Topics - Bronze Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "H"

 
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Haakonson, CPL Gerald (3rd ID)

Haas, MAJ Albert I. (USMC)

Haase, CPL William L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 84 - 1 November 1950

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Corporal William L. Haase, RA19350416, Armor, United States Army, a member of Company A, 72d Tank Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 31 August 1950 in the vicinity of Chakkyeaz, Korea. On that date he was a crewman in a tank platoon attached to a rifle company in a defensive position. The enemy had penetrated the line forcing the rifle company back, thus leaving the tanks without infantry support. It was imperative that this line be reformed at once or not only would the tanks be lost, but the whole line of defense would be endangered. Knowing this, Corporal Haase volunteered as a member of a patrol whose mission was to contact and rally the outnumbered rifle company. Supported by two tanks, the patrol made its way through intense enemy artillery and small arms fire and succeeded in reforming the line of defense and recovering the ground that had been lost. The courageous actions of Corporal Haase on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States. Entered the military service from Montana.

Hackett, CAPT Allen P. (24th ID) (posthumous)

General Orders No. 47 - 20 July 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

Captain Allen P. Hackett, 0-422834, Infantry, United States Army, at Taepyong-ni, Korea, on 16 July 1950, was assigned as Adjutant of the First Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment. At about 0800 hours on that date the Battalion Command Post was subjected to mass attacks of several waves of enemy infantry. In the resulting confusion, the personnel in the vicinity of the Command Post became disorganized. Captain Hackett calmly, and in the face of intense small arms fire, organized these persons into an effective fighting force which engaged the enemy and repulsed his attacks, thus keeping intact the Command Post of Battalion. Captain Hackett's calmness under fire and his personal courage and heroism inspired those about him so that his efforts in repulsing the enemy attacks was successful. After securing the Command Post area, Captain Hackett continued to lead men in an attack against enemy positions until he was killed by small arms fire. By his actions he brought great credit to himself and to American arms.

Haddux, PFC Hoy L. (25th ID) (Co. H, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Hafner, SGT Albert F. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 240 - 22 October 1950

Sergeant Albert F. Hafner, RA32866424, Quartermaster Corps, 25th Quartermaster Company, United States Army.  As section sergeant of a quartermaster truck platoon from 25 September to 8 October 1950 during the Korean conflict, Sergeant Hafner served with distinction.  During the rapid advance of the leading elements of the Division it was necessary for all supplies to be sent forward from the railhead by motor transport, a distance over 150 miles.  By maintaining a maximum number of vehicles operating over this route despite the constant threat of enemy action and mechanical failure, Sergeant Hafner greatly assisted materially in accomplishing the mission of his platoon.  Sergeant Hafner's untiring devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of the American soldier.  Entered the military service from Ohio.

Hageboeck, John H. (2nd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 80 - 28 October 1950

The Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Bronze Star Medal with “V” device is awarded to Captain John H. Hageboeck, 01175728, Artillery, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters, 37th Field  Artillery Battalion; 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himse1f by heroic achievement on 23 August 1950 in the vicinity of Changpyong-Dong, Korea. On this date he was a member of a Fire Direction Section relaying fire missions to his artillery battalion. The infantry, which the artillery battalion was supporting, had been forced to withdraw to new defensive positions by a fanatic enemy attack that was supported by intense artillery fire. The enemy forces had broken through the infantry’s right flank and gained control of dominating high ground from which position the Fire Direction Section was brought under heavy mortar and rifle fore. Even though the section received several casualties, Captain Hageboeck continued to perform his duties in a cool and collected manner and refused to seek shelter. The example which he set enabled the section to continue its functions and the artillery support thus made possible aided materially in stopping the enemy drive. Captain Hageboeck’s courage and heroic action reflect great credit upon h1mself and are in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Hagen, CPL Walter H. (25th ID) (Co. H, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Hagerich, PVT Charles (25th ID) (Co. D, 27th Inf. Regt.) (posthumous)

Hagerman, MSGT David O. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 87 - 5 November 1950

Master Sergeant David O. Hagerman, RA32234403, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 37h Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 9 September 1950 in the vicinity of Poncho, Korea.  During the early morning hours of this date, the enemy launched a determined attack with numerically superior forces against the positions of one of our infantry companies.  One of the positions of the company had been overrun and the enemy was forming for a breakthrough when Sergeant Hagerman with utter disregard for his personal safety, moved to a vantage point in the assaulted position, and directed artillery fire against the enemy.  After the initial penetration of the line had been closed, he moved to a more exposed position and while under small arms, mortar and grenade fire, called for and directed friendly artillery over his own position, completely breaking the enemy's attack.  The heroism displayed by Sergeant Hagerman on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from California.

Hagerman, CPL Arthur E. (25th ID) (Co. A, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Hahn, PVT Willard G. (3rd ID)

Haith, CPL David A. (24ID)

By direction of the President, Corporal David A. Haith, RA17252469, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company A, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal with V device for heroic action near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. After the successful assault crossing of the Naktong River, his platoon was pinned down on a narrow strip of beach by accurate enemy fire. In the ensuing exchange of fire, the limited supply of ammunition initially carried across the river was expended. Answering a call for volunteers, Corporal Haith and three other soldiers left their positions of relative safety, exposed themselves to the withering fire, crossed the river to the ammunition supply point and then, with their vitally needed supplies, re-crossed to their platoon’s exposed position. His courage, unhesitant devotion to duty and disregard for his own safety contributed materially to the success of his platoon’s mission and reflect great credit upon himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered service from Auburn, Nebraska.

Hale, MSGT Charles B. (24ID)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - 9 July 1954

Master Sergeant Charles B. Hale, Quartermaster Corps (then Infantry), United States Army, a member of Company C, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic conduct in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Sonju, Korea, on or about 21 September 1950. Although assigned as a platoon sergeant, Sergeant Hale voluntarily accompanied one of the squads which had been given a particularly hazardous mission during a night attack on Sonju. Fearlessly he led his squad through the streets of the city, effected a surprise attack on an enemy self-propelled 88-mm gun position eliminated one of the guns, and killed the crew before the weapon could be brought into action. He rapidly led his men in a surprise attack on enemy troops located in buildings along the street and caused heavy enemy casualties. His squad then joined with a tank infantry team which had attacked over a separate route. Sergeant Hale's courageous actions and outstanding leadership contributed materially to the successful accomplishment of the mission and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Hale, SGT Frank L. (1CAV)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 63 - 27 March 1951

Sgt. Frank L. Hale, RA45036355, Armor, United States Army, Company A, 71st Heavy Tank Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, 11 July 1950 to 20 September 1950.  For meritorious achievement in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States during the period indicated.  Entered federal service from Indiana.

Hale, CAPT Robert E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Haleamau, SGT Julian (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 253 - 28 October 1950

Sergeant Julian Haleamau, RA30117907, Infantry, Company G, 5th Infantry, United States Army.  On 4 September 1950 when numerically superior hostile forces attacked the company position near Chindong-ni, Korea, Sergeant Haleamau was painfully wounded.  Declining treatment, he remained with his platoon and joined in a counter-attack which drove the enemy forces from its surrounding position.  Only when the position had been secured did Sergeant Haleamau consent to evacuation.  The dauntless courage, grim determination and unflagging devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Haleamau are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from the Territory of Hawaii.

Haley, Dennis Francis (USAF)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Bronze Star Medal to First Lieutenant Dennis Francis Haley (AFSN: 0-2071159), United States Air Force, for meritorious service to the United States from 22 February 1952 to 4 September 1953 while a prisoner of War in North Korea. Although subject to extreme privation, meager rations, forced marches, incessant interrogations, brutal beatings, sadistic torture, long periods of solitary confinement and threatened execution, Lieutenant Haley, by his indomitable courage and resolute resistance completely defeated any attempt of the North Koreans and Chinese Communists to obtain security information they desired. His exemplary conduct and unequivocal conviction that the forces of freedom would ultimately prevail over an enemy ruthlessly avowed to destroy the independence of mankind, encouraged and inspired other prisoners to resist the insidious demands of their captors. By his outstanding leadership, heroic self-sacrifice and ceaseless opposition to the North Koreans and Chinese Communists, Lieutenant Haley has reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Hall, MSGT John Francis

Hall, PFC Walter J. (3rd ID)

Hall, CAPT William (25th ID) (Med. Co., 24th Inf. Regt.)

Hallman, SGT 1C William E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hallock, CPL Frank D. Jr. (7ID, Co. E, 17th Rgt.) (with V)

Halter, SGT James L.

Halvorson, SGT 1C Curtis H. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hambleton, 1LT James R. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hamby, PVT Billy W. (3rd ID)

Hamill, SGT Willard D. (Co. F, 7th Inf. Rgt., 3rd ID)

Sergeant Willard D. Hamill, US52190535, Infantry, Company "F", 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army, is cited for meritorious service in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in Korea during the period 14 April 1953 to 19 April 1954. Sergeant Hamill, serving as Automatic Rifleman and later as Squad Leader, performed his duties in a superior manner. His tireless enthusiasm and determination in training and supervising his squad members contributed materially to the company's high morale and close coordination despite adverse conditions. Sergeant Hamill's aggressive leadership qualities, resourcefulness and calm manner while under fire were an incentive to his men and gained for him their unwavering confidence and cooperation. The smooth operation and dependability of the platoon in combat were largely a result of his relentless efforts and sound, decisive judgment. Sergeant Hamill's outstanding skill, initiative and untiring devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Virginia.

Hamilton, PFC Dean D. (25th ID) (HQ & HQ Co., 35th Inf. Regt.)

Hamilton, LT John F. (3rd ID)

Hamm, Cecil R. (3ID)

3rd Infantry Division Headquarters
General Orders No. 108 - 31 December 1950

The Bronze Star Medal with V device for heroic service is awarded to Sergeant First Class Cecil R. Hamm, RA35576689, Company I, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, U.S. Army. On 7 December 1950, in the vicinity of Chinghung-Ni, Korea, Sergeant Hamm was painfully wounded about the face and hands by white phosphorous mortar fire. While awaiting evacuation, Sergeant Hamm learned that a combat patrol was preparing to move out the following day. Realizing the critical need for mortar forward observers, Sergeant Hamm refused evacuation and volunteered to accompany the patrol. Although Sergeant Hamm suffered intensely from his wound due to bitter cold while on the patrol, he succeeded in locating a large enemy force in the vicinity of Chinghung-Ni, Korea. Sergeant Hamm moved to high ground through heavy sniper fire and thoroughly reconnoitered the enemy positions. When the radio contact was lost, he returned by forced march to warn his battalion of the imminent enemy approach. Throughout the entire patrol, Sergeant Hamm exhibited the utmost courage, initiative and aggressiveness. His disregard for his wounds and his personal safety served as a constant inspiration to the remainder of the patrol, and was instrumental in the successful accomplishment of the mission. Sergeant Hamm's heroic actions, devotion to duty, fearless leadership, reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from West Virginia.

Hammam, Thomas F. (FC, CO. K, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Hammelsmith, PFC Robert W. (HQ & Sv Co., 89th Med TK Bn)

Hammerquist, CAPT Robert E. (HQ & HQ Co., 2d BN, 35th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Hammett, CAPT Arthur H. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hand, Samuel R. (USN)

Handlin, PFC George R. (3rd ID)

Haner, PFC Robert E. (27th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO50, 8Aug50)

Hankel, PFC Fred Jr. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 87 - 5 November 1950

Private First Class Fred Hankel Jr., RA37884485, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Service Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 August 1950 at Yongsan, Korea.  On this date an infantry battalion of his regiment was attempting to regain commanding ground that had been lost as a result of an enemy breakthrough.  From this commanding ground the enemy was able to deliver a great volume of fire on the Main Supply Route, cutting off the desperately needed supply of ammunition.  Private Hankel was aware of the situation and volunteered to drive his truck through the blockade and deliver the needed ammunition.  In complete disregard for his own personal safety, he drove his truck, which was heavily loaded with high explosive ammunition, slowly but with determination over the rough road and through the heavy enemy artillery, mortar and machine gun fire, and successfully delivered his load to the battalion command post.  As a result, the battalion was able to continue its attack and force the enemy to retreat.  The fearless and heroic action of Private Hankel on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Nebraska.

Hanna, SGT Timothy D. (23d Inf. Rgt.)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 36 - 19 August 1966

Sergeant Timothy D. Hanna, Infantry, United States Army, who while serving as a member of Company C, 2d Battalion 23d Infantry, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 18 November 1965, in Korea. Sergeant Hanna was leading a patrol in its return from the Demilitarized Zone in Korea when a noise was heard in the underbrush. After positioning his men, he tried to move forward but was stopped when wounded by hostile automatic weapons fire. Ignoring his multiple wounds, he continued to move forward, covered his men, and kept the patrol under control in a manner which prevented further casualties and unfavorable incidents. Sergeant Hanna's Sound judgment, professional ability, and heroic conduct in this hazardous situation reflect distinct credit upon himself and the United States Army. (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal with "V" device awarded to Sergeant Timothy D. Hanna for heroism on 18 November 1965, as announced in General Orders Number 14, Headquarters 2d Infantry Division, APO San Francisco 96224, dated 18 January 1966.)

Hanna, PFC William H. (25th ID) (HQ & HQ Co., 1st Bn, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Hansen, PFC Ben E. (ARMY)

Hansen, SGT Edwin C. (1CAV)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 123 - July 1951

The Bronze Star with “V” Device is awarded to Sergeant Edwin C Hansen (then Private First Class), Infantry, U.S. Army, Company B, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for heroism in action against the enemy on 1 November 1950 near Unsan, Korea. When strong enemy forces launched a vicious counterattack against the hill positions of Company B, the friendly troops received orders to withdraw to a ridge line. Realizing the necessity for covering fire, Sergeant Hansen, with three comrades, volunteered to remain behind and cover the movement with a 57mm recoilless rifle. He remained at his post, despite heavy small arms fire and mortar shelling, and fired point blank at the grouped Chinese who were threatening to overrun the company positions. Through his action of delaying the enemy attack, the majority of the unit was able to withdraw to more tenable positions. Sergeant Hansen’s heroic action reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Nebraska.

Hanson, Herman R.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 73 - 19 October 1950

The Bronze Star medal with V Device is awarded to Captain Herman R. Hansen, 0975902, Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement from 1 September to 11 September 1950 in the vicinity of Mosan-ni, Korea. During this period Captain Hanson was in charge of a medical unit which had the mission of treating and evacuating the wounded of an infantry regiment. In performing that mission, Captain Hansen was under repeated heavy enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire. With a complete indifference for his own personal safety, he treated and supervised the treatment of the wounded long hours without sleep and rest and the dangerous enemy fire. The courage and selfless devotion to duty manifested by Captain Hansen during his period were inspiring to his comrades and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from North Dakota.

Hanson, CPL Peter S.

Hanson, Ronald V. (25th ID)

General Orders No. 87 - 30 January 1951
25th Infantry

The Bronze Star with V device is awarded to Private First Class Ronald V. Hanson, RA17270929, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 35th Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army. On 24 October 1950 near Chung Bolgok, Korea, Private First Class Hanson’s convoy was attacked by a strong enemy force. Dismounting from his vehicle, he immediately delivered effective counter-fire. Despite an intense concentration of small arms fire and hand grenades, he remained in position, covered the displacement of his comrades and withdrew only after their evacuation had been completed. Private First Class Hanson’s valorous action and selfless devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Harbargher, Wayne B. (USN)

Harbeck, Garnard E. (25th ID)

General Orders No. 14 - 3 January 1951
25th Infantry Division

The First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the BRONZE STAR with V device is awarded to First Lieutenant Garnard E. Harbeck, 02005338, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 5th Infantry Regiment, United States Army. On 10 August 1950 in the vicinity of Pongam-ni, Korea, the assault battalion advanced so rapidly in an attack that all means of communication were disrupted by the distance and hostile action. When a message vital to the success of the operation was received and could not be transmitted by mechanical means, Lieutenant Harbeck drove a vehicle through three miles of enemy infested territory to deliver the important document. Lieutenant Harbeck’s courageous action materially assisted in the success of the attack and reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered military service from Iowa.

Hardman, SGT 1C Olan O. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hardy, 1st LT John R. (ARMY)

Hare, CPL Raymond C. (24th ID)

General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

Corporal Raymond c. Hare, RA 18275914, a member of Company "K", 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement against the enemy on 11 July 1950, near Chochiwon, Korea. Corporal Hare was squad leader, 3rd Squad 60 millimeter Mortar Platoon. When the enemy attacked Company "K" on 11 July the squad controlled by Corporal Hare was dug in and fighting as riflemen. During the attack the platoon sergeant was killed and Corporal Hare took it upon himself to organize the platoon for a withdrawal. Even though four enemy machineguns had flanked his position and were firing at them Corporal Hare was successful in bringing the remainder of the platoon out of their position and back to American lines which had been established five miles to the rear. His initiative and courage during a difficult situation reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Harer, Arnold W. (USN)

Harger, CPL Richard E. (General Orders No. 317 - July 20, 1951)

Hariu, PFC Theodore M. (25th ID) (Sv. Co., 25th Inf. Regt.)

Harlem, CAPT Robert L. (25th ID) (HQ & HQ Btry, 90th FABn) (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Harless, PVT Edward S. (25th ID) (HQ & HQ Co., 1st Bn, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Harmon, CPL Blaine (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 97 - 5 May 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Corporal Blaine E. Harmon, RA18274818, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery D, 82d Artillery, Army of the United States, a member of Battery D, 82d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. On that date he was a gunner on an antiaircraft firing vehicle which was in support of a convoy that was attempting to break through a series of enemy fireblocks. When his two cannoneers were wounded by the heavy enemy fire, he secured replacements from a passing group of soldiers and taught them how to service his weapons under fire. When these men also became casualties he serviced his own guns and continued to deliver effective fire against enemy positions. The heroism displayed by Corporal Harmon reflects great credit upon himself end the military service. Entered the military service from West Virginia.

Harp, 1LT Robert E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Harper, SGT 1C Dennis R. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Harper, SGT Eddie A. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 87 - 5 November 1950

Sergeant Eddie A. Harper, RA44168582, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Battery, 37th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 2 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea.  On this date he was riding in a vehicle with six other men then it suddenly came under intense enemy small arms fire, which wounded one of the men and caused four others to leave the vehicle.  He and another man remained with their wounded comrade, and continued to proceed along the road until they were again halted by heavy enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire.  Forced to abandon their vehicle, Sergeant Harper, assisted by the other man, carried his wounded comrade through fields and ditches, under constant enemy observation and small arms fire, for a distance of approximately one mile, where they reached an aid station.  The selfless and heroic devotion to a wounded comrade displayed by Sergeant Harper on this occasion resulted in the saving of a comrade's life, and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Alabama.

Harper, CPL Harrison O. (25th ID) (Co. C, 65th Engr Combat Bn)

Harper, Harry J. (USN)

Harrington, PVT John M. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 681 - 5 November 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Private John M. Harrington, US55036535, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 27 August 1951 in the vicinity of Pia-ri, Korea. On this date, during an assault upon hostile positions, Companies F and G were forced to withdraw due to a numerically superior enemy force. While Private Harrington and his comrades were withdrawing, they came across two wounded men who were in the path of the onrushing enemy force. Disregarding his personal safety, Private Harrington remained in his position and fought a rear guard action while his comrades assisted the wounded men. He held this position, inflicting numerous enemy casualties, until the wounded men were evacuated to positions of safety. The outstanding devotion to duty and comrades displayed by Private Harrington on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Harris, MSGT Clarence E. (24ID) (GOS 166 - 6 October 1950)

Harris, CPL Daniel C. (2ID) (2nd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

Corporal Daniel C. Harris, RA13263625, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company H, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 9 March 1951 near Naejonggum, Korea.  During a prolonged and heavy mortar barrage upon its positions, the medical aidman attached to Company H was wounded.  Observing this, Corporal Harris dashed from his sheltered position to the aide of the fallen aidman. Obtaining his aid-kit, he immediately proceeded to treat all men who had become casualties during the intense hostile barrage.  He then organized all available personnel in the vicinity and supervised them as they evacuated all the wounded on vehicles passing rearward.  His fearlessness and initiative under fire were responsible for saving the lives of several of the wounded soldiers.  The heroism displayed by Corporal Harris reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Maryland.

Harris, SGT Earl R. (25ID) (GOS205 - 27 September 1950) (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Sergeant Earl R. Harris, RA18247831, Infantry, Service Company, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 27 July 1950 the regimental ammunition supply point near Kumchong, Korea, was under mortar and artillery fire which also covered the route over which withdrawal of the regiment was being made.  Heedless of the grave danger of the position, Sergeant Harris volunteered to remain at the supply point to see that all ammunition was removed.  By his calm courage and determined stand, he inspired his men to greater effort and successful removal of critical supplies.  He was the last to leave the area.  Sergeant Harris' courageous and unfaltering devotion to duty exemplify the highest ideals of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Harris, M/SGT Fran W. (3rd ID)

Harris, CPL James R. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 254 - 28 October 1950

Corporal James R. Harris, RA19294871, Infantry, Company L, 24th Infantry, United States Army.  When his company in the vicinity of Haman, Korea was being besieged by numerically superior hostile forces on 23 August 1950, Corporal Harris courageously remained in his position to provide covering fire while his unit withdrew to a more favorable position.  Although wounded during this action, he remained at his post and assisted in delivering withering covering fire until the entire unit had departed.  Corporal Harris's initiative and gallant devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from California.

Harris, LTCOL John E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID) (2 awards)

Harris, MAJ John P. (USMC)

Harris, CPL Willie (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Harrison, PFC Jake (25th ID) (HQ & HQ Co., 1st Bn., 5th Inf. Regt.)

Harrison, CWO Samuel L. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Harrod, CAPT Carroll D. (49FAB)

Hart, CPL Ronald E. (3rd ID)

Harton, CPL Lawrence J. (3rd ID)

Harvey, 2LT Alton H. Jr. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Harwell, Eugene A. (USN)

Hasberry, PFC Leon Jr. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hashimoto, CPL Hideo (Co. G, 35th Inf. Rgt., 25ID)

Hashimoto, PFC Tadashi (Co. C, 35th Inf. Rgt., 25ID)

Hatch, Kenneth Martin (ARMY)

General Orders No. 127 - 8 September 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Bronze Star Medal with Combat "V" to First Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers) Kenneth Martin Hatch (ASN: 0-50640), United States Army, for heroic service in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States, as a member of the 72d Engineer Company, 24th Infantry Division. On 11 August 1950, near Samacham-ni, Korea, although friendly forces had overrun an enemy ordnance dump, the area was still being hotly contested. To prevent the possibility of the enemy's recovering their supplies, Lieutenant Hatch, despite the added hazard of hostile machine gun and mortar fire, prepared and supervised the destruction of five enemy field pieces and the adjacent ammunition stores. By his conspicuously valiant actions and notable technical ability, Lieutenant Hatch not only denied the material to the enemy but also eliminated the danger which the explosives created for friendly troops in the battle area. (The letter "V" device is authorized for wear with medal or ribbon) Place of Birth: Alaska. Home of record: Florence, Oregon

Hatch, SFC Lloyd L. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 230 - 17 October 1950

Sergeant First Class Lloyd L. Hatch, RA6263342, Ordnance Corps, 725th Ordnance Maintenance Company, United States Army.  As leader of an ordnance maintenance contact team operating with front line combat units during the period 20 July to 25 September 1950 in the early phase of the Korean action, SFC Hatch rendered outstanding service.  His untiring efforts to maintain small arms in a serviceable condition obviating the necessity for evacuating them from the using units was instrumental in alleviating a critical supply situation.  SFC Hatch's personal courage under adverse combat conditions, his technical skill and ingenuity reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces.  Entered the military service from Utah.

Hatfield, CAPT Raymond D. (for merit) (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 84 - 10 Aug 1950

Captain Raymond D. Hatfield, 0919577, General Staff Corps (Transportation Corps), United States Army, a member of Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious achievement during the period 2 to 9 July 1950, at Kokura, Japan. During this period, Captain Hatfield, as Division Transportation Officer, arranged for the shipment of the Division from Japan to Korea. Working with the badly depleted Japanese rail system, he successfully moved each element of the division from its station to the proper port for shipment. Overcoming great difficulties, he obtained the extremely scare shipping with which the Division was water lifted. With no regard for himself, working extremely long hours, Captain Hatfield succeeded in expeditiously moving the 24th Infantry Division from Japan to Korea. He brought great credit to himself and to the military service. Captain Hatfield entered the military service from Long Beach, California.

Hatfield, CAPT Raymond D. (1st Oak Leaf Cluster for merit) (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 112 - 30 August 1950

The First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious service in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States is awarded to Captain Raymond D. Hatfield, 0919577, General Staff Corps (Transportation Corps), United States Army, a member of Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division, 10 to 20 July 1950.

Hathaway, PFC Louis V. (Co. B, 65th Engineer Combat Btn/25th ID)

Hauge, MAJ Harry K. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 240 - 22 October 1950

Major Harry K. Hauge, 0435925, Infantry, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  While serving as executive officer of the Battalion cleaning out pockets of enemy resistance near Chirwon, Korea which had been bypassed in the advance of the Regiment, Major Hauge rendered outstanding service from 3 September to 6 September 1950.  Two groups of enemy had maneuvered around the battalion and established road blocks which effectively severed communications between forward and rear command posts.  Major Hauge immediately corrected the situation by establishing contact by radio relay.  Receiving information of the battalion's need of ammunition and supplies, Major Hauge arranged for and directed a successful air drop.  During this period the command post was subjected to two severe enemy attacks which were repelled by security forces under his skillful supervision.  Major Hauge's initiative and devotion to duty greatly assisted his battalion in accomplishing its mission and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Kentucky.

Hauschen, MSGT William J. (USMC)

Hawke, CAPT Williard W. (25ID) (GO126 - 8 September 1950) (2nd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Captain Williard W. Hawke, 01302462, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  When the Command Post of the 27th Infantry was threatened with envelopment following a devastating barrage of enemy artillery fire and infiltration by enemy infantry on 24 July 1950 near Namsong-ni, Korea, elements of the regiment were ordered to withdraw.  The route of withdrawal led through a village which also was being shelled by enemy artillery.  When the vehicle in which Captain Hawke was riding entered this village, the escape route was blocked by a loaded ammunition truck crosswise in the road.  A large number of vehicles lined up behind the disabled truck were extremely vulnerable to attack.  Captain Hawke immediately dismounted and supervised the removal of the ammunition truck to the side of the road, permitting the line of vehicles to move forward.  Observing that the disabled truck still presented hazard to the safe withdrawal of the regiment, Captain Hawke, heedless of the heavy concentration of fire falling on the village, dispatched a man to obtain a rope and then directed complete removal of the truck from the area.  The dauntless courage and outstanding leadership displayed by Captain Hawke removed a formidable obstacle to the movement of his regiment and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Washington.

Hawkins, PFC Daniel R. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hayes, Henry H. (Chaplain)

PARTIAL CITATION

Serving as battalion chaplain, Lieutenant (jg) Hayes displayed outstanding courage and initiative when an adjacent battalion was subjected to a devastating enemy artillery barrage while preparing to move forward.  Hearing the cries for aid, he ... ran through the heavy enemy fire to reach the stricken men.  Despite sporadic artillery fire, he courageously moved from casualty to casualty, dressing wounds, organizing stretcher parties, and comforting the wounded.  His great personal bravery and unswerving devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him, and aided materially in saving many lives.

Hayhurst, 1LT Jerimiah V. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Haynes, MSGT Frank Jr. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hazelet, SGT Jack F. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hazlett, SGT Windol (21st Inf., 24ID)

Wounded 6 February 1951.  Home of Record: Tennessee.

Hazzard, Edward M. (USN)

Head, Sgt. 1C Roy E. (7ID)


Sgt. 1C Roy E. Head

Headquarters, 7ID
General Orders No. 375 - 1 August 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with “V” Device is awarded to Sergeant First Class Roy E. Head, RA142255587, Artillery, United States Army, Headquarters Battery, 49th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement near Oktang-ni [near Hoengsong], Korea, on 12 February 1951. On this date, Sergeant Head was a member of an Artillery Liaison Section [Support Force 7 a.k.a. Task Force White] in support of the 23d Republic of Korea Army Regiment when the enemy penetrated to within small arms range to the hastily prepared defensive position of the section. An early morning attack by a numerically superior enemy force was directed at the small group, and they were showered with small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire. The small group was able to withstand the assault which lasted for more than two hours. Sergeant Head remained in his position, and his effective fire aided materially in repulsing the hostile force. Once again the enemy launched a determined attack, employing a still larger force. Realizing the ammunition supply was nearly exhausted and all avenues of escape cut, the valiant band of men, to prevent further bloodshed, surrendered to the enemy. The heroic action displayed by Sergeant Head reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the state of Kansas.

Birth: May 10, 1922
Scott County, Virginia, USA
Death: Apr. 30, 1951, North Korea
Master Sergeant Roy E. Head, died on April 30, 1951 in Suan Bean Prison Camp in North Korea. His remains were identified and repatriated June 4, 2010. He is buried at the Head-Benton Cemetery in Duffield, VA. Roy was born on May 10, 1922 in the Grit Hill section of Scott County, Virginia. He was the eldest of 5 sons born to the late Catron and Mary Lawson Head. He graduated from Rye Cove High School before joining the United States Navy on December 4, 1942. Mr. Head served in World War II on the USS Pensacola (the Grey Ghost of the Pacific). His rank was Fire Controlman Third Class. He was engaged in seven major battles which included Gilbert Island Operation, Marshall Island Operation, Battle for Leyte Gulf, Iwo Jima Operation & Okinawa Operation. Roy Head was discharged from the US Navy on December 16, 1945. After training to become a dentist he rejoined the military and went to Korea as an Army man.

Heagerty, PFC Francis (25th ID) (Btry B, 8th FA Bn.)

Heagy, Sgt. Otis L. (7ID)


Sgt. Otis Heagy's POW debrief
(Click picture for a larger view)

The Bronze Star Medal with “V” Device is awarded to Sergeant Otis L. Heagy, of the 49th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 February 1951 [near Hoengsong, Korea]. He was a member of an artillery forward observer section in support of the 21st Republic of Korea Army Regiment when the enemy penetrated to within small arms range to the hastily prepared defensive position of the section. An early morning attack by a numerically superior enemy force was directed at the small group, and they were showered by small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire. The small group was able to withstand the assault which lasted for more than two hours. Sergeant Heagy remained at his post, and his effective fire aided materially in repulsing the hostile force. Once again the enemy launched a determined attack, employing a still larger force. Realizing the ammunition supply was nearly exhausted and all avenues of escape cut, the valiant band, to prevent further bloodshed, surrendered to the enemy. The heroic action displayed by Sergeant Heagy reflects great credit to himself and the military service. Joined the military from Elwood, Indiana. (Source: The Anderson Herald, Indiana, 9 February 1952. The award was presented to his father while Heagy was still in captivity.)

Healey, SFC Frederick J. (3rd ID)

Healey, SGT Raymond V. (3rd ID)

Heanski, SGT Cecil F. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 240 - 22 October 1950

Sergeant Cecil F. Heanski, RA39455397, Quartermaster Corps, 25th Quartermaster Company, United States Army.  As section sergeant of a quartermaster truck platoon from 25 September to 8 October 1950 during the Korean conflict, Sergeant Heanski served with distinction.  During the rapid advance of the leading elements of the Division it was necessary for all supplies to be sent forward from the railhead by motor transport, a distance over 150 miles.  By maintaining a maximum number of vehicles operating over this route despite the constant threat of enemy action and mechanical failure, Sergeant Heanski greatly assisted materially in accomplishing the mission of his platoon.  Sergeant Heanski's untiring devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of the American soldier.  Entered the military service from Washington.

Heath, CAPT Charley S. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 68 - 28 March 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Captain Charley S. Heath, 01331180, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. Captain Heath voluntarily accompanied a special tank-infantry task force on a mission through enemy-held territory with the purpose of linking up with friendly units that had been cut off by the enemy. As the force advanced it came under hostile mortar and small arms fire which was so intense as to bring the leading tanks to a halt. Captain Heath, with the foot elements behind the tanks, immediately rushed forward and, completely indifferent to the withering fire, assisted the task force commander in getting the tanks under way again. When the task force commander in the course of the advance had to drop back repeatedly in order to communicate with other elements of the column, Captain Heath moved forward and kept the column moving. Even after he had received a painful leg wound, he persisted in remaining with the force until a junction with the cut off units had been effected. The heroism displayed by Captain Heath reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from California.

Heckleman, SGT Theodore H. (USMC))

Hedrick, MSGT Vernon (1CAV)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 104 - 9 June 1951

Master Sergeant Vernon Hedrick, RA20543296, Infantry, United States Army, Company B, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for heroism in action against the enemy on 1 November 1950, near Unsan, Korea.  When a numerically superior enemy force attacked a squad of the 2d platoon which had been occupying an outpost, the unit was ordered to withdraw to the main line of defense.  While the group was pulling back they were suddenly pinned down by intense hostile fire.  Sergeant Hedrick, seeing that the squad was in grave danger, left his position to seek a point of vantage from where he could direct artillery fire.  During his search, Sergeant Hedrick was constantly exposed to enemy observation and fire.  After locating a spot that offered excellent observation, he relayed fire directions to friendly artillery units.  Through his accurate fire directions, the hostile positions were neutralized, enabling the squad to safely withdraw.  Sergeant Hedrick's heroism reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the federal service from Kentucky.

Heffington, CPL Fenton M. (27th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO86, 27Aug50)

Heflin, PVT Thomas W. (25th ID) (HQ & HQ Co., 3d Bn, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Heiliger, CPL Darrell W. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 42 - 17 February 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Corporal Darrell W. Heiliger, ER37762864, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company B, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 10 January 1951 in the vicinity of Wonju, Korea. On that date he volunteered as a member of a combat patrol which had the mission of inflicting as many casualties as possible on the enemy and determining enemy strength and disposition. Despite the overwhelming odds against him he aggressively and with no regard for his personal safety, engaged the enemy in his efforts to accomplish the mission assigned the patrol. Although the patrol was subjected to heavy fire by a numerically superior enemy force, the mission was accomplished and all members returned safely to their lines. The heroic conduct of Corporal Heiliger on this occasion was a source of great inspiration to all members of the patrol and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Lancaster, Nebraska (home originally posted as “unknown”).

Heiliger, MSGT Darrell W. (2ID) (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 194 - 18 June 1951

The Bronze Star Medal (First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster) with V Device is awarded to Master Sergeant Darrell W. Heiliger, ER37762864, (then Corporal) Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company “B” 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 9 January 1951, in the vicinity of Yuhnyon-ni, Korea. On that day Company “C” was in defensive positions fighting off a fanatical enemy attack. Upon withdrawing and setting up in new positions it was discovered that a Republic of Korea unit had left a large supply of ammunition and equipment in a nearby village. Sergeant Heiliger volunteered to go on a patrol to recover the equipment which was badly needed by the company. Upon reaching a point near the village, the enemy opened fire with automatic weapons and small arms. Sergeant Heiliger, with complete disregard for personal safety, returned the fire and inflicted numerous casualties on the enemy force. Upon reaching the village, the patrol was again fired on and Sergeant Heiliger again fired at the enemy to cover the other men while they loaded the vehicle with the essential supplies. His fearless actions aided in the completion of the patrol’s mission without a casualty. Sergeant Heiliger’s heroism reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Home of record: Nebraska.

Helferding, PFC Fred (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 99 - 7 May 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Private First Class Fred Helferding, RA16236293, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery D, 82d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. Corporal Helferding was driving an antiaircraft firing vehicle which was supporting the withdrawal of an allied unit through an enemy fire block. Intense enemy fire had disabled several vehicles and caused confusion throughout the convoy. On one occasion, Corporal Helferding drove his vehicle off the road, hooked onto a firing vehicle which had skidded into a rice paddy and, disregarding the heavy fire, pulled it back onto the road, thereby enabling the vehicle’s crew to employ its firepower in support of the column. As he continued through the block, Corporal Helferding kept his driver’s hatch open so he could have better vision and, using his vehicle as a bulldozer, pushed stalled and burning vehicles off the road, thereby facilitating the passage of other vehicles behind him. His utter disregard for the enemy fire and his skillful use of his vehicle was greatly instrumental to the success of the unit in penetrating the enemy’s fire block. The heroism displayed by Corporal Helferding reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Illinois.

Hems, CPL Fred Bennett (USMC)

Henderson, PFC Alexander C.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 71 - August 06, 1950

Private First Class Alexander C. Henderson, RA13267809, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement on 19 July 1950 near Yuson, Korea. Private First Class Henderson’s platoon was on an outpost one thousand yards in front of the company positions. During an intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage, wire communications between the company and the outpost was destroyed. This being the only communication between the two units, Private first Class Henderson with disregard for his on safety volunteered to repair the line. While repairing the line he was seriously wounded. The act of heroic achievement displayed by Private First Class Henderson reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Private First Class Henderson entered the service from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Henderson, PFC Carroll H. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Henderson, PFC Clarence W. (valor) (7ID)

Henderson, WOJG Joseph S. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Henkel, CPL William Patrick

Corporal William P. Henkel, US55104490, Artillery, United States Army, Battery A, 13th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by meritorious service in Korea during the period 17 July 1951 through 10 January 1952.  He performed his duties as Reconnaissance Sergeant in a Forward Observer Section in an exemplary manner throughout this phase of operations.  Working under the most adverse field and weather conditions, he nevertheless carried out all assigned missions efficiently and capably.  He willingly spent long and arduous hours, often without proper food or rest and under enemy fire, to supervise the maintenance and defense of forward observation posts.  Corporal Henkel's tireless efforts, exceptional proficiency and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's missions and reflect great credit on himself and the United States Artillery.  Entered military service from St. Charles, Missouri.

Hennen, 1LT Earl M. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hennessee, Sfc. James A. (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Henry, LT COL Charles E. (21st AAA AW)

Hensley, CPL Ralph (7ID, 7th Recon Co.) (with V)

Henson, SGT Bennie (27th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO87, 27Aug50)

Henson, CPL Harold D. (50th AAA AW BN)

Herbert, PFC James E. (HQ & HQ Co., 2d Bn, 35th Inf. Rgt., 25ID)

Herbst, LT Daniel L. (3rd ID)

Herbst, CPL Darrell G. (25th ID) (Co. A, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Herendeen, William R. (USN)

Herlick, CPL Leroy A. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 253 - 28 October 1950

Corporal Leroy A. Herlick, RA16283725, Infantry, Company C, 5th Infantry, United States Army.  When a barrage of enemy artillery severed wire communications between the company command post and a forward observation post on 4 September 1950 near Chindong-ni, Korea, Captain Herlick left his position of relative safety and moved 300 yards through hostile small arms and artillery fire to repair the broken line.  With the line reestablished, supporting fire was directed on the enemy force causing them to withdraw.  Corporal Herlick's heroic actions contributed materially to the successful accomplishment of his company's mission and reflects the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Wisconsin.

Hernandez, MSGT Domingo (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hernandez, PFC Gilbert A. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 125 - 31 May 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with Letter "V" device is awarded to Private First Class Gilbert A. Hernandez, RA7401635, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. Private Hernandez was serving as a wire jeep driver. His unit was fighting its way past an enemy roadblock. He refused to leave the original area until every piece of communications equipment had been loaded, even though other vehicles had already left the area. After leaving the area, Private Hernandez halted many times to load wounded comrades on his jeep and other vehicles so they could be evacuated. During the hostile fire the left front wheel of his jeep was knocked from the axle by a direct mortar hit. Private Hernandez refused to abandon his vehicle and, with complete disregard for his personal safety, calmly removed a wheel from an immobilized jeep and placed it on his own vehicle. His courageous actions saved not only his jeep but also the wounded men and vital equipment. The heroism displayed by Private Hernandez on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Texas.

Hernandez, 1LT Ruddie E. Trizarry (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hernandez-Aviles, SGT 1C Monserrate (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hernandez-Diaz, SGT Eladio (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hernandez-Disdier, MSGT Adolfo (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hernandez-Irizarry, PFC Jose M. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hernandez-Lopez, CPL Orlando (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hernandez-Rodriguez, CPL Angel M. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Herring, M/SGT John O. (25th ID) (HQ & HQ Co., 3d Bn, 24th Inf. Regt.)

Hertel, SFC Loraine A. Jr. (25th ID) (HQ & HQ Btry, 25th Div Arty)

Hickey, Chaplain B.L. (USN)

Hickey, PFC William H. (25th ID) (Co. I, 27th Inf. Regt.)

Hickman, CAPT Don R. (25ID) (2nd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 175 - 22 September 1950

Captain Don R. Hickman, 035996, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 22 August 1950, near Sinji, Korea, a strong enemy attack had caused withdrawal of friendly troops, opening an infantry company and the battalion command post to direct hostile fire.  Captain Hickman immediately moved out into the automatic weapons and small arms fire, rallied and reorganized the men and led a counterattack with such speed and skill that the enemy were dispersed, the original friendly troops restored to their position and the threat of penetration eliminated.  Captain Hickman's initiative, courage and tactical skill reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Utah.

Hicks, PFC Jessie F. (CO D, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Hicks, PFC Thomas E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hietschold, PFC Raymond L. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Higa, PFC Henry K. (25th ID) (Co. B, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Higashidani, SGT Yukimitsu (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 230 - 17 October 1950

Sergeant Yukimitsu Higashidani, RA12277272, Infantry, Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army.  As a member of a regimental prisoner of war interrogation team during the period 25 July to 10 September 1950 in the early critical stages of the Korean action, Sergeant Higashidani rendered outstanding service processing refugees and interrogating prisoners of war.  His tireless devotion to duty in extracting valuable information from dangerous and crafty antagonists contributed greatly to the success of his combat team.  Sergeant Higashidani's linguistic achievement and technical skill reflect great credit upon himself and his organization.  Entered the military service from New Jersey.

Hight, SGT Harry G. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hill, SGT Arthur E. (25th ID) (Co. B, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Hill, 2LTG Homer E. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 233 - 19 October 1950

Second Lieutenant Homer E. Hill, 02262112, Infantry, Service Company, 35th Infantry, United States Army.  As regimental maintenance officer from 15 July to 30 August 1950, Lieutenant Hall rendered outstanding service during the early phase of the Korean conflict.  His untiring efforts and outstanding leadership were instrumental in maintaining the critically needed transportation of the regiment in a superior manner.  His experienced skill in loading convoys under blackout conditions was an inspiration to his men.  Lieutenant Hill's undivided attention to duty, aggressiveness, and judicious accomplishments reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Oklahoma.

Hill, CPL James H. (24ID, Co A, 3d Eng. Combat Bn.)|

Hill, MAJ John Gillespie (1CAV) ( 1st award)

 Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army
General Orders No. 578 - September 25, 1952

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Major (Armor), [then Lieutenant] John Gillespie Hill (ASN: 0-27997), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 7th Cavalry Regiment (Task Force 777), 1st Cavalry Division. Major Hill distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hambung-ni, Korea, on the night of 26 - 27 September 1950. On that night the battalion of which Major Hill was a member was moving rapidly forward in pursuit of hostile troops. Suddenly the column was subjected to a large volume of artillery and automatic weapons fire which pinned it down and inflicted several casualties. Simultaneously, two enemy tanks appeared and, directing murderous cannon and machine-gun fire against the friendly unit, succeeded in dividing it into two parts. Major Hill, with keen tactical perception, hurried up the road until he reached the battalion's advance party, which he immediately organized into rocket-launcher teams and guided them back to the scene of the battle. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he supervised the emplacement and firing of the rocket launchers while simultaneously throwing grenades and firing his own weapon with deadly accuracy at the foe. Just as one of the hostile tanks was destroyed by the rocket launcher fire, six additional tanks reinforced with hostile troops, greatly increasing the threat to the friendly unit. Major Hill immediately launched an attack on the newly arrived tanks, and directed the fire of his men with great effectiveness until two more tanks were destroyed and the remainder retreated. Inspired by Major Hills' courageous example, the friendly troops beat off the attack and continued their advance. The extraordinary heroism and completely selfless devotion to duty displayed by Major Hill throughout this action reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the most esteemed traditions of the military service.

Hill, CAPT John Gillespie (1CAV) (2nd award)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 163 - November 25, 1950

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Bronze Star Medal with Combat "V" to Captain (Armor) John Gillespie Hill, Jr. (ASN: 0-27997), United States Army, for heroism in action against the enemy while serving with the 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, on 16 October 1950, near Sinmak, Korea. When Captain Hill, Battalion S-3 Officer was informed that a group of North Korean soldiers had taken refuge in a railroad tunnel with a train and refused to surrender, he immediately volunteered to take a patrol to flush out the enemy. Taking a one-quarter ton vehicle, 75-mm. recoilless rifle and seven men, Captain Hill entered the pitch-black tunnel in search of the die-hard Koreans. After traveling approximately 50 yards, the patrol was met by a withering blast of automatic weapons fire knocking out the vehicle's headlights and smashing the radiator. Throwing caution to the winds, Captain Hill continued to push his patrol forward for 75 yards until they were hit by several enemy hand grenades. Quickly ordering the 75-mm. recoilless rifle into action, Captain Hill and the rest of the patrol engaged the hidden enemy in a fierce fire fight under the most eerie conditions. After 20 minutes the intense, choking smoke from the firing forced the patrol to withdraw from the tunnel. As soon as the smoke had cleared, Captain Hill dauntlessly led his men back into the tunnel's blackness where they captured several prisoners and found three dead North Korean officers. By virtue of his courageous and fearless leadership, Captain Hill played a highly important role in clearing the tunnel of the enemy and making available to friendly forces the use of a valuable train. Captain Hill's heroism reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Hill, CPL Mark P. (3ID)

Corporal Mark P. Hill, RA16368397, Army Medical Service, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Medical Battalion, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army, is cited for meritorious service in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in Korea during the period 21 July 1951 to 6 March 1952. Corporal Hill, serving as a company clerk, performed his duties in a superior manner. Often working long hours under adverse conditions, he constantly strove for perfection in the maintenance of the company records and reports, maintaining an exceptionally high standard of efficiency and punctuality at all times. His enthusiasm and resourcefulness made him a valuable asset to the organization. Corporal Hills outstanding skill, initiative, and untiring devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Illinois.

Hill, SGT William (24th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO89, 28Aug50)

Hilton, SGT Jesse F. (General Orders No. 312 - July 18, 1951)

Hilyer, 2LT William J. (24th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO63, 18Aug50)

Hilsenhoff, SGT 1C Robert D. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hindle, CPL Morris C. (25th ID) (Co. C, 27th Inf. Regt.)

Hino, PFC Takeo (25th ID) (Co. D, 25th Inf. Regt.)

Hinrichs, 1LT Roy S. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hinton, CAPT Reginald J. (2ID) (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 63 - 22 March 1951

The First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Captain Reginald J. Hinton, 01313094, Infantry, Army of the United States, Commanding Officer of Tank Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 26 November 1950 in the vicinity of Somin-dong, Korea. The enemy had launched an offensive on a wide front and succeeded in cutting off a battalion of the 38 Infantry. Realizing th the vital importance of retaking the town of Somin-dong where the battalion was trapped, Captain Hinton organized a group of three tanks and eleven infantrymen, the only force available at the time, and personally led them in an assault on the town. The speed and force of his tank-infantry raid was such as to put the enemy to rout and enable the battalion and Captain Hinton’s force to organize the defense of the town and hold it until reinforcements arrived. The heroism and skillful leadership demonstrated by Captain Hinton reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Hiscock, CAPT James H. (50th AAA AW Bn.)

Hisel, PFC Mark J. (7 ID, Med. Co., 31st Inf.)

Hiser, SGT Boyd A. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hite, PVT Harold B. (ARMY)

Hittle, PFC Roger E. (8th Ranger) (posthumous)

Hoag, James W. (USN)

Hockersmith, SGT Harry A. (3rd ID)

Hodge, Lawrence (SGT, HQ Co., 2d Bn)

Hodge, CPL Ralph (2ID)

Hodges, 1LT Robert C. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hodgin, SGT 1C Ace M. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 200 - 10 June 1953

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Sergeant First Class Ace M. Hodgin, US55174182, Infantry, United States Army, Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroism in action on 22 March, 1953, in the vicinity of Umchon, North Korea. On the morning of that date, Sergeant Hodgin’s platoon was assigned the mission of attacking and seizing the high ground of Hill 137 and evacuating friendly casualties that had been recently wounded when the enemy overran that position. Aggressively leading the assault through enemy small arms and mortar fire, Sergeant Hodgin and his men pushed the determined enemy from the objective, thereby facilitating the evacuation of the friendly casualties. After the successful drive, Sergeant Hodgin returned to the fire swept area to supervise the administration of first aid and direct litter parties to hasten the evacuation of the wounded. Throughout the conflict, he comforted and inspired the wounded men by words of encouragement. When all casualties had been evacuated, he reorganized the platoon and led them in a successful withdrawal to the Main Line of Resistance. The heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Hodgin on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from South Dakota.

Hodson, PFC Carl E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hoff, Chaplain Cameron P. (USNR)

Hoffman, MSGT Lamar E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hoffman, SFC John L. (25ID, Med Det., 25th DivArty)

Hogan, MAJ John K. (USMC) (2 Bronze Stars)

Hoggatt, MSGT Anthony J. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 189 - 25 September 1950

Master Sergeant Anthony J. Hoggatt, RA20427892, Infantry, Company I, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  From 20 to 28 August 1950 Master Sergeant Hoggatt alone manned a forward observation post near where the enemy made repeated attacks in force in their effort to reach the key city of Taegu, Korea.  With little chance for rest and despite adverse weather conditions, he maintained his position, observing every actions, passing information to his unit so that many attacks could be broken before they actually started.  By his unflagging attention to duty and determined stand, he helped neutralize three tanks, four self-propelled guns, and several other enemy weapons and contributed vitally to the success of his unit in stemming the enemy advance. Master Sergeant Hoggatt's valorous action and indomitable will to overcome the enemy reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Mississippi.

Hollingsworth, 1LT Dale G. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 148 - 15 June 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to First Lieutenant Dale G. Hollingsworth, 02021064, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company G, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 25 March 1951 in the vicinity of Sinsegol, Korea. On the afternoon of that date, Lieutenant Hollingsworth was leading his platoon in an attack upon Hill 821. Advancing ahead of his men, he forded a stream and led his men across an open area. The enemy on the hill suddenly opened intense fire upon the group. Knowing that speed in the attack was the essential factor, Lieutenant Hollingsworth unhesitatingly continued the advance up the slope of the hill. Thrown into confusion by this relentless attack, the enemy abandoned his positions. Lieutenant Hollingsworth directed heavy fire upon the fleeing enemy inflicting heavy casualties upon him. The speed which Lieutenant Hollingsworth employed in his daring assault enabled him to seize the objective without incurring a single casualty among the members of his platoon. The heroism in action displayed by Lieutenant Hollingsworth on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Des Moines, Iowa.

[KWE Note: Lieutenant Hollingsworth was killed in action on 23 MAY 1951.]

Hollis, MSGT Levy V. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 231 - 18 October 1950

Master Sergeant Levy V. Hollis, RA38422306, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry, United States Army.  During the period 21 August to 27 August 1950, Master Sergeant Hollis performed outstanding service as battalion operations sergeant during the early critical phase of the Korean conflict.  Repeatedly exposing himself to hostile small arms and sniper fire, he assisted greatly in coordinating the movement of troops to forward positions.  His courageous reconnaissance of enemy positions offered friendly mortars timely missions of importance.  Master Sergeant Hollis' untiring devotion to duty and professional proficiency reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Holloway, Charles K. (USN)

Holloway, SFC Jimmie (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 7 - January 08, 1951

The Bronze Star with “V” Device is awarded to Sergeant First Class Jimmie Holloway, RA34201485, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery A, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 26 September 1950 in the vicinity of Samga, Korea. On that date, Sergeant Holloway was an artillery forward observer attached to a rifle battalion which was attacking with the mission of seizing the town of Samga. The advance of the Infantry was bitterly contested by the enemy who occupied commanding ground on both sides of the route of advance. Sergeant Holloway, in order to locate these heavily defended and well camouflaged areas of resistance, exposed himself repeatedly to the intense hostile mortar, machine gun, and small arms fire. With complete indifference for his personal safety, he exposed himself to direct enemy observation, often drawing fire upon his position, in order to call for and direct supporting artillery fire. The fire he so ably directed destroyed several hostile gun positions and caused numerous casualties, thereby facilitating the advance of the rifle elements. The heroism displayed on this occasion by Sergeant Holloway reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States. Entered the military service from Florida.

Holly, Sfc. Marvin S. (for valor)

Holmes, CPL Harry R. (25ID, Co. A, 35th Rgt.)

Holovak, Charles (USN)

Holt, PFC Carroll (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Holzhaus, Ralph L. (USN)

Hooker, PFC Robert M. Jr. (3rd ID)

Hopkins, CAPT Walter K. (1CAV) (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 150 - November 11, 1950

Captain Walter K. Hopkins, O400916, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for heroism in action against the enemy on 17-18 September 1950 near Waegwan, Korea. The 2d Battalion was attacking the enemy along the Taegu-Waegwan road. Due to the intensity of the fighting and the mountainous terrain, it was impossible to get supplies by way of the regular supply points 5000 yards to the rear. Captain Hopkins established temporary supply points forward of the regular points and organized native bearers to get supplies up to the battalion and evacuate the wounded. Due to the heavy enemy mortar and small arms fire, Captain Hopkins disregarded his own safety and personally led the supply parties through to the battalion on several occasions. Captain Hopkins’ heroism greatly contributed to the success of his battalion’s attack and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered federal service from California.

Hopp, Earl K. (USN)

Hopper, CPL Henry (25th Med Bn, 25ID) (GO96, 29Aug50)

Horan, 1LT Edwin P. (Co. F, 7th Inf. Rgt., 3rd ID)

Horinuchi, PFC Ernest (ARMY)

Horkey, PFC Donald R. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 761 - 25 November 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Private First Class Donald R. Horkey, US55085285 (then Private), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 6 October 1951 in the vicinity of Kongdong, Korea. On this date during an attack, Company I called for an air strike to assist with the elimination of commanding hostile positions. Forward elements nearing their objective made it difficult for the planes to distinguish between friendly and enemy troops. Private Horkey, realizing the importance of this mission, placed a marking panel on his back and advanced through intense hostile fire to a position visible to the pilots. Despite the continuous fire he accomplished his mission, thus saving the lives of many friendly troops that might otherwise have been mistaken for enemy soldiers. The outstanding devotion to duty and heroism displayed by Private Horkey reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Horn, SGT1C Earmel G. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 185 - 24 September 1950

Sergeant First Class Earmel G. Horn, RA16262880, Infantry, Company E, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 28 July 1950 near Hwanggan, Korea, Sergeant First Class Horn volunteered to assist in an assault on a hill from which the enemy was delivering heavy fire into the company area.  Attacking boldly and fearlessly the strongly emplaced foe, Sergeant First Class Horn inspired his comrades to greater effort, so that the attack was completely successful and the enemy put to flight.  He personally silenced two automatic weapons and killed three enemy riflemen.  Sergeant First class Horn's exemplary courage and determination to overcome the enemy reflects great credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Michigan.

Horn, SFC James A. Jr. (27th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO87, 27Aug50)

Hornberger, SGT William D. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 230 - 17 October 1950

Sergeant William D. Hornberger, RA13221575, Ordnance Corps, 725th Ordnance Maintenance Company, United States Army.  As leader of an ordnance contact team operating in advance positions during the period 20 July to 25 September 1950 in the early critical phase of the Korean conflict, Sgt. Hornberger rendered outstanding service by performing armament work on small arms and artillery under critical combat conditions and adverse circumstances of climate and terrain.  Sgt. Hornberger's diligent attention to duty, technical skill, and professional aptitude reflect great credit upon himself, his organization, and the Armed Forces.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Horne, SGT Forrest R. (3rd ID)

Hoskin, 1LT Donald L. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

First Lieutenant Donald L. Hoskin, 0983549, (then Second Lieutenant), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company D, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 11 February 1951 near Chipyong-ni, Korea.  The 81mm mortar platoon commanded by Lieutenant Hoskin was subjected to intense enemy mortar fire.  Realizing that his fire was desperately needed by the rifle elements of the battalion, he held his men in position, encouraging them by his fearless example under fire.  On one occasion, he personally supervised the resupply of ammunition for his gunners while the ammunition supply point was under a heavy concentration of enemy mortar fire.  The heroism displayed by Lieutenant Hoskin reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from California.

Hostetler, Dean (USN)

Houck, CPL Duane H. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 16 June 1951

Corporal Duane H. Houck, ER57057257, Artillery, Army of the United States, a member of Battery "D", 82d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement near Amdal-Tong, Korea on 25 May 1951, Corporal Houck's M-16 was part of an Automatic Weapons section supporting the infantry.  After undergoing heavy fire his vehicle was ordered to withdraw.  While engaged in this operation, Corporal Houck saw a wounded man lying about 50 yards away.  Disregarding his own safety, he and another member of his section dismounted and amid heavy fire, ran to the aid of the wounded man, picked him up and returned him to the M-16 for evacuation.  The heroism displayed by Corporal Houck reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Kansas.

Houck, MSGT Paul R.

House, 1LT Ernest J. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Housken, PFC Duane T. (3rd ID)

Houston, Trumand E. (USN)

Howard, CPL Edwin R. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Howell, SGT Benjamin Y. (27th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO86, 27Aug50)

Howell, LTCOL Selah H. Howell (USAF) (Gen. Orders No. 63 - 19 September 1950)

Howle, James M. (USN)

Hoyem, 1LT George A. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 33 - 28 January 1953

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to First Lieutenant George A. Hoyem Jr., 02211298, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 38th Infantry Regiment), 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 and 13 September 1952 in the vicinity of Sokkage, North Korea. On the night of 12 September, Lieutenant Hoyem was leading a combat patrol on a probing action into enemy territory. Advancing deep into hostile territory the patrol, upon hearing enemy movements to their front, immediately dispersed into ambush positions. Opening fire at close range, the friendly patrol succeeded in inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy force and momentarily disorganizing them. Realizing that the enemy may have sent for reinforcements, Lieutenant Hoyem signaled his men to withdraw to higher ground while he remained to give effective cover fire. After successfully withdrawing, Lieutenant Hoyem received word that the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon had suffered heavy casualties and were unable to evacuate their wounded due to the vicious fire fight still raging. Moving toward the trapped platoon’s position, they succeeded in reaching a position approximately 700 yards from the wounded men before they were discovered and subjected to a devastating hail of enemy automatic weapons fire. Lieutenant Hoyem, with complete disregard for personal safety, dashed across the exposed fire-swept terrain, urging his men to follow. After reaching the wounded men, they were preparing to evacuate them when they were again in danger of annihilation from an enemy machine gun which fired upon them, blocking their route of escape. Lieutenant Hoyem, again displaying outstanding courage, took up an exposed position and fired upon the enemy emplacement, successfully silencing it until the protective screen of mortar smoke he had called for had taken effect. With this protective screen they succeeded in reaching the friendly lines, thereby saving the lives of many men who otherwise would have been lost. The outstanding heroism displayed by Lieutenant Hoyem reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered Federal service from Missoula, Montana.

Hritz, 1LT Eugene J. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hubbard, CPL Walter C. (2ID) (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 75 - 4 April 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with Letter "V" device is posthumously awarded to Corporal Walter C. Hubbard, RA14326557, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea, On that date his unit was cut off from the main body of the battalion by an overwhelming number of the enemy and subjected to intense small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire from a hostile roadblock, suffering heavy casualties. Corporal Hubbard volunteered to drive the first of several vehicles loaded with wounded soldiers in need of immediate medical aid through the roadblock to an aid station. Having driven half way through the fireswept roadblock, he was struck by mortar shell fragments and, briefly losing consciousness, slumped over the steering while. A subconscious and innate devotion to duty compelled him to straighten out again, look back and realize that the vehicles behind him with their wounded could not pass if his halted vehicle blocked the road. With a final desperate effort, he mustered his waning strength to steer his vehicle off the road so the other vehicles could quickly pass him and escape the danger zone. The heroism and utter devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Hubbard reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from North Carolina.

Huber, 1LT John F. (2nd ID)

General Orders No. 232 - 27 June 1953
Headquarters 2nd Infantry Division

First Lieutenant John F. Huber, 01862108, Infantry, United States Army, Headquarters, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by meritorious service from 13 March 1953 to 27 June 1953. During that period as a Platoon Leader in a Rifle Company and then as Battalion S-2, performing all his duties in a superior manner. His outstanding leadership and thorough knowledge of military procedures enabled him to make a success of each position. The services rendered by Lieutenant Huber reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Huber, SGT Kenneth C. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hubet, LT Daniel L. (3rd ID)

Hubona, PFC William (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 1171 - 16 June 1951

Private First Class William Hubona, ER57507991, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery A, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 17 May 1951 in the vicinity of Umyang-ni, Korea.  On that date Private Hubona was a member of a Forward Observer Party attached to Company L, 9th Infantry Regiment.  The Company was being attacked by a strong enemy force.  During the entire time of attack, Private Hubona, showing complete disregard for his own personal safety, went from one wounded man to another giving first aid and comfort.  He directed and assisted in the removal of wounded men from the highest point of a hill where the heaviest fighting was concentrated.  Private Hubona's actions on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Hudak, James J.

[KWE Note: The following was sent to the Korean War Educator by Corporal Hudak's daughter, Marlene A. King.]

"According to newspaper clippings, my father, Cpl. James J. Hudak, of 804 Waddell Avenue, Clairton, Pennsylvania attended Clairton High school. After being drafted in 1950, he arrived in Korea early 1951.  Assigned to U.S. Army Headquarters Battery, 48th Field Artillery Battalion, he was involved in Sniper Ridge and Triangle Hill assaults on the Kumhwa Valley at the Korean Central Front. He received a shrapnel wound in the right arm during a Chinese Communist artillery bombardment and was treated at 279th General Hospital in Osaka, Japan. After recovery he was sent back to the battlefield near Mando, Korea.

On October 6 1952, heavy fire and artillery barrage severed all wire communications to the friendly fire observers. Corporal Hudak realized the vital necessity for contact with the forward observer so he left comparative safety at his base, drove three miles with no regard for his personal safety through enemy lines to procure and personally deliver a replacement. This act was a major factor in repulsing the enemy. Cpl. James Hudak was awarded by Lt. Colonel Franklin M. Turnbull, the Bronze Star, Army Commendations, the U.N. Service Ribbon and the Korean Service Ribbon.

Dubbed The "fighting Hudaks" are James and his brothers who served, including Paul Hudak, WWII Arm; William Hudak, WWII Navy, and Robert Hudak, WWII Navy.

Please include this information in your listing as history is a most important teacher.  Let Us Never Forget the Price of Freedom."

Hudson, Capt. Carl (24ID)

24th Infantry Division Headquarters
General Orders No. 6 - 4 January 1951

The Bronze Star Medal (with letter “V” device authorized) is awarded to Chaplain (Captain) Carl H. Hudson, 0970221, (then First Lieutenant), Chaplain Corps, U.S. Army, a member of Headquarters 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic action near Osan, Korea, on 4 – 5 July 1950. His regiment was making its initial stand against overwhelming numbers of the advancing enemy. Throughout the engagement Chaplain Hudson repeatedly performed many acts of heroism and complete devotion to his fellow men. Completely unmindful of his own safety he exposed himself time and again ministering to and aiding in the evacuation of the wounded. When the order to withdraw was received he moved among the men, encouraging them with words of solace and inspiring them to highest possible degree of determination. Chaplain Hudson’s exemplary actions and complete devotion to the men of his command aided materially in the successful withdrawal, saved the lives of many of his comrades and reflect great credit on himself and the U.S. Chaplains Corps. Entered military service from Old Ocean, Texas.

Huertas-Marrero, PFC Pedro (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Huff, SGT Sidney L. (24ID)

General Orders No. 18 - 10 January 1952

Sergeant Sidney L. Huff, RA17281491, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company L, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic action near Kumsong, Korea, on 20 October 1951. As his company attacked an enemy-occupied hill, it was subjected to intense small arms fire. Sergeant Huff, Squad Leader, observed three of his men fall wounded in exposed positions. He immediately left his position of relative cover in order to bring back the wounded men and, with complete disregard for his own safety, advanced through the devastating hail of enemy fire to the men’s positions. After bringing two of the men to safety, he went forward for the third time. As he started back with the third man, he was wounded by grenade fragments but disregarded the wound and succeeded in returning with the wounded man to friendly lines. As a result of his fearless efforts, the wounded soldiers were taken out of extreme danger and were given immediate medical treatment. Sergeant Huff’s heroic action, daring initiative and selfless devotion to his comrades reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered service from Odebol.

Huffman, 1LT Kenneth E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hughes, Bruce Jeryl "BJ" (posthumous)

Hughes, PVT Claude E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hughes, CPL Howard R. (2ID)

The Bronze Star Medal with Letter "V" device is awarded to Corporal Howard R. Hughes, RA16314240, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. On that date his battalion was fighting its way out of a hostile ambush. Corporal Hughes voluntarily left his place in a column and dashed up a hill from which a pillbox was inflicting heavy fire upon friendly troops. Together with one comrade, he destroyed the enemy position and then proceeded to disperse a group of the enemy, killing many of them with weapons he found along the way. The heroism in action demonstrated by Corporal Hughes reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Indiana.

Hughes, PFC John A. (ARMY)

Hughes, CAPT John F. (7th Med. Btrn.)

Captain John F. Hughes, 0-976456, Medical Corps, United States Army, Clearing Company, 7th Medical Battalion, distinguished himself by heroic action in the vicinity of Onchon-Ni, Korea, on 9 October 1950. On this date, a division convoy, en route to Pusan, Korea, was ambushed and prevented from proceeding. Casualties consisted of six killed and twelve wounded in action. Without regard for his personal safety, Captain Hughes voluntarily advanced to a position approximately one thousand yards forward of the nearest friendly troops and, under heavy enemy fire and constant observation, administered medical care to the wounded men. Upon arrival of litter bearers, Captain Hughes proceeded further forward to two casualties in the immediate area of the enemy. After directing cover fire upon the enemy, he succeeded in treating and evacuating the two wounded men. The heroism displayed by Captain Hughes on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Massachusetts.

Hughes, CPL Robert H. (3rd ID)

Hughes, CPL Sidney R. (25ID, Med. Co., 35th Rgt.)

Humiston, Pfc. Donald L. (2ID) (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 306 - 08 September 1952

The Bronze Star Medal with “V” Device is posthumously awarded to Private First Class Donald L. Humiston, US51009909, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroism in action on 21 July 1952 in the vicinity of Chorwon, North Korea. On that date, Private Humison was a member of an ambush patrol which was sent in front of the Main Line of Resistance. When returning to friendly lines, the patrol was attacked by an overwhelming number of the enemy. Private Humiston, disregarding personal safety, returned deadly fire upon the enemy. He took his damaged radio from his back and continued to send a steady stream of fire at the enemy. The patrol leader ordered three men to go back to friendly lines for reinforcements, while the rest covered them with protective fire. Private Humiston chose to remain, but cheered them on while distracting the enemy with a stream of deadly fire. The numerically superior enemy force overpowered the remaining members of the patrol before reinforcements could arrive. The heroism in action displayed by Private Humiston reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Connecticut.

Hunt, Capt. Willard C.

Hunt, William T. (USN)

Hunter, CAPT Clyde E. (25ID, Hq & Hq Co., 1st Bn., 35th Rgt.)

Hunter, PVTG Vern P. (25th DivArty) (GO98, 29Aug50)

Hunter, SGT William E. (1st CAV)

Huntsman, Gary S. (USN)

Hutchenson, CAPT Henry E. Jr. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hyde, MSGT Randal E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Hyun, Sihak (ROKN)

 

 

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