Topics - Bronze Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "M"

 
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MacCarlie, PFC LeRoy M. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

MacDonald, 1LT Malcolm (2ID)

The citation reads “ for meritorious achievement on 30 November 1950, with Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division, while serving in Korea. First Lieutenant MacDonald volunteered to drive a vehicle and search for wounded soldiers in the area surrounding the unit’s encampment during a heavy enemy attack … MacDonald successfully located and evacuated several of his wounded comrades to a medical facility away from the enemy attack.”

MacDonald, 1LT Roderick (Co. A, 65th Engineer Combat Btn, 25th ID) (posthumous)

MacDonald, William W.R. (USN)

MacGarvey, MAJ Paul D. (1CAV) (3rd Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 104 - 9 June 1951

Major Paul D. MacGarvey (then Captain), 062132, Armor, United States Army, Commanding Officer, Company A, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy), 1st Cavalry Division, for heroism in action against the enemy on 19 October 1950, near Pyongyang, Korea.  Assigned the mission of attacking the capital city of North Korea, a tank-infantry team met stubborn resistance from the enemy in well emplaced positions, bogging down the assault.  Major MacGarvey jumped out of a well concealed position, went to his radio mounted on a one-quarter ton vehicle and, while exposed to heavy fire, gave instructions to his tank platoon leader.  When dissatisfied with this method of communication, he made his way under an intense volume of enemy fire to the tanks and climbed up on one of them to instruct the platoon leader.  Responding to Major MacGarvey's instructions and aggressive leadership, the tanks rolled down the road again and succeeded in launching a fierce attack against the foe.  His selfless action and leadership enabled the tank-infantry team to accomplish the assigned mission.  Major MacGarvey's heroism reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered federal service from Massachusetts.

Machado, MSGT Angel M. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Machcinski, Victor A. Sr.

Machida, PFC Lawrence K. (24ID)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 77 - August 08, 1950

Private First Class Lawrence K. Machida, RA10103322, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 34th infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement on 19 July 1950 at Taejon, Korea. During a withdrawal by Company L, Private First Class Machida and fellow members of his machinegun squad stayed behind to cover the withdrawal. Acting on their own initiative, Private First Class Machida and the other men of his squad kept setting their gun in position and firing until forced to withdraw further to the rear. As a result of their actions, the entire company was able to withdraw safely. This act of heroic achievement on the part of Private First Class Machida reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the service from Honolulu, Hawaii.

MacIntyre, LTCOL Neil R. (USMC)

Mack, William J. (USN)

Mackin, MAJ Joseph W. (USMC)

MacLaren, CAPT William R. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 241 - 22 October 1950

Captain William R. MacLaren, 01000262, Adjutant General's Corps, Headquarters 25th Infantry Division, United States Army.  Serving as assistant adjutant general of the Division Headquarters Forward Echelon from 13 July to 30 September 1950, Captain MacLaren rendered outstanding service by establishing and supervising the newly activated section upon arrival in Korea.  Working long hours with superior skill Captain MacLaren originated sound and efficient policy for processing correspondence, field messages, awards and decorations, and numerous other activities of his section.  His enthusiastic and diligent application to all phases of operations contributed materially to the efficient operation of the headquarters and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from California.

Maconie, Robert T. (USN)

Madden, 1LT Richard A. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Maddux, SFC Cecil J. (25ID, Btry B, 90th FAB)

Mahar, 2LT Thomas A.M. (24th ID) (posthumous)

General Orders No. 47 - 20 July 1950
24th Infantry Division

Second Lieutenant Thomas A.M. 0-2210005, Infantry, United States Army. From 0220 until 0530 on the morning of 16 July 1950, near Taepyong-ni, Korea, the position occupied by Company C, 19th Infantry, was subjected to three mass assaults of enemy infantry, each greatly outnumbering the defending troops. Each assault was repulsed largely due to the courage and outstanding leadership of Lieutenant Mahar. He kept the company commander constantly informed of the situation in his platoon by use of his telephone and encouraged the members of the platoon both by his shouted orders and his own display of courage. He pointed out targets to his men by firing at them himself. His last order to his platoon was: "Don't let them get through." His personal bravery and disregard of his own life encouraged his men to repulse the enemy attack and resulted in heavy casualties to the attacking enemy. He continued to display outstanding leadership until he was killed.

Magner, 1LT George J. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Makar, SGT Michael Jr. (65th Inf., 3rd ID) (2 awards)

Malave, SGT 1C Alfredo (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Malave-Santiago, MSGT Jose B. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Maldonado, SGT Angel W. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Maldonado, CPL Basilio (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Maldonado, MSGT Martin (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Malick, PFC James E. (25ID, Co. C, 27th Rgt.)

Mallette, CPL Donald J. (Co. K, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Manko, Louis T. (50th AAA AW Bn.)

Mandac, SGT Michael (24ID, Co. G, 21st Regt.)

Maney, CPL James (24ID, co. B, 19th Rgt.)

Mann, SGT Donald W. (25ID, Co. D, 5th Rgt.) (posthumous)

Mann, Donald W. (5RCT)

Manning, SFC Rolland E. (3rd ID)

Manson, SFC Marshall G. (Co. B, 65th Engineer Combat Btn, 25th ID)

Marchbanks, 2LT William D. (25ID) (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 233 - 19 October 1950

Second Lieutenant William D. Marchbanks, 02212022, Infantry, Company K [?], 35th Infantry, United States Army.  From 27 July to 25 August 1950 during the early critical phase of the Korean conflict, Lieutenant Marchbanks rendered outstanding service as mortar platoon leader.  Assuming command of the platoon upon the death of his commander, Lieutenant Marchbanks capably supervised his platoon in the execution of difficult fire missions under most adverse conditions of weather, terrain, and enemy action, and was responsible for repelling the determined attack of superior numbers of enemy forces near Anui, Korea.  Lieutenant Marchbanks' initiative, thorough military knowledge, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Marconi, MSGT Peter A. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Marcum, SFC Cecil H.

Marcus, CAPT Gerald R. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Marini-Sandoval, PVT William (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Markley, Chaplain J.H. (USN)

Marlowe, SGT Theodore F. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Marnul, MSGT Frank G. (25ID) (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 180 - 23 September 1950

Master Sergeant Frank G. Marnu, RA6801689, Infantry, Company B, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 21 August 1950 near Sinji, Korea, Master Sergeant Marnul volunteered for a patrol to bring out a group of enemy who had indicated a desire to surrender.  As the patrol started into enemy territory and darkness closed, the group of enemy dispersed slightly and fire opened on the patrol.  At the same time an abandoned truck exploded behind the patrol.  Master Sergeant Marnul calmly assisted the men in finding suitable cover and continued to move among them encouraging them and bettering their positions.  When the search for the surrender group proved fruitless, Master Sergeant Marnul assisted in rallying the patrol and leading it back to safety.  Master Sergeant Marnu's exemplary courage and leadership reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Marquart, CPL Vernon W. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 770 - 26 November 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Corporal Vernon W. Marquart, RA17313746, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company C, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 23 September 1951 in the vicinity of Pia-ri, Korea. On that date Company C was defending its newly-won positions against the fierce counterattacks of a numerically superior enemy force. Under intense hostile automatic weapons fire, the men of Corporal Marquart’s squad became confused and disorganized. He immediately circulated among his men lending words of encouragement and inspiring them to renewed efforts. During this action his unit suffered many casualties, and Corporal Marquart voluntarily crossed the open terrain, exposing himself to the heavy enemy fire, in order to render aid to the wounded men. His courageous actions were highly responsible for his unit being able to maintain its position and as a result of his devotion to his comrades, many lives were saved. The heroic conduct displayed by Corporal Marquart on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Marquez, SFC Luis Jr. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Marquez-Miranda, CAPT Agustin (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Marriot, PVT Leroy T. (Co. A, 65th Engineer Combat Btn, 25th ID)

Marrero-Morales, SGT Jorge A. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Marrero-Velez, SFC German (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Marschke, PFC Otho E. (3rd ID) (posthumous)

Marsh, SGT Jimmy T. (General Orders No. 360 - July 25, 1951)

Marsh, CPL Roland E. (24ID)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 71 - August 06, 1950

Corporal Roland E. Marsh, RA16294538, Infantry, United States Army, member of Company B, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement on 10 July 1950 at Wanton, Korea. While Corporal Marsh’s squad was pinned down by heavy enemy machinegun and small arms fire, he voluntarily exposed himself to fire at the machinegun emplacement. This action cause enemy fire to be drawn to himself thereby enabling his squad to resume the fire fight and prevent the enemy from overrunning the platoon position. This act of heroic achievement on the part of Corporal Marsh reflects great credit on himself and the military service. He entered the service from Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Marshall, CPL Robert H.

In 1951, during the Korean War, Cpl. Robert H. Marshall was ordered to retrieve an abandoned American tank in a river near enemy lines.

Martin, 2LT Clark C. (7ID, Btry B, 48th FAB)

Martin, MAJ Floyd R. (24th ID)

General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

Major Floyd R. Martin, 0-299916, Infantry, a member of the 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement in action against the enemy near Osan, Korea. On 5 July 1950, the 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment was dug in in defensive positions near Osan, Korea. At about 0700 hours thirty-two tanks advanced through the defense position and over-ran the supporting artillery approximately 1500 yards to the rear. The Battalion held the position against repeated enemy infantry attacks that were supported by artillery, mortar and automatic weapons fire. Without regard for personal safety Major Martin moved in exposed positions to perform his duties. When the enemy had the position near surrounded and a perimeter defense was ordered, Major Martin organized details to carry ammunition and personally carried load after load of ammunition to the center of the perimeter. During this period the position was subjected to tank, artillery, mortar, machinegun and small arms fire. Major Martin's courage and complete disregard for personal safety reflects great credit on himself and the military srevice.

Martin, PVT Joel M. (24ID, Co. C, 3d Eng. Combat Bn.)

Martin, SGT 1C Raymond C. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Martin, SGT 1C Richard L. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Martin, 1SGT Roy M. (2ID)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 20 - 16 June 1961

First Sergeant Roy M. Martin (then Master Sergeant), Armor, United States Army, a member of Company B, 72d Tank Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy during the period 14-16 May, 1952, on Hill 511 in the vicinity of Hwanggi, North Korea. As Platoon Sergeant of a tank platoon furnishing supporting fire for an Infantry unit engaged in active combat operations against a hostile enemy, Sergeant Martin was assigned a direct firing mission. Despite the fact that his firing positions were repeatedly shelled by enemy artillery and mortar fire, Sergeant Martin, on his own initiative and with utter disregard for his own personal safety, continued his mission under extreme combat conditions, causing severe damage to enemy installations and inflicting heavy casualties upon enemy positions. On many occasions, when targets became difficult to locate as a result of heavy smoke screens, Sergeant Martin courageously exposed himself to intense artillery and mortar barrages in an effort to more accurately directing fire upon the enemy. The intrepid gallantry and bold leadership demonstrated by Sergeant Martin conspicuously inspired the men of his unit, and instilled in them a fighting spirit which was retained throughout this period. Sergeant Martin's outstanding heroism is in the most cherished traditions off the United States Army, and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Martinez, 1LT Damian (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Martinez, PFC David (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Martinez, CPL Gregorio (3rd ID)

Martinez, PFC Julio E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Martinez, PFC Marco M. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 218 - 18 April 1951

Private First Class Marco M. Martinez, RA19314251, Artillery, Battery B, 8th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  At Seoul, Korea, on 12 February 1951, a strong hostile force crossed the Han River and maneuvered for an assault on friendly positions.  When the forward artillery observer was unable to establish radio communications, Private First Class Martinez volunteered to lay a wire line from the observation post to the Battalion headquarters.  Despite exposure to heavy small arms, mortar and tank fire, he accomplished his mission expeditiously so that effective artillery fire could be placed on the hostile incursion.  Private First Cass Martinez's valorous action reflects great credit on himself, his unit and the American soldier.  Entered the military service from California.

Martinez, MSGT Martin (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Martinez, CAPT Rafael G. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Martinez-Bermudez, SGT Francisco (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Martinez-Guerra, PFC Rafael E. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Martinez-Sandin, 1LT Gilberto (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Marting, PFC Cecil (3rd ID)

Maruca, PFC Louis R. (3rd ID)

Marvin, PFC Marvin (ARMY)

Marx, CPL Harvey L. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Maryak, PFC John S. (3rd ID)

Mason, SFC Everett L. (24ID)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - 9 July 1954

Sergeant First Class Everett L. Mason, United States Army, a member of Company C, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic conduct in action against the enemy near Sonju, Korea, on or about 21 September 1950. He was in charge of a combat patrol charged with the mission of probing territory behind enemy lines to secure information as to strength of enemy forces and location of crew-served weapons. He skillfully led his men undiscovered through enemy lines. He exposed himself voluntarily in order to draw hostile fire, thereby permitting his patrol to locate accurately several enemy gun positions. After further probing activities, Sergeant Mason, successfully evading the enemy, led his patrol in an attack on one previously located enemy position and inflicted many casualties. With outstanding leadership, he returned his patrol to friendly lines without suffering any casualties. Sergeant Mason's heroic action and devotion to duty reflect credit on himself and the military services.  Home of Record: Hampton, Virginia.

Mason, SFC Norman R. (Army - 25th Division)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 448 - November 29, 1950

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Bronze Star Medal with Combat "V" to Sergeant First Class [then Sergeant] Norman R. Mason, United States Army, for heroic achievement while serving with Company A, 65th Engineer Combat Battalion, 25th Infantry Division in Korea. On 7 September 1950 near Haman, Korea, when his squad was pinned down by intense hostile machine gun fire, Sergeant First Class Mason remained in his exposed position to deliver devastating fire at the enemy to cover the displacement of his squad. Sergeant First Class Mason's notable courage and outstanding devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Massey, PFC Marshall R. (25ID) (1st Oak Leaf Cluster) (Missing in Action)

Mastor, Phil M. (USNR)

Maszk, MSGT Stanley C. (1CAV)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 101 - June 05, 1951

The Bronze Star with “V” Device is awarded to Master Sergeant Stanley C Maszk, Infantry, U.S. Army, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for heroism in action against the enemy on 1 November 1950 near Unsan, Korea. When a numerically superior enemy force infiltrated through the battalion perimeter, the defending troops were forced to make a hurried withdrawal to new positions. During this movement, Sergeant Maszk stayed behind with three other men to secure and prevent important operational documents from falling into enemy hands. When hostile small arms fire interrupted the task, three of the men took up the fire in an effort draw the attention of the enemy away from the tent. After loading the documents on a 1/4 ton vehicle, they drove from the area. Upon arriving at a previously appointed position, a grenade thrown by an enemy landed on the right side of the vehicle. Sergeant Maszk, in an attempt to throw the grenade away, was wounded when it exploded in mid-air. His quick action, however, enabled the documents and his comrades to safely reach friendly lines. Sergeant Maszk’s deed reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from North Dakota.

Matheney, Richard A. (USMC)

For heroic achievement in connection with operations against the enemy while serving with a Marine infantry company in Korea on 13 September 1951. Corporal Matheney, serving as scout sergeant in the artillery forward observation team attached to the company, displayed great courage, initiative, and resourcefulness during a series of fanatical enemy counterattacks. The company had seized its objective in darkness only to be hit almost immediately by a determined enemy. His duties as scout sergeant performed, he voluntarily undertook to carry critically needed ammunition to the riflemen and machine gunners on the company perimeter despite intense fire from hostile small arms, automatic weapons, mortars, and artillery. He repeatedly performed this vital mission, assuring an adequate supply of ammunition and releasing infantrymen to defend the line. When the artillery was unable to provide illumination, he conceived the idea of setting off trip flares from the artillery observation post. His quick thinking prevented the enemy from approaching the company's positions unobserved. Corporal Matheney's bravery and professional skill contributed greatly to the successful defense of the company perimeter and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Mathenia, SGT William H. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 231 - 18 October 1950

Sergeant William H. Mathenia, RA17242932, Armor, Company A, 89th Medium Tank Battalion, United States Army.  During the period 2 August to 10 August 1950 in the early critical phase of the Korean conflict, Sergeant Mathenia rendered outstanding service as a member of a vehicle recovery crew.  By opportunely repairing a damaged tank in enemy territory despite intense small arms and mortar fire, a tank attack route was cleared.  By expeditiously recovering another tank from a collapsed bridge under heavy enemy fire an additional critical vehicle was restored to action.  Sergeant Mathenia's courageous devotion to duty and technical acumen are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Missouri.

Matthess, SGT Charles R. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 185 - 17 June 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Sergeant Charles R. Matthess, RA17254322, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Chaun-ni, Korea. On that date he was a medical technician attached to the 2d Battalion aid station which was isolated by a numerically superior enemy force. While running this roadblock under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire, Sergeant Matthess organized litter bearer squads and supervised the evacuation of several wounded. Without regard for his personal safety, he personally exposed himself to enemy fire to give medical aid to wounded men during the withdrawal, and his own personal bravery and calmness was responsible for the orderly evacuation by litter squads of several wounded. The heroism displayed by Sergeant Matthess on this occasion reflects groat credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Matino, Michael F. (USN)

Matos, CPL Carlos M. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Matos, CPL Gregorio (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Matos, CPL Wilfredo Olmeda (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Matos-Perez, CPL Jose G. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Matos-Rivera, PFC Angel (3rd ID)

Matos-Santiago, SGT Crisanto (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Matsuda, PVT Donald K. (40ID)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 33 - 24 June 1957

Private Donald K. Matsuda, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 223rd Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic conduct in action against the enemy near Kumsong, Korea on 6 February 1952. Private Matsuda, a demolitions man in the P&A section, was withdrawing under orders as a member of a combat patrol when he saw that the Patrol Leader had been badly wounded. Although Private Matsuda himself was wounded, he returned and, in the face of heavy enemy small arms and mortar fire, assisted his commander in returning to the safety of their own lines. Private Matsuda's courage and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Matsutani, SGT 1C Frank S. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Mauk, CPL Dav id J. (7ID)

Headquarters, 7ID
General Orders No. 80 - 1 November 1950

Corporal David J. Mauk, RA15268244, Infantry, United States Army, while serving with Company G, 32d Infantry, distinguished himself by heroic action against an armed enemy near Kuroli-li, Korea, on 21 September 1950. On this date, while attacking a hill, Company G was hit by heavy enemy fire and suffered a great number of casualties. Corporal Mauk, throughout the attack, voluntarily and repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy small arms and mortar fire in order to evacuate the wounded men to a covered position where they could be treated. Corporal Mauk's devotion to duty and heroic action on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Pennsylvania.

May, PVT Donald J. (3rd ID)

May, CPL Edgar W. (USA)

Corporal Edgar W. May, US27041926, Infantry, United States Army. Corporal May, a member of Company B, 14th Infantry, was acting in a dual role as a machine gunner and messenger when his unit was being subjected to heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire, near Panmunjom, Korea, on the night of 29 May 1953. Completely disregarding his personal safety, he moved along the line many times with messages from the company commander to his men as the heavy firing continued. Corporal May continued to expose himself and his machine gun as he poured heavy fire onto the enemy thereby inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. His heroic actions and determined devotion to duty greatly contributed to the success of his unit's mission in the withdrawal of the enemy. Corporal May was also instrumental in repelling Chinese counter-attacks before action reached "Carson." His courage, determination, and selfless devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army. Entered the Federal service from Michigan.

May, Einer A. (USN)

Mayers, Robert

Mayfield, SGT 1C Thomas J.W. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 233 - 19 October 1950

Sergeant First Class Thomas J.W. Mayfield, RA34014754, Army Medical Service, Medical Company, 24th Infantry, United States Army.  From 28 July to 1 September 1950, as a member of a battalion medical company in combat during the extremely difficult days of the Korean conflict, Sergeant First Class Mayfield served with notable distinction.  His untiring efforts to provide care for the patients in his aid station despite severe handicaps of limited facilities and equipment, and often under intense automatic weapons, mortar and small arms, greatly assisted the battalion surgeon in the saving of numerous lives.  Sergeant First Class Mayfield's courage and devotion to duty, initiative, and technical knowledge reflect great credit upon himself and the Army's Medical Service.  Entered the military service from Mississippi.

Maymi, SGT 1C Andres (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Maynard, CPL McKenly Jr. (7ID, Hq, 3d Bn, 17th Regt.)

Maynard, PFC Ray L. (1CAV) (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 150 - November 11, 1950

Private First Class Ray L. Maynard RA16251127, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Battery, 99th Artillery Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, for heroism in action against the enemy on 7 September 1950 near Tabudong, Korea. While serving in a forward artillery liaison section, the infantry battalion command post to which Private Maynard was attached came under severe enemy mortar fire which caused very heavy casualties. When he learned of a seriously wounded soldier in another position, Private Maynard, with complete disregard for his own safety, left the shelter of his foxhole to go through the rain of mortar fire to the aid of his seriously wounded comrade. With the aid of another liaison member, he carried the wounded man to safety. The prompt and selfless act of conspicuous courage saved the life of the wounded man. Private Maynard’s heroism reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Michigan.

Mayne, SFC Robert J. (Armor, Tank Co., 15th Inf. Rgt., 3rd ID)

Maynez, 1LT Joe C. (25ID)

Headquarters 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 239 - 22 October 1950

First Lieutenant Joe C. Maynez, 02206150, Quartermaster Corps, 25th Quartermaster Company, United States Army. As truck platoon leader of his company from 29 September to 8 October 1950 during the Korean conflict, Lieutenant Maynez served with distinction. During the rapid advance of the leading elements of the Division it was necessary for all supplies to be sent forward from the railhead by motor transport, a distance of over 150 miles. By maintaining a maximum number of vehicles operating over this route despite the constant hazards of enemy action and mechanical failure, Lieutenant Maynez materially assisted in accomplishing the supply mission of his unit. Lieutenant Maynez's initiative and technical skill reflect great credit upon himself and his organization. Entered the military service from New Mexico.

Mays, CPL Lewis F. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 185 - 24 September 1950

Corporal Lewis F. Mays, RA16282400, Infantry, Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  During a battalion attack near Chuson-ri, Korea, on 2 August 1950, deep into enemy territory, hostile fire from three sides halted the column and pinned down the troops.  While the riflemen took cover, Corporal Mays remained on the road beside the radio vehicle and, despite heavy fire from commanding ground, transmitted the battalion commander's orders so that effective action to eliminate the enemy harassment could be taken.  Corporal Mays' unflinching devotion to duty under most hazardous conditions is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States soldier.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Mays, CPL William H. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 83 - 30 October 1950

Corporal William H. Mays, RA18265830, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company I, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 11 August 1950 in the vicinity of Pohang-Dong, Korea.  On that morning, his company was proceeding to the assistance of another rifle company which had been ambushed and pinned down by the enemy.  Approximately two miles from Pohang-Dong his company was suddenly subjected to intense enemy small arms fire.  Corporal Mays, a light machine gun squad leader, took cover in a shallow ditch by the road, and his squad took cover on the opposite side of the road.  After first trying to locate his squad, he exposed himself to the intense hostile fire, retrieved the machine gun and commenced to deliver fire against the enemy.  At the first burst of fire from his gun, the enemy directed the full fury of their attack against his position and hurling hand grenades, severely wounded him.  Despite his painful wound, and indifferent to the intense fire to which he was subjected, he continued to fire his weapon with devastating effect until his ammunition was exhausted.  His determination and unflinching devotion to duty were instrumental in forcing the enemy to withdraw, and allowed his company to proceed on its mission.  The heroism displayed by Corporal Mays on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Maysonet, PVT Julio (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Meachum, Chaplain Lonnie W. (USNR)

Meade, CPL George D. (7ID, co. C, 17th Regt.)

Meanor, 1LT William H. (7ID, Co. B, 31st Rgt.)

Meares, CPL Cecil W. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 249 - 27 October 1950

Corporal Cecil W. Meares, RA13307115, Artillery, Battery A, 64th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  When his artillery battery in the vicinity of Haman, Korea was being attacked by numerically superior enemy forces on 2 September 1950, Corporal Meares remained with his howitzer despite the intense enemy fire.  By turning his gun around and firing point blank at the oncoming enemy he was instrumental in disrupting the fanatical attack.  Corporal Meares' courageous devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Virginia.

Meece, PFC Eugene C. (Med. Co., 35th Inf. Regt.)

Meeker, PFC Norman R. (HQ & SV Co., 89th Med Tk Bn, 25ID)

Meinerding, SGT Eugene A. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Meis, Bob

Meister, CPL Alvin E. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 47 - 22 February 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Corporal Alvin E. Meister, RA17266796, (then Private First Class), Infantry, United states Anny, a member of Tank Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 September 1950 near Changnyong, Korea. On the morning of that date he was a gunner on a tank that was furnishing covering fire for the crew of another tank, which had been damaged by an enemy anti-tank mine. When the repair crew was subjected to heavy enemy small arms fire, Corporal Meister was ordered to locate the enemy through his telescopic sight. When he was unable to locate the enemy by this means, he voluntarily climbed up through the turret and, although wounded by enemy fire, succeeded in directing fire upon the enemy position. As a result of his courageous action, the enemy fire was neutralized, and the crew of the other tank was able to return their vehicle to action. The heroic conduct of Corporal Meister on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Dog Ear Township, Tripp County, South Dakota.

Mejia-Flores, 1LT Angel (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Melendez, MSGT Cesar L. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Melendez, CPL Pascual (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Melendez-Claudio, CPL Cristobal (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Melendez-Claudio, MSGT Cristobal (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Mello, PFC Manuel T. (3rd ID)

Melnick, SGT Pete (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 177 - 16 June 1951

The Bronze Star with Metal “V” Device is awarded to Sergeant Pete Melnick, RA132192S5, (then Private), Armor, United States Army, a member of Tank Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 10 and 11 February 1951 in the vicinity of Ch’owon-ni, Korea. He was a driver of a tank which was part of a task force supporting friendly troops. When the numerically superior enemy force had overrun friendly positions and established a series of roadblocks, cutting off the task force, the tanks were forced to withdraw. Sergeant Melnick, hampered by poor visibility, fearlessly exposed himself to intense enemy fire, while passing through three enemy roadblock positions. His superior driving ability enabled him to bring his tank through the enemy roadblocks, over unfamiliar and almost impassible terrain. The courage of Sergeant Melnick reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Mendez, CAPT Jose F. (65th Inf., 3rd ID) (2 awards)

Mendez-Medina, PFC Mario (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Mendonca, CWO Frank A. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 230 - 17 October 1950

Chief Warrant Officer Frank A. Mendonca, W2111141, 725th Ordnance Maintenance Company, United States Army.  As officer in charge of ordnance maintenance contact team during the period 20 July to 25 September 1950 in the initial phase of the Korean conflict, CWO Mendonca rendered outstanding service by improving the maintenance standards of critical vehicles throughout the Division.  He established a liaison with front line combat units, encouraged them in the maximum use of his teams by traversing numerous hills of enemy infested territory.  In one instance CWO Mendonca was instrumental in the evacuation of tracked vehicles from Sangju, Korea in the face of impending enemy seizure.  CWO Mendonca's untiring devotion to duty and courageous aggressiveness are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Ordnance Corps.  Entered the military service from California.

Mendonsa, Chaplain A.G. (USNR)

Mendoza, PFC Jose (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Meola, Vincent J. (USN)

Mercado-Rodriguez, CPL Roberto (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Mercado-Torres, CPL Hilario (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Merced-Aponte, PVT Jorge (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Mercer, CPL Burnell M. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Merrifield, CAPT Fred R. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Merrill, Kenneth Wayne (Army)

Merriman, CPL Earl W. (Co. I, 35th Inf. Rgt., 25ID)

Merritt, 1LT Carl L. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Merritt, CPL Max H. (2ID) (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 192 - 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded posthumously to Corporal Max H. Merritt, ER37479569, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company A, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 28 February 1951, in the vicinity of Na-Dong, Korea. On that date he was a member of a rifle squad which was acting as a point in an advance when it was suddenly subjected to intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire from an enemy roadblock. Under direct fire from the rear as well as from the front, Corporal Merritt held his ground and provided protective fire for his squad. In the fire fight which ensued he was killed, but his courageous action and unselfish devotion to duty enabled the remainder of his squad to withdraw in an orderly manner. The heroic conduct of Corporal Merritt on this occasion reflected great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Clarks, Nebraska. (Amended to read Nebraska instead of Colorado by GO 860, 1951.)

Messinger, SFC Valentine J. (25ID, Btry B, 90th FAB)

Meyer, SGT Charles A. (3rd ID)

Meyer, 1LT Charles J. (24ID, Co. C, 21st Rgt.)

Mials, PFC Frederick D. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 218 - 18 April 1951

Private First Class Frederick D. Mials, RA14313760, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry, United States Army.  In the vicinity of Impa, Korea, on 30 September 1950, the command post of Private First Class Mials' Battalion was suddenly attacked by an infiltrating hostile force.  Moving through an intense concentration of small arms and automatic weapons fire, he secured a forward vantage point and thoroughly disrupted the hostile incursion with a heavy volume of devastating fire.  As the enemy line wavered and began to withdraw, he immediately rejoined the main body and led his comrades in a spirited assault that threw the foe into a complete rout.  Private First Class Mials' valorous initiative, aggressive leadership and selfless devotion to duty are in keeping with the great traditions of the American soldier.  Entered the military service from North Carolina.

Michienzi, LT James A. (7th Inf. Rgt.)

Mihalyak, SGT John M. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Miho, CPL Tom S. (25ID, Hq & Hq Co., 27th Rgt.)

Miles, MAJ Lee G. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Miller, SGT Arthur (7ID, 7th Recon Co.) (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Miller, Charles M. (USN)

Miller, SFC Dale R. (valor)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 281 - 10 July 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with Letter "V" device is awarded to Sergeant First Class Dale R. Miller, RA36576205, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Changbong-ni, Korea. On that date, his battalion was grouped in an assembly area which was under intense enemy mortar and machine gun fire. Sergeant Miller, though wounded himself, courageously exposed himself to render first aid to two of his wounded comrades. [which warrants a silver star] He courageously refused to be evacuated until he was assured that his comrades had received all possible aid. The heroism and devotion to his comrades displayed by Sergeant Miller reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Washington.

Miller, SGT Daniel D. Jr. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Miller, CPL David (3rd ID)

Miller, Garland (USN)

Miller, MSGT Harry C. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 172 - 21 September 1950

Master Sergeant Harry C. Miller, RA30112569, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 24 July 1950 near Sangyong-ni, Korea, an enemy tank column broke through to the battalion supply area and was laying direct fire on ammunition trucks at a range of 300 yards.  Leaving his position of relative safety, Master Sergeant Miller rushed down the road to the trucks, found the drivers and directed the removal of the critical supplies to an area out of range of the continuing tank fire.  Master Sergeant Miller's courageous leadership and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Territory of Hawaii.

Miller, CPL James E. (CO H, 35th Inf. Regt.)

Miller, MSGT John (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Miller, 2LT Norman G. (USA)

My brother recently sent me the original Bronze Star Citation for my father Norman G. Miller. My father was a career military officer who retired 1972. He enlisted in the Navy and served in World War II, then went to college and became an officer in the US Army. He retired as a Lieutenant Colonel. The citation reads as follows:

Headquarters 40th Infantry Division
APO 6
General Orders Number 466
2 October 1953

Second Lieutenant Norman G. Miller C67945, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, 224th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by heroic achievement near Mundung-ni, Korea, on 6 May 1953. During an intense enemy mortar and artillery barrage, Lieutenant Miller volunteered to accompany a medical litter jeep to a position where several friendly soldiers were awaiting medical aid and evacuation. With disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Miller assisted in giving medical aid to the wounded men continually exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire. Lieutenant Miller’s heroic actions aided immeasurably in saving the lives of these men and won for him the admiration and respect of superiors and subordinates alike. The personal heroism, outstanding initiative and sincere devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Miller reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army. Entered the Federal service from California.

Miller, CPL Robert G. (27th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO87, 27Aug50)

Miller, SGT Robert K. (25ID, Btry B, 90th FAB)

Miller, CPL Roland F. (25ID, Co. H, 35th Rgt.)

Milligan, PFC Joseph P. (ARMY)

Mills, SGT Kenneth D. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 248 - 26 October 1950

Sergeant (then Corporal) Kenneth D. Mills, RA17095783, Army Medical Service, Medical Company, 29th Infantry, United States Army.  On 27 July 1950 when the company to which he was attached as aid man was attacked near Hadong, Korean, Sergeant Mills, heedless of heavy concentrations of enemy machine gun and small arms fire, moved across exposed terrain to administer treatment to the wounded and remove them to a less exposed area.  When the unit was ordered to withdraw, Sergeant Mills assisted three wounded men to safety.  The courage, determination and heroic devotion to his comrades displayed by Sergeant Mills exemplify the highest traditions of the Army Medical Service.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Milne, 1LT Robert S. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Minor, 2LT Charles s. Jr. (25ID, Hq. Co.) (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Minor, PFC Gasper J. (25th ID)

General Orders No. 93 - 1 February 1951
25th Division

The Bronze Star with V device is awarded to Private First Class Gasper J. Minor, RA26798534, Infantry, Heavy Mortar Company, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 18 August 1950, while shelling Chungam-ni, Korea, Private First Class Minor’s company was attacked by infiltrating enemy troops. Despite an intense concentration of hostile fire, he immediately took his place on the line and delivered effective counterfire. Although wounded early in the action, he remained in his exposed position and continued firing until the attack was repulsed. Private First Class Minor’s valorous action and selfless devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself, his unit and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Miranda, MSGT Miguel (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Miranda, CPL Victor M. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Miranda-Avilez, SFC Pedro (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Misikevich, SFC Paul (CO A, 65th Inf. Regt.)

Miskowski, CPL Nicholas (7ID, Hq. Co., 3d Bn, 17th Rgt.)

Miss, MAJ David C. (21st AAA AW Bn.)

Mitchell, WOJG James H. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Mitchell, SGT Joseph M. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 248 - 26 October 1950

Sergeant First class Joseph M. Mitchell, RA98483837, Artillery, Battery C, 159th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  When the battery position became untenable on 1 September 1950 in the vicinity of Haman, Korea and march order was given, Sergeant First Class Mitchell and three enlisted men who attempted to move their howitzer were subjected to concerted hostile fire from commanding positions.  Although forced to seek cover on three occasions, Sergeant First Class Mitchell and his crew, heedless of the withering fire, disengaged the trails which were imbedded in the ground, coupled the howitzer to the prime mover and moved through a narrow pass under enemy fire to bring the gun and vehicle to safety.  Sergeant First Class Mitchell's courage, determination and heroic devotion to duty prevented capture by the enemy of valuable equipment and reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Mitnick, 1LT Herbert (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Mix, LeRoy R. (USN)

Miyake, CPL Tye (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 230 - 17 October 1950

Corporal Tye Miyake, RA16230634, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 35th Infantry, United States Army.  During the period 25 July to 10 September 1950 Corporal Miyake served as a member of a prisoner of war interrogation team in Korea.  Working tirelessly under extremely adverse conditions, Corporal Miyake obtained vital intelligence information concerning enemy troop dispositions, moral and plans which greatly facilitated the operations of his unit.  Corporal Miyako's physical stamina, technical ability and devotion to duty contributed materially to the success of his unit and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Miyata, PFC Harry (8th Ranger) (posthumous)

Mobley, SGT Larvia A. (25ID, Hq & Hq. Co., 1st Bn, 35th Rgt.) (3rd Oak Leaf Cluster)

Moccio, SFC Nicholas (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Mochida, SGT Keikichi (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 230 - 17 October 1950

Sergeant Keikichi Mochida, RA16202787, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 35th Infantry, United States Army.  During the period 25 July to 10 September 1950, Sgt. Mochida served as a member of a prisoner of war interrogation team with an advance unit during the initial phase of the Korean conflict.  His tireless devotion to duty, personal courage, and skillful interrogation of refugees and prisoners resulted in the extraction of valuable information which contributed greatly to the success of subsequent operations.  Sgt. Mochida's professional skill reflects great credit upon himself, his organization, and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Model, CPL Nash R. (24ID, Hq, 5th Rgt.)

Modisett, CAPT Tom F. (Army)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 39 - 31 July 1957

Captain Tom F. Modisett, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on "Old Baldy" Hill, Korea on 18 August 1952. During an enemy attack on the position occupied by his company, he voluntarily exposed himself to heavy artillery and small arms fire in order to find cover for his men and direct return fire. Despite severe wounds he refused evacuation until the enemy had been repulsed and his objective secured. The courage and leadership displayed by Captain Modisett reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Moffett, 2LT Donald E. (25 ID, 27th Inf. Rgt.)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 499 - 16 August 1951

Second Lieutenant Donald E. Moffett, 02263097, Medical Service Corps, Medical Company, 27th Infantry, United States army.  On 4 June 1951, during a sharp fire fight near Pyogyog-am, Korea, Lieutenant Moffett was directing the evacuation of the wounded from the forward positions.  As his three litter teams were moving toward the rear, they were suddenly attacked by infiltrating hostile elements emplaced in positions overlooking the road.  Despite the proximity of the enemy, he repeatedly exposed himself to intense small arms fire to reorganize the teams and to direct them safely through the hostile block.  Lieutenant Moffett's calm courage, resolute leadership and selfless devotion to duty are in keeping with the high traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from California.

Mojica-Rodriguez, 1LT Jose (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Molberg, PFC William D. (3rd ID)

Molina, SGT Justo (65th ID, 3rd ID)

Molina, SFC Sixt D. (HQ Co., 3rd ID)

Moliterno, Carmine

Moll, CPL Alfonso (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Monsour, CAPT Thomas B. (24ID)

General Orders No. 210 - 29 October 1950
24th Infantry Division

By direction of the President, Captain Thomas B. Monsour, 01175808, Artillery, United States Army, Commanding Officer of Battery B, 13th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal with V device for heroic achievement in action against the enemy near Taejon, Korea on 20 July 1950. During the defense of the city he displayed outstanding heroism in constantly subjecting himself to intense artillery and tank fire in order to better direct his command in its actions. When forced to withdraw, his battery was halted by strong enemy roadblocks and, again braving intense fire, he moved among his troops in their successful elimination of the strong points. His heroic actions were an inspiration to his command and reflect great credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Entered service from Meridian, Mississippi.

Montanez-Mojica, CPL Enrique (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Montano-Matos, PFC Felipe (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Montes, CAPT Angel D. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Montes-Cardona, SFC Juan (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Montoya, SGT Victor L. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Montroy, PFC Ronald L. (3rd ID)

Mooney, CPL Alden R. (3ID)

Mooney, Taylor (63rd FAB, 24th ID)

Moore, SGT Arveli A. (7ID, 7th Recon Co.)

Moore, SGT Gale S. (24th ID)

General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

Sergeant Gale S. Moore, RA 193032645, Infantry, a member of Headquarters Company First Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement against the enemy near Chonan, Korea on 5 July 1950. Sergeant Moore was at the Battalion Command Post which was located on the side of a hill. The Command Post was under intense enemy artillery fire which made the position untenable. The order was given to withdraw from this position. Sergeant Moore stayed at the position to direct the men as to where they were to go, and helped several men who had been wounded out of the area and to places of safety. He stayed at his position with no regard to his own personal safety and checked the area to make sure that all the men had gotten out. During this time Sergeant Moore suffered heart attack and requested to be left behind as he would slow up the progress of the other men. With the aid of some other men he was able to make it to a place of safety. This heroic action on the part of Sergeant Moore reflects great credit on himself and the Military Service.

Moore, MSGT Hancel C. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Moore, Chaplain James C.

PARTIAL CITATION

For meritorious achievement while serving with a Marine infantry battalion in Korea from 12 February to 5 July 1952.  After citing his initiative, courage, and industriousness in providing a ministry to his men, Moore's citation continues:

"He was consistently present in the front line trenches when friendly patrols and raids returned from making contact with the enemy."

[KWE Note: Found on page 153, The History of the Chaplain Corps, US Navy, Vol. 6, During the Korean War.]

Moore, Chaplain John T. (Roman Catholic)

PARTIAL CITATION

When the infantry companies and other elements of the regiment were committed to the main line of resistance and subjected to intense action, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and traveled over roads that were under constant enemy observation and frequent mortar and artillery fire in order to carry out his duties.  He was continuously on hand at forward aid stations administering both spiritual and physical aid to the wounded men.  He made daily visits to the men on the main line of resistance, holding services in bunkers and exerting every effort to administer spiritual guidance to the men.

[KWE Note: This citation was for the period 2 April-1 August 1953.  Chaplain Moore was wounded the day before the truce was signed, and became the last naval chaplain casualty of the Korean War.]

Moore, M/SGT Lauren F. (3rd ID)

Moore, PFC Leon M. (1st CAV)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 63 - 27 March 1951

Private First Class Leon M. Moore, RA14314795, Armor, United States Army, Company B, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy), attached to 1st Cavalry Division, 8 August 1950 to 2 November 1950.  For meritorious achievement in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States during the period indicated.  Entered federal service from South Carolina.

Moore, CPL Manny L. (25ID, Hvy Mortar Co., 27th Rgt.)

Moore, PFC Robert E. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 123 - 29 May 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Private First Class Robert E. Moore, RA15379403, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. On that date, Private Moore was part of a vehicular column of artillery and infantry withdrawing southward under heavy enemy attack. At one point the column was blocked by a burning vehicle. Private Moore, finding a light machine gun, moved to the front of the column and, under intense enemy fire, operated the gun until enemy fire was silenced and other friendly troops could clear the area. The heroism in action displayed by Private Moore reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Kentucky.

Moore, CPL Robert L. (24ID, Co. K, 5th Rgt.)

Moore, CAPT Roy L. (65th Inf., 3ID)

Moquite, CPL Nicanor (3ID)

Mora, CPL Luis (65th Inf., 3ID)

Morales, SFC Jose E. (65th Inf., 3ID)

Morales-Roman, PFC Jose (65th Inf., 3ID)

Morasco, MSGT Joseph (65th Inf., 3ID)

Moreno, PFC Alberto (3ID)

Morfey, PFC Donald L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 816 - 5 December 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Private First Class Donald L. Morfey, US55093805, Army Medical Service, Army of the United States, a member of Medical Company, (the attached to Company E), 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 6 October 1951 in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea. On that date Company E was in defensive positions under continuous enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire. In the course of this action, Private Morfey noticed a wounded comrade lying in a forward position under intense hostile fire. Without hesitating he left his covered emplacement and advanced over the fire-swept area to the side of his comrade. At this point he administered first aid and, undaunted by the heavy fire directed at him, carried his wounded comrade to a site of comparative safety. His courageous action was highly responsible for saving his comrade’s life. The heroic conduct of Private Morfey on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Morgan, SFC Richard M. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 87 - 5 November 1950

Sergeant First Class Richard M. Morgan, RA6992345, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Tank Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 4 September 1950 near Taegok-Ni, Korea.  On this date, he was in command of a tank that was supporting the attack of an infantry battalion.  While maneuvering the tank to the crest of a steep hill, it suffered a direct hit from an enemy anti-tank gun, and commenced moving back down the hill, completely out of control.  As a tank commander, his position in the turret gave him a quick route of escape, but as he was about to jump, he perceived that his crew was having difficulty in making their escape.  Despite the increasing momentum of the tank, and the imminent danger of turning end over end, he remained in the tank, with complete disregard for his safety, until he had assisted his comrades to safety.  Sergeant Morgan's heroic action on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from California.

Morgan, LT Russell B. (3ID)

Morganelia, SFC Michael (3ID)

Morin, CPL Kenneth R. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 16 June 1951

Corporal Kenneth R. Morin, RA19347697, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Kunmul-gol, Korea.  On that date, the rear command post of the battalion was under attack by a numerically superior enemy force.  The small group of officers and men at the command post fought off the attack until it became apparent that the positions could not be held with the men and equipment on hand.  Corporal Morin then volunteered to run to Tank Company in order to bring tanks to aid the command post.  With utter disregard for his own safety, he exposed himself to withering enemy automatic weapons fire, proceeding to the tank Company.  Returning with the tanks, he rode in one of the tanks toward the command post until the armored column was temporarily halted by enemy fire whereupon he proceeded on foot the rest of the way.  On arrival at the command post, which meantime had been overrun by the enemy, Corporal Morin loaded a truck with wounded while still under intense fire, and drove them to safety.  The heroism in action and devotion to duty demonstrated by Corporal Morin on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Massachusetts.

Moring, Jerrell D. (USN)

Moroney, William J. (45ID)

Morris, CPL John E. (27th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO50, 8Aug50)

Morris, SGT Robert W. (24ID)

24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 127 - 12 April 1952

Sergeant Robert W. Morris, US55066881, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company M, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Bronze Star medal with V Device for heroic action near Kumsong, Korea, on 16 November 1951. He had the mission of adjusting mortar and artillery fire. In order to adjust the friendly fire he had to expose himself to hostile small arms fire. Realizing the dire necessity for accuracy, he fearlessly and with utter disregard for his personal safety exposed himself so that the friendly troops' attack could be effectively covered by artillery and mortar fire. Sergeant Morris' heroic action, outstanding proficiency and selfless performance of duty contributed immeasurably to the successful accomplishment of the overall mission and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered service from Davenport, Iowa.

Morrison, Fred (USN)

Morrison, CWO Louis C. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Morrison, LT Robert C. (21st AAA AW BN)

Morrison, PFC William J. (Army)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 45 - 28 August 1957

Private First Class William J. Morrison, (then Private), Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism near Chorwon, Korea, on 18-19 September 1952. During an attack on the hill "Old Baldy," Private Morrison's company was pinned down by intense enemy small arms fire. Without regard for his own safety Private Morrison volunteered to return across approximately 200 yards of open terrain to deliver a message and obtain reinforcements. The courage and devotion to duty displayed by Private Morrison reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Morrow, 1LT Edwin (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 564 - 3 October 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to First Lieutenant Edwin Morrow, 02014537, Artillery, Army of the United States, Battery B, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 29 August 1951 in the vicinity of Tumil-li, Korea. On this date Lieutenant Morrow was the artillery forward observer with Company B, 9th Infantry Regiment, which was attacking up a finger toward Ridge 940. Due to intense enemy fire and with casualties mounting, the unit was forced to withdraw. During the withdrawal all the officers in Company A had become casualties, causing confusion among the men due to lack of leadership. Lieutenant Morrow assumed command of the unit, supervising the evacuation of the wounded men and led the company in an orderly withdraw to positions of safety. The heroism and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Morrow reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Mortensen, Chaplain 1LT Benjamin F. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Moryl, MSGT Walter (25ID) (3rd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 133 - 10 September 1950

Master Sergeant Walter Moryl, RA6130783, Infantry, Company B, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 28 July 1950 near Hwanggan, Korea, Company B was subjected to a mortar barrage.  As the enemy closed in on high ground from three sides, a hazardous river crossing appeared to be the only route of withdrawal.  However, Master Sergeant Moryl, despite the continuing enemy attack, made a rapid reconnaissance and succeeded in leading to safety some 150 of his men.  Master Sergeant Moryl's sound judgment and valorous leadership are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Massachusetts.

Mosley, SGT Marvin G. (24ID, 555 FAB)

Mosher, SGT Maurice (24th ID) (3 Bronze Stars)

Mosier, PFC Ralph (valor) (7ID)

Mostellar, PFC Fred (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Moudy, SFC Charles H. (21st AAA AW BN)

Mouton, PFC Isom (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Moyer, Myron D. (USN)

Moynahan, PFC Joseph (1CAV)

WITH THE 1ST CAVALRY DIV. IN KOREA — Joseph A. Moynahan, 26172 Gading Road, Hayward, was recently promoted to the grade of sergeant while serving with the 1st Cavalry Division on the western fighting front in Korea. The division, a veteran infantry force of the Korean war, is now engaged in bitter hill fighting in the current UN offensive.

Moynahan is a member of the 5th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division. Moynahan also has been awarded the Bronze Star medal for heroism in action in Korea. He distinguished himself on September 6, near Majon-ni. His unit, Heavy Mortar Company of the 5th Cavalry Regiment, was assisting in the rescue of the trapped company and Moynahan, a forward observer, crossed the Imjin river to better locate the enemy.

The citation accompanying the decoration reads, in part: "He edged his way through intense automatic weapons and small arms fire to a foremost and extremely dangerous position. Here he skillfully directed mortar fire that destroyed three hostile emplacements and lessened the pressure on the embattled company. Later, observing an estimated enemy platoon gathered in a wooded area, Private First Class Moynahan quickly directed mortar fire on them. His display of courage and devotion to duty materially aided the company to advance and complete the mission with a minimum of casualties. Private First Class Moynahan's heroism reflects great credit on himself and the military service.” Daily Review (Hayward, CA) November 29, 1951

Muehlberger, WOJG Charles W. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Muetzel, 2LT Francis W. (USMC)

The Bronze Star Medal with Combat V Device is awarded to Second Lieutenant Francis W. Muetzel (049792), U.S. Marine Corp, for heroic achievement in connection with operations against the enemy while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, (1st Marine Division) in Korea on 15 September 1950. Acting as leader of a rifle platoon, Second Lieutenant Muetzel displayed outstanding courage and initiative in the performance of his duties. Maintaining excellent control of his platoon both during and after the amphibious landing at Inchon, he rapidly cleared his zone of enemy emplacements, capturing fourteen prisoners and inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. While proceeding inland, he was directed to change his course and seize the objective of an adjacent unit which was unable to advance because of intense and accurate enemy fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety he led his platoon in a skillful attack of the position, routing the entrenched enemy and taking twenty-five additional prisoners. His great professional ability and coolness under fire were of immeasurable aid in the success of the operation. Second Lieutenant Muetzel’s heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.

Mugford, 1LT Charles (25ID, AAA AW Bn.)

Mulcahy, CPL James (27th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO85, 27Aug50)

Mullins, PFC Roy G. (3rd ID)

Mummert, CPL Jack R. (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

Corporal Jack R. Mummert, RA13314857, Corps of Engineers, United States Army, a member of company A, 2d Engineer Combat Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 13 and 14 February 1951 in the vicinity of Agok, Korea.  Corporal Mummert was a volunteer member of a patrol to be conducted behind enemy lines.  A tank column carried the patrol approximately three miles into enemy territory.  There the patrol deployed and operated undetected throughout the night.  In the morning the patrol split into smaller groups to search out the enemy and ascertain his disposition, strength, weapons, and any other valuable information.  Soon after the groups left the defensive perimeter they engaged the enemy in firefights which lasted throughout the day.  Through a strategically located radio relay station, artillery fire was requested and directed upon the village of Agok.  Many casualties were inflicted  upon the enemy and three prisoners were taken.  The actions of Corporal Mummert contributed materially to the success of the patrol mission.  The heroic conduct displayed by Corporal Mummert reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Mummert, PFC John R. (25ID, Co. H, 35th Rgt.)

Mundy, SFC Chester D. (25ID)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 240 - 22 October 1950

Sergeant First Class Chester D. Mundy, RA35155617, Infantry, Company G, 35th Infantry, United States Army.  During the period 22 July to 28 August 1950 Sergeant First Class Mundy served as Mess Steward of an infantry company during combat  operations in Korea.  Throughout this period Sergeant First Class Mundy displayed notable ingenuity and resourcefulness in supervising the preparation of substantial meals despite a lack of variety of foodstuffs.  Working under adverse field conditions he supervised the preparation of palatable food, frequently exposing himself to hostile fire to deliver the food to men in forward positions.  Sergeant First Class Mundy's initiative, resourcefulness and technical skill reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Indiana.

Munera, CAPT Antonio V. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Munford, 1LT Charles A. Jr. (25ID, Hq, 25th Div.)

Muniz, CAPT Manuel R. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Munoz-Rivera, MSGT Angel M. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Munnerlyn, SGT George K.

For meritorious achievement in connection with operations against the enemy while serving with a Marine infantry company in Korea from 15 May to 1 December 1952. Serving as a squad leader, Sergeant Munnerlyn displayed outstanding ability, initiative and devotion to duty. On one occasion, when he and his squad were on a patrol to make contact with the enemy, they were hit by intense enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire. In spite of the imminent danger, he moved his squad forward and deployed them in such a manner to eliminate the foe and continue their patrol deeper into enemy territory. On numerous occasions his squad was assigned the mission of defending vital sectors of the main line of resistance, and while discharging his duties in leadership and skill. He frequently exposed himself to enemy fire in order to better control his men and assist in evacuating the wounded. Sergeant Munnerlyn's outstanding initiative and devotion to duty served as an inspiration to all who observed him and his conduct throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Sergeant Munnerlyn is authorized to wear the Combat "V".


December of 1953 photograph of Marine George Keith Munnerlyn taken in San Diego, California at age twenty-one and inscribed to his family. Keith wrote that “coming under the Golden Gate Bridge on December 21, 1952 returning from Korea aboard the United States William Weigel” was his most memorable moment of the Korean War or at least the one he wanted to remember most.
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Keith Munnerlyn with interpreter, Kim Hong, November 5, 1952 during the Korean War. In 1951, Keith’s Unit Operations were involved in the FMF Security Pak in Guam E2/7, the 1st MAR Division 1st PLT Reno and Las Vegas, Reno Block and the Hook Snatch at Panmunjom. Keith Munnerlyn earned: Civil Defense, Korean Combat with two stars, United Nations, Korean Presidential Citation, Navy/Marine Service, the Bronze Star with the Combat “V” and the sharpshooter and pistol badges.
(Click picture for a larger view)

Shown above is a copy of the Bronze Star Medal Citation letter to Marine George Keith Munnerlyn. The Korean War took place between June 25, 1950 and July 27, 1953 with Keith right in the thick of it.
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Marine George Keith Munnerlyn receives the Bronze Star Medal with the Combat “V” from Major General E.A. Pollack on March 27th, 1953 in San Diego, California for his actions and courage under fire during the Korean War. The Bronze Star Medal with the Valor Device is the United States military's fourth highest award for valor.
(Click picture for a larger view)

Muratti, MAJ Jose A. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Murray, CAPT William R. (25ID, Hq & Sv. Co., 65th Engr. Combat Bn.) (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Murphy, SFC Earl (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Murphy, Chaplain J.P. (USN)

Murphy, CPL Louis M. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Murphy, 1LT Paul J. Jr. (meritorious) (7ID)

Murphy, SFC Richard P. (1CAV)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 121 - July 1951

The Bronze Star with “V” Device is awarded to Sergeant First Class Richard P Murphy (then Sergeant), Infantry, U.S. Army, Company G, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for heroism in action against the enemy on 13 October 1950 near Kaesong, Korea. At 1700 hours, Sergeant Murphy’s platoon was given the mission of taking a heavily defended enemy hill position. During the attack, one of Sergeant Murphy’s comrades was wounded. When fierce resistance made a withdrawal necessary, several were men tried to recover the wounded man, but the hostile fire was so intense they were unable to reach him. Sergeant Murphy, with utter disregard to his own personal safety, stood up and fired a machine gun from the hip, diverting the enemy’s attention from the rescuing unit to himself. His action made possible the evacuation of the injured soldier to safety and medical treatment. Sergeant Murphy’s heroism and selfless devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Minnesota.

Murphy, Chaplain (1LT) Thomas A. (7ID, Hq Co., 32nd Rgt.)

Murphy, CPL William J. (2ID) (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

Corporal William J. Murphy, RA12317227, Infantry, United states Army, a member of Company H, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 29 January 1951 near Noean-ni, Korea.  Corporal Murphy's mortar squad was on a motorized patrol when the enemy subjected the unit to machine gun and small arms fire.  Although enemy fire was falling all about him, he leaped from his vehicle and assisted his comrades in setting up the mortar on the road.  Using direct sighting methods the mortar crew rendered such accurate and deadly fire support to the rifle elements of the patrol that the enemy force was soon dispersed.  The heroism displayed by Corporal Murphy reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New Jersey.

Murray, PFC Charles R. (25ID)

Private First Class Charles R. Murray, RA15271111, Infantry, Company F, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 26 July 1950 when the first platoon of Company F was in a defensive position protecting the right flank of the company and enemy artillery blanketed the platoon position, an enemy force cut off six vehicles and a group of men who were ahead of the advance positions.  Observing a sergeant from his company moving forward to attempt a rescue of the isolated group, Private First Class Murray, disregarding the heavy machine fire, joined the sergeant and assisted in leading the group through an enemy mine field to safety.  Private First Class Murray's heroic actions prevented valuable equipment from falling into enemy hands and greatly facilitated the advance of his unit.  Entered the military service from Maryland.

Murrell, PFC Talmadge R. (27th Inf. Rgt., 25ID) (GO98, 29Aug50)

Muscara, SFC Michael J. (3rd ID)

Music, SGT Herbert D. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Musick, SFC George (2ID)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 115 - 23 December 1950

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to Sergeant First Class George Musick, RA37189146, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company H, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement from 31 August to 3 September 1950 in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea. On the night of 31 August 1950 the enemy, attacking in overwhelming numbers, had penetrated our lines and were attempting to make a complete breakthrough in that area. During the enemy advance, a small group of men from a heavy weapons company were cut off and surrounded by the enemy. The group formed a perimeter defense and dug in. Sergeant Musick was a member of this group. From 1 to 3 September 1950 the perimeter was under constant, heavy enemy artillery, mortar, and machine gun fire and was subjected to frenzied and frequent hostile assaults. Rations were low, and the only water available to the men was the early morning dew that gathered from the grass, rifle stocks and other equipment. In spite of these adversities Sergeant Musick was constantly in the midst of every fire fight and aided in beating off the determined enemy attacks. Throughout this trying period, his unfailing determination and fortitude were a constant source of inspiration to his comrades and contributed greatly to the sturdy defense of the perimeter. The heroism and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Musick reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Musson, PFC Richard A. (3rd ID)

Myers, CAPT Arthur W. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Myers, MAJ Arthur W. (65th Inf., 3rd ID)

Myers, CPL Vernon M. (24ID, Hq. Co, 3d Bn, 21st Regt.)

Myung, CPL Yoo Je (3rd ID)

 

 

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