Navy Accounts of the Korean War
Sinking of the USS Partridge AMS-31

 
Close this window

 

Introduction

The following information was obtained from various sources on the Internet, including the Department of the Navy - US Naval Historical Center.  To add other information, write to Lynnita.

The Partridge was laid down as YMS-437 on 3 October 1944 by J. M. Martinac Corp., Tacoma, Washington; launched 22 April 1945; and commissioned 25 July 1945, Lt. (j.g.) Gilbert Q. McKinley, USNR, in command. Upon fitting out, YMS-437 reported to the U.S. Pacific Fleet for duty on 16 August. Assigned to the First Fleet, YMS-437 conducted operations in the Hawaiian Islands area and along the U.S. West Coast. She was reclassified and named Partridge (AMS-31) 18 February 1947.

Partridge joined the U.S. forces during the Korean War in late 1950.  She was ordered to assist in clearing Wonsan Harbor of mines.  The little minesweeper struck a mine and sank 2 February 1951. Eight of her crew were killed and six were wounded. One died en route to a hospital ship.

Readers should keep in mind that there were two ships with the name USS Partridge.  On June 11, 1944, off the coast of Normandy, the original one (USS Partridge ATO-138)was torpedoed by a German E-boat, killing 35 of the 90 crew members and seriously injuring many of the survivors. USS Partridge AMS-31 hit a mine during the Korean War.


Casualties of the Sinking of the USS Partridge (8 American fatalities, including four MIA)

  • Clark, Lt. jg. Boyers Morgan, USNR.  His ship was sunk in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 02/02/51.  Lt. JG Clark was the Commanding Officer. Boyers Morgan Clark Jr. was born April 18, 1924, in Elkins, West Virginia, the eldest child of Boyers Morgan Sr. and Marian Robison Clark. As a young man Boyers, who was called “Morgan,” participated in the Boy Scouts, reaching the rank of Eagle Scout, and was active in the YMCA. He attended Elkins High School and while a student was president of the Hi-Y Club. He graduated in 1942. He attended Wayne University in Detroit, Northwestern University in Chicago, and Columbia University in New York as a student of the Navy’s V-12 program and received a Bachelor of Science degree. After graduating he was commissioned as an ensign in the Navy. During World War II, Ensign Clark served in the Iwo Jima, Okinawa and Coral Sea engagements. After being discharged from the Navy, he enlisted again. On February 2, 1951, he was serving as commander of the USS Partridge, a minesweeper, when the vessel hit a mine as it entered Kangnung Harbor, Korea, and sank. At first listed as missing, Lieutenant Clark later was officially listed as dead. His body was not recovered, and his name is on the Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial.  Before his death, Morgan had married Bernice Baker. They became the parents of two children: Cheryl Lee and Boyers Morgan Clark III.
     
  • Gifford, Clyde Marvin, Brazoria, TX
    E3 Gifford, USN, served in the U.S.S. Partridge-AMS-31. His ship was sunk in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 02/02/51. MIA.  He was born February 27, 1929 in Texas, a son of Scott W. Gifford (1893-1990) and Ethel A. Cross Gifford (1895-1961).  His siblings were Mrs. Willis Gordon (Wanda Lucille) Pruett (1923-2009), DeLloyd Gifford, Thelma Gifford Woodruff, and Venita Gifford Mitcham.
     
  • Hoschler, Stephen Vincent "Shorty", Akron, IA.  Petty Officer 1C Hoschler (Quartermaster First Class) was born January 22, 1919, in Akron.  He graduated from Akron High School and then he enlisted in the U.S. Navy in November 1941, a month before the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor.  He served in the Pacific and Asiatic theaters during World War II. During the atomic bomb tests at Bikini, he served on the flagship McKinley. He had a service record of nine years in the Navy.

    ---

    Akron Register-Tribune
    February 8, 1951

    STEPHEN HOSCHLER IS FIRST AKRON CASUALTY IN THE KOREAN WAR
    Navy Veteran Killed When Ship Hits Mine In Korean Waters Friday

    "The first casualty for an Akron serviceman in the Korea War was announced when Mrs. Henrietta Hoschler, of this city was notified that her son, Stephen V. Hoschler, Quartermaster, first class, USN, had been killed when his ship, the USS Partridge, a minesweeper, had struck a mine and sunk last Friday while conducting and clearing the way for battleship Missouri, off the coast of Korea, where it has been bombarding Korean ports. Three other seamen were killed and four others are missing in the sinking of the Partridge.

    Stephen V. Hoschler, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hoschler, was born here January 22, 1919. He graduated for Akron high school. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy in November, 1941, a month before the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, and served in the Pacific and Asiatic theaters during World War II. During the atomic bomb tests at Bikini, he served on the Flagship McKinley. He had a service record of nine years in the Navy. A week ago Mrs. Hoschler received a letter from Stephen, in which he said things were getting plenty hot there. The young man last visited home folks here several months ago.

    It is coincidence that Stephen’s cousin, Albert E. Hoschler, for whom the local Legion Post was named, was the first Akron soldier killed in World War I, in France.

    Surviving Stephen, in addition to his mother, are five brothers, William of Cincinnati, O.; Leo, of Fresno, Cal.; Edward and D.K., of Ontario, Cal.; and Lowell, of Akron; and two sisters, Mrs. J. F. Cheney, of Sioux City, and Mrs. Bernard Callahan, of Elk Point. The deep sympathy of the community goes out to these relatives in their bereavement.

    A memorial mass was said at 9:00 o’clock this (Thursday) morning in St. Patrick’s Catholic church, of which the deceased seaman was a member.

    ---
     
  • Japanese Mess Boy (#1)- killed instantly while fixing meal in galley
     
  • Japanese Mess Boy (#2) - Killed instantly while fixing meal in galley
     
  • Julian, Scott Milholland Jr. - Born September 2, 1926,  Lt. jg. Julian was the son of Scott Milholland Julian Sr. (1896-1974) and Judith Field Julian (1899-1982) of Little Rock, Arkansas.  He enlisted out of Memphis, Tennessee.
     
  • Pringle, Theodore Baskerville Jr. "Ted", Marysville, CA
    E3 Pringle, USN, served in the U.S.S. Partridge-AMS-31. His ship was sunk in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 02/02/51.  He died while being transferred to a hospital ship.
     
  • Rapien, William George "Bill", Mt. Healthy, OH.  Born January 4, 1929, he was an engineman (Fireman E-3) on the Partridge when he was killed.  He was a son of Frank J. Rapien (1895-1975) and Marina M. Wolfer Rapien (1896-1962).  His siblings were twin Frank H. Rapien (1929-2009), Mrs. Red (Rose Marie) Meiners (1921-1999), Mrs. William (Dot) Effler, Mrs. Tony (Joan) Fluegeman, Mrs. Don (Mary Ann) Wertz, and Mrs. Joe (Eileen) Kruse.
     
  • Sisneros, Bennie, Albuquerque, NM
    E2 Sisneros, USN, served in the U.S.S. Partridge-AMS-31. His ship was sunk in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 02/02/51. He was born December 29, 1928 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. MIA.  He was unmarried.
     
  • Thorpe, Will Roy Jr., Redding, CA
    Born on August 15, 1924, Electrician's Mate 1C (EM1) Thorpe served on the USS General William Mitchell before being transferred to the Partridge.

Survivors List (There were 20.)  List incomplete as of 5/04/2017.

  1. Bedrosian, John
  2. Haines, William D. - Engineman 1c
  3. Scanlon, Roger - lost his right leg.  Was hospitalized in Oakland for nine months.

Silver Star Citations

Fuller, Lt. Robert C. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Robert C. Fuller, Jr. (NSN: 0-432656), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy during mine sweeping operations at Wonsan in the Korean theater during the period 10 to 31 October 1950. As Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Partridge (AMS-31), and while sweeping enemy mine fields in the face of heavy fire from enemy coast defense batteries, by his inspiring leadership and professional competence, he contributed directly to the efficient operation of his ship and the successful clearance of mine free channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan.

General Orders: Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1073 (November 17, 1950)
Action Date: October 10-31, 1950
Service: Navy
Rank: Lieutenant
Company: Commanding Officer
Division: U.S.S. Partridge (AMS-31)

Haines, Engineman 1C William D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Engineman First Class William D. Haines, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while attached to and serving on board the U.S.S. Partridge (AMS-31) on 2 February 1951. When that ship struck an enemy mine while engaged in minesweeping operations in the Korean Combat Zone, two men were seriously injured and pinned down in the wreckage of the pilot house. Despite the short time this type of vessel usually stayed afloat after striking a mine he quickly climbed the wreckage, and with the aid of another, successfully rescued two men. Not until the vessel began to sink rapidly did he abandon ship. By his aggressive initiative coupled with complete disregard for his own safety, Engineman First Class Haines contributed greatly to the safety of his shipmates, and his zealous devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

General Orders: Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1221 (August 4, 1951).

 

Close this window
 

2002-2016 Korean War Educator. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use of material is prohibited.

- Contact Webmaster with questions or comments related to web site layout.
- Contact Lynnita for Korean War questions or similar informational issues.
- Website address: www.koreanwar-educator.org
 

Hit Counter