"In Defense of Humanity"

 
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A Study of Clark County Soldiers Who
Gave Their Lives in World War I, World War II,
the Korean War and the Vietnam War"

Presented to the City of Winchester [Kentucky], June 07, 2005
Compiled by Michael F. Tyler

 

[KWE Note: The text and photographs found on this casualty page are credited to Michael F. Tyler of Winchester, Kentucky. They are from the Korean War segment (pages 33-37) of a manuscript entitled, "In Defense of Humanity" compiled by Tyler when he served as an intern for the City of Winchester. Few city governments in the United States care enough about their veterans to commission a research project to honor its local veterans. The Korean War Educator commends Winchester and Mr. Tyler for this excellent and worthy project. The full text of "In Defense of Humanity" can be found on the Winchester website at www.winchesterky.com.]


Introduction by Michael F. Tyler

I began this project after being hired as an intern by the City of Winchester. Mayor Dodd Dixon requested that I research the lives and service of Clark County soldiers who sacrificed their lives serving their country. This includes soldiers of both World Wars, as well as the Korean and Vietnam Wars. During my research, I found the names of additional soldiers that were not listed on the doughboy monument, located behind the Clark County Courthouse. Their exclusion was often due to moving to or from Winchester, or the absence of any family members here. I have tried to include everyone who ever lived in or had close ties to Winchester.

In order to research the lives of these 136 individuals, many of whom died nearly a century ago, it was necessary to draw from a wide range of sources. Primary biographical resources used were letters and obituaries printed in The Winchester Sun, as well as interviews with the soldiers’ friends and family members, whose names I have listed on the contributors page. Basic facts and military records were obtained through the National Archives and Records Administration, as well as through the Department of Military Affairs in Frankfort. The American Battle Monument Commission’s database was also very useful in locating often hard to find information.


Clark County, Kentucky Korean War Casualties

Barnett, Raymond E.

Corporal Barnett was killed in action on July 10, 1950, while serving in Korea. A veteran of World War II, he reenlisted in the Korean War, and was a member of the 45th Regiment, Company G. Barnett, the son of Annie Lee and Clint Barnett, had attended Winchester High School, and was survived by his father, four brothers, Earl, Robert, Clinton, and Oliver Barnett, as well as two sisters, Mrs. Elsie Tapp, and Mrs. Della Puckett. His services were conducted by Reverend Clarence Walker of Lexington, Kentucky, and he was buried in the Winchester Cemetery.

Brandenburg, Clifton

Son of Curtis and Cora Willis Brandenburg, Private First Class Brandenburg was killed in action while serving in Korea, on September 16, 1952. He was a member of the Central Baptist Church. Brandenburg was survived by his parents, a sister, Annie Frances Brandenburg, and a brother, Pfc. Charles Ray Brandenburg. His services were conducted by Rev. Paul Fox and Rev. Claude Shimfessel, and he was buried in the Winchester Cemetery.

Byrd, Wendell Forrest

A native of Clark County, Captain Byrd was serving as pastor of a church in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, when he was called into the Korean War. He was already a veteran of World War II. Capt. Byrd was killed on October 27, 1951, when he reportedly accidentally tripped a mine while hunting in Korea, near the Hwachon Reservoir. A member of the Headquarters and Service Company, 13th Engineer Combat Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, he was awarded the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, and the National Defense Service Medal. Byrd was survived by his mother, Mrs. G. M. Byrd, his wife, Ruth Sample Byrd, his daughter, Lou Byrd, a brother C. K. Byrd, and five sisters, Mrs. Lula Young, Mrs. Mable Brumbaugh, Mrs. A. T. Rowe, Mrs. S. S. Myers, and Mrs. David Cropp.

Clemens, John J.

Private First Class Clemens was killed in action while serving with the U. S. Army in Korea, on September 19, 1951. He had been a member of the 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Pfc. Clemens was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, and the National Defense Medal.

Combs, Anthony

Private First Class Combs entered the army in June, 1950. He had been in Korea for a year when he died of severe wounds caused by missile fire while in action, on October 14, 1951. Combs had reportedly rushed through an open area while under enemy fire, attempting to drive the lead truck in a convoy, thus allowing the parked convoy to move toward safety. He received the Bronze Star for his actions. Combs was survived by his mother, Mrs. Gladys Goolman, his father, Mr. Woodrow Combs, his step father, Mr. William Goolman, and his half brother, Larry Goolman. Military services were held for him in the Winchester Cemetery, presided over by the Rev. Claude Shimfessel.

Davis, Russell G.

Private First Class Davis was killed in action on August 7, 1950, while serving in Korea. He was a member of the 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Davis was awarded the Purple Heart among other awards, and was survived by his parents, Mr. And Mrs. Asa and Mary Davis, McClure Road, as well as six brothers and six sisters.

Lambert, James O.

Second Lieutenant Lambert was serving with the Army in North Korea when he was declared missing in action on October 2, 1952, and dead on January 7, 1954. He had trained at Fort Benning, Georgia, and was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Division. Lt. Lambert was awarded the Purple Heart among other awards.

Lewis, Henry P.


Henry P. Lewis
(Click picture for a larger view)

Corporal Lewis was serving in North Korea with the 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, when he was killed in action on September 16, 1952. He was survived by his wife, Mrs. Betty Green Lewis, and was awarded the Purple Heart among other awards.

Logan, Carl D.

Private Logan was with Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, when he was killed in action on September 6, 1951, in North Korea. He was survived by his parents, Mr. And Mrs. B. F. Logan, of Jeff, Kentucky, and a brother, Claude Logan. Pvt. Logan was awarded the Purple Heart, as well as several other awards for his service.

Palmer, Billy


Billy Palmer
(Click picture for a larger view)

Private First Class Billy Palmer had been in the Army since January 3, 1951, and was serving on the Island of Okinawa, Japan, when the building in which he was sleeping caught on fire. He sustained second and third degree burns, and died five days later, on February 26, 1952. Palmer was survived by his wife, Mrs. Betty Jane Palmer, and his mother, Mrs. Hazel Ervine, Hamilton, Ohio. His services were conducted at the Epperson Church of God in Estill County, Kentucky, and he was buried in the Winchester Cemetery.

Prewitt, Jack L.


Jack L. Prewitt
(Click picture for a larger view)

Sergeant Prewitt was a native of Montgomery County, Kentucky, and was a 1945 graduate of Lafayette High School in Lexington, Ky. He served three years in World War II before his year and a half of service in Korea. Sgt. Prewitt was killed in an aircraft explosion off the coast of Japan, on April 9, 1952. He was survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson L. Prewitt, three brothers, Fred, William, and Robert Prewitt, as well as two sisters, Susan and Carolyn Prewitt. Prewitt had been a member of Epworth Methodist Church in Lexington, Kentucky, however, his memorial services were conducted at the First Methodist Church in Winchester.

Pritchett, Arnie R.


Arnie R. Pritchett
(Click picture for a larger view)

Private Pritchett had given three years of service in the U. S. Army before he was killed in action on February 4, 1951, in South Korea. He had been a member of the 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Pritchett received the Purple Heart and many other awards for his sacrifice, and was survived by his mother, Mrs. Cordie A. Larrison, his father, Elijah Pritchett, three brothers, Gilbert, Staff Sgt. Truman, and Pvt. James Pritchett, as well as two sisters, Barbara Jean Pritchett and Mrs. Cora Holland. His services were conducted at the Lexington Cemetery by Rev. John W. Basham.

Rogers, Joseph Lee


Joseph Lee Rogers
(Click picture for a larger view)

Private First Class Rogers served a year in the U. S. marines after graduating from the Clark County High School in 1950, where he had been a star basketball player. He sustained serious phosphorous burns while fighting in Korea, on May 28, 1951, two weeks after his 19th birthday, and died from those burns on June 16. Rogers was survived by his wife, Mrs. Patricia Douglas Rogers, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fritz and Hattie Rogers, three sisters, Mrs. H. H. Hensell, Mrs. Ettie Landry, and Mrs. Clay S. Gaunce, and his brother, Fritz Rogers, Jr. His services were conducted at the Winchester Cemetery by Rev. A. Dalton Leath, of First Baptist Church, Winchester. Rogers received many awards, including the Purple Heart, for his sacrifice.

Smith, Willie

Corporal Smith had been a member of Battery B, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division. He was classified as missing in action on November 30, 1950, in Kunu-ri, North Korea, but was not officially declared dead until December 31, 1953. Smith was awarded the Purple Heart and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal, among others.

Spurlock, John Warren

Private First Class Spurlock had been a member of the 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division. On December 1, 1950, as he was fighting near Kunu-ri, North Korea, he was taken prisoner, later dying on February 26, 1951, reportedly of starvation. Spurlock was awarded the Prisoner of War Medal, among many others. He had been employed by the Richard Seed Company on Colby Road, in Winchester. Spurlock was survived by two younger brothers, one of which served in the Air Force.

Steele, Carl Cole


Carl Cole Steele
(Click picture for a larger view)

Carl Steele was a graduate of the Winchester High School, and served in the Air Force for five years. After serving in Japan for eighteen months as an Airman First Class, he was killed on June 18, 1953, in an airplane crash near Tokyo, Japan, that claimed 129 lives. Steele had been flight engineer of a C-124A Globemaster transport, with the 22nd Troop Carrier Squadron, 374th Troop carrier Group. Awarded many medals for his service in Korea, he was survived by his wife, Mrs. Beatrice McGuire Steele, his mother, Mrs. O. F. Baxter, his sisters, Betty Steele, and Mrs. Georgia Barnett, as well as five brothers, Fred, Luther, Charles, John, and Travis Steele.

Stewart, Leon S.


Leon S. Stewart
(Click picture for a larger view)

Private First Class Stewart had been in the Army for a year, and had served in Korea for four months with the Heavy Mortar Company, 5th Infantry Regimental Combat Team. His company was near “Outpost Harry,” in North Korea, assisting the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, when he was killed in action on June 11, 1953. Stewart had attended the Winchester High School, worked as a newsboy for The Winchester Sun, and was employed by the Winchester Dairy before entering the Army. He was survived by his Mother, Mrs. Mina Stewart, three sisters, Mrs. Shirley Adams, Mrs. W. L. Berry, and Mrs. Ernest Pasley, as well as three brothers, Cecil, John, and S1/c Jesse Stewart. Pfc. Stewart was awarded the Purple Heart, and many other awards and medals for his service in Korea. His funeral services were conducted at Scobee Funeral Home by Rev. J. C. Everman. Military rites were also performed for Stewart at the Winchester Cemetery.

Todd, Marion Hisle

Sergeant Todd served in South Korea with the 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He was a veteran of World War II, and had reenlisted in the Army in January, 1948, before being killed in action on February 6, 1951. Sgt. Todd was awarded the Purple Heart, the Bronze Star, and the Oak Leaf Cluster for his service. He was survived by his parents, Everett Todd, and Mrs. Joseph Carter, and a brother, Eugene Todd. Todd’s services were conducted by Rev. A. Dalton Leath and Rev. Reed Carter, and he was buried in the Lawrenceburg, Kentucky Cemetery. He had been a member of Simpsonville Baptist Church in Lexington, KY.

 

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