured face. For his action in helping to save the B-29 and its crew, Mr. Goss was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross." 

    Also of note is the fact that this particular aircraft received major battle damage earlier in the war on September 19, 1950.
     

  • Southern Comfort (44-61810) -  On June 13, 1952, the aircraft departed Yokota Air Base, Honshu, Japan on an electronic surveillance mission. It was shot down by 2 Russian MiG-15's over the Sea of Japan south of Mys Ostrovnoy, 100 miles north of Hokkaido and 120 miles from the Russian coast. The official records state that the aircraft was on a classified surveillance mission of shipping activity over the Sea of Japan. The plane was followed by radar over the course of the flight until 1320 hours at which time the radar contact was lost. The aircraft failed to return to Yokota Air Base and although several attempts were made to establish radio contact, no communications from the crew were received. The missing aircraft was known to have three six-man and 11 one-man life rafts on board and sufficient food and medical supplies to care for all 12 crew members for three days. On June 14 1952, during the search, an empty six-man life raft was sighted, right side up, at a point about 100 miles off the Russian coast, but search planes were unable to salvage the raft due to prevailing conditions. An unconfirmed report indicated that a second six-man life raft was seen four miles south of the first raft, but this sighting could not be verified. The search continued until June 17, 1952 but no wreckage was found and no survivors were sighted.

    The 12 crew members were:
     
    • Becker, SSgt. Roscoe George (right scanner) - MIA
    • Berg, SSgt. Eddie R. (tail gunner) - MIA
    • Blizzard, SSgt. William A. (radio operator) - MIA
    • Bonura, SSgt. Leon F. (left scanner) - MIA
    • Busch, Maj. Samuel Nathan (aircraft commander) - MIA
    • Homer, MSgt. William Robert (flight engineer) - MIA
    • McDonnell, 1Lt. Robert J. (navigator) - MIA
    • Monserrat, SSgt. Miguel W. (central fire control gunner) - MIA
    • Moore, MSgt. David L. - MIA
    • Pillsbury, A1c Danny A. (camera operator) - MIA
    • Scully, 1Lt. James A. (pilot) - MIA
    • Service. Capt. Samuel D. (radio operator) - MIA
  • Star Duster/Rough Roman (44-69818) - The aircraft was low on fuel and it crash landed on July 7, 1953 during landing approach after returning from a combat mission.  There was poor weather at recovery airfields.  All 13 crew members were killed in the crash.  They were:
     
    • Abney, A/2c Donald Lee
    • Campbell, Lt. Col. Edward Everett
    • Davis, A/1c Earl Arthur
    • DeLancy, A2c John Glendale
    • Fleming, A2c Edward John
    • Harris, 1Lt. Ralph Lionel
    • Maples, A/1c Percy Jerome
    • McGuire, Capt. Charles Frederick
    • Pierson, 1Lt. Robert Leach
    • Thomas, A/1c James Clark
    • Vandarwarka, 1Lt. Clayton Wallace
    • Walker, 1Lt. Jack Earl
    • Wright, A/2c Kenneth E.
       
  • Stardust Four Zero (44-62217) - On January 13, 1953, while on a mission of dropping leaflets over enemy territory, the aircraft was attacked by 12 MiGs. Crew of 14 - Three crew members were killed and eleven were taken prisoner. Shot down on night mission. 11 of crew POW (Col Arnold's plane); released in 1955. The crew members were:
     
    • Arnold, Col. John Knox - commander of the 581st Air Resupply & Communications Wing (now deceased) - POW/repatriated
    • Baumer, Maj. William E. - instructor pilot from the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron - POW/repatriated
    • Benjamin, A/2c Harry M. - left scanner, 581st AR Squadron (now deceased) - POW/repatriated
    • Brown, T/Sgt. Howard W. - flight engineer, 581st AR Squadron (now deceased) - POW/repatriated
    • Brown, 2LT. Wallace L. - pilot, 581st AR Squadron - POW/repatriated
    • Buck, 1Lt. John W. - bombardier, 581st AR Squadron - POW/repatriated
    • Hart, A/2c Alvin Dale Jr. - tail gunner, 581st AR Squadron - held by Soviets after the war (name on 71 List)
    • Kiba, A/1c Steve E. - radio operator, 581st AR Squadron - POW/repatriated
    • Lewellyn, Capt. Elmer F. - navigator, 581st AR Squadron - POW/repatriated
    • Schmidt, A/2c Daniel C. - Central Fire Control (CFC) Scanner, 581st AR Squadron (now deceased) - POW/repatriated
    • Thompson, A/2c John W. - right scanner, 581st AR Squadron - POW/repatriated
    • Vaadi, Capt. Eugene J. - aircraft commander, 581st AR Squadron - POW/repatriated
    • Van Voorhis, Capt. Paul Edward - radar operator, 581st AR Squadron.  POW/held by Soviets after the war (name on 71 List)
    • Weese, 2Lt. Henry Douglas - radar operator, 581st AR Squadron.  POW/held by Soviets after the war (name on 71 List)

    For more information on this aircraft and what became of its personnel, see Newspaper Articles section of this web page.  See also Historically Speaking (by Herb Harper) on this web page.
     

  • Stateside Reject (44-62152) - This aircraft was battle damaged at K-14.  It crashed on November 15, 1950 during takeoff at Kadena and was written off as damaged beyond repair.   The crew was injured, but all were rescued.  It was attached to the 19th Bomb Wing. No further information has yet been found. 
     
  • Sunbonnet King (44-61815) - shot down by two Soviet LA-11 fighters near Yuri Island while on a photo mission over Northern Hokkaido on October 07, 1952.  Three regular crew members did not fly that day.  All eight remaining crew members were lost.  They included:
     
    • English, Capt. Eugene M. - pilot - MIA
    • Brock, 1Lt. Paul E. - co-pilot - MIA
    • Dunham, Capt. John R. "Chute" - navigator - remains returned by Soviets in 1993
    • Colgan, SSgt. Samuel A. - MIA
    • Neail, A2C Frank E. III - MIA
    • Hirsch, Sgt. John Arthur - MIA
    • Kendrick, A/2c Fred G. - MIA
    • Shipp, A/3c Thomas G.- MIA
       
  • Tail Wind/Burke's Jerks/Sweet Judy II (#45-21721).  On February 7, 1952, while departing on a combat mission, this aircraft crashed during snow three miles northwest of Yokota Air Base, Japan. KORWALD and other accident reports list only two crew members (Baker and Smith), who were both fatalities.*  The crew consisted of:
     
    • Baker, 1Lt. Allen Frisbee - bombardier - KIA
    • Belcher, Capt. Robert - navigator - KIA
    • Caron, Sgt. Edward - gunner
    • Crutchfield, TSgt. Robert - engineer - KIA
    • Eberhart, Cpl. Edward - gunner
    • Grable, Col. John - aircraft commander - KIA
    • Heffernan, Sgt. Neal - gunner - KIA
    • Henry, 1Lt. Robert - VO - KIA
    • Imsdahl, Cpl. Owen J. - central fire control
    • Johnson, 2Lty. Richard - pilot - KIA
    • Setser, Cpl. Walter - right gunner
    • Smith, Maj. Daniel D. Jr. - IP - KIA
    • Thompson, MSgt. Howard - cc

    *When B-29 veteran Earl "Mac" McGill was asked by the KWE if a B-29 could be flown by only two people, his reply was: "No. Minimum flight crew required a Flight Engineer to start engines and set various controls that pilots did not have available. Regulations also required two scanners. It is also highly unlikely that they would have flown without a navigator and radar operator. Data (including photos) on Tail Wind has always been questionable. The photos seem to indicate WWII markings (or lack of). A possible reason that only two are listed is that the rest bailed out without casualty (also highly unlikely). Most likely is records goof."
     

  • TB-29 (44-86382) - On December 18, 1953 this USAF Boeing TB-29 Superfortress, formerly Silverplate Boeing B-29-55-MO, 44-86382, of the 7th Radar Calibration Squadron, Sioux City Air Force Base, Iowa, was destroyed by post-crash fire when the pilot and co-pilot mistook Ogden Municipal Airport, Utah, for nearby Hill Air Force Base, put down on a much shorter runway, overran the threshold, bounced across a deep ditch, 10-foot-wide (3.0 m) canal, crossed a highway, and came to rest in pieces, followed by immediate fire. There was one fatality on crew and two others were injured.
     
  • TB-29 (44-87656) - Based at Griffiss AFB, Rome, New York, this aircraft was involved in a taxiing accident at Wright-Patterson AFB on November 21, 1952.  The pilot was Homer S. McCollum.
     
  • The Fry' In Pan/Sucoshi Ni (44-69812) - This aircraft received AAA damage while conducting a bombing mission over Pyongyang.  Damage was to the engine and outboard left wing.  It landed safely on its home base that day, March 01, 1951.
     
  • The Outlaw (44-65306) - According to Earl "Mac" McGill, the co-pilot on the B-29s final flight day, the aircraft had taken a hit from a Soviet MiG 15 cannon to the right outboard engine on a previous combat mission.  The engine had been replaced, but several test flights thereafter were aborted due to failed run-up checks.  On October 2, 1951, just at take off, flames came from the #1 engine.  The left wing clipped a storage tank located on top of a slight hill at the air base.  The plane smashed through a scrubby, sub-tropical forest, the nose gun mount and bomb sights broke off and were flung into the cockpit, the nose gear strut sheared and was driven into the cabin ceiling, and the fuselage broke in two.  The crew was five men that day and all escaped injury.  The crew members were:
     
    • Griffin, Joe - Tail Gunner
    • McGill, Mac -Pilot
    • Phillips, Paul - Central Fire Control
    • Sexton, Jim - Flight Engineer
    • Thompson, Don - Aircraft Commander
       
  • Tiger Lil (42-94000) - shot down over Sea of Japan by two Russian MiGs on November 07, 1954 (after truce was signed) while on a routine photo mapping mission.  After the aircraft caught fire, the eleven-man crew bailed out.  All but one survived.  The aircraft crashed on the island of Hokkaido, 10 miles east of the town of Kenebetsu.  It descended into an area at Nemuro, Japan and crashed into an unoccupied house.  The plane was a total loss.  Its crew members were:
     
    • Angulo, 2Lt. Sigfredo - pilot - KIA
    • Berry, A/1c Robert E.
    • Dalton, A/1c John W.C. II
    • Fieth, Capt. Anthony
    • Lentz, A/2c Walter K.
    • Oliver, 1Lt. David N.
    • Rollins, 2Lt. Harry L.
    • Sechler, 2Lt. Henry J.
    • Taylor, Sgt. Harold R.
    • Weimer, A/3c Earl E.
    • Whalen, A/3c Wallace B.
       
  • To Each His Own (44-62207) - Diverted to K-2 due to poor weather conditions at Yokota Air Base, Japan.  Landed on runway under construction.  Substantial damage to aircraft but no injuries to crew.  The accident took place at Taegu, Korea on June 09, 1952.  Crew members included (incomplete listing):
     
    • Roche, 2Lt. John D.
    • Sputler, 1Lt. Ernest C. Jr.
       
  • Tondemonai/Eight Ball (44-62237) -  At an altitude of 150 feet following take-off on a combat mission, #4 engine caught on fire.  At an altitude of 500 feet, #2 engine caught fire.  Bombs were salvoed.  Then two explosions from #2 engine occurred.  The aircraft went out of control.  The crew started bailing out at an altitude of approximately  650 feet.  There were three fatalities.  The final flight crew members were:
     
    • Bowman, 1Lt. Howard L. (pilot)
    • Coyne, 1Lt. Kerrin (gunner)* - died January 15, 2008
    • Funk, 1Lt. Orville (radar operator) - fatality
    • Gallant, 2Lt. C.W. Jr.
    • Galligan, Edward (left gunner)
    • Gardner, Capt. Richard A, (aircraft commander)
    • Hassing, Capt. Doug H. (navigator)
    • Hathaway, SSgt. James W. "Wally" (flight engineer) - fatality (remained in aircraft)
    • Higley, A/1c Howard M. (radio operator) (fatality)
    • Quackenbush, 1Lt. Bob (bombardier)
    • Rotolo, A/1c Stephan (right gunner)
    • Steele, A/1c William (CFC gunner)

    *Kerrin Coyne wrote a detailed account about this plane crash. It can be found on RB-29 Net.
     

  • Top of the Mark (44-69763) - Damaged on March 30, 1951, but was repaired and returned to battle.  The plane shows up in 1953-53 mission reports.
     
  • Trouble Brewer/Snake Bit (44-86390) - This aircraft crash-landed on its 9th mission on June 25, 1952.  Weather conditions did not permit the aircraft to land at its planned return base.  It crashed at Ashia AFB due to lack of fuel and a short runway.  Its main gear stopped the plane from going over a 500-foot cliff.  There was no loss of life, but among the seriously injured was the bombardier, who put his feet through the nose glass.  The crew* included:
     
    • Allan, Cpl. Dean S. - gunner
    • Cox, Cpl. Jerry - radio operator
    • Crandall, Lt. Horace - bombardier (injured)
    • English, Cpl. Joe - gunner
    • Funk, Capt. Donald O. - aircraft commander
    • Justice, Sgt. - flight engineer (injured - hurt his back)
    • Lundell, Cpl. "J" Lindroth - gunner
    • Reasor, Lt. Lee - navigator
    • Russell, Cpl. Kenneth - gunner
    • Robb, Lt. Donald - radar (died 5/25/2015 - Memorial Day)
    • Sorensen, Lt. Robert - pilot

    *According to Ken Russell, who was on this aircraft, after the crash some changes were made to the crew.  Lt. Frank Zitano was bombardier, Sergeant Eversol was engineer, and Max Kinnard was the aircraft commander.
     

  • Typhoon Goon II (44-69770) - On October 26, 1952, while making a low-level penetration of Typhoon Wilma, this aircraft went down 300 miles east of Leyte in the Philippines during a 14-hour over-water flight to obtain information about Typhoon Wilma. The aircraft was attached to the 54th Weather Reconnaissance Squadron at Andersen AFB on Guam. The original "Typhoon Goon" was Aircraft 45-21838, which was stationed on Guam from January 1948 until December 1950, during which time she flew at least 25 typhoon missions. When Aircraft 770 arrived on Guam in January of 1951, she was given the name "Typhoon Goon II" to keep the tradition alive. The crew's last radio message indicated they were close to the eye and were attempting to make a low level fix. They reported that their radar altimeter had "burned out", and that they were going to fly in anyway, using just pressure altimetry to maintain the proper altitude. This was an extremely dangerous prospect, since Wilma was a Category 5 super typhoon with 185 mph winds at the time of penetration, and had a very sharp change in pressure near the eye. If the plane was attempting to fly at a constant pressure altitude, the pilot would have been forced to perform a steep descent in the eyewall. It is likely the aircraft hit a strong downdraft that carried them into the sea, or that severe turbulence caused the aircraft to go out of control, with insufficient time for the pilot to recover.

    The crew was reported missing when the aircraft failed to arrive at Clark AFB at 10:00 p.m. that day, the estimated time of fuel exhaustion.  Surface winds in the typhoon were 125 knots, 144 miles per hour--a category 5.  Reports indicated that native fishermen witnessed a four-engine aircraft plunge into the sea and quickly sink into the water six to eight miles off San Ricardo Point, the southern tip of Leyte Island.  No parachutes were observed.  Concentrated efforts to recover wreckage or debris failed.  Ten airmen were onboard, and their remains were not recovered:
     
    • Baird, Capt. Donald M.
    • Brewton, A/1C Alton Beverly Jr.
    • Burchell, 1Lt. William D. - navigator
    • Colgan, A/1C William - flight mechanic/scanner
    • Fasullo, A/1C Anthony J. - radio operator
    • Fontaine, MSgt. Edward H. - radio operator
    • Harrell, Maj. Sterling L. - aircraft commander
    • Pollak, Capt. Frank J. - navigator
    • Verrill, A/3C Rodney E. - weather equipment operator
       
  • United Notions (44-62084)* - This aircraft was hit by AAA on September 09, 1950 and exploded in mid-air near Wolbong-ni.  Five chutes cleared the aircraft.  The crew members were:
     
    • Cherry, SSgt. Clarence Martin - of Salem, Oregon - POW
    • Duncan, SSgt. James Harold - of Spokane, Washington - POW
    • Faeth, Sgt. William Patrick - of St. Paul, Minnesota - KIA
    • Harrell, SSgt. Virgil Bryan Jr. - of Miami, Florida - KIA
    • Hoit, Capt. Zane M. - KIA, remains returned in Operation Glory.  He was the pilot.
    • Hoult, SSgt. Arthur W. - MIA
    • Hyatt, Capt. Don H. - MIA
    • Logan, Capt. Samuel P. Jr. - MIA
    • Oyler, Capt. Ernest R. - MIA
    • Spence, Maj. Marvin J. - MIA
    • Williamson, SSgt. Kenneth - MIA
       
  • United Notions (44-27326)* - Crashed into a mountain near Taeam-dong approximately 3-5 northeast of K-2 (Taegu) on September 13, 1951.  The pilot of this "United Notions" aircraft was McNeely.  All 14 on board were killed.  The lost were:
     
    • Bakich. MSgt. Michael A.
    • Brodeur, Cpl. Ronald F.
    • Brown, 1Lt. Donald D.
    • Capron, TSgt. Donald V.
    • Carrara, 2Lt. Jack N.
    • Clayton, Cpl. Raymond L.
    • Findel, Sgt. Gerald K.
    • Hande, Pfc. Wallace D.
    • McNeeley, Capt. Albert N. - pilot
    • Morgan, 1Lt. Warren L.
    • Pettreira, Cpl. Richard J.
    • Peterson, 2Lt. Robert D.
    • Rush, 2Lt. Malcolm L.
    • Spann, Cpl. John
       
  • Vicious Roomer (44-62042) - This aircraft took off from Yokota Air Base, Japan on March 28, 1952, for a combat mission over North Korea. During the flight to North Korea, the aircraft experienced mechanical problems (engine fire) over the Sea of Japan and the pilot ordered the crew to bail out. After five of the crewmen bailed out, the pilots regained control of the situation and successfully flew the aircraft back to Japan where they landed safely. Of the five men who bailed out, only one survived. The crew included (partial list):
     
    • Knott, Cpl. Robert M. - remains recovered
    • McIntosh, Rudy - only surviving member of bailout
    • McManus, Sgt. Phillip - remains recovered
    • Rainey, Cpl. Samuel H. - remains recovered
    • Zellars, SSgt. Elliot - remains recovered
       
  • WB29 (44-61640) - This aircraft plunged into the sea on February 26, 1952 while on a typhoon tracking mission.  Its number one engine burst into flames.  The B-29 was based at the 54th SRS (M) Weather at Andersen AFB, Guam.  Its crew included:
     
    • Deese, Sgt. James L. - survivor
    • Erickson, Capt. Edward N. - survivor
    • Gendusa, 2Lt. Vincent P. - Missing
    • Johnson, Sgt. Kenneth D. - survivor
    • Krueger, 1Lt. Walter - Missing
    • Leach, MSgt. Frank P. - Missing
    • Parker, SSgt. Donald E. - Missing
    • Shaw, 1Lt. Robert J. - Missing
    • Toland, Cpl. Francis X. - Missing

    Information about this aircraft loss, survivors and lost personnel can be found in extensive detail by clicking HERE.  This link leads to a transcript of the search and rescue efforts.
     

  • WB29 (44-87756) - Attached to the 55th SRS (M) Weather at McClellan AFB, California, this B-29 weather plane crashed on April 05, 1952 as it approached for landing at McClellan Air Force Base, Sacramento, California. The crash occurred three miles short of the runway after returning from a 19-hour flight. The following crew members died:
     
    • Acebedo, Maj. Bruce
    • Fose, SSgt. Carlton J.
    • Fultz, MSgt. Edwin M.
    • Hopkins, Capt. Guilford A.
    • King, SSgt. Elbert E.
    • Kizer, Capt. Robert L.
    • Lam, 2Lt. August I.
    • Schulz, SSgt. Hayden C.
    • Shook, TSgt. George R.
    • Winstead, Capt. Leonard B.

    TEN ARE KILLED IN PLANE CRASH.

    Sacramento, Cal., April 6. 1952 -- (UP) -- An air force B-29 weather plane, returning from a 19-hour flight, crashed on a farm three miles short of the McClellan air base runway Saturday night, killing all 10 crew members. An air force spokesman said the big bomber received routine landing instructions three minutes before it crashed and gave no indication of trouble at that time. The four-engined plane apparently caught fire in the air and smashed into a pasture at a 45-degree angle. The main sections of the craft remained intact, but the wreckage was a roaring mass of flames by the time crash crews from the air base reached the scene minutes later.
    The air force announced the names of the dead as:

    Major BRUCE ACEBEDO, pilot, Del Paso Heights, Cal.
    Captain GUILFORD A HOPKINS, weather observer, North Sacramento.
    Captain L. E. WINSTEAD, navigator, Hardy, Ark.
    Second Lieutenant AUGUST I. LAM, navigator, San Francisco.
    Master Sergeant EDWIN M. FULIZ, radio operator, Milroy, Pa.
    Technical Sergeant GEORGE R. SHOOK, flight engineer, North Highlands, Cal.
    Staff Sergeant ELBERT E. KING, drop sound operator, Del Paso Heights, Cal.
    Staff Sergeant HAYDEN C. SCHULZ, flight mechanic, North Sacramento.
    Staff Sergeant CARLTON J. FOSE, Appleton, Wis.
    Captain ROBERT L. KIZER, copilot, Sacramento.

    Captain KIZER, whose home station is Travis Air Base, Cal., was getting flight time while serving on temporary duty at McClellan field. The B-29 was attached to the Fiftieth strategic reconnaissance squadron. An eyewitness to the crash, EVERETT FURMAN, JR., confirmed the plane was afire before it struck the ground. "I saw flames in the sky, and when I stopped my car I saw the plane come down at a 45-degree angle," FURMAN said. "If smashed into a pasture about half a mile from me." GEORGE SHULER, a civilian member of the McClellan fire department, said he and fellow firemen saw the flames from the base and were en route to the scene before an alarm was sounded. "When we arrived we found the plane mostly intact," he said. "It looked like it had just nosed down and started to burn. Some pieces of debris and bomb bay doors were scattered around the area but the main bulk of the plane was in one piece."
    SHULER said the fire fighters were hampered by jammed traffic and crowds of spectators who were attracted to the scene by the flames. An air force board of inquiry was slated to investigate the cause of the crash.

    Billings Gazette Montana 1952-04-07
     

  • WB-29 (45-21872) - On September 25, 1953, this WB-29 (converted from B-29-100-BW 45-21872) was destroyed in a crash near Eielson AFB, Alaska, while assigned to the 58th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium), Weather.
     
    • Baker, Capt. Charles F. - weather observer (only fatality)
    • Barrett, William A. - pilot (survivor)
       
  • Wolf Pack (44-86343) - This aircraft was shot down by AAA September 13, 1952 over Suiho Hydroelectric Plant, Korea. Recently released files show that it was shot down by a MiG-15 flown by a Soviet pilot. Eleven of the twelve crew were MIA (presumed KIA).  The crew included:
     
    • Bloesch, 1Lt. Fred E. - MIA
    • Brown, MSgt. Nelson Marion - MIA
    • Hobday, A/1c Jimmie R. -MIA
    • Kelly, 1Lt. Henry Bradford - MIA
    • Kelly, A/1c James William - MIA
    • LeBaron, A/1c James R. - MIA
    • Lowe, Capt. James A. Jr. - MIA
    • Parker, A/1c Fred Jr. - Survived/taken POW
    • Peters, 1Lt. Spiro J. - MIA
    • Phillis, 1Lt. William K. - MIA
    • Royer, 1Lt. Ted Grover - MIA
    • Trosclair, James Oliver - MIA

    To learn more about the missions of Wolf Pack #44-86343, click HERE to read a letter sent to Dane Hays, the son of crew member Jimmie Hobday. The author of the letter, former Korean War POW Fred Parker, was the only crew member to survive.
     

  • Wrights' Delights, They Chosen Flew  (44-86392) - At 0131 hours on November 19, 1952, this aircraft was on a bombing mission over Songhon.  On return it was hit by fighters.  The aircraft went down approximately eight miles north of Chodo Island after fire and order to bail out.  Maj. William F. Sawyer, aircraft commander, landed safely on a friendly island.  He stated that he ordered the crew to follow normal bailout procedure and was satisfied that he was the last man to leave the aircraft.  Major Sawyer saw the aircraft hit the water approximately a half mile north of Chodo.  The crew included the following:
     
    • Bird, Capt. Robert James (navigator) - MIA
    • Jensen, TSgt. Morton Henry (ECM operator) - MIA*
    • Keene, Maj. Kassel Monford (passenger) - MIA
    • McLoughlin, A/2c Robert John (tail gunner) - MIA
    • Nichols, A.2c James Lorence (central fire control) - MIA
    • Peck, Capt. James Kenneth (bombardier) - MIA
    • Porter, A/2c James Howard (radio operator) - MIA
    • Sawyer, Maj. William F. (aircraft commander) - landed alive safely
    • Sestak, 2Lt. Myron Frederick (passenger) - KIA, body recovered on the North Korean
    • Swingle, 1Lt. Beverly A. (pilot) - KIA, body picked up in the water off the coast of Chodo mainland shot through the head
    • Thompson, A/1c Raymond (left gunner) - MIA
    • Tiller, MSgt. Horace Nelson (flight engineer) - MIA
    • Whitman, A/1c William Henry (right gunner) - MIA
    • Winchester, Lt. Alan (V.O.) - picked up alive in the water off Chodo on the 19th

    *According to Richard W. (Dick) Iler, a B-29 left gunner who roomed with Jensen and had the bunk next to his, "Jensen had volunteered to extend his tour two or three times, and was lost on his 100th mission.  A celebration of this accomplishment, with bells and whistles and the press in attendance at Wing Headquarters was planned for Jensen's return, but for obvious reason fell flat."

 
 
 
 
 

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