Topics - Bronze Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "K"

 
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Kabadelis, LT Christos G. (3rd ID)

Kadlec, SFC Vaclav B. (3rd ID)

Kail, CDR Robert Belden (USN)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Bronze Star Medal with Combat "V" to Commander Robert Belden Kail (NSN: 0-75100), United States Navy, for meritorious service as Plans Officer on the Staff of Commander Task Force Ninety-Five from 25 October 1950 to 21 June 1951. By his excellent tactical skill, keen foresight, and broad planning, he gave invaluable assistance to the force commander in the formulation and implementation of plans for naval warfare by this task force in successful action against the enemy. Constantly changing situations required his utmost in broad and complex planning. During combat operations against the east coast ports of Wonsan, Songjin, and Choongjin, Korea, aboard the U.S.S. Manchester (CL-83), he particularly distinguished himself by his intensive application to duty in the preparation of plans and supervision of the implementation thereof during long periods of active intense tactical operations against the enemy while ships of this task force were exposed repeatedly to enemy shore battery fire and minefields. In addition he served with distinction on this Staff aboard the U.S.S. Dixie (AD-14) in the naval bombardment of Kosong, and Kansong, Korea, on the east coast, and on the U.S.S. Bataan (CVL-29) during aerial strikes against the enemy's west coast shipping and land forces. By his perseverance, judgment and conscientious devotion to the fulfillment of his duties, he contributed immeasurably to the successful conduct of actions against the enemy which included blockade, anti-mining, siege of enemy cities, destruction and disruption of the enemy's sea and land transportation system and gunfire support for our own forces. His courage and aggressive leadership were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Kalinowsky, PFC Henry (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 16 June 1951

Private First Class Henry Kalinowsky, RA12287147, Medical Corps, 2d Medical Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 28 May 1951, in the vicinity of Kung-Dong, Korea.  His mission on this date was to render medical assistance to members of Battery "B", 82d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled) during operations against the enemy.  He was with an Antiaircraft Automatic Weapons Section when he left the comparative safety of an M-16 to aid wounded men along the road.  In one instance it was necessary for him to expose himself to heavy small arms and mortar fire to assist a wounded comrade while in full view of the enemy.  Without regard for his own safety he negotiated this open area and successfully evacuated the wounded man to a place of cover.  This action undoubtedly saved the wounded man's life.  His intrepidity in the face of a deadly hail of observed enemy fire served as an inspiration to the troops that he was assisting and aided materially to the successful accomplishment of their mission.  The actions of Private Kalinowski, on this date reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New York.

Kalla, CPL Arthur R. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 682 - 5 November 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Corporal Arthur R. Kalla, US55037644, (the Private First Class), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Company, 1 Battalion, 9 Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 3 October 1951 in the vicinity of Tondul, Korea. On this date, Corporal Kalla, a wireman, was assigned to a wire laying crew which was to accompany a patrol to lay wires. As the patrol advanced, the supply of wire ran out. After calling for more wire, the patrol leader left a few riflemen as protection for the wire crew and proceeded toward his objective. An enemy patrol suddenly stumbled upon the waiting group, and during the brief fire fight that followed, two men from the group were seriously wounded. Corporal Kalla, though painfully wounded, left his position of safety to guide and assist his wounded comrades back to friendly lines. In spite of the uncertainty of the enemy position and prevailing darkness, Corporal Kalla successfully guided his comrades to safety. The outstanding devotion to duty and comrades displayed by Corporal Kalla on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Collegeville, Minnesota.

Kaminski, CAPT M.B. (Btry B, 21st AAA AW)

Kane, MAJ Charles F. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 87 - 5 November 1950

Major Charles F. Kane, 043046, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 16 September 1950 near Changnyong, Korea.  On this date, he was on an observation post on the side of a hill, observing, coordinating and reporting the progress of his battalion, as it attacked enemy positions on another hill.  When the enemy fire upon the observation post became so intense that it was necessary for all other personnel to withdraw, he remained and moved into an even more exposed position on the side of the hill facing the enemy, where his observation was better.  In complete disregard for his own safety, he stayed in this dangerous position, reporting movements of the enemy forces to the companies of the battalion, so that they were able to bring more accurate fire upon the enemy and ultimately destroy him.  His heroic conduct under severe enemy mortar and artillery fire was a decisive factor in the final success of our forces in this engagement.  The heroism and coolness while under fire displayed by Major Kane on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Kangers, SGT James A. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Karas, CPL Paul R. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kastner, PFC Roy J. (8th FAB, 25ID) (GO80, 21Aug50)

Kats, CPL Harold J. (2ID)

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Corporal Harold J. Kats, ER55009320, (then Private First Class), Army Medical Service, Army of the United States, a member of Medical Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 24 January 1951 in the vicinity of Wonju, Korea. Corporal Kats was a medical aidman with an armored combat patrol. While the patrol was in progress, Corporal Kats noticed an injured man lying in the road. Although a deadly hail of enemy fire swept the road, he left his position and, with the help of a South Korean soldier, placed the man on a stretcher and carried him to safety. The outstanding courage of Corporal Kats reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Nebraska.

Kauahi, Alexander K. (5th RCT)

Kaw, SGT Louis E. (3rd ID)

Kaye, Alan J. (USN)

Kangers, SGT James A. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kappes, SFC Harold A. (7ID, Co. A, 13 Eng. Combat Bn.)

Kaufman, SFC Lawrence (Service Co., 15th Inf. Rgt, 3rd ID)

Kawahara, PVT Masayoshi (2ID) (KIA)

Kean, 1LT William M. (ARMY)

Keane, Dennis J. Jr. (USN)

Keane, Paul A. (USN)

Kearns, SGT C.J. (Army - General's aide)

Kearns, 1LT Ralph E. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 217 - 24 June 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to First Lieutenant Ralph E. Kearns, 02047379, Medical Service Corps, Army of the United States, a member of Medical Company, 38 Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 16 and 17 May 1951 in the vicinity of Saoranc-chi, Korea. Lieutenant Kearns was in command of a forward aid station which was supporting a rifle battalion under heavy enemy attack. Because of the difficult terrain and due to darkness, the evacuation of wounded was seriously hampered and rendered extremely dangerous. Lieutenant Kearns, with total disregard for his safety, led his medical personnel on repeated trips to the front line positions, often going alone, and evacuated wounded directly from their foxholes, removed than to defiladed areas, treated and evacuated them to the rear, carrying these operations out in the face of the heavy fire and without individual protection. The heroism displayed by Lieutenant Kearns reflects great credit upon himself and the military serv1ce. Entered the military service from Nebraska.

Keating, 2LT Gerald H. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kederich, LTCOL Charles H. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Keckler, SFC James T. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kederich, LT COL Charles H. Jr. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Keeling, LT William O. (21st AAA AW)

Keeter, Donald Ray

Keffas, PFC John (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Keith, LT COL John W. Jr. (2ID) (First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 87 - 5 November 1950
Amended by Section V, GO 49 - 24 February 1951

Lieutenant Colonel John W. Keith, Jr., 032482, Artillery, United States Army, Commanding Officer, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 1 September 1950 in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea.  On this date enemy forces had penetrated the defensive lines of the infantry regiment which his battalion was supporting.  Despite the danger of having his positions overrun, he kept his battalion in position and delivered a continuous barrage of fire which caused severe casualties upon the enemy.  When enemy small arms fire finally forced the withdrawal of the battalion he personally and with complete disregard for his own safety supervised the displacement of the batteries.  He continually exposed himself to enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire throughout the day and displaced his batteries at the last possible moment.  The continuity and volume of fire that was made possible by the actions of Colonel Keith slowed the advance of the enemy forces until the infantry could reorganize and reestablish a final line of resistance.  Colonel Keith's outstanding display of leadership and heroism reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Alabama.

Kelder, SFC Robert D.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 80 - August 09, 1950

Sergeant First Class Robert D. Kelder, RA32148675, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company D, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement on 6 July 1950 at Pyongtaek, Korea. During an enemy attack the machinegun platoon of which Sergeant First Class Kelder was a member was subject to heavy small arms, artillery, and direct tank fire. Communications became disrupted and the platoon did not receive the orders to withdraw. The platoon became surrounded and after fighting their way out, Sergeant Kelder and the members of his platoon found themselves in enemy territory. Remaining behind enemy lines for about 40 hours, Sergeant First Class Kelder and his men finally made their way through the lines without a casualty and rejoined their parent organization. Intelligence information gathered during their stay behind the enemy lines proved to be of great value to the company. This act of heroic achievement on the part of Sergeant First Class Kelder reflects great credit on himself and the military service. He entered the service from New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Keller, CPL Robert G. (24ID)

By direction of the President, Corporal Robert G. Keller, U552056039 Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company C, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal with V device for heroic achievement near Pangdangdong-ni, Korea, on 19 and 20 October 1951. As his company attacked strongly defended enemy positions, it met with exceedingly strong resistance. Corporal Keller, 57mm Recoilless Rifleman, exposed himself constantly to devastating enemy fire as he moved well forward to fire into enemy bunkers and positions. In the hours of darkness, the enemy made a strong counterattack, forcing the friendly unit to withdraw temporarily. Corporal Keller, picking up a rifle, maintained covering fire for his comrades as they withdrew and was one of the last men to leave his position in the face of the enemy attack. As a result of his tenacious determination, his comrades were ab1e to regroup and successfully complete their mission. Corporal Keller’s heroic action, daring initiative and selfless devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered service from Cleveland, Ohio. (24th Div GO 1, 2 Jan 1952)

Keller, 1LT Robert S. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kelley, CAPT Thomas E. (50th AAA AW Bn.)

Kempfer, SFC Marvin (Co. C, 65th Engineer Combat Btn, 25th ID)

Kendrick, 1LT Bobbie J. (25ID)

First Lieutenant Bobbie J. Kendrick, 02206091, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 25 August 1950 after Company F had advanced some 100 yards in the vicinity of Chonpyong-dong, Korea to secure a line of departure for other forces, the latter were delayed and Company F came under such deadly hostile mortar and small arms fire that withdrawal was necessary.  Seeing that a wounded man had fallen in the attacked area, Lieutenant Kendrick rushed out amidst the mortar shells and intense sniper fire to aid and evacuate the man.  He then returned again to the exposed sector, withdrawing to his lines only after all other wounded had been brought to safety.  Lieutenant Kendrick's courageous devotion to his comrades reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Kendrick, PFC Leon L. (25ID, Co. K, 35th Rgt.)

Kennedy, CPL French L. (24ID)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - 30 September 1954

Corporal (then private first class) French L. Kennedy, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement in Korea from 2 July to 15 July 1950. During a delaying and covering action fought by his unit in the "P'yongtaek-Taejon" area Corporal Kennedy displayed outstanding courage while service as a machine gunner Corporal Kennedy constantly exposed himself to danger in order to deliver effective fire against the enemy. Corporal Kennedy voluntarily remained behind during withdrawals to lay a base of machine gun fire which contributed materially in saving lives of friendly forces and inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. His actions helped to break up hostile attacks, delaying and disorganizing the main attacking forces. Corporal Kennedy's courageous actions and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Balbour County, West Virginia.

Kennedy, PFC Paul T. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 139 - 10 September 1950

Private First Class Paul T. Kennedy, RA14284542, Infantry, Company A, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 2 August 1950 near Chindong-ni, Korea, Private First Class Kennedy and three other enlisted men discovered a medium tank, the turret of which had been damaged by an enemy antitank gun.  Although he was unfamiliar with the operation of a tank, Private First Class Kennedy assisted in returning it to the battalion area.  When the enemy attacked the following morning, Private First Class Kennedy, acting as crewman with the three others as driver, gunner and crewman, moved the tank into position and directed fire on the attacking forces, notwithstanding the hazards of an open turret.  When the 76mm gun jammed, the crew moved the tank around the perimeter directing 30 and 50 calibre machine gun fire on the enemy, until all ammo had been expended.  While seeking more ammunition he had to abandon the tank when the turret jammed and the tank was set afire.  By their bold and ingenious actions, Private First Class Kennedy and the crew had destroyed two hostile machine gun positions and inflicted numerous casualties on the enemy.  The resourcefulness, initiative and courage of Private First Class Kennedy reflect the greatest credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Georgia.

Kennedy, CAPT Robert A. (24ID, Med. Tank Co., 5th Rgt.) (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Kenney, 1LT Joseph J. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kent, CPL Fred A. (25ID) (valor)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 218 - 18 April 1951

Corporal Fred A. Kent, RA16297023, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 22 September 1950 near Paedun-ni, Korea, while scaling a steep hill, Corporal Kent's squad was subjected to intense fire from the enemy entrenched on the peak.  Despite the necessity of traversing a large, open area through automatic weapons fire and bursting grenades, he made repeated trips to an adjacent hill to inform his platoon leader of the progress of the attack and to receive further instructions.  By thus ensuring close coordination with the rest of the platoon, he contributed materially to the effective accomplishment of the mission.  Corporal Kent's courage, determination and selfless devotion to duty are in keeping with the great traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Michigan.

Kenyon, 2LT George N. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kerr, MSGT Ambrose P. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kersey, PVT James B. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kershner, PVT Conrad M. (3rd ID)

Kerstetter, PFC Robert H. (HQ & HQ Co., 2d BN, 35th Inf. Rgt., 25ID)

Kesler, 1LT John W. (24ID) (GOS 166 - 6 October 1950)

Kibele, MAJ Elbert E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kierstead, SGT Maxwell S. (24ID, Co. A, 3d Eng. Combat Bn.)

Kilbreth, CPL Oather (27th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO59, 16Aug50)

Kilgore, CPL Edgar E. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 1225 - 31 May 1951

Corporal Edgar E. Kilgore, RA8334450, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery D, 82d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, (Self-propelled), 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 10 January 1951 in the vicinity of Chechon, Korea.  Corporal Kilgore was a crew member of an Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Combat vehicle assigned to support a combat infantry patrol whose mission was to reach Wonju, inflict as many enemy casualties as possible, and return.  As a result of a running firefight on the return trip, five men in the infantry patrol were surrounded by the enemy.  Corporal Kilgore, together with the other members of his vehicle, voluntarily returned to the area now occupied in force by the enemy to attempt to rescue the five infantrymen.  By employing effective covering fire, Corporal Kilgore and his crew prevented the capture and loss of life of the infantrymen.  The heroism and selfless attitude displayed by Corporal Kilgore reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Arkansas.

Killam, CPL Chester L. (DivHQ, 25ID) (GO55, 13Aug50)

Killeen, Chaplain P.A. (USN)

Killion, 1LT William J. (1CAV)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 61 - 18 August 1954

First Lieutenant William J. Killion, Infantry (then second lieutenant), a member of Company E, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, distinguished himself by heroic conduct in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Unsan, Korea, on 2 November 1950. His platoon occupied a defensive position, overlooking the command post position of his battalion, when enemy forces launched a strong and determined attack on the battalion while it was in the process of moving to new positions. Lieutenant Killion observed that the battalion had been cut off and had established a limited perimeter defense. Without orders, he promptly organized his platoon and formulated plans preparatory to striking the enemy in order to relieve the pressure of hostile action against friendly troops. Then under cover of darkness, Lieutenant Killion successfully struck the enemy from their rear, inflicted heavy casualties, broke through into the perimeter, and assisted in holding off hostile forces until plans could be completed for a breakout. Aggressively he continued to lead reconnaissance patrols, many times in enemy territory, and attempted to reach friendly lines. During these actions he was captured by Communist forces. Lieutenant Killion's courageous action and outstanding leadership reflect credit on himself and the military service.

Kilner, SFC Edward A. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 110 - 17 May 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with Letter "V" device is awarded to Sergeant First Class Edward A. Kilner, RA15292439, (then Sergeant), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company M, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. The mortar platoon in which Sergeant Kilner was a gunner was attached to a rifle company in action against fierce and determined attacks by a numerically superior enemy. The mortar platoon and rifle company had been encircled by the enemy. In order to shift his mortar fire quickly to all parts of the perimeter, Sergeant Kilner resolutely grasped the tube in his hands, thus permitting utmost fire mobility. Firmly holding the hot tube and calmly shifting his fire from target to target, heedless of the enemy fire striking in his proximity, he accounted for heavy casualties among the enemy and enabled the rifle company and his platoon to withdraw to better positions. The heroism displayed by Sergeant Kilner reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Ohio.

Kim, PFC Charles (ARMY)

Kim, CAPT Kim Ki Do, Number 64, Korean National Police Force, 25 July to 30 September 1950

Kim, Young Oak

King, 1LT Charles D. (Med. Co., 24th Inf. Rgt., 25ID)

King, CPL Ernest R. King (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 410 - 8 August 1951

Corporal Ernest R. King, RA13330130, Armor, United States Army, a member of Company A, 72d Tank Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement near Agok, Korea on 31 August 1950.  On this occasion Corporal King was a member of a tank crew located in a blocking position overlooking the Naktong River.  During the night a numerically superior enemy force attacked and quickly overran adjacent infantry positions.  From the surrounded tank Corporal King fought over nine hours before retiring some eight miles to new friendly positions.  As a result of this action an estimated 250 enemy were killed and the enemy was delayed long enough to allow friendly units to complete their withdrawal.  The courage and devotion to duty displayed by Corporal King reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Virginia.

King, PVT James A. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 77 - 9 April 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Private James A. King, RA17171943, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 27 November 1950 in the vicinity of Kamak-Tong, Korea. On that date he was a radio operator for a mortar forward observer party attached to a rifle company. Under cover of heavy mortar, artillery, and automatic weapons fire, a strong enemy force launched an assault. Private King exposed himself constantly by moving from one point to another in order to secure the best possible position for transmitting firing orders. Throughout the action he displayed a complete disregard for his personal safety and his courageous actions were instrumental in slowing the enemy advance. The heroism displayed by Private King reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

King, 1LT Raymond W. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

King, 1LT Robert A. (25ID)

First Lieutenant Robert A. King, 050797, Infantry, Company G, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On the night of 25 July 1950, Lieutenant King commanded the rear guard of his regiment which was withdrawing to more tenable positions near Tangso-u, Korea.  Although hard-pressed by an overwhelmingly superior number of enemy troops which threatened a flanking attack to the right, Lieutenant King so skillfully employed his troops, inspiring them by his personal example of calm courage under the heavy artillery, mortar and direct tank fire, that they provided effective cover against formidable hostile forces and permitted the regiment to take up firm defensive positions.  Lieutenant King's staunch and valorous leadership is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Kentucky.

Kingery, PFC Delbert D. (24th ID)

General Orders No. 205 - 27 October 1950
Headquarters 24th Division

Private First Class Delbert D. Kingery, RA37686673, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company D, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal with V device for heroic achievement in action against the enemy in the vicinity of the Naktong River on 5 August 1950. During an attack on well fortified enemy hilltop emplacements, his unit was erroneously attacked by friendly aircraft supporting the infantry. Realizing the seriousness of the situation and the possibilities of needless casualties, Private Kingery left his position of relative safety and although exposed to both the strafing and enemy fire, secured an air identification panel, dashed to the top of the hill and displayed it in such a manner that the air attack was discontinued. Through his courage and fearless devotion to duty, many casualties were prevented, and the attack was successfully completed. His heroic actions reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Knoxville, Iowa.

Kingsboro, PVT Robert M. (3rd ID)

Kingston, 2LT Joseph P. (7ID)

Headquarters, 7ID
General Orders No. 80 - 1 November 1950

Second Lieutenant Joseph P. Kingston, 0-59386, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroic actions against an armed enemy near Seoul, Korea, on 26 September 1950. On this date, while his platoon was advancing up a steep hill, Lieutenant Kingston moved out ahead of the platoon and reached the enemy entrenchments where he captured two enemy soldiers. He then teamed up with one of his men and cleaned out the hill which was honeycombed with entrenchments, capturing nine more enemy soldiers before they had a chance to fire on his platoon. These actions enabled his platoon to capture the enemy strong-point without a single casualty, even though the enemy had perfect observation. His courageous leadership was an inspiration to his men and reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Washington.

Kinnebrow, SGT Londell (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 231 - 18 October 1950

Sergeant Londell Kinnebrow, RA34073650, Ordnance Corps, 725th Ordnance Maintenance Company, United States Army.  From 20 July to 25 September 1950 during the early phase of the Korean conflict Sergeant Kinnebrow performed outstanding service as a tank maintenance and repairman.  His technical knowledge, untiring persistence, and initiative were instrumental in minimizing the normal delay in servicing damaged equipment during a period of highly critical shortages.  He frequently made repairs in the field in hazardous positions under constant threat of enemy attack.  Sergeant Kinnebrow's professional proficiency and courageous devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Louisiana.

Kinney, PFC Floyd W. (3rd ID)

Kirchofer, 1LT Roger B. (2ID)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - 30 September 1954

First Lieutenant Roger B. Kirchofer, Infantry, United States Army, a member of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division distinguished himself by heroic conduct in action against the enemy in the Mug-Gol sector of Korea, on 18 and 19 May 1951. Units of the 1st Battalion had suffered serious casualties, their organization was disrupted and the remains of the battalion were encircled by enemy forces. Lieutenant Kirchofer assumed command an, with disregard to hazards to his own life, he led his comrades in a determined effort to effect a breakthrough. Although the enemy troops were located in positions on higher ground and were delivering heavy fire against the surrounded troops, an attack was launched which succeeded in forcing the enemy to withdraw with heavy casualties. Upon reaching the area where it was expected to join with friendly forces, Lieutenant Kirchofer observed that the area was completely occupied by hostile forces. Lieutenant Kirchofer then ordered his men to break up into small groups and to move back to friendly lines under cover of darkness. Lieutenant Kirchofer voluntarily remained in charge of his wounded comrades in order to surrender to the enemy with hopes that the wounded would receive medical attention. Lieutenant Kirchofer's courage, determination of purpose and unwavering devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Kirk, SGT Donald J. (3rd ID)

Kirkland, MSGT Joe P. (24ID, co. d, 6th Med Tank Bn.)

Kittleson, PFC Albert L. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Klavins, CPL Eriks (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kleinman, MAJ Forrest (24ID)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 166 - 6 October 1950

Major Forrest Kleinman, 0335972, Infantry, United States Army, then a member of First Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement near Chinju, Korea, on 30 July 1950. During the defense of the Chinju-Masan road he organized 300 South Korean troops to augment the then under-strength battalions. Personally directing these troops to positions, he was continuously exposed to enemy fire. Without regard for his own safety, he remained in forward positions orienting the troops and effectively directing their fire on the advancing enemy. Through his heroic actions and outstanding ability, he aided materially in the successful accomplishment of the battalion’s mission. His devotion to duty and fearless example reflect great credit to himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Vancouver, Washington.

Kleion, CAPT Walter A. (Army)

Klepadlo, CAPT Walter E. (2ID)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 67 - 11 December 1962

Captain Walter E. Klepadlo, O2097136 (then First Lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, while serving with company "C", 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement during ground combat against an armed enemy on 16 July 1953, in the vicinity of Ansan, North Korea. While performing a mission of laying trip flares in front of the positions of Outpost "Harry", Captain Klepadlo and his five man detail were suddenly subjected to intense enemy mortar and small arms fire. Realizing there would be no advantage in making a stand because of the size and exposed position of his group, he directed his men to return to the Outpost. Exposing himself to enemy fire, Captain Klepadlo covered the withdrawal of his men with his weapon and checked to see that no one was left behind. Only when he was satisfied that the group had reached the Outpost did he leave his position. By his calm, decisive action in this hazardous situation, the group was able to withdraw in an orderly manner and casualties were averted. Captain Klepadlo's heroic action reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Kline, PFC Robert (HQ, 2nd BN)

Kline, CAPT Walter A. (Army) (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 45 - 28 August 1957

Captain Walter A. Klein, (then First Lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on "Old Baldy" Hill, Korea, on 19 September 1952. Given the mission of taking an important point on the hill and holding it until reinforcements could be brought up, Captain Klein began the assault across terrain under excellent enemy observation. When effective enemy small arms fire inflicted numerous casualties and threatened to repulse the action, Captain Klein encouraged his men and led them to the crest of the hill. When finally forced to withdraw by overwhelming numbers, Captain Klein assured that all wounded were evacuated before he sought safety. The courage and leadership displayed by Captain Klein reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Klundt, CPL Gustav A. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 122 - 28 May 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Corporal Gustav A. Klundt, RA39454666, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company G, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 11 February 1951 in the vicinity of Yulmuk, Korea. Transporting vitally needed ammunition to his unit from the battalion supply point, he encountered an enemy roadblock and received heavy fire from both sides. Although painfully wounded, he continued forward until he reached his unit, allowing himself to be treated only after the ammunition had been distributed. The courage and devotion to duty of Corporal Klundt reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from North Dakota.

Kluss, 2LT Byron C. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 243 - 29 June 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Second Lieutenant Byron C. Kluss, 0974392, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company I, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 2 June 1951 in the vicinity of Inje, Korea. While Company I was moving into defensive positions, it came under intense enemy mortar and artillery fire, which caused the unit to become disorganized. When the company commander fell wounded, Lieutenant Kluss immediately started reorganizing the company. Disregarding the intense enemy mortar and artillery fire, he moved back and forth placing platoons and squads in defensive positions. His quick action and alert leadership saved many lives and was directly responsible for the successful completion of the company’s mission. Lieutenant Kluss’ heroism reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Knapp, 1LT John H. (25th ID)

Headquarters 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 239 - 22 October 1950

First Lieutenant John H. Knapp, 02200330, Quartermaster Corps, 25th Quartermaster Company, United States Army. As motor officer of his company from 31 July to 25 September 1950 in Korea, Lieutenant Knapp rendered outstanding service. On many occasions Lieutenant Knapp was exposed to enemy fire while recovering vehicles damaged by hostile action and mechanical failure. His technical knowledge and experience resulted in continuous operation of a maximum number of trucks to transport vital supplies and troops. Lieutenant Knapp's courageous devotion to duty while covering the entire Division front and extended supply lines subjected to land mines and small arms fire contributed materially to the successful combat operations of his unit and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from New York.

Knapp, N.C. (American Red Cross)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 236 - 22 October 1950

N.C. Knapp, Field Director, American Red Cross, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army.  From 12 July to 30 September 1950 Mr. Knapp displayed outstanding courage and exceptional efficiency in the performance of his duties as Senior Representative of the American Red Cross and with the 25th Infantry Division in Korea.  He travelled extensively on hazardous roads exposed to hostile fire to provide welfare services for military personnel on numerous occasions.  He visited the most forward position to convey information on home conditions to the combat troops.  At Mamwen, Korea when American prisoners of war were librated following capture of the town by United Nations Forces, he worked tirelessly to provide these men with numerous personal items not available to them during their interment and wrote individual letters to the families of each of the men.  Throughout his association with the Division in Korea, Mr. Knapp's services have been characterized by an enthusiastic approach to his assignment and a sincere appreciation of the importance of his role of providing welfare services for tactical troops under combat conditions.  By his heroic, enthusiastic and selfless regard for the welfare of his comrades which reflects the highest credit on himself and the American Red Cross, Mr. Knapp made an invaluable contribution to the maintenance of high morals in the Division and therefore to its success in the Korean conflict.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Knapp, 1LT Richard (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Knaust, PFC Donald L. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

Private First Class Donald L. Knaust, RA57509045, Corps of Engineers, United States Army, a member of Company B, 2d Engineer Combat Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement from 14 to 17 February 1951 in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea.  Company B was part of the 23d Regimental Combat Team which was surrounded by hostile forces.  The regimental perimeter was under constant fire from enemy troops who occupied the commanding terrain in the area.  Private Knaust was a member of a party which was constructing underground shelters for the wounded.  During the period he exposed himself constantly to the heavy enemy fire to gather materials for the necessary construction.  With the comfort and safety of the wounded as his foremost thought, he performed his mission rapidly and efficiently.  The heroism displayed by Private Knaust reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New Jersey.

Knepp, SFC Loren J. (A Co., 160th Inf., 40th ID)

Wounded in action 19 January 1952.  Home of Record: Indiana.

Knight, PVT St. Valentine (3rd ID)

Knight, CAPT Thomas G. Jr. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Knopf, PFC George E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Knorr, PVT John (Bronze Star with V) (Co. E, 7th Inf., 3ID)

18 February 1951

For heroic achievement in connection with military operations against an armed enemy on the morning of 15 December 1950, the outpost platoon of Company "E", 7th Infantry, was attacked in the vicinity of Yongan-ni, Korea, by a numerically superior force of enemy troops.  During the engagement, the mortar positions received several direct hits by enemy fire.  Private Knorr voluntarily moved under heavy enemy fire to the position to retrieve the mortars and, on arrival, discovered that the weapons were damaged and that three mortar crew members were critically wounded.  Realizing that the positions were in danger of being overrun, and completely ignoring the hail of small arms, mortar, and machine gun fire, he destroyed ammunition and assisted the wounded to safety.  Upon the successful evacuation of the wounded, Private Knorr learned that the small arms ammunition supply was running dangerously low and volunteered to cross an area raked by enemy mortar and small arms fire to obtain a resupply.  Private Knorr's courage under fire, his presence of mind, and aggressive spirit, not only saved the lives of the mortar crew, but were instrumental in the successful defense of the platoon position and the repulse of the enemy with heavy losses.  His heroic actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the state of Oklahoma.

Knost, SGT Carroll A. (HQ & HQ Co., 3rd Bat., 15th Inf. Rgt., 3rd ID)

Knull, CPL Albert S. Jr. (3rd ID)

Knupp, PFC Everett L. (ARMY)

Knutson, PFC Marlon D. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kock, Edward B. (USN)

Kohen, Roland J. (USN)

Kohl, MAJ Clement J. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kohl, SGT Gene (3rd ID)

Kokoska, 2LT Stanley R. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kompanik, SFC John R. (90th FAB, 25ID) (GO94, 29Aug50)

Konek, CAPT Edward A. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Korems, 1LT Kendall W. (2ID) (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 16 June 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with Letter “V” device for heroic achievement in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States is awarded to First Lieutenant Kendall W. Korems, 062246, a member of Battery “D”, 82nd Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled), who distinguished himself by heroic achievement against an armed enemy near Amdal-Tong on 25 May 1951. Lieutenant Korems’ platoon was supporting the infantry in the attack when they were caught in a crossfire of small arms and automatic weapons interspersed with mortar fire. Realizing that many of the men lacked combat experience, Lieutenant Korems rushed forward and aid fierce fire, went from M-16 to M-16 directing fire, pointing out targets, and encouraging the men. When one M-16 turret went out of action Lieutenant Korems repaired it himself on the spot thereby exposing himself to still more enemy fire. Lieutenant Koreams’ actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the service from Minnesota.

[KWE Note: Lieutenant Korems' Bronze Star was amended to 1st Oak Leaf Cluster by General Orders No. 212.]

Kornrumpf, SGT Earl R. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kortright, 1LT Manuel (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Koster, SFC Arthur L. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Koudelka, PFC Dennis F.

Kousis, SGT Theodoros V. (Service Co., 15th Inf. Rgt., 3rd ID)

Koutsky, PFC William B. (25ID, Hq & Hq Co., 1st Bn, 35th Rgt.)

Krebs, WOJG Logan A. (24th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO85, 27Aug50)

Kreps, SGT Charles D. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 8y7 - 5 November 1950

Sergeant Charles D. Kreps, RA6884014, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Tank Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 13 August 1950 in the vicinity of Pohang-dong, Korea.  On this date he was a tank commander in a medium tank platoon which was en route to join another unit in an attack on the city of Pohang-dong.  Their route lay through approximately six miles of enemy-held territory.  About one mile from their destination, the lead tank was knocked out when a bridge which it was crossing was destroyed by enemy demolitions.  The blown bridge effectively blocked the narrow road.  Although ordered to withdraw with the rest of the platoon, Sergeant Kreps aided in gathering the wounded crew members of the knocked out tank and placing them on the other tanks.  When his 76mm gun became inoperative, he exposed himself in the turret and fired his carbine at the enemy, with complete disregard for the heavy enemy machine gun and small arms fire, to provide security for his tank. As a result of his courageous actions five wounded men were evacuated and further loss of valuable equipment was prevented.  Sergeant Kreps' courage and devotion to duty on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Krigbaum, 1LT William L. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kruk, CAPT John S. (25ID, Hq & Hq Btry, 25th DivArty)

Krumpach, CAPT Anthony P. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Kubinak, Sumner John (Ranger) (posthumous)

Kuechenmeister, PFC Fred W. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 296 - 15 July 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Private First Class Fred W. Kuechenmeister, ER57509809, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement from 16 May to 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Kunmul-gol, Korea. The enemy had encircled the 1st Battalion during this period. Private Kuechenmeister was a squad leader in the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon and was in charge of an observation post on the battalion’s right flank, from where he directed the fire of his squad upon the enemy positions. During one of the repeated hostile assaults, Private Kuechenmeister calmly waited until the enemy had moved up within a few yards and then had his men open a murderous fire which inflicted staggering losses upon the enemy and threw him back into an artillery barrage. Thus repulsing attack upon attack for 36 consecutive hours, Private Kuechenmeister courageously remained at his post and refused to leave until he received direct orders from his battalion commander to do so. The heroism displayed by Private Kuechenmeister reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Madison, Minnesota.

Kuhns, CPL Homer K. (Co. C, 5th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (posthumous)

Kukahiko, PFC Francis J. (Co. B, 65th Engineer Combat Btn, 25th ID)

Kulik, SGT John N. (Co. F, 15th Inf. Rgt., 3rd ID)

Kupraites, SGT Joseph J. (24ID) (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - 9 July 1954

Sergeant Joseph J. Kupraites, (then corporal), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, First Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement in action against the enemy, near Anju, Korea, on 4 November 1950. When his unit was forced to withdraw as result of a strong attack by numerically superior enemy forces, Corporal Kupraites and two comrades volunteered to remain in position on the crest of a knoll, already by-passed by attacking hostile troops, to delay the enemy and cover the withdrawal of friendly forces. His skillfully placed and accurate fire resulted in numerous enemy casualties, contributed materially to the delay of the fierce hostile attack, and permitted his unit to complete its withdrawal to new defense positions. He fought with tenacious determination until his ammunition supply was nearly exhausted and the enemy had infiltrated into his position in superior force making further resistance impossible. Sergeant Kupraites' courageous actions and devotion to duty reflect credit on himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Brooklyn, New York.

Kurfman, SGT Richard O.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 809 - 3 December 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Sergeant First Class Richard O. Kurfman, US55008057, (then Sergeant), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company B, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 23 September 1951 in the vicinity of Samtae-dong, Korea. On that date during an attack to secure dominating terrain, Sergeant Kurfman led his squad to a point from where better observation of the enemy emplacements could be obtained. In spite of the intense hostile fire, he remained in an exposed position, supervising his men as they dug in and directed their fire on the determined hostile forces, inflicting numerous casualties upon them. In an effort to dislodge the friendly unit, the enemy launched fierce counterattacks, but by Sergeant Kurfman’s inspiring example of bravery under fire and dogged determination his men held their positions. The heroism in action and outstanding leadership displayed by Sergeant Kurfman on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Kuykendall, PVT Bobby (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 87 - 5 November 1950

Private Bobby Kuykendall, RA14280327, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 15 September 1950 in the vicinity of Hyonpung, Korea.  On this date his company was under heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire and was defending its positions against an attack by a numerically superior enemy.  Communication between the elements of the company was disrupted by this heavy fire.  Private Kuykendall, a machine gunner, left the comparative safety of his position and dashed out into the area which was being subjected to heavy hostile fire.  Disregarding the shells bursting about him, and displaying indifference for his personal safety, he repaired all breaks in the wires, thereby restoring communications between the company's platoons.  His heroic action greatly aided his company in its successful defense of its position.  The heroism displayed by Private Kuykendall on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Kuykendall, Walter Dean (2 Bronze Stars)

 

 

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