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Individual Awards and Honors
Received in Post-War Korea

 

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This page opened on the Korean War Educator on February 11, 2013.  To add citations, send them to Lynnita Brown, 111 E. Houghton St., Tuscola, Illinois 61953 or e-mail Lynnita.

Air Medals are awarded for heroism while participating in aerial flight.  Soldier's Medals are awarded for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy.


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Air Medal Recipients

Alves, Kenneth J.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 3 - 28 January 1964

Captain Kenneth J. Alves, Armor, United States Army, a member of the Aviation Section, Detachment L (Provisional), United States Army Advisory Group to Korea, distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight near Wonju, Korea, on 17 July 1953.  As pilot of an OH-23D helicopter, Captain Alves demonstrated outstanding flying ability, perseverance, and sound judgment in his voluntary efforts to rescue thirty Korean women and children from a small island in the Somgang River which was swollen by the torrential rains of Typhoon Wendy.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety, and despite the darkness, heavy rainfall, and hazardous flying conditions, he quickly located the stranded people and effectively completed seven lifts from the island threatened by inundation.  Captain Alves' exceptional flying skill and heroic action during this mercy mission reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal for outstanding courage on 17 July 1963 as announced in General Orders Number 81, Headquarters, U.S. Army Advisory Group, Korea, dated 14 August 1963.)

Breneman, Charles A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 18 - 24 April 1968

Specialist Six Charles A. Breneman, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroic action on 24 October 1967 in Seoul, Korea.  As one of the crew members of a UH-1B helicopter, he helped in saving the lives of approximately 40 people trapped on the roof of a burning building in downtown Seoul.  After the helicopter succeeded in landing on the roof of the burning building, Special Breneman was highly instrumental in calming the frantic people, frightened by the raging flames and the great amount of smoke, and preventing chaos.  He then supervised the loading of the helicopter.  In order to evacuate a maximum number of people in the helicopter, it was necessary for Specialist Breneman to hang to the open door.  The helicopter made three trips through intense fire and smoke and the crew successfully saved the lives of all the trapped people.  Specialist Breneman's heroic actions are exemplary of the highest traditions of the United States Army.  His courageous actions are not only a credit to himself but to his command and to his country.  (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Specialist Six Breneman as announced in General Order Number 1, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, dated 5 January 1968.)

Fehringer, Paul W.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 12 - 17 March 1967

Specialist Four Paul W. Fehringer, US55807518, United States Army, is cited for heroism on 26 July 1966.  Specialist Fehringer was acting as a crew chief on a UH-1B helicopter conducting flood rescue operations in the inundated Han River Valley, east of Seoul, Korea.  The crew's first rescue operation involved evacuating approximately 170 persons stranded on the rapidly disappearing high ground of a Korean village.  The helicopter landed in a backyard of one of the village homes, in the only remaining dry area which measured about 50 square feet.  Immediately following the helicopter's landing, the flood victims began pushing, shoving and fighting, all seeking to board the ship.  Responding immediately to the explosiveness of the situation, Sergeant Fehringer jumped out into the midst of the mob and by using sign language, and a limited amount of Korean, he attempted to gain control.  Pulling an English speaking Korean to his side he shouted orders that were translated and brought the crowd under his control.  He then began to systematically load women and children into the helicopter.  During the two mile flight to the off-loading area, Specialist Fehringer spent his time reassuring frightened mothers and children and maintaining control.  Ten flights were required to evacuate this group of people.  On another occasion it was necessary to hover over a house to get to the people stranded within the building.  While the helicopter was hovering, Specialist Fehringer climbed down the skid to the roof of the house and went inside to help them.  Specialist Fehringer's actions throughout the rescue operations brought great credit on himself and the United States Army.

Huckobey, James D.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 40 - 9 December 1965

Specialist Five James D. Huckobey, (then Specialist Four), United States Army, while serving as a member of Company A, 7th Aviation Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea on 1 March 1965.  When informed of the need of an aerial operation to recover the body of a hunter from a known but uncharted mine field, Specialist Huckobey unhesitatingly volunteered as Assistant Crew Chief of an Army CH-21 helicopter for the dangerous mission.  While the pilot hovered the helicopter inches from the ground, Specialist Huckobey hung from the door of the aircraft and exposed his body from the waist forward to the mine infested area to reach the victim.  Through his determination and courage, he continued this brave effort for over an hour until the recovery operation was completed.  His fortitude and perseverance, combined with the invaluable assistance he provided the pilot in guiding the aircraft, contributed significantly to the success of the difficult evacuation mission.  Specialist Huckobey's heroism and professional skill in this perilous recovery operation reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Littleton, Walter M.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 5 - 23 February 1966

Captain Walter M. Littleton, Artillery, while serving as a member of Company A, 7th Aviation Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 1 March 1965.  When informed of the need of an aerial operation to recover the body of a hunter from a known but uncharted minefield, Captain Littleton unhesitatingly volunteered as co-pilot of an Army CH-21 helicopter for the dangerous mission.  With fortitude, perseverance, and exceptional flying ability, he and the pilot skillfully maneuvered the helicopter over a mine infested area while the crew chief and the assistant crew chief hung from the door of the aircraft and attached a rope to the body of the hunter killed by a mine.  Although forced to hover the helicopter inches above the ground for over an hour before recovery of the body was finally achieved, he displayed professional competence, determination, and courage which resulted in the success of the difficult evacuation mission.  Captain Littleton's heroism and outstanding flying ability in this hazardous recovery operation reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes the award of the Army Commendation Medal for heroism 1 March 1965, as announced in General Orders Number 125, Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division, APO San Francisco, 96207, dated 15 March 1965.)

Moore, Travis L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 52 - 18 December 1963

Captain Travis L. Moore, Armor, United States Army, a member of the Aviation Section, Detachment L (Provisional), United States Army Advisory Group to Korea, distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight near Wanjo, Korea, on 17 July 1963.  As pilot of an OH-23D helicopter, Captain Moore demonstrated outstanding flying ability, perseverance, and sound judgment in his voluntary efforts to rescue 30 Korean women and children from a small island in the Somgang River which was swollen by the torrential rains of Typhoon Wendy.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety, and despite the darkness, heavy rainfall, and hazardous flying conditions, he quickly located the stranded people and effectively completed seven lifts from the island threatened by inundation.  Captain Moore's exceptional flying skill and heroic action during this mercy mission reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal for outstanding courage on 17 July 1963 as announced in General Orders Number 81, Headquarters, U.S. Army Advisory Group, Korea, dated 14 August 1963.)

Pine, Clyde L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 40 - 9 December 1965

Staff Sergeant Clyde L. Pine, while serving as a member of Company A, 7th Aviation Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 1 March 1965.  When informed of the need of an aerial operation to recover the body of a hunter from a known but uncharted mine field, Sergeant Pine unhesitatingly volunteered as Crew Chief of an Army CH-21 helicopter for the dangerous mission.  While the pilot hovered the helicopter inches from the ground, Sergeant Pine hung from the door of the aircraft and exposed his body from the waist forward to the mine infested area to reach the victim.  Through his determination and courage, combined with the invaluable assistance he provided the pilot in guiding the aircraft, he contributed materially to the success of the difficult evacuation mission.  Sergeant Pine's heroism, perseverance, and professional skill in this perilous recovery operation reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes the award of the Army Commendation Medal for heroism on 1 March 1965, as announced in General Orders Number 127, Headquarters 7th Infantry Division, APO San Francisco, 96207, dated 15 July 1965.)

Prater, Billy R. Jr.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 2 - 12 January 1966

Chief Warrant Officer Billy R. Prater, Jr., United States Army, while serving as a member of Company A, 7th Aviation Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea on 1 March 1965.  When informed of the need of an aerial operation to recover the body of a hunter from a known but uncharted minefield, Chief Warrant Officer Prater unhesitatingly volunteered as pilot of an Army Ch-21 helicopter for the dangerous mission.  With courage, sound judgment, and outstanding flying ability, he skillfully maneuvered the helicopter over a mine infested area while the crew chief and the assistant crew chief hung from the door of the aircraft and attached a rope the body of the hunter killed by a mine.  Although forced to hover the helicopter inches above the ground for over an hour before recovery of the body was finally achieved, he demonstrated determination, fortitude, and professional skill which resulted in the success of the difficult evacuation mission.  Chief Warrant Officer Prater's heroism and unique flying ability in this hazardous recovery operation reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes the award of the Army Commendation Medal for heroism 1 March 1965, as announced in General Orders Number 126, Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division, APO San Francisco 96207, dated 15 July 1965.)

Sheppard, Charles W.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 18 - 24 April 1968

Specialist Five Charles W. Sheppard, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroic action on 24 October 1967 in Seoul, Korea.  As the crew chief of UH-1B helicopter, he helped in saving the lives of approximately forty people trapped on the roof of a burning building in downtown Seoul.  After the helicopter succeed in landing on the roof of the burning building, Specialist Sheppard was highly instrumental in calming the frantic people, frightened by the raging flames and the great amount of smoke, and preventing chaos.  Specialist Sheppard supervised the loading of the aircraft during the three trips through intense fire and smoke that were necessary in order to save the people that were endangered.  The lives of all the trapped people were successfully saved and Specialist Sheppard's heroic actions are to be highly commended.  His courageous actions are not only a credit to himself, but to his command and to his country.  (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Specialist Five Sheppard as announced in General Order Number 1, Headquarters Eighth United States Army, dated 5 January 1968.)


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Army Commendation Medal - Foreign

Cho, Ku Ho

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 13 - 6 March 1969

Second Lieutenant Ku Ho Cho, Republic of Korea Army, who distinguished himself by heroic action against an armed enemy on 22 June 1968 while serving with 11th Company, 71st Regiment, 25th Division, Republic of Korea Army.  On this date, Lieutenant Cho immediately deployed 10 members of his unit to deprive three insurgents from withdrawing from a fire fight and fleeing north.  Locating two of the three infiltrators, Lieutenant Cho pressed an envelopment of the insurgents.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he gave effective small arms fire six meters from his position upon the enemy soldiers, mortally wounding one of them.  Lieutenant Cho's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the free world's military service and reflect great credit upon him, the 25th Division, the Republic of Korea Army and the United Nations Command.

Kim, Sung Ki

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 13 - 6 March 1969

Corporal Sung Ki Kim, Republic of Korea Army, who distinguished himself for heroism by his demonstrated valor in the face of the enemy on the night of 29 June 1968.  On this date, Corporal Kim was a member of a five-man ambush patrol operating within the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) as a part of the anti-infiltration barrier system in the 2d Infantry Division Sector.  At approximately 2100 hours on 29 June 1968, a three-man North Korean infiltration team was sighted moving towards the ambush patrol of which Corporal Kim was a member.  The entire patrol calmly waited until the intruders were well within the ambush position and then opened fire, killing one infiltrator and forcing the rest to flee north.  Corporal Kim's behavior throughout the entire action was outstanding.  His performance was characterized by superior self control, unflinching discipline, and remarkable courage.  He fully demonstrated his outstanding professional ability and complete devotion to duty.  His rapid response to the commands of his patrol leader, the effective and accurate fire that he placed on the advancing infiltrators, and his disregard for personal safety significantly contributed to the success of his unit.  Corporal Kim clearly demonstrated his will to defend his country and his dedication to the cause of freedom.  His performance of duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of those who stand ready to defend the Free World.  Corporal Kim's actions reflected great credit upon himself, the 2d Infantry Division, the United States Army and the Army of the Republic of Korea.


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Bronze Star Medal Recipients

Aldrich, Harold (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 31 - 30 September 1964

Specialist Five Harold Aldrich, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroic achievement while engaged in military operations against an opposing armed force on 13 November 1963, in Korea, and while serving with the Armistice Affairs Division, United Nations Command/United States Forces Korea, as a member of the United Nations Command component of Joint Observer Team Number 4.  Specialist Aldrich displayed fortitude, courage, and military discipline when the unarmed and properly identified Team was fired upon without warning by hostile forces as it was conducting an inspection of the Military Demarcation Line markers and safe lanes in accordance with the Armistice and subsequent agreements.  To escape the onslaught of heavy machine gun and rifle fire, the Team members sought cover in icy waters near the north bank of the North Han River where they were pinned down for four and one-half hours.  Although he was wounded, Specialist Aldrich demonstrated perseverance and outstanding ability to cope with the unexpected.  Through his personal example and encouragement to the Team, he was highly instrumental in maintaining its morale, discipline, and determination, and in its success in reaching a place of safety.  Specialist Aldrich's professional competence, heroic conduct, and devotion to duty in this hazardous situation reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Berens, Ron K. (POW)

For meritorious service as a crew member of the USS PUEBLO (AGER-2) during their period of captivity in North Korea from 24 January to 23 December 1968. Although subjected to extreme forms of physical and mental cruelties, which were in violation of all international agreements, he steadfastly demonstrated defiance and total resistance towards his captors. He never wavered in his devotion to duty and loyalty to the United States, even though the guards and interrogators, frustrated by his behavior, increased the tempo and severity of their ruthless treatment. His courageous stand served to inspire his fellow prisoners and strengthened their will to resist. By his exemplary performance of duty, he reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Burgoyne, Michael A. (Bronze Star with V)

General Orders No. 5 - 26 April 1985

For action 23 November 1984 while serving with the United Nations Command Support Group - Joint Security Area, Korea. Private Burgoyne.

Chicca, Robert J. (POW)

For meritorious service as a crew member of the USS PUEBLO (AGER-2) during their period of captivity in North Korea from 24 January to 23 December 1968. Although subjected to extreme forms of physical and mental cruelties, which were in violation of all international agreements, he steadfastly demonstrated defiance and total resistance towards his captors. He never wavered in his devotion to duty and loyalty to the United States, even though the guards and interrogators, frustrated by his behavior, increased the tempo and severity of their ruthless treatment. His courageous stand served to inspire his fellow prisoners and strengthened their will to resist. By his exemplary performance of duty, he reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Clark, Alphus R. (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 31 - 30 September 1964

Lieutenant Colonel Alphus R. Clark, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroic achievement while engaged in military operations against an opposing armed force on 13 November 1963, in Korea, and while serving with the Armistice Affairs Division, United Nations Command/United States Forces Korea, and serving as the Senior Member of the United Nations Command component of Joint Observer Team Number 4.  Colonel Clark demonstrated fortitude, courage, and professional skill when the unarmed and properly identified Team was fired upon without warning by hostile forces as it was conducting an inspection of the Military Demarcation Line markers and safe lanes in accordance with the Armistice and subsequent agreements.  To escape the onslaught of heavy machine gun and rifle fire, the Team members sought cover in icy waters near the north bank of the North Han River where they were pinned down for four and one-half hours.  Throughout the grueling ordeal, Colonel Clark rendered encouragement to the Team members and displayed decisive leadership and sound judgment which resulted in their safe escape after the prolonged period in icy waters under heavy hostile gun fire.  When it appeared that the incident could develop into a fire fight between the guard posts on each side of the river, he was highly instrumental in preventing a major conflict by urging the Republic of Korea forces on the south bank to withhold counter fire.  Colonel Clark's heroic conduct, and outstanding performance of duty in this hazardous situation reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Colwell, David K. (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 3 - 23 January 1968

Second Lieutenant David K. Colwell, O5338964, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism at the risk of his life on 10 August 1967 near the Korean Demilitarized Zone as a Platoon Leader, Company B, 2d Battalion, 31st Infantry, 7th Infantry Division.  Lieutenant Colwell displayed great personal courage and uncommon professionalism during an ambush attack by the Communist North Koreans on a vehicle transporting members of Company B, 2d Battalion, 31st Infantry.  Soon after the initial attack, Lieutenant Colwell leaped from the safety and cover of his trailing vehicle and advanced, under heavy automatic weapons fire and armed with only a .45 caliber pistol, to aid the men of the ambushed truck.  Upon reaching the besieged vehicle, he immediately began to defend his position with a borrowed M-14 rifle, while shouting orders and encouragement to the men.  Demonstrating exceptional bravery and leadership, Lieutenant Colwell then exposed himself to intense enemy fire and lowered the tailgate of the truck in order to evacuate injured personnel and redeploy the men and weapons to ward off the North Koreans.  His outstanding and heroic actions greatly assisted in driving off the enemy and prevented possible further injury and deaths among the trapped soldiers.  Lieutenant Colwell's intrepidity and conspicuously outstanding performance reflect great credit upon himself, the 7th Infantry Division and the United States Army.

Deaver, Alan C. (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 15 - 8 April 1968

Sergeant First Class Alan C. Deaver, Infantry, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroic action against an armed enemy on 16 July 1967, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry (Mechanized), 2d Infantry Division.  On this date, Sergeant Deaver was in charge of a position along the Korean Demilitarized Zone when it was attacked by an undetermined number of North Korean infiltrators.  After overrunning the position, the enemy withdrew toward the Demilitarized Zone in an attempt to exfiltrate.  Sergeant Deaver volunteered to lead one of the patrols that was dispatched to capture the intruders prior to their crossing the Demilitarized Zone.  In an attempt to extricate the infiltrators from the United Nations side of the Demilitarized Zone, the enemy directed effective small-arms fire against Sergeant Deaver's patrol.  At this time, Sergeant Deaver observed one of the enemy soldiers attempting to escape across a stream bed under the protection of the enemy fire.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety he gave chase to the escaping aggressor until he closed with him.  He then delivered effective pistol fire upon the enemy soldier, mortally wounding him.  Sergeant Deaver's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 2d Infantry Division and the United States Army.

Grace, Stephen L. (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 57 - 17 October 1968

Sergeant Stephen L. Grace, US56705807, United States Army, who distinguished himself by his heroic actions near the Korean Military Demarcation Line on 21 April 1968 while assigned to Company B, 2d Battalion, 31st Infantry, 7th Infantry Division.  Sergeant Grace voluntarily exposed himself to hostile fire in order to save the life of a wounded comrade and thwart the enemy's attempt to destroy his ten man force.  As two patrols moved to secure a hill about 100 meters south of the Military Demarcation Line, one patrol leader advanced to the crest alone.  Two shots hit him; then both patrols received heavy enemy fire.  Quickly deploying his men, Sergeant Grace advanced up the hill, removed the wounded man to the relative safety of a depression, and assumed a defensive position.  Observing two individuals attempting to flank his element, he moved to a position behind a tree.  As he was firing on the enemy personnel, Sergeant Grace was wounded in the right arm, knocking his weapon out of his hands and rolling him down the hill.  Unarmed, having little cover, and in pain, he continued to direct his men in returning fire.  Sergeant Grace's forceful leadership and clear judgment enabled the squad to drive the attackers from the hill and prevented further injury and loss of life.  His intrepidity and heroic conduct reflect great credit upon himself , the 7th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.  This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal with "V" device awarded to Sergeant Grace for heroism on 21 April 1968, as announced in General Orders Number 47, Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division, APO San Francisco 96207, dated 28 May 1968.)

Hanna, Timothy D. (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 36 - 19 August 1966

Sergeant Timothy D. Hanna, Infantry, United States Army, who while serving as a member of Company C, 2d Battalion 23d Infantry, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 18 November 1965, in Korea.  Sergeant Hanna was leading a patrol in its return from the Demilitarized Zone in Korea when a noise was heard in the underbrush.  After positioning his men, he tried to move forward but was stopped when wounded by hostile automatic weapons fire.  Ignoring his multiple wounds, he continued to move forward, covered his men, and kept the patrol under control in a manner which prevented further casualties and unfavorable incidents.  Sergeant Hanna's Sound judgment, professional ability, and heroic conduct in this hazardous situation reflect distinct credit upon himself and the United States Army.  (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal with "V" device awarded to Sergeant Timothy D. Hanna for heroism on 18 November 1965, as announced in General Orders Number 14, Headquarters 2d Infantry Division, APO San Francisco 96224, dated 18 January 1966.)

Harris, Timothy L. (POW)

For meritorious service as a crew member of the USS PUEBLO (AGER-2) during their period of captivity in North Korea from 24 January to 23 December 1968. Although subjected to extreme forms of physical and mental cruelties, which were in violation of all international agreements, he steadfastly demonstrated defiance and total resistance towards his captors. He never wavered in his devotion to duty and loyalty to the United States, even though the guards and interrogators, frustrated by his behavior, increased the tempo and severity of their ruthless treatment. His courageous stand served to inspire his fellow prisoners and strengthened their will to resist. By his exemplary performance of duty, he reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Hawkins, Robert W. (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 33 - 26 July 1967

Sergeant Robert W. Hawkins, United States Army, Company A, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry, 2d Infantry Division, displayed heroic action during operations against a ground enemy on 5 April 1967, at Guard Post 566, vicinity Taesong-Dong in the Demilitarized Zone of Korea.  While in the process of improving defensive positions on the guard post perimeter, Sergeant Hawkins and two members of his squad were attacked by an enemy force of squad or larger size which had moved south of the Military Demarcation Line (MDL).  Sergeant Hawkins immediately ordered his men into firing position and directed their fire against the hostile force, killing the three enemy who had penetrated the MDL.  Sergeant Hawkins and elements of his squad were pinned down by intense enemy automatic weapons fire from a woodline north of the MDL.  Acting with keen foresight and judgment, Sergeant Hawkins ordered a fire team to establish a base of fire to cover the withdrawal of himself and other personnel who had been pinned down.  Sergeant Hawkins then moved his two squad members by fire and maneuver to a more advantageous position to a trenchline on the Guard Post.  Sergeant Hawkins then rallied his squad and directed their fire upon the hostile force, thus rendering the enemy ineffective and causing the remaining enemy to withdraw in wild disorder.  Sergeant Hawkins' professional and inspiring leadership resulted in killing at least three of the enemy and a routing of the hostile force without loss or injury to his squad.  His gallantry and heroism while under fire reflect great credit upon himself and his unit.  His actions were in the highest tradition of the United States Army.

Hester, Claude M. (Bronze with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 26 - 18 June 1968

Private First class Claude M. Hester, (then Private), United States Army, a member of Company C, 76th Engineer Battalion (Construction), Camp Liberty Bell, Joint Security Area, Korea, who distinguished himself by heroic action during operations against an armed infiltrator force on 28 August 1967 at the south boundary of the demilitarized zone in Korea.  At 1645 hours, a North Korean infiltrator force fired directly from hidden hillside positions into all tents, buildings and sectors of Company C with heavy and light automatic weapons fire.  Private Hester had driven into the company motor pool parking area in a 5-ton dump truck when the enemy fire commenced.  All other persons in the company area were either unarmed, pinned down, or caring for the wounded.  Private Hester did not leave his truck cab but, without regard for his own life or safety, calmly and methodically fired a 20-round magazine of ammunition with his M-14 rifle directly into the hostile force positions.  This action undoubtedly reduced the enemy's rate of fire and hampered their accuracy.  He was the only individual in the unit to return the hostile fire within the first minutes of the attack.  He then dismounted his truck, obtained more ammunition from an arriving Infantry force and again, with complete disregard for his own safety, accompanied the Infantry squad in an aggressive sweep of the hill.  His gallantry and heroism while under intense fire were in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and his unit.

Langenberg, Peter M. (POW)

For meritorious service as a crew member of the USS PUEBLO (AGER-2) during their period of captivity in North Korea from 24 January to 23 December 1968. Although subjected to extreme forms of physical and mental cruelties, which were in violation of all international agreements, he steadfastly demonstrated defiance and total resistance towards his captors. He never wavered in his devotion to duty and loyalty to the United States, even though the guards and interrogators, frustrated by his behavior, increased the tempo and severity of their ruthless treatment. His courageous stand served to inspire his fellow prisoners and strengthened their will to resist. By his exemplary performance of duty, he reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Larion, George F. Jr. (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 36 - 5 November 1964

Corporal George F. Larion Jr., United States Army, distinguished himself by heroic achievement while engaged in military operations against an opposing armed force on 30 July 1963, in the vicinity of Notlri, Korea.  Upon learning that an armed North Korean patrol had been sighted in the area of Notlri, Corporal Larion unhesitatingly volunteered to participate in a military operation to drive out the hostile forces.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he joined the skirmish line and, while displaying coolness and fortitude, participated in the effort to locate the insurgents until he was mortally wounded by hostile gunfire.  His courage, professional competence, and dedicated devotion to duty served to detect the position of the hostile forces and contributed materially to the successful accomplishment of the mission.  Corporal Larion's courageous actions and outstanding performance of duty in this hazardous situation reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Leach, Wendell G. (POS)

For meritorious service as a crew member of the USS PUEBLO (AGER-2) during their period of captivity in North Korea from 24 January to 23 December 1968. Although subjected to extreme forms of physical and mental cruelties, which were in violation of all international agreements, he steadfastly demonstrated defiance and total resistance towards his captors. He never wavered in his devotion to duty and loyalty to the United States, even though the guards and interrogators, frustrated by his behavior, increased the tempo and severity of their ruthless treatment. His courageous stand served to inspire his fellow prisoners and strengthened their will to resist. By his exemplary performance of duty, he reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

McManus, Abraham W. (Bronze Star with V)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 36 - 5 November 1964

Sergeant Abraham W. McManus, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroic achievement while engaged in military operations against an opposing armed force on 30 July 1963, in the vicinity of Notlri, Korea.  Upon learning that an armed North Korean patrol had been sighted in the area of Notlri, Sergeant McManus unhesitatingly volunteered to join a skirmish line and drive out the hostile forces.  When a fellow soldier close to him was suddenly felled by hostile gunfire during the advance, he displayed coolness and fortitude, made his way toward the direction of the gunfire, and detected the position of the hostile forces.  Noticing that one was preparing a grenade and another attempting to load an automatic weapon, Sergeant McManus demonstrated complete disregard for his own personal safety by jumping to his feet and preventing the hostile action from materializing.  His courage, professional competence, and dedicated devotion to duty served to avert further casualties to his unit and contributed in great measure to the successful accomplishment of the mission.  Sergeant McManus' heroic actions and outstanding performance of duty in this hazardous situation reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Schumacher, Frederic Carl (Bronze Star with V)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Bronze Star Medal with Combat "V" to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Frederic Carl Schumacher, United States Navy, for meritorious service as a crew member of the U.S.S. PUEBLO (AGER-2) during his period of captivity in North Korea from 24 January to 23 December 1968. Although subjected to extreme forms of physical and mental cruelties, which were in violation of all international agreements, he steadfastly demonstrated defiance and total resistance towards his captors. He never wavered in his devotion to duty and loyalty to the United States, even though the guards and interrogators, frustrated by his behavior, increased the tempo and severity of their ruthless treatment. His courageous stand served to inspire his fellow prisoners and strengthened their will to resist. By his exemplary performance of duty, he reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. (Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Schumacher is authorized to wear the Combat "V".)

Siembida, George R. (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 57 - 17 October 1968

Specialist Four George R. Siembida, RA11640319, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroic actions near the Korean Demilitarized Zone on 21 April 1968 while assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 31st Infantry, 7th Infantry Division.  Specialist Siembida voluntarily and without regard to personal safety exposed himself to hostile fire in the performance of his duties as an aid man.  Arriving at the scene of an intense fire fight, Specialist Siembida was quickly informed of the location of wounded personnel.  After giving instructions to the other aid men, he proceeded to reach the casualties.  Despite the heavy enemy fire, Specialist Siembida ran approximately 100 meters across an open area to the first man.  Finding him dead, he shouldered the body and made the perilous return to friendly positions, preventing possible enemy capture of the body.  He thereupon again dashed through the heavy fire to reach the other wounded personnel.  Struggling to a forward position, Specialist Siembida found that the men had already been evacuated.  He retrieved valuable discarded equipment, and, after traversing the open area for the fourth time, supervised the treatment and evacuation of the wounded.  Specialist Siembida's outstanding intrepidity and heroic conduct reflect great credit upon himself, the 7th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.  (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal with "V" device awarded to Specialist Four Siembida for heroism on 21 April 1968, as announced in General Orders Number 47, Headquarters 7th Infantry Division, APO San Francisco 96207, dated 28 May 1968.)

Turgeon, Roy W. Jr. (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 57 - 17 October 1968

Second Lieutenant Roy W. Turgeon, Jr., O5342903, Infantry, United States Army, who distinguished himself by his heroic actions near the Korean Military Demarcation Line on 21 April 1968.  While attached to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 31st Infantry, 7th Infantry Division, Lieutenant Turgeon voluntarily and without regard to personal safety exposed himself to intense fire while directing counter-action against an attacking enemy force.  His Quick Reaction Force arrived at the scene of a fire fight in which ten friendly personnel were pinned down.  Upon drawing fire, Lieutenant Turgeon deployed his personnel in order to effect the most efficient return fire.  In the course of the fight, he observed wounded friendly personnel on the side of a hill. Despite withering enemy fire, he twice crossed 70 meters of open area in order to move a wounded man to the relative security of friendly track vehicles.  Lieutenant Turgeon's strong, fearless leadership effected the rescue of the hard pressed patrol by forcing the enemy to retreat north of the Military Demarcation Line.  Lieutenant Turgeon's intrepidity and heroic conduct in the face of the enemy reflect great credit upon himself, the 7th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.  (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal with "V" device as announced in General Orders Number 46, Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division, APO San Francisco 96207, dated 28 May 1968.)

Tyrell, Jack L. Jr. (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 26 - 18 June 1968

Private First Class Jack L. Tyrell, Jr., United States Army, who distinguished himself by courageous action on 10 August 1967, when the patrol he was guiding was ambushed by an undetermined number of North Korean agents, at the southern end of the Demilitarized Zone.  Leading the patrol to an intersection of two trails, his dog, Blackie, suddenly scented the hidden North Koreans and lunged toward them.  One of the North Koreans then began firing an automatic weapon, killing the dog and wounding Private Tyrell.  Despite his wounds, Private Tyrell alerted the patrol and began firing into the enemy positions.  With complete disregard for his own life, Private Tyrell continued to fire on the enemy until he was struck in the head by enemy fire and knocked unconscious.  Through his heroic actions, Private Tyrell forced the enemy to spring the ambush prematurely, thus preventing the possible injury or loss of life of other members of the patrol.  Private Tyrell's performance of duty was in the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 2d Infantry Division and the United States Army.  (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal with "v" device awarded to Private Tyrell for heroism displayed on 10 August 1967, as announced in General Orders Number 285, Headquarters 2d Infantry Division, dated 19 October 1967.)


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Bronze Star Medal Recipients (Foreign)

Cho, San Pyo (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 58 - 24 September 1969

Staff Sergeant Sang Pyo Cho, Republic of Korea Army, distinguished himself by heroic action against an armed enemy on 22 June 1968 while serving with 1st Company, 71st Regiment, 25th Division, in the village of Pogwang-dong, Korea.  On this date, Sergeant Cho deployed members of his patrol to block the infiltrators' withdrawal route. Seeing two members of his patrol mortally wounded by enemy fire, Sergeant Cho crawled with 7 meters of the enemy position under intense small arms fire.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety he threw 4 hand grenades into their position killing 2 of the 5 hidden insurgents, thus disrupting the enemy's fire.  Sergeant Cho's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon him, the 25th Division, Republic of Korea Army and the United Nations Command.

Sohng, Chung-Kil (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 13 - 6 March 1969

Second Lieutenant Chung-Kil Sohng, Infantry, Army of the Republic of Korea, who distinguished himself by displaying exemplary professionalism and resourcefulness while engaged in hostile action with an enemy force.  On 25 June 1968, while serving as a weapons platoon leader, l7th Company, 37th Regiment, 12th Republic of Korea Army Division, Lieutenant Sohng and his men were dispatched to investigate the report of North Korean agents in the vicinity of Kosong-Kun, Kangwon-Province.  The patrol immediately took action to cut off any possible infiltration route.  The patrol then conducted ambush duty for the remainder of the night.  The following morning Lieutenant Sohng, while reconnoitering in the vicinity of Kosong-Kun, Kangwon-Province, contacted one enemy agent.  A firefight ensued and the agent was killed at a distance of 15 meters.  A second agent was sighted to their flank and killed at a distance of 20 meters.  Meanwhile, Lieutenant Sohng requested and received reinforcements from his parent unit.  Upon arrival of reinforcements, Lieutenant Sohng surrounded and combed the area suspected of harboring more enemy agents.  As a consequence two more enemy agents were uncovered and killed.  Lieutenant Sohng's leadership ability and tactical know how were instrumental in routing and killing 4 enemy agents without a single friendly casualty.  Lieutenant Sohng's actions were in keeping with highest standards of the free world forces and reflect great credit upon himself, the 12th Division, the Army of the Republic of Korea and the United Nations Command.

Um, E. Yung (Bronze Star with V)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 13 - 6 March 1969

Staff Sergeant e. Yung Um, Army of the Republic of Korea, who distinguished himself by heroic action against an armed enemy on 22 June 1968 while serving with Reconnaissance Company, 72d Regiment, 25th Division, Republic of Korea Army.  On this date, Sergeant Um was in charge of a search party patrolling the Korean Demilitarized Zone when the patrol encountered three infiltrators.  Immediately one infiltrator was killed.  Sergeant Um climbed an observation tower and located the remaining intruders trying to exfiltrate to the north.  Sergeant Um with small arms fire from the observation tower pinned down the intruders.  Sergeant Um then crawled within 20 meters of the enemy.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he placed effective small arms fire upon the enemy soldiers, mortally wounding them.  Sergeant Um's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the free world's military service and reflect great credit upon him, the 25th Division, the Republic of Korea Army, and the United Nations Command.


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Distinguished Flying Cross Medal Recipients

Lundgren, CWO Thomas P. (Army - post war award)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 33 - 12 June 1962

Chief Warrant Officer Thomas P. Lundgren, W3150442, Transportation Corps, United States Army, a member of the 15th Transportation Detachment, 1st Cavalry Division, distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight on 26 February 1962, in Korea.  Warrant Officer Lundgren was the pilot of an H-19C Chickasaw helicopter carrying a co-pilot and five passengers.  In an attempt to land the helicopter at a helipad in mountainous terrain, the anti-torque mechanism suddenly failed and the aircraft began to vibrate violently at approximately one hundred feet above the ground.  As the helicopter settled earthward, directional control was lost and the aircraft started to turn away from the helipad into a wooded area. In this sudden emergency, Warrant Officer Lundgren demonstrated outstanding technical competence, sound judgment, and presence of mind.  Despite the extreme difficulty in maintaining control of the helicopter, he succeeded in maneuvering its tailboom against a tree, thereby stabilizing the aircraft, and preventing it from completely spinning out of control.  After assuring that his passengers were evacuated and a safe distance away, he then attempted to save the helicopter by hover-taxiing it to the helipad.  When the tailboom became dislodged from the tree, the helicopter rotated violently, became completely uncontrollable, crashed, and immediately burst into flames.  When the aircraft crashed, the co-pilot was trapped on the flight deck.  Warrant Officer Lundgren assisted him to safety through the pilot's emergency exit, then evacuated himself before the burning aircraft became completely engulfed by flames.  Warrant Officer Lundren's complete disregard for his own personal safety, quick thinking, and courageous action saved the lives of his passengers and co-pilot and reflects the utmost credit on himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes the previous award of the Army Commendation Medal for meritorious achievement on 26 February 1962, as announced in General Orders Number 46, dated 2 April 1962, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, APO 24, San Francisco, California.)

Norman, Kevin Michael (posthumous)

General Orders: Permanent Order 008-16 (January 8, 2009)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross (Posthumously) to Captain Kevin Michael Norman, United States Army, for heroism during aerial flight on 12 August 2003, while serving as Commander, Company A, 6th Battalion, 52d Aviation Regiment, 17th Aviation Brigade, Seoul Air Base, Korea. Through great courage and incredible flying skills, Captain Norman was able to prevent his disabled aircraft from crashing into a Korean village, saving the lives of an untold number of local national civilians. Captain Norman's heroic actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect distinct credit upon himself, the 17th Aviation Brigade, the Eighth United States Army, and the United States Army.

Narrative to Accompany Award: Captain Kevin M. Norman, United States Army, distinguished himself by exceptionally heroic actions and extraordinary flying achievement while participating in aerial flight in service to the United States as Commander, A Company, 6th Battalion, 52d Aviation Regiment, 17th Aviation Brigade, Seoul Air Base, Korea, on 12 August 2003. Captain Norman was flying a C-12 Huron on a routine maintenance test flight from Seoul Airbase, Korea when the plane encountered mechanical problems. He and his co-pilot, Chief Warrant Officer 3 David W. Snow heroically struggled to keep the failing aircraft from crashing into the homes of the local national population, saving the lives and property of the people of Kongse-Ri. Several witnesses, including Lee Chae-Soo, a local Korean property owner, said the pilots purposely steered the disabled aircraft away from the homes in the community. Chae-Soo was quoted as saying, “I'm thankful for those pilots, as I feel they sacrificed themselves to protect the residential area.” Despite the plane being on fire, the witnesses say it changed course and maneuvered away from the village. Lieutenant General Charles C. Campbell, the Commander of 8th United States Army at the time of the incident, said in an official press release, “Our heartfelt condolences go out to the families of these two heroic aviators who did everything they could to prevent civilian casualties.” Captain Norman demonstrated incredible courage and fortitude during this chaotic and terrifying accident. His thoughts and actions put the lives of others above his own. The people of Kongse-Ri are extremely grateful for his incredible flying skills and heroic actions that saved their lives. His actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect distinct credit upon himself, the 17th Aviation Brigade, the 8th United States Army, and the United States Army.


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Navy Cross Recipients

Hammond, Robert J. (POW)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert J. Hammond, Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a crewmember of the U.S.S. Pueblo (AGER-2) during their period of captivity in North Korea from 24 January to 23 December 1968. Following his capture, Sergeant Hammond, through his unyielding resistance and fierce loyalty to his shipmates and his country, became a symbol of resistance, courage, and dedication to the United States. This infuriated the North Koreans, who singled him out for more frequent and far more severe brutalities than were administered to the other prisoners. When the North Koreans learned that the U.S.S. Pueblo crew had duped them in their international propaganda efforts, they intensified their efforts to break the will and spirit of the crew through the administration of indiscriminate beatings. Realizing that many of his shipmates were in danger of being permanently injured or killed, Sergeant Hammond willingly attempted to sacrifice his own life in order that his shipmates might be spared further torture. The following day the North Koreans ceased their beatings and tortures. Sergeant Hammond's devotion to duty and heroic actions against seemingly impossible odds reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals. Home Town: Ossipee, New Hampshire


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Silver Star Medal Recipients

Deville, Mark A.

Private First Class Mark A. Deville, United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for exceptional valor and gallantry in action while serving with the Joint Security Force Company, United Nations Command Security Force at Panmunjom, Korea, on 23 November 1984. In reaction to thirty attacking North Korean soldiers in pursuit of a Soviet defector, Private Deville's aggressive actions were instrumental in defeating the enemy. Throughout the intense firefight, Private Deville displayed a complete disregard for his own personal safety while accomplishing his mission. Private First Class Deville's bravery and aggressive performance of duty under extremely hazardous circumstances are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect great credit upon him, the United Nations Command and the United States Army.

Hodges, Duane (posthumous)

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Duane Hodges, Fireman, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action on 23 January 1968 which serving on board U.S.S. PUEBLO (AGER-2) during the unwarranted attack upon and illegal seizure of that vessel in international waters in the Sea of Japan by North Korean naval and air force consisting of two patrol boats, four torpedo boats, and two aircraft. When PUEBLO came under fire from these North Korean units, Petty Officer Hodges rendered invaluable assistance in the face of the intense hostile fire while participating in the unfamiliar task of destroying classified materials. Mortally wounded while carrying out this assignment, Petty Officer Hodges, by his courage, initiative, and inspiring dedication, he reflected credit upon himself and upheld and enhanced the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  [Born: September 5, 1946 at Creswell, Oregon. Home Town: Creswell, Oregon]

Lamb, Richard C.

Staff Sergeant Richard C. Lamb, United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for exceptional valor and gallantry in action while serving with the Joint Security Force Company, United Nations Command Security Force at Panmunjom, Korea, on 23 November 1984. In reaction to thirty attacking North Korean soldiers in pursuit of a Soviet defector, Staff Sergeant Lamb's aggressive actions were instrumental in defeating the enemy. Throughout the intense firefight, Sergeant Lamb displayed a complete disregard for his own personal safety while accomplishing his mission. Staff Sergeant Lamb's bravery and aggressive performance of duty under extremely hazardous circumstances are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect great credit upon him, the United Nations Command and the United States Army.

Mizusawa, Bert Kameaaloha

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Bert Kameaaloha Mizusawa, United States Army, for exceptional valor and gallantry in action while serving as Commander of the Joint Security Force Company, United Nations Command Security Force at Panmunjom, Korea, on 23 November 1984. In reaction to thirty attacking North Korean soldiers in pursuit of a Soviet defector, Captain Mizusawa's outstanding leadership and aggressive actions in leading his company while under fire were instrumental in defeating the enemy. Additionally, he personally led the defector to safety while under fire and deliberately, at great risk to himself, exposed himself to the enemy in front of his own troops to ensure the success of his company's combat action. Throughout the intense firefight, Captain Mizusawa displayed a complete disregard for his own personal safety while accomplishing his mission. Captain Mizusawa's bravery and outstanding leadership under extremely hazardous circumstances are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect great credit upon him, the United Nations Command and the United States Army.

Orlicki, John E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist John E. Orlicki, United States Army, for exceptional valor and gallantry in action while serving as Team Leader, Joint Security Force Company, United Nations Command Security Force at Panmunjom, Korea, on 23 November 1984. In reaction to thirty attacking North Korean soldiers in pursuit of a Soviet defector, Specialist Orlicki's aggressive actions were instrumental in defeating the enemy. He was responsible for providing sustained suppressive fires and stopping the enemy force with an M-203. Throughout the intense firefight, Specialist Orlicki displayed a complete disregard for his own personal safety while accomplishing his mission. Specialist Orlicki's bravery and aggressive performance of duty under extremely hazardous circumstances are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect great credit upon him, the United Nations Command and the United States Army.

Reynolds, Ernest D. (posthumous)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 16 - 4 April 1967

Private Ernest D. Reynolds, US55881470, United States Army, who while serving as a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 2 November 1966 in the Republic of Korea by sacrificing his own life in the defense of his fellow soldiers.  Private Reynolds was a member of a patrol operating near the southern boundary of the Demilitarized Zone in Korea when his patrol was attacked and overrun by an armed patrol of the North Korean Army.  Prior to the attack, as rear security man, he had occupied a concealed position and opened fire upon the enemy, and he continued to fire until he himself was killed.  His indomitable courage, determination, and profound concern for his fellow soldiers, are in the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect great credit upon himself, the 2d Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

Ross, Gary

Source: Korean War Project

"Here is a story that ran in the Hawaii Army Weekly. A soldier who served in the 1984 JSA firefight finally got his CIB: http://www.25idl.army.mil/article.cfm?art_id=651

Soldier receives honor years after mission
By Staff Sgt. Kanessa Mynett-Allen

The U.S. Army prides itself on recognizing and honoring Soldiers who distinguish themselves through actions above and beyond the call of duty. For one 25th Infantry Division (Light) Soldier, that honor arrived Monday, 16 years after an event he said changed his entire perspective on the United States military.

Staff Sgt. Gary Ross, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 25th ID (L), division deployment training center noncommissioned officer-in-charge, was awarded the Bronze Star with V device and the Combat Infantryman's Badge for a combat action he took part in as a private while stationed in Korea more than a decade and a half ago.

Lt. Col. Sam Holloway, division supply officer and Ross' supervisor, said this honor means closure for Ross. "It's final recognition for an outstanding performance of duty a long time ago. This was a long time coming, and it's a well deserved honor," Holloway said.

Ross was awarded the Bronze Star for "exceptional valor as a rifleman assigned to the Joint Security Force Company, United Nations Command Security Force at Panmunjom, Korea Nov. 23, 1984."  Ross and his unit took part in a firefight with thirty North Korean Soldiers in pursuit of a Soviet defector, ensuring border security and the safety of the defector and others in the UN command sector of the Joint Security Area.

Brig. Gen. Carl Eikenberry, 25th ID (L) Assistant Division Commander (Support), presented the awards. Eikenberry was a major assigned as Ross' deputy commander at the time the firefight for which he was recognized ensued. Eikenberry explained to the guests the circumstances surrounding the long wait for Ross' overdue award and how the company commander, who now works for the Secretary of the Army, had to launch a campaign "to recognize this Soldier who performed heroically that day."

Eikenberry said it was important to remember that it's not what a Soldier wears on their chest that is important, but that it's what's inside their head and heart that matter and make a difference. He noted that Ross has been taking difficult assignments throughout his entire career and not having had these prestigious awards until now has not changed the high quality of Soldier he is.

Ross said being recognized for a combat action that took place so long ago came as a surprise and it's a huge honor for him to receive these awards. "I was not expecting it. It makes you feel really good that someone thought enough about it to keep on this after all these years," Ross said.  "I continuously think of what happened over there because people died, but I never thought about it as an award due."

Ross, who initially joined the Army to earn enough money for his college education, said that that one day in Korea, just six months after he enlisted, changed his outlook on the military's mission altogether. "If this did not happen I would not have made a career out of it. I take pride in the Army and it shows a great deal of honor that I received this now. With or without it, I am proud."

Schumacher, Frederic Carl (POW)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Frederic Carl Schumacher, Lieutenant [then Lieutenant Junior Grade], U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action on 23 January 1968 which serving on board U.S.S. Pueblo (AGER-2) during the unwarranted attack upon and illegal seizure of that vessel in international waters in the Sea of Japan by North Korean naval and air force consisting of two patrol boats, four torpedo boats, and two aircraft. When the U.S.S. Pueblo came under heavy fire from these North Korean units, Lieutenant Schumacher, as Operations Officer, repeatedly exposed himself to the intense fire while organizing and providing the necessary supervision to ensure the destruction of all classified materials under his purview. Through his inspiring leadership, courage, and dedication in the face of hostile fire, he reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. [Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri]


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Soldier's Medal Recipients

America, Clifford F. (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 7 - February 24, 1956

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pride in presenting the Soldier's Medal (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Clifford F. America, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters and Service Company, 13th Engineering Battalion, Combat), in Korea, on 24 June 1955. During the heavy summer rains, eleven American soldiers stranded in a tank, and their tank retriever in the middle of the Han Tan River were in imminent danger of being submerged by the rapidly rising and turbulent water. Fully aware of the hazards involved, and that the river banks downstream were very steep and harbored land mines, Sergeant America voluntarily organized and led an assault boat crew into the swirling water in an effort to rescue the marooned men. The raging, torrential river and swift current swept the boat approximately 700 yards downstream where it struck a large rock, foundered and capsized, and Sergeant America drowned. Although unsuccessful in his heroic attempt to save the lives of the eleven soldiers, Sergeant America's consummate gallantry and supreme sacrifice set an inspiring example of valor to all who observed him, reflecting utmost credit on himself and upholding the noble traditions of the military service.

Anderson, Roger D.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 60 - 12 October 1962

Platoon Sergeant Roger d. Anderson, (then Sergeant First Class), United States army, a member of the 2d Platoon, Company A, 1st Battle Group, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, distinguished himself by heroism on 4 May 1962, in Korea.  While working as a member of a minefield detail, a Korean soldier of the Korean Augmentation to the United States Army, accidentally stepped into a minefield cluster, exploded one of the mines which severed his leg, and caused him to fall within other live mines in the cluster.  Upon hearing the explosion, Sergeant Anderson rushed to the area, and, fully aware of the extreme danger to his own life, voluntarily and promptly participated in the hazardous rescue operation.  After probing, locating, and disarming the mines in the area and reaching the severely wounded Korean, he quickly applied first aid and discovered that the injured soldier was lying on top of a live mine.  Realizing the imminent danger of detonation in attempting to remove the mine from beneath the victim, he undauntedly started the harrowing and dangerous task.  He held the wounded man's body with one hand to prevent him from moving and exploding the mine and fearlessly and skillfully extracted the mine and continued his work until all mines in the cluster were located and disarmed.  He then capably assisted in evacuating the wounded soldier from the minefield.  Sergeant Anderson's unhesitating, efficient, and heroic action in the face of grave danger saved the life of his Korean comrade and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes so much of General Order Number 75, Headquarters 1st Cavalry division, dated 4 June 1962, as pertains to award of the Army Commendation Medal to Sergeant Anderson for meritorious achievement on 4 May 1962.)

Aumiller, Charles A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 16 - 10 April 1962

Sergeant Charles A. Aumiller, RA13657980 (then Specialist Fourth Class), United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 11 July 1961 in Korea, while a member of Company B, 1st Battle Group, 31st Infantry.  During a mobility exercise with his unit, Sergeant Aumiller saw a group of Korean soldiers bathing in the rain-swollen Hantan River.  One of the Korean bathers was swept into a 500-yard stretch of rapids with jagged rocks and boulders protruding.  Upon hearing the victim's cries for help, Sergeant Aumiller, unhesitatingly, and without regard for his own personal safety, jumped into the raging river to rescue the Korean soldier.  With great efforts and determination, he successfully reached and held the shocked victim above the water  level.  As the two men wee being hurled through the rapids, Sergeant Aumiller caught hold of a concrete piling and pulled the Korean to safety on a large boulder.  They were pulled from the water by other American soldiers who tied rile slings together to use as rope.  Sergeant Aumiller's courageous and heroic action in voluntarily risking his own life to save the life of an allied soldier reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal as announced in General Orders Number 115, Headquarters 7th Infantry Division, dated 27 October 1961.)

Bailiff, Finley

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 10 - 21 March 1956

Private Finley Bailiff, Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of Company "A", 73d Tank Battalion, for heroism on 18 September 1955, near Taejon-ni, Korea.  While off duty, Private Bailiff learned that three American servicemen lay injured in a mine field, and quickly proceeded to the scene of the accident to assist in rescue operations.  During the hours of darkness, and fully aware of the danger involved, Private Bailiff unhesitatingly probed through dense brush and over-hanging vegetation and, with the help of a comrade, evacuated one of the ill-fated soldiers to safety.  After administering emergency treatment to the suffering man, Private Bailiff headed an aid team and, entering the mined area a second and third time, rescued the other two casualties.  Then he carefully surveyed the hazardous area for an alleged fourth victim, and repeated his search the following day to insure that no one was left in the mine field.  Private Bailiff's intrepidity and prompt, courageous actions reflect utmost credit on himself and uphold the honored traditions of the military service.

Bair, Thomas F.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 38 - 18 September 1967

Captain Thomas F. Bair, 04027927, Military Police Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism while serving as Security Officer of the United States Army Support Group, Joint Security Area, Panmunjom, Korea, on 22 March 1967.  At the conclusion of the Military Armistice Commission meeting being held at Panmunjom, Korea, Mr. Su Kun Yi, Vice Chief of the official North Korean Central News Agency, entered a U.S. Army sedan seeking transportation to South Korea.  Without thought fort his own safety, Captain Bair immediately ran to the assistance of Mr. Su Kun Yi, knocking two armed North Korean guards from the vehicle as they attempted to drag Mr. Su Kun Yi from the vehicle.  Captain Bair's actions were instrumental in the successful flight of Mr. Su Kun Yi to asylum in the Republic of Korea.  Captain Bair's heroic conduct is not only in the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflected great credit upon himself and the Military Service but greatly enhanced the image of his unit and the United Nations Command.

Balcombe, Jeanne M. (posthumous)

On September 1, 1999, Sgt. 1st Class Jeanne M. Balcombe, of the 1st Platoon, 55th Military Police Company, was posthumously awarded the Soldiers Medal for heroism in the face of danger. While on duty on August 21, 1999, Balcombe's quick thinking and selfless response safeguarded and protected others at the Troop Medical Clinic at Camp Red Cloud, Korea. She placed herself in harm's way between three soldiers and an armed gunman.

"Sergeant Jeanne Balcombe was shot and killed at Camp Red Cloud, South Korea, by one of her own soldiers. The suspect, who was drunk at the time, was upset that Sergeant Balcombe had ordered a blood test on one of the suspect's friends. He then overpowered a South Korean soldier stationed at the base and took his sidearm. He shot Sergeant Balcombe three times, including once in the head, before fleeing the base. He was captured later in the day by Korean National Police officers with the murder weapon still in his possession. The suspect was convicted of capital murder by General Court Martial and sentenced to life in prison. Sergeant Balcombe was a member of the 55th Military Police Company. She is survived by her husband and two daughters."

Barker, James K.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 50 - 26 September 1968

Specialist four James K. Barker, RA12651355, United States Army, a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 23 Infantry (Mechanized), who, through a heroic effort that endangered his own life, was largely responsible for saving the life of a member of a scout platoon on 29 March 1968.  The victim, having become stuck in the quicksand-like mud near the Imjin River, was soon engulfed in the rapidly rising tide of the river.  When it became apparent that the man could not be pulled free by ordinary means, Specialist Barker, realizing he could himself become trapped in the mud, entered the water to the point where the man was rapidly sinking.  Specialist Barkier remained with him for one and one-half hours, at times disappearing from sight in the rising tide, in an effort to keep the victim from going below the river's surface.  Due largely to his efforts, he and the victim were eventually pulled from the deadly trap by a rescue helicopter.  Specialist Barker's heroic effort served as an inspiration to more than a score of rescuers on the scene and brought great credit to himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Specialist Barker as announced in General Orders Number 89, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, APO San Francisco 96301, dated 7 June 1968.)

Bass, Harold J.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 38 - 18 September 1967

Airman First Class Harold J. Bass, AF11435379, United States Air Force, who distinguished himself by heroism on 9 February 1967.  At approximately 1030 hours an Army Mohave CH37 helicopter crashed and burned at an ACWs site located at Yongmun-San, Korea.  Without regard for his own safety Airman Bass immediately ran to the helicopter and freed the pilot, whose escape hatch jammed and couldn't be opened from the inside.  After freeing the pilot, Airman Bass then moved to the side of the helicopter and, disregarding the flames from burning gasoline, assisted a passenger who was entangled in the wreckage.  Only after he was assured that all personnel were evacuated did he leave the aircraft.  He then proceeded to administer first aid to one of the crew members who was severely burned.  Airman Bass' actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of bravery in the United States Army and bring great credit upon himself, his squadron, and the United States Air Force.

Bauer, Daniel R.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 16 - 10 April 1962

Second Lieutenant Daniel R. Bauer, O5007623, Armor, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on the night of 13 October 1961, in the vicinity of Moyre-Dong, Korea.  When Lieutenant Bauer was informed that four members of his platoon on a routine night patrol mission were injured and trapped near a cluster of antitank and antipersonnel mines, he voluntarily and courageously participated in the hazardous rescue operations.  In an outstanding display of exceptional initiative, resourcefulness, and quick thinking, he immediately obtained probing and marking equipment, organized lighting facilities, arranged for medical aid, and moved rapidly to the minefield site.  He quickly moved all supporting personnel to a safe distance, and with total disregard for his own personal safety, bravely proceeded to probe a safe lane through seventy-five feet of the minefield to the position of his men.  Despite the difficulties and danger imposed by darkness, thick ground cover of tangled vines, the necessity for probing each two or three inches in the minefield that contained M-15 antipersonnel mines, and the imminent danger of detonation, he advanced with great speed and without regard for his own life to reach his men rapidly.  Cautiously probing the area of the mine explosion, he encountered three unexploded mines.  Realizing he was in a mine cluster, he undauntedly continued working until he evacuated one unharmed man and one severely wounded, thereby saving his life.  He then evacuated two of the men who died of wounds, and did not withdraw until all personnel were removed from the minefield. Lieutenant Bauer's unhesitating, efficient, and heroic action in the face of grave danger saved the lives of two of his men and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes so much of General Orders Number 145, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division, dated 9 November 1961, as pertains to the previous award of the Army Commendation Medal to Lieutenant Bauer for meritorious achievement on 13 October 1961.)

Beall, Gerald J. Jr.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 56 - 28 October 1957

Private First class Gerald J. Beall, Jr., RA19545748, United States Army, a truck driver for Company M, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroism near Nullo-ri, Korea, on 22 October 1956.  On learning that a Korean youth had been badly injured by the explosion of a land mine, Private Beall drove his vehicle to the scene of the accident.  Fully aware of the danger involved and without benefit of a mine detector, he unhesitatingly entered the uncharted minefield and went to the rescue of the helpless man. With the help of two companions who followed him into the hazardous area, he evacuated the suffering man to the truck and took him to the battalion aid station for treatment.  Private Beall's valorous actions were instrumental in saving the life of a young Korean, reflecting utmost credit on himself and upholding the traditions of the military service.

Best, Leonidas W.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 18 September 1957

Major Leonidas W. Best, Transportation Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on the night of 22 February 1957.  Major Best's detachment was one of a group of aviation units assigned the mission of rescuing survivors of a C-124 aircraft which crash-landed on a sandbar in the Han River Estuary.  In a desperate race against the rapidly rising tide waters and a mounting danger to the survivors from continued exposure to the winter elements, he directed the evacuation flights of the helicopters under extremely hazardous conditions.  With disregard to his own safety or comfort he worked in the ice filled river with the rising tide reaching his armpits, supervising the flights, loading the survivors, and directing search operations.  Despite the hazards of the helicopter rotor blades, the swift current of the rising tide, and full awareness of the danger of hovering aircraft over head, Major Best resolutely and unhesitatingly performed his duty, thereby contributing immeasurably to the completely successful rescue mission.  His unhesitating and courageous action in the face of grave danger coupled with complete disregard for his own safety, reflects great credit on himself, his unit, and the military service.

Butler, George A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 40 - 9 December 1965

Private First Class George A. Butler, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 6 February 1965, while serving as a military policeman in Company B, 728th Military Police Battalion, Taejon, Korea.  Private Butler was performing normal military traffic patrol when he saw a small Korean boy fall through the ice covering the Yuchon River.  He stopped his vehicle, ran to the bank of the river and, with complete disregard for his own safety, began to crawl over the ice to the floundering child when the ice broke under his weight.  Then, he forged his way toward the boy, breaking the ice with his forearms.  Through his determination and great effort, he succeeded in reaching the boy and bringing him to the safety of the shore.  After being assured that the child was feeling fine, he released him to a group of Korean adults who ha congregated at the scene.  Private Butler's heroic conduct in this emergency is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Cain, Harold L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 18 September 1957

Private Harold L. Cain, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on the night of 22 February 1957 in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, when the C-124 aircraft on which he was a passenger developed engine trouble shortly after takeoff and crash-landed on a sandbar in the Han River, bursting into flames on impact.  Private Cain ignored the fiercely burning airplane and constant threat from explosion, and with complete disregard for his own life, voluntarily returned to the airplane to seek and aid injured survivors.  He made repeated trips at the risk of his life in attempting to drag the injured men from the plane.  His heroic efforts were hampered by darkness and danger from drowning in the fast flowing and freezing tide waters.  Despite the icy water, he led several men suffering from shock away from the crash area and later helped load casualties onto rescue helicopters.  Private Cain continued his heroic efforts until all of the injured had been evacuated and removed to safety.  When he finally consented to his own evacuation the raging river had risen above his knees and threatened to sweep him into the icy waters.  His prompt and courageous action reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Capka, Jerry G.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 10 - 21 March 1956

Major Jerry G. Capka, Corps of Engineers, United States Army, a member of Headquarters 2d Engineer Group (Construction), distinguished himself by heroism near Kimpo Air Base, Korea, on 6 August 1955.  When a 2 1/2-ton truck transporting 20 enlisted men fell from a bridge, trapping all occupants inside the vehicle, Major Capka radioed a request for ambulances and fire-fighting equipment and quickly organized rescue operations.  While attempting to lift the truck with the help of a group of enlisted men and Korean civilians, the gasoline tank exploded and enveloped the vehicle in flames.  With complete disregard for his own safety, Major Capka forced an entry into the burning vehicle and effected the rescue of several victims.  Major Capka's courageous actions reflect utmost credit on himself and are in keeping with the traditions of the military service.

Carmack, Roy D.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 40 - 9 December 1965

Staff Sergeant Roy D. Carmack, United States Army, as a member of Company C, 2d Battalion (Mechanized), 17th Infantry, distinguished himself by heroism on 12 April 1965, in Korea.  Sergeant Carmack was on the scene during a mechanical repair of an Armored Personnel Carrier when the vehicle, loaded with ammunition, burst into flames.  After two mechanics were forced from the carrier when the fixed fire extinguisher failed to put out the blaze and an explosion was imminent, Sergeant Carmack displayed complete disregard for his own safety in an effort to extinguish the fire.  He grabbed a portable fire extinguisher and, although attired only in field clothing, entered the burning carrier and succeeded in extinguishing the flames.  His courage and prompt actions prevented possible injury to personnel on the scene and damage to Government property.  Sergeant Carmack's heroic conduct in this emergency situation is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Carter, John T.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 50 - 26 September 1968

Second Lieutenant John T. Carter, 054341875, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry (Mechanized), who, through a heroic effort that endangered his own life, was largely responsible for saving the life of a member of a scout platoon on 29 March 1968.  The victim, having become stuck in the quick-sand like mud near the Imjin River, was soon engulfed in the rapidly rising tide of the river.  When it became apparent that the man could not be pulled free by ordinary means, Lieutenant Carter, realizing he could himself become trapped in the mud, entered the water to the point where the man was rapidly sinking.  Lieutenant Carter remained with him for one and one-half hours, at times disappearing from sight in the rising tide.  Due largely to his efforts, he and the victim were eventually pulled from the deadly trap by a rescue helicopter.  Lieutenant Carter's heroic effort served as an inspiration to more than a score of rescuers on the scene and brought great credit to himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Lieutenant Carter as announced in General Orders Number 89, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, APO San Francisco 96301, dated 7 June 1968.)

Chandler, Joseph T.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 2 - 5 February 1965

Specialist Four Joseph T. Chandler, United States Army, as a member of Troop B, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, distinguished himself by heroism in Korea on 2 April 1964.  While participating in operations near the Demilitarized Zone of Korea, Specialist Chandler displayed complete disregard for his own personal safety by unhesitatingly volunteering to traverse an active mine field to rescue a soldier who was seriously wounded by a mine explosion.  After an extremely hazardous effort of probing a lane through 30 feet of the minefield, he succeeded in reaching the injured man.  Although the soldier was apprehensive about the return trip, Specialist Chandler encouraged the injured man while carrying him on his back through another 30 feet of the uncleared minefield to a position where medical personnel evacuated the wounded man.  Specialist Chandler's heroic action and deep concern for a fellow soldier are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal for heroism on 2 April 1964, as announced in General Orders Number 92, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, APO 24, dated 10 July 1964.)

Christian, Willie G.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 42 - 7 November 1960

Sergeant Willie G. Christian, United States Army, a member of Battery "B", 1st Howitzer Battalion (8"), 17th Artillery, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of the village of Sarang-Ni near the Han Tan Chon River in Korea, on 24 May 1960.  While undergoing unit practice for the annual battery test, Christian was informed that a field mine had accidentally exploded and seriously injured three Republic of Korea civilians.  When a request was made for assistance in behalf of the victims, Sergeant Christian immediately volunteered his services.  With full knowledge that the area at the scene of the explosion contained armed mines, and despite the existing possibility of a mine detonating in the field at any time, he assisted in the evacuation of the injured Korean nationals, and aided Republic of Korea Army soldiers in controlling civilians in the vicinity.  The complete disregard which Sergeant Christian displayed for his own personal safety, and the unselfish and courageous actions which he manifested by risking his life in this dangerous emergency are in the most cherished traditions of the United States Army, and reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.

Clarke, Warren J.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 18 September 1957

Private First Class Warren J. Clarke, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on the night of 22 February 1957, in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, when the C-124 aircraft on which he was a passenger developed engine trouble shortly after takeoff and crash-landed on a sandbar in the Han River, bursting into flames on impact.  Although the plane was burning fiercely, in spite of the constant threat of an explosion, and with complete disregard for his own life, Private Clarke voluntarily returned to the aircraft and dragged one injured man from the flaming plane.  He then made repeated attempts to approach the aircraft to remove more of the injured.  Private Clarke's actions were with utter disregard for his own personal safety in that the threat of explosion was imminent and the rapidly rising tide threatened to sweep him into the freezing water.  Debris scattered about the crash site and jagged edges on the aircraft seriously hampered removal of the injured and the numerous helicopters hovering overhead created additional hazards which threatened loss of life or grave personal injury.  Private Clarke's prompt and courageous action with disregard for his own life reflects great credit on himself and the United States Army.

Clough, Forest L. Jr.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 18 September 1957

First Lieutenant Forest L. Clough, Jr., Artillery, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on the night of 22 February 1957.  Lieutenant Clough was one of a group of helicopter pilots assigned to the mission of rescuing survivors of a C-124 aircraft which had crash-landed on a sandbar in the Han River Estuary.  In a desperate race against the rapidly rising tide and the danger to the survivors from continued exposure to the winter elements, he made several flights to the crash site under extremely hazardous conditions to evacuate survivors who were huddled on the sandbar or on ice floes in the river.  With practically no illumination, he landed his helicopter in as much as 30 inches of water.  Despite darkness, density of aircraft in the air, inadequate landing areas at the crash site, and with full awareness that an aircraft failure or misjudgment could result in his death or serious injury, Lieutenant Clough resolutely and unhesitatingly performed his duty, thereby contributing immeasurably to the completely successful rescue mission.  His unhesitating and courageous action in the face of grave danger, with complete disregard for his own safety, reflects great credit on himself, his unit, and the military service.

Cochran, William T.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 18 - 18 April 1967

Warrant Officer William T. Cochran, W3152942, United States Army, distinguished himself by an act of heroism on 26 July 1966 while assigned as co-pilot on a UH-18 helicopter participating in flood rescue operations in the Han River Valley in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea.  Warrant Officer Cochran left the helicopter to assist a Korean National policeman with a rowboat, to attempt the rescue of a family of five stranded in the second story of their home. Due to type construction, raging water and trees, it was impossible to make the rescue with the helicopter.  The rowboat had been flown to the vicinity, offloaded to a building and subsequently towed by helicopter to the upstream side of the house.  Warrant Officer Cochran and the policeman then rowed the boat through the trees to the house.  To evacuate the family, it was planned to make two trips so as not to overload the twelve foot rowboat.  Just as the boat was beginning to be towed away from the house with four persons aboard, the mother with a baby on her back and the policeman jumped in too.  One of the boys stood up and tried to reach the house causing the boat to overturn, spilling all occupants into the fast moving current of the Han River.  Sensing that he was the only person who could swim, Warrant Officer Cochran, dressed in flight suit and combat boots and with utter disregard for his own safety, made three successful rescue attempts, saving two boys and the adult male.  Warrant Officer Cochran's personal courage and complete disregard for his own safety are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself.

Crawford, Garland R.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 43 - 27 September 1963

Specialist Five Garland R. Crawford, United States Army, while a member of Company A, 8th Engineer Battalion (Construction), 1st Cavalry Division, Eighth United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 6 March 1963, in Korea.  Specialist Crawford unhesitatingly volunteered to traverse a mine field to rescue a soldier who was seriously wounded by a mine explosion.  During more than one hour of extremely hazardous efforts in clearing a lane to the injured soldier, Specialist Crawford and his comrades located and disarmed numerous mines.  When he and the other members of the rescue party had advanced to within approximately twenty meters of the injured soldier, a helicopter lowered a sling in an attempt to airlift him from the dangerous area.  Observing that the soldier was too weak to tie himself securely to the sling and was in danger of falling or rolling onto other mines, Specialist Crawford, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, rushed through the remaining distance of the un-cleared mine field, and assisted him into the sling.  Specialist Crawford's heroic action, devotion to duty, and deep concern for a fellow soldier are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.  (This award supersedes the award of the Army Commendation Medal to Specialist Crawford for heroism on 6 March 1963, in Korea, as announced in General Orders Number 84, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, dated 15 May 1963.

Crisman, Forrest E.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 58 - 27 November 1957

Sergeant Forrest E. Crisman, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on the night of 22 February 1957, in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, when the C-124 aircraft on which he was a passenger developed engine trouble and crash-landed on a sandbar in the Han River, bursting into flames on impact.  Despite extreme physical and emotional stress, forbidding terrain conditions and darkness, Sergeant Crisman immediately organized the survivors for their safety and assumed command of passenger accounting operations.  Upon learning that there was an Air Force Sergeant severely wounded in or near the plane, Sergeant Crisman immediately organized a rescue team to return to the site of the plane.  Despite great personal danger, Sergeant Crisman waded through waist-deep icy water back to the burning plane, aware that there were several full tanks of gasoline inside which had not yet exploded.  In the face of these hazards, Sergeant Crisman and the men who went with him appeared to give no thought to their personal safety or their lives and reentered the plane.  The wounded man was located near the flaming inside engine, and was carried back through the rapidly rising icy water by the rescue detail.  Upon his return, Sergeant Crisman continued to assist the wounded and give moral support to others.  Sergeant Crisman's prompt, vital, and courageous action in the face of extreme danger reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Daniels, James W.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 1 - 8 January 1960

Private James W. Daniels, Military Police Corps, United States Army, a member of Company "D", 728th Military Police Battalion, distinguished himself by heroism on 10 July 1959 at Kunsan, Korea.  Private Daniels was patrolling the POL pipeline on Kunsan Air Base during the hours of darkness when a severe explosion occurred at the pumping station in the vicinity of his patrol.  Private Daniels hastened to the scene of the blast to find the area engulfed in a rapidly spreading fire fed by high octane gasoline, from a ruptured main.  Hearing cries for help from the adjacent marsh area, Private Daniels, voluntarily, and with complete disregard for his own safety and the danger of intense heat, explosion, and spreading fire, waded into the gasoline covered marsh water and, with the help of a comrade, located and carried a seriously injured airman to safety.  He then, with a comrade, commandeered an Air Force vehicle to assist in the evacuation of the injured man to the Base hospital.  Private Daniels' unselfishness, initiative, and prompt courageous action saved the airman from possible death by drowning or fire from the spreading gasoline-fed flames, reflecting great credit on himself and the military service.

Dold, Robert V.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 39 - 31 July 1957

Specialist Second Class Robert V. Dold, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by heroism near Oui-Dong, Korea, on 4 November 1956.  Upon learning that a comrade had been injured by an antipersonnel mine, Specialist Dold immediately procured a vehicle, picked up an aid man and quickly drove to the scene of the accident.  Fully aware of the danger involved and without benefit of a safe lane or mine detector, he unhesitatingly entered the unchartered minefield and went to the rescue of the helpless man.  After assisting in administering first aid, he helped evacuate the critically injured man by litter to an awaiting ambulance which rushed him to a collecting station for further treatment.  Specialist Dold's valorous actions were instrumental in saving the life of a fellow soldier, reflecting utmost credit on himself and the military service.

Dubberly, Jackie B.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - 8 September 1955

Private Jackie B. Dubberly, distinguished himself by heroism near Pusan, Korea, on 8 April 1955.  When a soldier was overcome by gasoline vapor while removing the float and pump pipes in a stalled tractor-trailer, Private Dubberly immediately crawled through the 18-inch opening of the hatch and attempted to rescue him.  Although the stricken man had lost coordination of his facilities and the power to reason, Private Dubberly remained in the tank and tried desperately to save his comrade until he, Dubberly, fell unconscious from the poisonous fumes.  Private Dubberly's valorous conduct and intrepid actions reflect utmost credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the military service.

Esteras-Fortuno, Jose A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 9 - 8 March 1966

Major Jose A. Esteras-Fortuno, Infantry, United States Army, while serving as a member of Headquarters 1st Brigade, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroism in Korea on 15 July 1965.  While participating in emergency and relief operations during a flood which devastated the village of Nullo-Ri, South Korea, Major Esteras-Fortuno was informed that a young woman had been swept into a culvert and carried toward a river by the rushing water.  He ran to the scene and quickly saw her in the river.  Then, with complete disregard for his own safety, he jumped into the swift, hazardous, and debris-filled river, swam to the victim, and pulled her to the water's edge.  Although near complete exhaustion and requiring assistance of others to pull himself and the young woman from the raging waters, he immediately picked her up and carried her to the nearest medical clinic where she was revived by a local doctor.  Major Esteras-Fortuno's deep concern for the welfare of others, and prompt and heroic conduct in this dangerous situation are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes the award of the Army Commendation Medal to Major Esteras-Fortuno for heroism on 15 July 1965 as announced in General Orders Number 68, Headquarters 2d Infantry Division, dated 27 October 1965.)

Esworthy, Howard L. (posthumous)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 6 - 4 February 1957

Private Howard L. Esworthy, Military Police Corps, United States Army, a member of the Military Police Security Detachment (8225), distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of Heunde, Korea, on 2 August 1956.  During the decline of a typhoon and while on normal police duty, Private Esworthy was notified that an officer and two nurses had been swept off the rocky shore into the ocean.  Quickly securing an air mattress and a coil of rope, he rushed to the scene of the accident.  Fully aware of the hazards involved, he climbed down a steep incline and onto a high rock in an attempt to effect a rescue.  When one of the women was within approximately 20 feet, Private Esworthy threw the rope to her, but, because of the turbulence of the water, was unable to make contact.  At this junction, his position was engulfed by huge waves and he was carried out to sea by the swift tidal current, and drowned.  Although unsuccessful in his heroic attempt to save the lives of the three people, Private Esworthy's consummate gallantry and supreme sacrifice has set an inspiring example of valor to all who observed him, reflecting utmost credit on himself and upholding the noble traditions of the military service.

Ferriera, Arnold J.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 1 - 8 January 1960

Master Sergeant Arnold J. Ferriera, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 3d Gun Battalion (280-mm), 38th Artillery, distinguished himself by heroism on 29 August 1959 in the vicinity of Chon Gong-Ni, Korea.  Sergeant Ferriera observed a group of Korean women and children running up and down the banks of the Han Tan River and pointing excitedly toward a child floundering approximately 25 feet from shore in deep water.  Without hesitation or concern for his own personal safety, Sergeant Ferreira plunged fully clad into the water and, fighting swift and swollen currents and a strong undertow, swam out to rescue the drowning child.  Without assistance, he brought the young boy safely to shore, quickly administered artificial respiration which revived him and returned the child to his mother.  Sergeant Ferreira's quick presence of mind, courageous actions, and selfless determination in this emergency undoubtedly saved the child's life, and reflect the utmost credit on himself and the military service.

Field, Adolph F.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private Adolph F. Field, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy on 8 April 1955 in Pusan, Korea. On the evening of that day a gasoline tractor-trailer was brought into the Motor Pool of the 98th Quartermaster Battalion for emergency repair of the float on the pump pipes and, in attempting to remove the defective float from within the gasoline tank, the driver of the tractor-trailer was overcome by the gasoline fumes and rendered unconscious. Although having seen one comrade pulled from the tank unconscious and another almost overcome by the poisonous vapors in their attempt to save the driver, Private Field completely disregarded his own safety by unhesitatingly entering the fume-filled gasoline tank through the 18-inch hatch to rescue his fellow soldier. With singular bravery and great risk to his life, he successfully lifted the unconscious driver through the hatch and pushed him out of the tank, subsequently helping to place him in an ambulance. Private Field's prompt and courageous action in the face of grave danger is testimony of his intrepid and selfless devotion to duty. His act of heroism reflects great credit on himself and upholds the esteemed traditions of the military service.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 53 (September 8, 1955)

Ford, Howard D.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 1 - 8 January 1960

Private First Class Howard D. Ford, Military Police Corps, United States Army, a member of Company "D", 728th Military Police Battalion, distinguished himself by heroism on 10 July 1959 at Kunsan, Korea.  Private Ford was patrolling the POL pipeline on Kunsan Air Base during the hours of darkness when a severe explosion occurred at the pumping station in the vicinity of his patrol.  Private Ford hastened to the scene of the blast to find the area engulfed in a rapidly spreading fire fed by high octane gasoline from a ruptured main.  Hearing cries for help from the adjacent work area, Private Ford, after being warned that the marsh was covered with gas and that the flames from the pumping station were liable to spread to the marsh at any moment, voluntarily and with complete disregard for his own safety and the dangers of intense heat, explosion, and spreading fire, waded into the gasoline covered marsh water and single-handedly located and carried a seriously injured airman to safety.  Private Ford then assisted in the evacuation of the injured man to the Base hospital.  Private Ford's unselfishness, initiative, and prompt courageous action saved the airman from possible death by drowning or fire from the spreading gasoline-fed flames, reflecting great credit on himself and the military service.

Freyser, William O.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 42 - 4 October 1966

Staff Sergeant William O. Freyser, United States Army, while serving as an Assistant Field Advisor, Special Forces Group (Airborne) with the Republic of Korea Army, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea on 3 November 1965.  Sergeant Freyser was participating in a practice parachute jump when some of the jumpers landed in the deep and dangerous waters of the Han River.  As one of the last to leave the aircraft, he managed to land on the bank of the river.  Quickly unharnessing himself from his equipment, he disregarded his own safety, plunged into the water, and swam as fast as he could to aid a Korean soldier who was being submerged by the pull of his parachute and heavy combat equipment.  Despite the strong current, Sergeant Freyser reached the stricken man and pulled him to shallow water in time to prevent a drowning.  Sergeant Freyser's heroic conduct and profound concern for his fellow man are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Garcia, Raymond Jr.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 42 - 7 November 1960

Private First Class Raymond Garcia, Jr., United States Army, a member of Battery "B", 1st Howitzer Battalion (8"), 17th Artillery, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of the village of Sarang-Ni near the Han Tan Chon River in Korea, on 24 May 1960.  While undergoing unit practice for the annual battery test, Private Garcia was informed that a field mine had accidentally exploded and seriously injured three Republic of Korea civilians.  When a request for assistance was made in behalf of the victims, Private Garcia immediately volunteered his services.  With full knowledge that the area at the scene of the explosion contained armed mines, and despite the existing possibility of a mine detonating in the field at any time, he moved back and forth across the mine field and administered first aid until a helicopter arrived to evacuate the injured Korean national to a hospital.  He remained with the victims of the explosion and accompanied them to the hospital in the helicopter.  The complete disregard which Private Garcia displayed for his own personal safety, and the unselfish and courageous action which he manifested by risking his life in this dangerous emergency are in the most cherished traditions of the United States Army, and reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.

Hailey, Charles E.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 39 - 31 July 1957

Private First Class Charles E. Hailey, Ordnance Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 2 August 1956 at Pusan, Korea.  When PFC Hailey received word that a group of people were in distress on a point of land at Heunde Beach, Pusan, Korea, he promptly proceeded to the scene with his commanding officer and other personnel from his unit.  He found that a huge wave in the wake of a typhoon had washed several persons into the sea and they were being drowned by the raging surf.  PFC Hailey, with the help of several enlisted men, attempted to throw a rope to one of the drowning victims.  This required him to climb down a jutting cliff where waves were breaking ferociously against the rocks.  Realizing the futility of their efforts, PFC Hailey and the others decided to return to higher ground.  As they proceeded up the cliff, one of the waves swept PFC Hailey and a companion off their feet.  PFC Hailey pulled himself to safety, sustaining a fractured ankle and a chipped elbow, while his companion was washed off the rocks and drowned in the sea.  PFC Hailey's heroic actions in the emergency reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.

Haws, John C.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 1 - 8 January 1960

Private First Class John C. Haws, Military Police Corps, United States Army, a member of Eighth United States Army Sentry Dog Detachment, distinguished himself by heroism on 10 July 1959  at Kunsan, Korea.  Private Haws was patrolling the POL pipeline on Kunsan Air Base during the hours of darkness when a severe explosion occurred at the pumping station in the vicinity of his patrol.  Private Haws hastened to the scene of the blast to find the area engulfed in a rapidly spreading fire fed by high octane gasoline from a ruptured main.  Hearing cries for help from the adjacent marsh area, Private Haws, voluntarily, and with complete disregard for his own safety and the danger of intense heat, explosion, and spreading fire, waded into the gasoline covered marsh water and, with the help of a comrade, located and carried a seriously injured airman to safety.  He then, with a comrade, commandeered an Air Force vehicle to assist in the evacuation of the injured man to the Base hospital.  Private Haws' unselfishness, initiative, and prompt courageous action saved the airman from possible death by drowning or fire from the spreading gasoline-fed flames, reflecting great credit on himself and the military service.

Hladki, Anthony P.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 9 - 8 March 1966

Private First class Anthony P. Hladki, United States Army, while serving as a member of Company C, 802d Engineer Battalion (Construction), distinguished himself by heroism on the night of 21 July 1965, near Seoul, Korea.  Private Hladki was working at a ferry site during a flood of the Han River when he heard screams and saw a Korean girl struggling in the swift current of the river.  With complete disregard for his own safety, he rushed into the deep, turbulent stream fully clothed and wearing web equipment to rescue the girl.  Through his determination, he succeeded in reaching her and bringing her to the safety of the shore where first aid treatment was quickly administered prior to her rapid evacuation to a local hospital.  Private Hladki's deep concern for the welfare of others and heroic and prompt actions in this emergency are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Howard, Alfred L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 18 September 1957

Private First Class Alfred L. Howard, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on the night of 22 February 1957, in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, when the C-124 aircraft on which he was a passenger developed engine trouble shortly after takeoff and crash-landed on a sandbar in the Han River, bursting into flames on impact.  Private Howard, with complete disregard for his own life, voluntarily returned to the burning aircraft in search of survivors.  He aided in the rescue of an Air Force Sergeant, who was lying near the plane, despite constant danger from the flames and the threat of explosion.  After removing the injured man, he continued his rescue work by helping to load survivors on helicopters that had been sent to the area. His repeated trips to the plane constantly places his life in peril and the threat of being swept into the freezing water was imminent.  The additional danger created by numerous helicopters hovering overhead seeking landing sites posed a threat of grave personal injury.  Private Howard continued his heroic efforts until all had been removed to safety.  His prompt and courageous action in the face of extreme danger reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.

Undated News Clipping - "Private First class Alfred L. Howard, nephew of Mrs. Maggie B. Close, Berkeley Springs, was awarded the Soldier's Medal at a recent review at Fort Knox, Kentucky, for his efforts during a plane crash last February in Korea.

Pfc. Howard, disregarding his own safety, assisted in the removal of a number of wounded men from the crashed and burning C-124 Globemaster which went down between Seoul and Inchon.  The plane was flying to Japan from Korea with 159 men aboard when one of the engines exploded four minutes after take-off.  The Soldier's Medal is one of the nation's highest peacetime awards. Howard is presently assigned to Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 6th Armored Cavalry Regiment at Ft. Knox."

Jackson, Eurvee Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 2 - 14 January 1963

Private Eurvee Jackson, Jr., RA16733348, Transportation Corps, United States Army, Company C, 17th Transportation Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroism on 12 September 1962, in Korea.  Private Jackson was participating in an armored personnel carrier driver training exercise when the amphibious vehicle he was driving was caught in the rapid current of the Hantan River.  As the vehicle was swept downstream and struck a rock, a fellow soldier was thrown into the treacherous river.  Knowing that the soldier could not swim, Private Jackson immediately, and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, jumped out of the driver's hatch and into the river to aid him.  In his attempt to rescue his comrade, he was caught in the strong current and disappeared beneath the water.  Private Jackson's courageous act of self-sacrifice is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

James, Elmus V.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 18 September 1957

Private First class Elmus V. James, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself heroically on the night of 22 February 1957 in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, when the C-124 aircraft on which he was a passenger developed engine trouble shortly after takeoff and crash-landed on a sandbar in the Han River, bursting into flames on impact.  Ignoring his own personal safety and with complete disregard for his own life, he assisted injured survivors in the vicinity of the burning aircraft, carrying two of them to safety.  Private James did not heed the warnings of the copilot as to the danger of explosion.  He went within the vicinity of the burning aircraft in order to ascertain if any individuals were trapped inside.  After the explosion he continued to help others less fortunate than himself despite the ever present danger to his own life from working in the steadily rising and fast flowing tide waters.  Private James in the face of extreme danger brought great credit on himself and the military service.

Johnson, Robert W.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 56 - 28 October 1957

Warrant Officer Robert W. Johnson, United States Army, 13th Transportation Company (Light Helicopter) (H-34), distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on the night of 22 February 1957. Warrant Officer Johnson, copilot of an H-19 helicopter, was one of a group of helicopter pilots assigned the mission of rescuing survivors of a C-124 aircraft which crash-landed on a sandbar in the Han River Estuary. In a desperate race against the rapidly rising tide waters and mounting danger to the survivors from continued exposure to the winter elements, he made approximately five flights to the crash site under extremely hazardous conditions to evacuate survivors who were huddled on the sandbar or on ice floes in the river With practically no illumination he landed his helicopter in as much as thirty inches of freezing water, and on one occasion hovered sideward alongside an ice floe to pick up two survivors. Despite the darkness, density of aircraft in the area, inadequate landing areas at the crash site, and with full awareness that an aircraft failure or misjudgment could result in death or serious injury, Warrant Officer Johnson performed his duty with exceeding dispatch and resolution, thereby contributing immeasurably to the completely successful rescue mission. The unhesitating and courageous action in the face of grave danger displayed by Warrant Officer Johnson, with complete disregard for his own safety is worthy of commendation and reflect great credit on himself, his unit and the United States Army.

Johnston, Douglas A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 16 - 4 April 1967

Sergeant Douglas A. Johnston, RA14845746, United States Army, while serving as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 38th Artillery Brigade, Osan Air Force Base, Korea, distinguished himself by heroism on 23 July 1966 in Songtan-Eup, Korea.  Without hesitation or concern for his own safety, Sergeant Johnston saved the lives of nine Korean children who were trapped by rapidly rising water during a flood which threatened the village of Songtan-Eup, Korea on 23 July 1966.  Sergeant Johnston was passing through Songtan-Eup when he noticed an elderly Korean frantically lifting nine children onto the rooftop of a house to escape the flood waters.  Realizing that the water would soon engulf the house, and at the risk of his own life, Sergeant Johnson plunged into the boiling current to aid the trapped children.  For over an hour in the gathering darkness he carried the nine children to the sanctuary of higher ground.  Nine times he made the dangerous trip, swimming as much as one hundred yards through the raging current with each of the children.  Sergeant Johnston's courageous rescue saved nine lives and won him the praise, admiration, and respect of the Korean people.  Sergeant Johnston's courage and heroic conduct in this emergency are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Kearney, Jerald F.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 7 - 29 January 1969

Private First class Jerald F. Kearney, RA12965437, United States Army, while a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, United States Army Security Agency Group, Korea, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 6 August 1968 at approximately 0900 hours.  Private Kearney was a passenger on a ferry crossing the treacherous Kum-Gang River, at Kunsan, Korea.  Upon nearing the southern dock of the ferry crossing, Private Kearney, along with several other passengers, observed a young Korean boy being swept downstream by the extremely swift current and outgoing tide of the Kum-Gang River.  The boy was approximately 50 yards from the Kunsan shore and was struggling to keep above water by flailing his arms in the air.  However, he continued to sink below the surface of the water four or five times.  Private Kearney immediately, and without regard to his own life and safety, removed his shoes and dove off the ferry and into the river.  He swam approximately 20 yards to the boy who was unconscious by this time, began to tow him to shore against the adverse current, and finally reached the shore.  Although obviously fatigued from the rescue, Private Kearney, without hesitation, began to administer artificial respiration to the boy.  His efforts were successful, and the young boy revived after about four minutes.  Private Kearney's completely voluntary act, alert action and complete disregard for his own personal safety without question saved the young Korean boy's life.  His exemplary actions in risking his life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Kepner, Robert L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 39 - 31 July 1957

Sergeant First Class Robert L. Kepner, Ordnance Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 2 August 1956 at Pusan, Korea.  When Sergeant Kepner received word that a group of people were in distress on a point of  land at Heunde Beach, Pusan, Korea, he promptly proceeded to the scene with his commanding officer and other personnel from his unit.  He found that a huge wave in the wake of a typhoon had washed several persons into the sea and they were being drowned by the raging surf.  Sergeant Kepner, with the help of several enlisted men, attempted to throw a rope to one of the drowning victims.  This required him to climb down a jutting cliff where high waves were breaking ferociously against the rocks, placing him in great danger of being swept into the sea.  Risking his own life, he exhibited every possible effort to complete the rescue.  Sergeant Kepner's heroic actions in the emergency reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.

La Porte, William D.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 39 - 31 July 1957

Private First Class William D. La Porte, Ordnance Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 2 August 1956 at Pusan, Korea.  When PFC La Porte received word that a group of people were in distress on a point of land at Heunde Beach, Pusan, Korea, he promptly proceeded to the scene with his commanding officer and other personnel from his unit.  He found that a huge wave in the wake of a typhoon had washed several persons into the sea and they were being drowned by the raging surf.  PFC La Porte, with the help of several enlisted men, attempted to throw a rope to one of the drowning victims.  This required him to climb down a jutting cliff where high waves were breaking ferociously against the rocks, placing him in great danger of being swept into the sea.  Risking his own life, he exhibited every possible effort to complete the rescue.  PFC La Porte's heroic actions in the emergency reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.

Larsen, John T.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 16 - 4 April 1967

Staff Sergeant John T. Larsen, RA16644405, United States Army, Company A, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by an act of heroism at approximately 0930 hours on 29 June 1966.  While Company C, 1st Battalion 23d Infantry was conducting an area sweep in the third brigade sector of the demilitarized zone in South Korea, the Commanding Officer of Company C, discovered that one platoon of his company had entered an unmarked mine field.  Two members of that company had received traumatic amputations by mine explosions and were lying in the mine field.  Upon discovering their location, the Company Commander attempted to reach the injured men by using an alternate route.  Upon attempting to reach the injured men, the Company Commander also stepped on a mine and was severely injured.  As he fell, Staff Sergeant Larsen, with total disregard for his own life and knowing that he was in danger of grievous bodily harm, rushed into the mine field and pulled the Company Commander out.  Staff Sergeant Larsen's voluntary action in disregarding his own safety in order to care for a fellow soldier was in the highest tradition of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.  (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Sergeant Larsen for heroism on 29 June 1966, as announced in General Orders Number 109, Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, dated 25 July 1966.)

Lembke, Charles H.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 43 - 4 December 1959

Sergeant Charles H. Lembke, a member of Headquarters Battery, 7th Infantry Division Artillery, distinguished himself by heroism on 11 June 1959.  Sergeant Lembke was in the process of coupling a 2 1/2-ton truck and a radar tracker when the tracker moved forward and threatened to crush a Korean soldier assisting him in this duty.  Quickly realizing that the Korean soldier was frozen with fear and unable to move, Sergeant Lembke immediately jumped over the tongue of the tracker mount and, without concern for his own personal safety, pushed the dazed man free of the closing vehicles.  In performing his heroic action, Sergeant Lembke was caught between the two heavy vehicles and received severe bruises and lacerations about the chest.  His courageous efforts saved the Korean solider from death by preventing him from being crushed around the face and head.  The unselfish concern, fearlessness, and quick presence of mind displayed by Sergeant Lembke in this sudden emergency are worthy of emulation, and reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Lotson, James A. Jr.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 61 - October 17, 1955

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class James A. Lotson, Jr., United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 43d Transportation Company (Light Truck), 69th Transportation Battalion, (Truck), on 12 April 1955. At approximately 0900 hours, Private Lotson, a truck driver, observed a fire burning around the gas tank of his vehicle. At this time Private Lotson's vehicle was parked immediately beside an ammunition storage Quonset and was loaded with 500 rounds of 60-mm mortar ammunition. The ammunition storage Quonset, one of seven similar Quonsets in the immediate vicinity, contained 50 tons of ammunition. Private Lotson immediately tried to extinguish the fire with sand but to no avail. Private Lotson, without regard for his personal safety, entered his vehicle and drove it approximately 100 yards away from the area and then ran for cover. The ammunition on the vehicle then exploded completely destroying the vehicle. Private Lotson's heroic action, in addition to preventing the loss of approximately 350 tons of ammunition stored in the Quonsets very possibly saved the lives of American soldiers and Korean service personnel working in the vicinity.

Luchau, Galen L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 25 - 27 June 1956

Specialist Third Class Galen L. Luchau, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism near South Wolmi-do Island, Inchon Port, Korea, on 3 October 1955.  As a landing craft approached the island, a sudden jarring of the boat flung a crew member into the deep, choppy water.  Realizing that the darkness of the night made immediate action imperative, Specialist Luchau unhesitatingly kicked off his shoes, plunged into the water and swam to the rescue of the unconscious man.  Supporting the limp crewman, he struggled to keep afloat as the swift tide threatened to sweep them out to sea.  After some minutes his calls for help attracted the attention of others in the boat who tossed him a life jacket and directed the coxswain to turn back.  Specialist Luchau's courageous and unselfish action reflects utmost credit on himself and upholds the esteemed traditions of the military service.

McAnelly, Terry L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 38 - 18 September 1967

Sergeant Terry L. McAnelly, US53407279, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism on 22 March 1967, while serving as an Assistant Section Sergeant of the United States Army Support Group, Joint Security Area, Panmunjom, Korea.  At the conclusion of the Military Armistice Commission meeting being held at Panmunjom, Korea, Mr. Su Kun Yi, Vice Chief of the official North Korean Central News Agency, entered the U.S. Army sedan Sergeant McAnelly was driving, seeking transportation to South Korea.  Without thought for his own safety, Sergeant McAnelly immediately drove from the Joint Security Area amid a fusillade of small arms fire from the North Korean guards and unhesitatingly crashed through a North Korean barrier en route to the United States Ay Support Group Advance Camp.  His quick reaction and expert driving were instrumental in the successful flight of Mr. Yi to South Korea.  Sergeant McAnelly's heroic conduct is not only in the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the Military Service but greatly enhanced the image of his unit and the United Nations Command.

Moller, Elmer R.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 50 - 26 September 1968

First Lieutenant Elmer R. Moller, OF110136, Military Intelligence, United States Army, a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry (Mechanized), who, through a heroic effort that endangered his own life, was largely responsible for saving the life of a member of his unit on 29 March 1968.  The victim, having become stuck in the quick-sand like mud near the Imjin River, was soon engulfed in the rapidly rising tide of the river.  When it became apparent that the man could not be pulled free by ordinary means, Lieutenant Moller, realizing he could himself become trapped in the mud, entered the water to the point where the man was rapidly sinking.  Lieutenant Moller remained with the victim for one and one-half hours, at times disappearing from sight in the rising tide, in an effort to keep the victim from going below the river's surface.  Due largely to his efforts, he and the victim were eventually pulled from the deadly trap by a rescue helicopter.  Lieutenant Moller's heroic effort served as an inspiration to more than a score of rescuers on the scene and brought great credit to himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Lieutenant Moller as announced in General Orders Number 89, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, APO San Francisco 96301, dated 7 June 1968.)

Moon, Eugene L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 10 - 21 March 1956

Master Sergeant Eugene L. Moon, Medical Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism while a member of Detachment I (Provisional), 8202d Army Unit, Headquarters, United States Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea, on 6 August 1955.  While Sergeant Moon was dining at the Enlisted Men's Club, a member of his detachment, who had been reprimanded and evicted from the club a short time before for violating club rules returned to the club armed with a revolver.  Brandishing his weapon, the belligerent soldier commanded everyone to remain seated.  One man who stood up was promptly fired upon and slightly wounded.  Sergeant Moon, realizing that others might be seriously wounded or killed, ordered the soldier to surrender his weapon.  When he refused to obey, Sergeant Moon, with complete disregard for his own safety, leaped to his feet and attempted to wrest the pistol from him.  During the ensuing struggle, Sergeant Moon, with complete disregard for his own safety, leaped to his feet and attempted to wrest the pistol from him.  During the ensuing struggle, Sergeant Moon was fired upon at close range and seriously wounded.  Sergeant Moon's heroic action undoubtedly saved others in the group from serious injury and possible death, reflecting great credit on himself and upholding the esteemed traditions of the military service.

Morris, William E.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 42 - 7 November 1960

Private First Class William E. Morris, United States Army, a member of Battery "B", 1st Howitzer Battalion (8"), 17th Artillery, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of the village of Sarang-Ni near the Han Tan Chon River in Korea, on 24 May 1960.  While undergoing unit practice for the annual battery test, Private Morris was informed that a field mine had accidentally exploded and seriously injured three Republic of Korea civilians.  When a request for assistance was made in behalf of the victims, Private Morris immediately volunteered his services. With full knowledge that the area at the scene of the explosion contained armed mines, and despite the existing possibility of a mine detonating in the field at any time, he assisted in the evacuation of the injured Korean nations, and aided Republic of Korea Army soldiers in controlling civilians in the vicinity.  The complete disregard which Private Morris displayed for his own personal safety, and the unselfish and courageous actions which he manifested by risking his life in this dangerous emergency are in the most cherished traditions of the United States Army, and reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.

Papizan, Ronnie A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 16 - 10 April 1962

Private First Class Ronnie A. Papizan, RA14709368, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 19 October 1961, in Korea while assigned to Company A, 13th Signal Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division.  While assisting in the installation of a telephone drop wire, Private Papizan observed that soldier working on a nearby pole had come in contact with overhead high voltage lines and could not free himself.  Fully aware that he too would come in contact with the high voltage through the body of the trapped soldier, he unhesitatingly, and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, climbed the pole and grasped the feet of the victim, causing both bodies to fall free of the pole and power lines.  Although the rescued soldier was safely hurled to grass below, Private Papizan sustained severe injuries when his head struck a concrete sidewalk.  Private Papizan's exceptional courage and heroic action in the face of grave personal risk saved the life of his fellow soldier, and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes so much of General Orders Number 149, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division, dated 28 November 1961, as pertains to the previous award of the Army Commendation Medal to Private Papizan for meritorious achievement on 19 October 1961.)

Perkins, Walter B.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 5 - 9 February 1962

Specialist Four Walter B. Perkins, RA17539659, United States Army, a member of Combat Support Company, 1st Battle Group, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, distinguished himself by heroism on 24 September 1961, in Korea.  While boating on the Yong-ju Gol reservoir Specialist Perkins sighted a young Korean girl struggling in deep waters approximately seventy-five yards off shore.  Displaying remarkable composure and complete disregard for his own safety he plunged into the waters fully clothes and swam to her.  In the ensuing struggle she pulled Specialist Perkins under water and fought off his attempts to rescue her.  Despite this vigorous resistance Specialist Perkins managed to free himself and calm the girl.  As he towed her towards shore a boy in a small boat rowed out to meet them.  Specialist Perkins assisted in placing the victim in the boat.  Realizing that this small craft would sink if overloaded by his weight specialist Perkins, although exhausted, swam to shore without assistance.  Specialist Perkins' alertness, prompt action and disregard of his personal safety in this emergency reflect great credit on himself and are in the highest traditions of the military service.  (This award supersedes so much of General Orders Number 14, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division, dated 3 November 1961, as pertains to previous award of the Army Commendation Medal to Specialist Perkins for meritorious achievement on 24 September 1961.)

Piech, John F.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 42 - 7 November 1960

Specialist Four John F. Piech, United States Army, a member of Battery "B", 1st Howitzer Battalion (8"), 17th Artillery, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of the village of Sarang-Ni near the Han Tan Chon River in Korea, on 24 May 1960.  While undergoing unit practice for the annual battery test, Specialist Piech was informed that a field mine had accidentally exploded and seriously injured three Republic of Korea civilians.  When a request was made for assistance in behalf of the victims, Specialist Piech immediately volunteered his services.  With full knowledge that the area at the scene of the explosion contained armed mines, and despite the existing possibility of a mine detonating in the field at any time, he assisted in the evacuation of the injured Korean nationals, and aided Republic of Korea Army soldiers in controlling civilians in the vicinity.  The complete disregard which Specialist Piech displayed for his own personal safety, and the unselfish and courageous actions which he manifested by risking his life in this dangerous emergency are in the most cherished traditions of the United States Army, and reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.

Reasonover, George D.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 14 - 19 April 1956

Captain George D. Reasonover, Corps of Engineers, United States Army, while a member of Company C, 3d Engineers Battalion, distinguished himself by heroism in Korea, on 25 June 1955.  During the torrential summer rains, a pontoon bridge was ripped from its moorings, swirled adrift and lodged against the abutments of Libby Bridge, a vital communications link spanning the swollen Imjin River in flood stage.  Trees, timber, and other debris were collecting rapidly, and the tremendous pressure and vibration posed an imminent threat to the structural integrity of the piers.  After reconnoitering the situation and procuring explosives, Captain Reasonover voluntarily elected to be lowered to the twisting,  lurching bridge in an effort to blast it free.  Despite the hazards of the elements, slippery footing, and the swift current canting the floating bridge to a 40 degree angle during the operation, Captain Reasonover worked for more than an hour placing and resetting the charges to where they could be primed for detonation.  As a result of his prompt, courageous actions the pontoon bridge was blown free and drifted downstream where it was reclaimed, and Libby Bridge escaped without damage.  Captain Reasonover's exemplary conduct reflects utmost credit on himself and upholds the traditions of the military service.

Rhinehart, James W.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 18 September 1957

Captain James W. Rhinehart, Transportation Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on the night of 22 February 1957.  Captain Rhinehart was one of a group of helicopter pilots assigned the mission of rescuing survivors of a C-124 aircraft which crash-landed in the Han River Estuary.  In a desperate race against the rapidly rising tide waters and a mounting danger to the survivors from continued exposure to the winter elements he made approximately five flights to the crash site under extremely hazardous conditions to evacuate survivors who were huddled on the sandbar on ice floes in the river.  With practically no illumination he landed his helicopter in as much as 30 inches of freezing water, and on one occasion hovered sideward alongside an ice floe to pick up two survivors.  Despite the darkness, density of aircraft in the air, inadequate landing areas at the crash site, and with a full awareness that an aircraft failure or misjudgment could result in his death or serious injury, Captain Rhinehart resolutely and unhesitatingly performed his duty, thereby contributing immeasurably to the completely successful rescue mission.  His unhesitating and courageous action in the face of grave danger, coupled with complete disregard for his own safety, reflects great credit on himself, his unit, and the military service.

Rhodes, Ivory

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 61 - 17 October 1955

Corporal Ivory Rhodes, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of Pusan, Korea, on 8 April 1955.  On that day, a gasoline tractor-trailer with a defective float on the pump pipes was brought into the motor pool for repairs.  While repairing the defective mechanism, the driver of the vehicle was overcome by gasoline fumes and lost consciousness in the tank.  The assistant driver who had entered the tank to rescue the unconscious man had also been overcome by the fumes.  Although he realized the risk of his own life, Corporal Rhodes entered the fume-filled gasoline tank through the narrow opening at the top in an attempt to rescue his two comrades.  Through resolute effort, Corporal Rhodes succeeded in rescuing the assistant driver and was himself nearly overcome by fumes.  The intrepid actions of Corporal Rhodes Resulted in the saving of his comrade's life, reflecting great credit on himself and upholding the highest traditions of the military service.

Riggs, Bobby O.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 42 - 7 November 1960

Private First Class Bobby O. Riggs, United States Army, a member of Battery "B", 1st Howitzer Battalion (8"), 17th Artillery, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of the village of Sarang-Ni near the Han Tan Chon River in Korea, on 24 May 1960.  While undergoing unit practice for the annual battery test, Private Riggs was informed that a field mine had accidentally exploded and seriously injured three Republic of Korea civilians.  When a request for assistance was made in behalf of the victims, Private Riggs immediately volunteered his services.  With full knowledge that the area at the scene of the explosion contained armed mines, and despite the existing possibility of a mine detonating in the field at any time, he assisted in the evacuation of the injured Korean nationals, and aided Republic of Korea Army soldiers in controlling civilians in the vicinity.  The complete disregard which Private Riggs displayed for his own personal safety, and the unselfish and courageous actions which he manifested by risking his life in this dangerous emergency are in the most cherished traditions of the United States Army, and reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.

Rohr, William J.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 19 - 28 May 1965

Specialist Four William J. Rohr, Army Medical Service (then Private First class), United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism while serving as a member of Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, on 2 April 1964, near the Demilitarized Zone, Korea.  When notified that a soldier had been injured by a mine, Specialist Rohr unhesitatingly proceeded to the minefield to participate in the medical evacuation of the wounded man.  Upon arriving at the scene, he left his litter jeep at the fence, bravely traversed the live minefield, and reached the injured man who was located approximately fifty feet inside the mined area.  With the assistance of another medical man on the scene, he helped place the injured soldier on the litter, made his way through the uncleared minefield, and succeeded in carrying the wounded man to the litter jeep for transportation to the dispensary.  Specialist Rohr's deep concern for a fellow soldier and heroic actions under these hazardous circumstances are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes the Award of the Army Commendation Medal to Specialist Rohr for heroism on 2 April 1964 as announced in General Orders No. 101, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, dated 30 July 1964.)

Rout, Ronald A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 56 - 28 October 1957

Private First Class Ronald A. Rout, Army Medical Service, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism following the crash-landing of a C-124 aircraft on a sandbar in the Han River Estuary on 22 February 1957.  After the crash-landing he assembled injured personnel, collected dry clothing and treated the survivors for shock and exposure to the icy water.  The immediate and effective assistance rendered by Private Rout prior to the arrival of qualified medical personnel prevented serious injury to many of the survivors.  His unselfish and heroic actions were accomplished with compete disregard for his own safety or comfort and were rendered exceedingly difficult because of freezing cold, darkness and danger of being swept into the current by the steadily rising and fast flowing tide waters.  Debris scattered about the crash site and jagged edges on the plane created an additional hazard to his personal safety.  Private Rout's exemplary action during this hazardous incident is indicative of a high degree of leadership ability and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Sanchez, Librado P.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 39 - 31 July 1957

Sergeant First Class Librado P. Sanchez, Army Medical Service, United States Army, Chief Technician, Aid Station, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by heroism near Ou-Dong, Korea, on 4 November 1956.  Upon learning that a fellow soldier had stepped on an anti-personnel mine and lay injured in an uncharted minefield, Sergeant Sanchez immediately proceeded to the scene of the accident.  Despite the lack of a safe lane or mine detector, he courageously entered the hazardous area, made his precarious way to the suffering man and stemmed profuse bleeding by means of a tourniquet.  After administering emergency first aid, he assisted in evacuating the helpless man by litter to an awaiting ambulance for removal to a collecting station for further treatment.  Sergeant Sanchez' quick thinking and valorous actions resulted in the saving of a comrade's life, reflecting utmost credit on himself and the military service.

Sarajian, Robert B.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 18 - 18 April 1967

Captain Robert B. Sarajian, 05292298, Medical Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism at Camp Young, Korea on 23 December 1966 while serving as Battalion Surgeon, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry, 2d Infantry Division.  On this date he was on duty at the Camp Young Dispensary, when upon hearing a commotion outside, he left the dispensary to investigate.  He observed a crowd of personnel around a telephone pole and a ladder leading up to a platform which was affixed to the telephone wires and the pole.  There were two soldiers on the platform, one of them lying flat on the platform with his feet entangled in the high tension wires and apparently seriously injured.  Thinking only of rendering medical assistance and with complete disregard of his own safety, Captain Sarajian proceeded to climb the swaying ladder.  Upon reaching the platform, he discovered that the man had been accidentally electrocuted and had no pulse.  He then administered cardiac resuscitation and managed to carry the soldier to the ground where he performed artificial respiration and transferred him to the dispensary.  His quick thinking and prompt action enabled him to save the life of the injured soldier.  Captain Sarajian's gallantry and heroic action in the face of danger is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 2d Infantry Division, and the United States Army.  (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal for heroism on 23 December 1966, as announced in General Orders Number 21, Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, dated 1 February 1967.)

Scanella, Salvatore A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 43 - 27 September 1963

Staff Sergeant Salvatore A. Scanella, United States Army, while a member of Company A, 8th Engineer Battalion (Construction), 1st Cavalry Division, Eighth United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 6 March 1963, in Korea.  Sergeant Scanella unhesitatingly volunteered to transverse a mine field to rescue a soldier who was seriously wounded by a mine explosion.  During more than one hour of extremely hazardous efforts in clearing a lane to the injured soldier, Sergeant Scanella and his comrades located and disarmed numerous mines.  When he and the other members of the rescue party had advanced to within approximately twenty meters of the injured soldier, a helicopter lowered a sling in an attempt to airlift him from the dangerous area.  Observing that the soldier was too weak to tie himself securing to the sling and was in danger of falling or rolling onto other mines, Sergeant Scanella, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, rushed through the remaining distance of the un-cleared mine field, and assisted him into the sling.  Sergeant Scanella's heroic action, devotion to duty, and deep concern for a fellow soldier are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.  (This award supersedes the award of the Army Commendation Medal to Sergeant Scanella for heroism on 6 March 1963, in Korea, as announced in General Orders Number 84, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, dated 15 May 1963.)

Scarborough, John R.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 18 September 1957

First Lieutenant John R. Scarborough, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 22 February 1957, near Seoul, Korea.  When the C-124 "Globemaster" on which he was a passenger developed engine trouble resulting in a crash-landing in the Han River, approximately 25 miles northwest of Seoul, Lieutenant Scarborough despite sustaining several burns during landing, immediately began assisting survivors.  Upon being advised of the extent of the burns which he could not see, and being further advised to seek medical treatment, Lieutenant Scarborough ignored the advice and continued to assist survivors who were helpless in the vicinity of the burning aircraft.  Ignoring the danger of imminent explosion, Lieutenant Scarborough personally carried three victims to safety, and directed others to assist in carrying others.  When the engine did explode, covering the aircraft and immediate vicinity with fire so that nothing further could be done, Lieutenant Scarborough proceeded to supervise the evacuation of survivors by helicopter.  Despite the severity of his burns, Lieutenant Scarborough refused evacuation until all other injured, many with lesser injuries, were evacuated.  Throughout the emergency he ignored personal hazard and danger to his own life by approaching the burning aircraft to evacuate helpless survivors.  His aggressive action, sound judgment, and personal bravery were an inspiration to fellow passengers and undoubtedly saved lives that would otherwise have been lost.  The heroism displayed by Lieutenant Scarborough on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Sligh, David E. Jr.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 10 - 21 March 1956

Private First Class David E. Sligh, Jr., United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism near Camp Saint Barbara, Korea, on 31 July 1955.  Plunging from a cable supporting a pontoon bridge into the torrential, rain-swollen Young P'yung Chun River, a Korean soldier clung to an anchor line in a desperate attempt to keep afloat, but appeared too weak to put on the life preserver thrown to him by means of a guy line.  Observing that the struggling man was near exhaustion and beginning to panic, Private Sligh volunteered to go to his aid before the swift current swept him downstream.  After donning a life preserver he was lowered into the swirling, turbulent water by a wire tied to his belt.  He edged toward the floundering man, and succeeded in securing him with the wire.  When the men on the bridge attempted to pull both men upstream, the tremendous pressure snapped Private Sligh's belt buckle, leaving him stranded with the helpless soldier.  Although Private Sligh's own strength was waning fast, he gallantly held the man's head above water and clung to the anchor line for more than 30 minutes until his comrades could obtain and toss him a rope to effect the rescue.  Private Sligh's valorous conduct and intrepid actions were instrumental in saving the life of the Korean soldier, reflecting utmost credit on himself and upholding the honored traditions of the military service.

Smith, James W.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 15 - 28 April 1965

Specialist Four James W. Smith, Army Medical Service, (then Private First Class), United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism while serving as a member of Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, on 2 April 1964, near the Demilitarized Zone, Korea.  When notified that a soldier had been injured by a mine, Specialist Smith unhesitatingly proceeded to the minefield to participate in the medical evacuation of the wounded man.  Upon arriving at the scene, he left his litter jeep at the fence, bravely traversed the live minefield, and reached the injured man who was located approximately fifty feet inside the mined area.  With the assistance of another medical man on the scene, he helped place the injured soldier on the litter, made his way through the uncleared minefield, and succeeded in carrying the wounded man to the litter jeep for transportation to the dispensary.  Specialist Smith's deep concern for a fellow soldier and heroic actions under these hazardous circumstances are in the highest traditions of the service.  (This award supersedes the award of the Army Commendation Medal to Specialist Smith for heroism on 2 April 1964 as announced in General Orders Number 101, Headquarters 1st Cavalry division, dated 30 July 1964.)

Smith, John H.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 2 - 12 January 1966

Specialist Five John H. Smith, (then Private First class), United States Army, while serving as a member of Company C, 7th Medical Battalion, United States Forces, distinguished himself by heroism on 10 January 1965, in Korea.  Specialist Smith unhesitatingly volunteered to participate in a rescue mission when he learned that a fellow soldier had accidentally stepped on a live mine, was seriously wounded, and trapped in the minefield.  When the injured man was unable to hold on to a rope extended by an evacuation helicopter hovering over the minefield, Specialist Smith, followed by two soldiers carrying a stretcher, proceeded down a bank of a creek to get as close as possible to the victim.  After placing the stretcher on the bank and crawling to the end of it, he was still 6 feet away from the wounded man.  Then, with complete disregard for his own safety, he bravely maneuvered himself through the hazardous remaining distance, reached the wounded soldier, and carried him back to the stretcher.  With the assistance of other personnel on the scene, he then carried the wounded soldier to the landing site of the evacuation helicopter.  Specialist Smith's heroic conduct, ingenuity, and deep concern for a fellow soldier are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes the award of the Army Commendation Medal to Specialist Smith for meritorious achievement on 10 January 1965 as announced in General Orders Number 20, Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division, APO San Francisco, 96207, dated 17 February 1965.)

Smith, Rudolph P.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 52 - 18 December 1963

Sergeant First Class Rudolph P. Smith, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, Eighth United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism in Korea, on 13 June 1963.  While in the kitchen of Headquarters Company of the Eighth United States Army Consolidated Mess, Sergeant Smith witnessed the probable electrocution of a Korean electrician who became trapped by a short circuit in the main electrical switch box.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant Smith unhesitatingly lunged at the electrician, grabbed him about the waist, and threw him to the floor, successfully freeing the man from the lethal current in which he was ensnared.  In the process of his swift and courageous action, Sergeant Smith's arm was singed and his clothing burned.  His prompt and heroic action in this emergency is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal for outstanding courage on 13 June 1963 as announced in General Orders Number 163, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, dated 26 August 1963.)

Spencer, Carey W.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 18 September 1957

Private First class Carey W. Spencer, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on the night of 22 February 1957, in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, when the C-124 aircraft on which he was a passenger developed engine trouble shortly after takeoff and crash-landed on a sandbar in the Han River, bursting into flames on impact.  After reaching safety through an escape exit, with complete disregard for his own life, Private Spencer volunteered to return to the burning plane to rescue those trapped in or near it.  Despite a raging fire and the threat of explosions from the airplane's fuel tanks, Private Spencer helped carry two badly injured men to safety and then entered the aircraft to look for other survivors.  He later saw a man swimming in the icy waters of the river and with the help of others, succeeded in getting the man out and to the warmth of a fire which had been built.  Private Spencer refused to quit his rescue work until he was satisfied that all survivors of the flight were safe.  His actions reflect the highest traditions of the United States Army.

Spriggs, Robert A. (posthumous)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 24 - 10 July 1958

Private First Class Robert A. Spriggs, Signal Corps, United States Army, a member of Company C, 51st Signal Battalion (Corps) distinguished himself by heroism on 9 May 1958.  While on the bank of Han Tan River in Korea, Private Spriggs saw his comrade, a Republic of Korea soldier, who was laundering clothing, wade out into the water to retrieve some clothing which had been caught in the current.  The Republic of Korea soldier stepped from an underwater ledge into deep water and, unable to swim, began to flounder and call for help.  Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, Private Spriggs unclothed, entered the water and swamp out to aid the helpless man.  As Private Spriggs approached to render assistance, the victim panicked, overpowered Private Spriggs to the extent that he could not break the man's grip, and both men drowned.  In the performance of this brave action in an attempt to rescue his fellow-man, Private Spriggs displayed a rare courage and spirit of self-sacrifice which reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.

Summers, Charles D.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 39 - 31 July 1957

Second Lieutenant Charles D. Summers, Ordnance Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 2 August 1956, at Pusan, Korea.  When Lieutenant Summers received word at the Detachment that a group of people were in distress on a point of land at Heunde Beach, Pusan, Korea, he promptly proceeded to the scene with other personnel from his unit and found that a huge wave in the wake of a typhoon had washed several persons into the sea and they were being drowned by the raging surf.  Lieutenant Summers, without regard for his own personal safety, attempted to swim to one of the drowning victims, but was forced back by the high waves.  Risking his own life, he exhibited every possible effort to complete the rescue.  Lieutenant Summers' heroic actions and ability to assume command in an emergency situation reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.

Todd, Forrest E.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 43 - 27 September 1963

Staff Sergeant Forrest E. Todd, United States Army, while a member of Company D, 1st Battle Group, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, Eighth United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 6 March 1963, in Korea.  Sergeant Todd unhesitatingly volunteered to traverse a mine field to rescue a soldier who was seriously wounded by a mine explosion.  During more than one hour of extremely hazardous efforts in clearing a lane to the injured soldier, Sergeant Todd and his comrades located and disarmed numerous mines.  When he and the other members of the rescue party had advanced to within approximately twenty meters of the injured soldier, a helicopter lowered a sling in an attempt to airlift him from the dangerous area.  Observing that the soldier was too weak to tie himself securely to the sling and was in danger of falling or rolling onto other mines, Sergeant Todd, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, rushed through the remaining distance of the uncleared mine field, and assisted him into the sling.  Sergeant Todd's heroic action, devotion to duty, and deep concern for a fellow soldier are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.  (This award supersedes the award of the Army Commendation Medal to Sergeant Todd for heroism on 6 March 1963, in Korea, as announced in General Orders Number 84, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, dated 15 May 1963.)

Tomlinson, Thomas L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 12 - 17 March 1967

Specialist Four (then Private First Class) Thomas L. Tomlinson, US55825685, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroic and courageous actions in saving the life of a small Korean child with complete disregard for his own life and personal safety on 16 July 1966 while assigned to Headquarters, Headquarters and Service Battery, 1st Battalion, 79th Artillery, 7th Infantry Division.  Specialist Tomlinson leaped into the swollen and torrential flood waters of the Imjin River, in the vicinity of Musan-ni, Korea, and rescued the small child from certain death.  Specialist Tomlinson's heroic deed was spontaneous, without a moments hesitation to consider the risk involved.  Special Tomlinson's courage and bravery are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 7th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

Thomson, Donald E.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 38 - 18 September 1967

Lieutenant Colonel Donald e. Thomson 035490, Artillery, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism on 22 March 1967, while serving as Commanding Officer of the United States Army Support Group, Joint Security Area, Panmunjom, Korea.  At the conclusion of the Military Armistice Commission meeting being held at Panmunjom, Korea, Mr. Su Kun Yi, Vice Chief of the official North Korean Central News Agency, entered a U.S. Army sedan seeking transportation to South Korea.  With disdain for his own safety, Lieutenant Colonel Thomson immediately went to and also entered the sedan occupied by Mr. Yi.  In spite of North Korean guards attempts to drag Mr. Yi from the car, Lieutenant Colonel Thomson directed the car be driven amid a fusillade of small arms fire from the North Korean guards.  Lieutenant Colonel Thomson's quick actions and leadership were instrumental in the successful flight of Mr. Yi to the United States Army Support Group Advance Camp.  Lieutenant Colonel Thomson's heroic conduct is not only in the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the Military Service but greatly enhanced the image of his unit and the United Nations Command.

Treas, Richard L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 33 - 26 July 1967

Captain Richard L. Treas, Infantry, United States Army, on December 20, 1966, in Chun Chon, Korea, distinguished himself through an act of heroism voluntarily risking his life in saving a nine year old Korean boy from drowning in the ice swollen, turbulent So Yang river.  While driving across the So Yang river bridge, at the northern edge of the city of Chun Chon, Captain Treas noticed an excited crowd of people gathering along the bank of the river on the south side of the bridge.  Closer observation revealed the object of excitement to be a small Korean child who had broken through the ice incrustation and fallen into the river, clinging for life to a piece of floating ice.  Not knowing the thickness of the ice or the depth of the river or the swiftness of its current and notwithstanding the fact that he, cannot swim, Captain Treas disregarded his personal safety and voluntarily risked his life by proceeding immediately to rescue the Korean child.  Breaking through the ice, Captain Treas forced his way against the strong current of the turbulent stream, the depth of which often reached his chin.  Fending off chunks of ice with sharp and jagged edges, Captain Treas reached the child at mid stream and carried him back to safety, aided by Sergeant First Class Kim, Myung Keun, a Korean Soldier assigned to Detachment Center, U.S. Army Advisory Group, Korea, who had likewise risked his life by following Captain Treas into the stream in this rescue effort.  Upon reaching the banks, Captain Treas delivered the near frozen boy to a Korean National Policeman for immediate evacuation to the nearest hospital for urgently required medical care.  Through this act of heroism, Captain Treas reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Army Advisory Group, Korea, and the United States Army.

Vidman, Fred

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 39 - 31 July 1957

Private First Class Fred Vidman, Ordnance Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 2 August 1956 at Pusan, Korea.  When PFC Vidman received word that a group of people were in distress on a point of land at Heunde Beach, Pusan, Korea, he promptly proceeded to the scene with his commanding officer and other personnel from his unit.  He found that a huge wave in the wake of a typhoon had washed several persons into the sea and they were being drowned by the raging surf.  PFC Vidman, with the help of several enlisted men, attempted to throw a rope to one of the drowning victims.  This required him to climb down a jutting cliff where high waves were breaking ferociously against the rocks, placing him in great danger of being swept into the sea.  Risking his life, he exhibited every possible effort to complete the rescue.  PFC Vidman's heroic actions in the emergency reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.

Watts, Willie

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 28 - 21 August 1961

Private First Class Willie Watts, United States Army, a member of Company "C", 2d Medium Tank Battalion (Patton), 40th Armor, distinguished himself by heroism near the village of Changja-Dng, Korea, on 28 January 1961.  While participating in the annual Army Training Test, Private Watts was informed that the tank to which he was assigned as loader was on fire.  After standard fire fighting procedures were carried out, the flames abated momentarily, and the crew dismounted to determine the extent of the damage.  Suddenly the fire reflashed and the tank engine began blazing fiercely.  Realizing that the immediate danger of an explosion of the fully armed and combat-loaded tank threatened the lives and safety of Infantry troops in the area, Private Watts quickly opened the grill doors, and, using fire extinguishers brought to him by crew members of other tanks, directed a steady stream of carbon dioxide at the source of the fire.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he refused to leave the tank, despite the fact that the intense heat had melted the soles of his boots.  Private Watts persisted in his efforts, and his unswerving determination and courageous actions permitted sufficient time to organize and direct the fire fighting team which brought the blaze under control.  The brave and heroic manner in which Private Watts risked his life in this dangerous emergency is in the most cherished traditions of the United States Army, and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Westerfeld, Russell L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 23 - 20 May 1963

Private First Class Russell L. Westerfeld, United States Army, a member of the 226th Signal Company, 4th United States Army Missile Command (Air Transportable), distinguished himself by heroism on 16 December 1962, in the vicinity of the Soyang River, City of Chun Chon, Korea.  Private Westerfeld observed two young Korean ice skaters fall through the ice into the swiftly flowing deep water of the Soyang River.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he unhesitatingly entered the icy river in an effort to rescue the panic-stricken youths.  Upon reaching the edge of the ice, he managed to grasp one of the frightened boys, and with the aid of a pole extended to him by a companion, pulled the boy through the water to the bank of the river.  Private Westefeld's prompt and courageous action in this emergency is in the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

White, Bernard W.P.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 10 - 21 March 1956

Specialist Third Class Bernard W.P. White, United States Army, a member of Detachment A, 4th Military Intelligence Company, distinguished himself by heroism near Kimpo Air Base, Korea, on 6 August 1955.  Upon approaching a bridge spanning the Han River, Specialist White learned that a heavy truck containing approximately 20 servicemen had crashed through the railing and plunged 40 feet to the river bank.  He rushed to the scene of the accident and assisted in an attempt to right the truck and release the trapped men.  At this juncture the gasoline tank exploded, knocking Specialist White about 20 feet.  Despite his own burns and intense heat he returned to the flaming vehicle to aid a soldier whose clothing was afire, got him to the river to extinguish the flames, and administered first aid.  Only after all possible assistance had been given the injured soldiers did he accept treatment for the painful burns he had incurred.  Specialist White's display of heroism reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Williams, Murphy

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 61 - 17 October 1955

Master Sergeant Murphy Williams, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism in Pusan Harbor Korea, on 19 April 1955.  While serving as Fire Chief, Station 1, 8075th Engineer Firefighting Company, Sergeant Williams and his company responded within minutes after a report of fire aboard the SS Audrey II, loaded with HE bombs, incendiary clusters and heat sensitive explosives, berthed in Pusan Harbor.  Firefighting operations were hampered by intense clouds of billowing smoke.  Fully aware of the danger involved, Sergeant Williams entered the smoke-logged, ammunition-laden hatch to ascertain the location and extent of the blaze.  He immediately saw an ignited parachute flare wedged between the hull and the dunnage, out of reach of the fire hose and imminently threatening to detonate the lethal cargo.  Quickly seizing the burning flare with his bare hands, he carried it to the center of the hold where the water hose could extinguish it.  Sergeant Williams' quick thinking and intrepid actions averted a major catastrophe with potential loss of lives and property, reflecting utmost credit on himself and upholding the esteemed traditions of the military service.

 

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