Korean War Casualty Information
Korean War Service Deaths - Alamance County, North Carolina

 
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[KWE Note: The information found on this page was copied from www.alamancelibraries.org.]

Barrett, Andrew H.

Corporal Barrett was wounded in action in Korea on November 10, 1950 while serving with the 24th Infantry Regt., 25th Infantry Division and died of his wounds 2 days later. Cpl. Barrett was born in 1927 and entered the service while living in Alamance County. Cpl. Barrett was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Korean War Service Medal.

Source: American Battle Monuments Commission website

Barrett, J.B.

Private First Class Barrett, brother of Don and Joseph Barrett of Burlington and son of Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Barrett of Church Hill, Tennessee, was reported missing in action in Korea in July 1950 while serving with the 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division and later declared dead. Pfc. Barrett was born in 1924 and entered the service in July 1949 while living in Alamance County.  In addition to his parents, he is survived by 1 sister and 5 brothers, including Clay Barrett of the U.S. Army in Texas. Pfc. Barrett was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Korean War Service Medal.

Source: Times-News March 20, 1952 and American Battle Monuments Commission website

Bunting, Worth L.

Sergeant Bunting, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Bunting of Graham, NC, was reported missing in action in Korea while serving with the 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He was taken prisoner while fighting the enemy near Chochiwon, South Korea on July 11, 1950 and forced to march to North Korea on the “Tiger Death March” He died while a prisoner at Hanjang-ni, North Korea on January 31, 1951 at the age of 23 years. Sgt. Bunting’s remains were never recovered, and the Army and his family did not learn the details of his death for a number of years after the end of the conflict. Sgt. Worth Bunting’s younger brother, Sgt. James R. Bunting, entered the army just 1 month after his brother and served 9 months in Korea early in the war. He was wounded there in October 1950 and later was stationed with the Air Force in Germany.

Sgt. Worth Bunting’s name is inscribed on the Memorial to the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial. He was awarded the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Prisoner of War Medal, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

Source: Times-News January 4, 1951 and September 12, 1953 and American Battle Monuments Commission website

Heritage, Willard Franklin “Frank”

Sergeant First Class Heritage, son of Mr. John W. Heritage of Ford St, Burlington and the late Mrs. Lenora Heritage was born in 1919 and was a veteran of World War II. He attended Burlington High School and had been in the Army for 9 years. Sgt. Heritage left for Korea from Fort Lewis, Washington in July 1950. He was killed in action in Korea on November 28, 1950 while fighting the enemy near Kunu-ri, North Korea. Sgt. Heritage was a member of Company B, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division. Sgt. Heritage’s remains were never recovered. He is survived by one daughter, Gail, one son, Franklin, a brother Mr. W. W. Heritage of Illinois, and his step-mother Mrs. Minnie Heritage. Sgt. Heritage was awarded the Purple Heart, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation, the Republic of Korea War Service Medal and the World War II Victory Medal.

Source: Times-News January 30, 1951 and American Battle Monuments Commission website

Billy Sam Lee

Private First Class Lee, son of Mrs. and Mrs. J. S. Lee of Elon College, NC, was killed in combat in Korea on August 29, 1951 while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division. Pfc. Lee entered the service in January 1951, trained at Parris Island, SC and Camp Pendleton, California and arrived overseas in Korea on August 5. The 20-year-old Marine had been in the war zone for 3 weeks at the time of his death and was serving gas an ammunition carrier for a machine gun crew.
Before entering the service, Pfc. Lee attended Anderson School and worked at the Ossipee Weaving Plant of Burlington Mills. Survivors include his parents who live on the Reidsville Highway, 3 sisters, and 2 brothers. Pfc. Lee was a member of Camp Springs Methodist Church. He was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Korean War Service Medal.

Source: Times-News September 7, 1951 and American Battle Monuments Commission website

Manuel, William D.

Private First Class Manuel, son of Mr. and Mrs. D.L. Manuel of Burlington, Route 6, was wounded in combat near Kunu-ri, North Korea on November 30, 1950 at the age of 18 years and died the next day. Pfc. Manuel had been wounded previously by shrapnel wounds in the arm in early September 1950 and retuned to duty on October 13. He enlisted in the Army in January 1949, trained in South Carolina and Washington State, and sailed for Korea from Fort Lewis, Washington, in July 1950. At the time of his death, he was serving with the 82nd Infantry Division, 7th Battalion. Survivors include his parents, 2 brothers James and Edgar, and a half-bother, Garland Beal, of Swepsonville.

Pfc. Manuel was awarded the Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Korean War Service Medal.

Source: Times-News January 3, 1951 and American Battle Monuments Commission website

Martin, Elwin C, Jr.

Corporal Martin was taken prisoner while fighting the enemy near Chochiwon, South Korea on July 10, 1950 and died on July 16, 1952 while a prisoner of war at Camp 3 near Chang-Song, North Korea. Cpl. Martin was born in 1929 and was a member of the 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He entered the service while living in Leaksville, North Carolina, but had lived in Alamance County. Cpl. Martin was awarded the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Prisoner of War Medal, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Korean War Service Medal.

Source: American Battle Monuments Commission website

May, Raymond F.

Private May, son of Otis F. and Minnie Horner May of Glen Raven, was killed in action in Korea on February 3, 1951 at the age of 21 years while serving with Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Pvt. May enlisted in the Army in July 1950 and trained at Ft. Knox, Kentucky and Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland. He sailed for Korea in December 1950 and was killed after only a few days at the front. Aside from his parents, he is survived by 1 sister, 1 brother, and three grandparents—Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Horner and Mrs. Nora May of Glen Raven. A military funeral for Pvt. May was held at Pinecroft Baptist Church with burial in Pine Hill Cemetery. Private May was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Korean War Service Medal.

Source: Times-News January 3, 1952 and January 9, 1952 and American Battle Monuments Commission website

Ray, James W.

Sergeant Ray, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Ray of Route 2, Burlington, was killed in action in Korea on February 20, 1951 while attacking the enemy during “Operation Thunderbolt” near Wonjou, South Korea.. At the time of his death, he was serving with the 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Sgt. Ray was born at Danville, Virginia on August 14, 1930. He attended Glencoe School and was employed by Glencoe Mills before enlisting in the Army in August 1948. He was sent to Japan in January 1949 and went to Korea last August. Aside from his parents, Sgt. Ray is survived by 1 brother, 2 sisters, and a grandmother—Mrs. Mary Ray of Danville, Virginia. He was a member of Calvary Baptist Church here. Sgt. Ray was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

Source: Times-News March 25, 1951 and American Battle Monuments Commission website

Stockard, Robert Cicero “Bobby”

Private First Class Stockard, son of Cramer F. and Mrs. Annie Love Stockard and grandson of the late J. Cicero Stockard of Alamance County, was killed in action in Korea on November 11, 1951 while serving with Company G, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division.  Pfc. Stockard was born on July 1, 1930, graduated from Alexander Wilson High School in 1948 and attended Burlington Business College before enlisting in the Marines in March 1951. He served as a machine gunner and was wounded on September 12, 1951 and later returned to duty. Survivors include his parents, 1 sister, and his maternal grandfather, Robert Love of Route 1, Graham. Funeral services were held at Glenhope Baptist Church with burial in Mt. Hermon Church Cemetery. Pfc. Stockard was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

Sources: Times-News February 18, 1952 and American Battle Monuments Commission website

Wilder, James B.

Private First Class Wilder was killed in action in Korea on September 2, 1950 while serving with the 29th Infantry Regimental Combat Team. He was born in 1932 and was age 18 years at the time of his death. Pfc. Wilder was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

Source: American Battle Monuments Commission website

Winstead, Henry Grady

Sergeant Winstead, son of W.A. Winstead of Route 1, Graham and the late Mrs. Mollie Ida Winstead
was killed in action in Korea on May 22, 1951 at the age of 22 years. Sgt. Winstead was a medic with the Medical Company, 5th Infantry Regimental Combat Team and he was killed while tending his wounded comrades near Taesong, South Korea. Sgt. Winstead attended Maple Avenue School and worked for Burlington Mills before he entered the service in 1947. He had been in Korea for almost a year at the time of his death. In addition to his father, he is survived by 3 sisters, 3 brothers, and 2 half-brothers, Mark and Mack Flores. There are plans to have Winstead’s remains returned to Burlington for local burial. Sgt. Winstead was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

Source: Times-News June 13, 1951 and American Battle Monuments Commission website

Worth, Marcellus D.

Private First Class Worth, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Worth of Route 1, Haw River, was an African-American soldier who was killed in action in Korea on May 24, 1953 while serving with the 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. He was born in 1930 and was a native of Alamance County. In addition to his parents, Pfc. Worth is survived by two brothers, Broadrick D. Worth and Floyd M. Worth, one grandmother, Mrs. Harriette McBroom, and one great-grandmother, Mrs. Artelia McBroom. The funeral was held in August 1953 at Melville Congregational Christian Church with military rites conducted at Maxwell Chapel. Pfc. Worth was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

Source: Times-News June 13, 1953 and July 31, 1953 and American Battle Monuments Commission website

Wright, Clyde Manuel

Private Wright was seriously wounded in action in South Korea on September 3, 1950 and died of wounds later that day. Pvt. Wright was serving with the 72nd Medium Tank Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division at the time of his death. He was born in 1931. He was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

Source: American Battle Monuments Commission website

 
 
 

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