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Post-War United States Marine Corps
Casualties in/near Korea

 
To add information to this page of the Korean War Educator, contact Lynnita or write Lynnita Brown, 111 E. Houghton St., Tuscola, IL 61953.  Phone 217-253-4620.

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Post-War Marine Corps Casualties:

[Note: The following casualties are listed by date of death rather than alphabetically.  "Died of other causes" could mean just about anything that was not classified "killed in action".  Clarification of any of these causes of death is welcome on the KWE.]

1953 (after cease fire):

  1. Andrews, Pfc. Gary G. - Private First Class Andrews was a member of Company H, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He was seriously wounded while fighting the enemy in Korea and died of those wounds on July 28, 1953. Private First Class Andrews was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Combat Infantryman's Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  2. Smith, Pfc. Harold B. - Private First Class Smith was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division. On July 27, 1953, he was returning from a patrol forward of "Outpost Berlin", when he stepped on a mine. He was evacuated to the hospital ship USS Haven (AH-12) and died the following morning (July 28). Private First Class Smith was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  3. Hansman, 2Lt. William R. - Second Lieutenant Hansman was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He died of other causes in Korea on July 28, 1953. Second Lieutenant Hansman was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  4. Leonberger, Pfc. Robert A. - Private First Class Leonberger was a member of Headquarters and Service Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He died in Korea from other causes on July 29, 1953. Private First Class Leonberger was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  5. Crater, Pfc. Joseph E. - Private First Class Crater was a member of the Signal Company, Headquarters Battalion, 1st Marine Division. He died of other causes in Korea on August 1, 1953. Private First Class Crater was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  6. Elberth, Cpl. Matthew J. Jr. - Corporal Elberth was a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Signal Battalion, 1st Marine Division. He died in Korea from other causes on August 1, 1953. Corporal Elberth was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  7. Winner, Sgt. Gerald W. - Sergeant Winner was a member of Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He died in Korea from other causes on August 7, 1953. Sergeant Winner was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  8. Drake, Pfc. John M. Jr. - Private First Class Drake was a member of Company G, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in Korea on August 15, 1953. Private First Class Drake was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  9. Stout, Sgt. Harold C. Jr. - Sergeant Stout was a member of the 33rd Marine Air Group. He died in Korea from other causes on August 29, 1953. Sergeant Stout was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  10. Wilson, Pvt. William C. - Private Wilson was a member of Company B, 1st Shore Party, 1st Marine Division. He died in Korea from other causes on August 30, 1953. Private Wilson was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  11. Medas, Cpl. Albert Jr. - Corporal Medas was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He was seriously wounded while fighting the enemy in Korea and died of those wounds on September 1, 1953. Corporal Medas was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  12. Bird, Sgt. John O. - Sergeant Bird was a member of Marine Air Base Squadron Twelve, 1st Marine Air Wing. He died of other causes in Korea on September 3, 1953. Sergeant Bird was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  13. Porter, Capt. Ben C. - Captain Porter was a member of Marine Air Base Squadron 12, 1st Marine Air Wing. He died of other causes in Korea on September 3, 1953. Captain Porter was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  14. Stahala, Cpl. Howard R. - Corporal Stahala was a member of Marine Air Base Squadron Twelve, 1st Marine Air Wing. He died of other causes in Korea on September 3, 1953. Corporal Stahala was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  15. Pouk, SSgt. Andrew P. - Staff Sergeant Pouk was a member of Headquarters Squadron, First Marine Air Wing. He died in Korea from other causes on September 10, 1953. Staff Sergeant Pouk was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  16. Deveau, SSgt. Edward P. - Staff Sergeant Deveau was a member of Battery B, 1st 90mm Anti-aircraft Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific. He died in Korea from other causes on September 23, 1953. Staff Sergeant Deveau was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  17. Reilly, Cpl. John P. - Corporal Reilly was a member of Weapons Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He died in Korea from other causes on September 24, 1953. Corporal Reilly was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  18. Carter, Pfc. Theodore - Private First Class Carter was a member of the 1st Provisional Anti-aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Platoon, 11th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He died of other causes in Korea on September 27, 1953. Private First Class Carter was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  19. DeRose, Pfc. Rocco William - Private First Class DeRose was a member of Company H, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division. On October 5, 1952, He was on a night patrol near Panmunjon, when his patrol was ambushed. When he failed to return, he was listed as Missing in Action. He was presumed dead on October 16, 1953. His name is inscribed on the Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial. Private First Class DeRose was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  20. Wilson, Pfc. Raymond C. - Private First Class Wilson was a member of Company D, 1st Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division. He died in Korea from other causes on October 23, 1953. Private First Class Wilson was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  21. Boraski, Sgt. Anthony Simon - Sergeant Boraski was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in Korea on October 30, 1953. Sergeant Boraski was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  22. Boshaw, Pfc. Merlyn Earl - Private First Class Boshaw was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in Korea on November 3, 1953. Private First Class Boshaw was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  23. Fialkowski, 2Lt. Walter K. - Second Lieutenant Fialkowski was a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division. He died in Korea from other causes on November 3, 1953. Second Lieutenant Fialkowski was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  24. Chase, WO Lewis E. - Warrant Officer Chase was a veteran of World War II, fighting in the Pacific. In Korea, he was a member of the 161st Marine Helicopter Transportation Squadron, 1st Marine Air Wing. On November 6, 1953, he was working on the mud flats of western Korea when the incoming tide threatened him. Rescue attempts by helicopter failed and he drowned. Warrant Officer Chase was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation, the Republic of Korea War Service Medal, the World War II Victory Medal and the Asiatic-Pacific Theater Medal with three Battle Stars.
  25. Lynch, TSgt. Morton J. - Technical Sergeant Lynch was a member of Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He died in Korea from other causes on November 17, 1953. Technical Sergeant Lynch was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  26. Wilson, Sgt. William Dean - Sergeant Wilson was a member of Headquarters and Service Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division. He was listed as Missing in Action while fighting the enemy in Korea. He was presumed dead on December 7, 1953. His remains were not recovered. His name is inscribed on the Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial. Sergeant Wilson was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  27. Laflin, Sgt. Allen J. - Sergeant Laflin was a member of Headquarters and Service Company, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He died of other causes in Korea on December 18, 1953. Sergeant Laflin was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  28. Dufresne, Pfc. Donald E. - Private First Class Dufresne was a member of the 1st Marine Division. He died of other causes on December 31, 1953. Private First Class Dufresne was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

1954:

  1. Barrett, Sgt. Frank Robert - Sergeant Barrett was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division. He was listed as Missing in Action while fighting the enemy in Korea on December 28, 1953 and presumed dead on December 28, 1954. His name is inscribed on the Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial. Sergeant Barrett was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.
  2. See Inchon Harbor Tragedy - January 21, 1954.

1969:

  1. Lynch, SSgt. Hugh M. - He was killed along with 30 other crew members of a US Navy EC121 when their electronic reconnaissance aircraft was shot down over the Sea of Japan by two North Korean MiGs on April 15, 1969.

1984:

  1. See Helicopter Crash - March 24, 1984 (18 US Marines killed)

1997:

  1. D'Eredita Maj. Danny A. - Major D'Eredita lost his life on February 09, 1997 while a member of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (All Weather) - 21, Marine Corps Air Station, Iwakuni, Japan.  On February 9, 1997, the F/A-18D "Hornet" he was in crashed into the Yellow Sea 60 miles southwest of Korea.
     
  2. Nickles, Capt. Mark R. - See D'Eredita.

2017:

  1. Rudd, Sgt. Maj. Timonthy Jay - Rudd died a "non-combatant-related death" on March 19, 2017 in Pohang, Korea, while serving as a senior enlisted advisor for the 3rd Marine Logistics Group.  Surviving are his wife, Tracy Ditto Rudd; son, Christopher Jay Rudd; and daughter, Jessica Lee Rudd, all of the home. He is also survived by his parents and siblings.

    Sergeant Major Timonthy J. Rudd was born in Post, Texas. He entered the United States Marine Corps in 1990. Private Rudd graduated from recruit training at San Diego, California in August 1990. He was then assigned to A Company, Infantry Training Battalion, Camp Pendleton, California where he received training as a 0351 Dragon/Smaw gunner. Upon graduation Private Rudd was sent to Security Forces School in Vallejo, California where he then graduated and reported in for sea duty aboard the USS Independence CV-62 as a Private First Class. Private First Class Rudd spent the next two years aboard the naval vessel where he was promoted to Lance Corporal and then picked up the rank of Corporal meritoriously. While stationed aboard the aircraft carrier he had participated in Operation Southern Watch.

    In January 1993 he received orders to check in with 2d Battalion, 4th Marines. While assigned as a section leader for Smaw’s in Echo Company he conducted a UDP to Okinawa in May 1993. In February 1994, he was promoted to the rank of Sergeant meritoriously and was assigned to H&S Company as the assistant Admin Chief. During this time he participated in the re-designation of 2d Battalion 4th Marines to 2d Battalion 6th Marines. After serving one year in H&S Company he was assigned to Golf Company as a squad leader for 2nd Platoon and deployed on a Mediterranean float aboard the USS Wasp.

    In March of 1996 Sergeant Rudd received orders to Drill Instructor duty. Upon graduation of Drill Instructors School, Sergeant Rudd was assigned as a Drill Instructor with 3rd Recruit Training Battalion. While serving on the Drill Field he held several billets consisting of a Drill Instructor, Senior Drill Instructor, Rappel Master, event leader for the Crucible and ran the Command Operations Center for the Crucible.

    In July of 1998, Sergeant Rudd received orders back to 2d Battalion, 6th Marines. He was assigned to Weapons Company as a Dragon/Tow Section leader for the Anti-Armor Platoon. In December 1998, he picked up the rank of Staff Sergeant. During his tour with Weapons Company he served in the billets of Anti-Armor Platoon Sergeant, Heavy Machine Gun Platoon Sergeant, CAAT Heavy Platoon Sergeant and completed two Mediterranean deployments before receiving orders to the Staff Non-commissioned Officer Academy in October 2002.

    In October 2002, Staff Sergeant Rudd was assigned to the Staff Non-commissioned Officer Academy, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina as an instructor for the Sergeants Course. In September 2003, he picked up the rank of Gunnery Sergeant and was assigned as the Chief Instructor for the Advanced Course. In February 2005, he was assigned as the Staff Non-commissioned Officer in Charge of the Advance Course.

    In October 2005, Gunnery Sergeant Rudd received orders to 1st Battalion, 9th Marines. He was assigned to Weapons Company where he filled multiple billets; Anti-Armor Platoon Commander, Operations Chief and Company First Sergeant. In May 2006, he deployed with a Mobile Training Team to Operations in Afghanistan. In December 2007, he was frocked to the rank of First Sergeant and served as the Bravo Company First Sergeant. While serving as the Bravo Company First Sergeant he deployed with 1st Battalion, 9th Marines to Ramadi, Iraq in support of Iraqi Freedom.

    In December 2008, First Sergeant Rudd executed orders to Kilo Battery, 2d Battalion, 14th Marines located in Huntsville, Alabama. He served as both an Inspector-Instructor and Reserve Battery First Sergeant. In December 2011 he was frocked to the rank of Sergeant Major.

    In January 2012, he was assigned as the Sergeant Major for 2d Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment. During this tour he deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

    In February 2014, he was assigned as the Sergeant Major of the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training, New River Air Station.

    In January 2015, he was assigned as the Sergeant Major of Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262. During this tour he deployed as the ACE SgtMaj for the 31st Marine Expeditionary Force.

    Sergeant Major Rudds’ personal awards include the, Meritorious Service Medal with one gold star, Navy-Marine Corps Commendation Medal with two gold stars, an Army Commendation Medal, a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and a Combat Action Ribbon.
     

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Inchon Harbor Tragedy - January 21, 1954

On January 21, 1954, 24 Marines and two Navy corpsmen lost their lives in a tragic accident in Inchon Harbor.  (The KWE list below shows 28 fatalities.)  U.S. Navy Landing Ship (LST456) collided with an Army Landing Craft Medium (LCM5195), tossing 50 occupants into the icy waters.  The LST was manned by Japanese seaman and the vessel was carrying 1000 anti-Communist Chinese soldiers to Formosa when it was rammed by the small assault boat.  Pfc. John D. Gates of Pensacola, Florida was at the wheel of the assault boat at the time of the collision.  A former commercial fisherman, he told authorities that the strong current in the water forced his boat against the LST.

The Marines were mostly from Company H, 4th Marines, and were wearing heavy combat packs when they fell into the water.  Many sank to the bottom of the harbor because of the cumbersome packs.  Survivors and the dead were pulled from the water by rescue boats from the General Pope and native sampans.  Survivors were taken to the hospital ship USS Consolation for treatment and recovery.

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List of Fatalities

  1. Barrera, Pfc. Ignacio D. - Born September 13, 1933, he was from San Antonio, Texas.
  2. Campbell, Pfc. Robert G. - Born on January 21, 1932, he was from Richmond, Indiana. His parents were Mr. and Mrs. Ernest H. Campbell of Richmond.  His wife was also from Richmond.
  3. Charves, Pfc. James C. - Born May 13, 1933, he was from Oakland, California.
  4. Davenport, Pfc. Norman Roy - Born December 31, 1933 in Missouri Valley, Iowa, he was the son of Roy P. Davenport of Missouri Valley, Iowa.  He is buried in Oak Grove Cemetery, Missouri Valley, Iowa.
  5. DeFrisco, Pfc. Carmine F. Jr. - He was from Wilmont Park, Pennsylvania.
  6. Farrell, Pfc. Michael J. - Born November 13, 1934, he was born in Bronx, New York.
  7. Gilmartin, Pfc. Thomas F. - He was from Boston, Massachusetts.
  8. Hauzer, Pfc. Gilbert Louis - Born September 23, 1934, he was from Missouri.  He is also listed as being from Eugene, Oregon.
  9. Hedlund, 1Lt. Kenneth A. - He was from Worcester, Massachusetts.
  10. Kovarik, HM2 Stephen John - Born October 31, 1932 in Johnstown, New York.  He was a member of Headquarters and Service Company, 3rd Battalion, 4th Marines, 3rd Marine Division.
  11. Mahalak, Pfc. Joseph - Born March 15, 1933, he was from Wyandotte, Michigan.
  12. McIntyre, 1Lt. Theodore F.X. - He was from Boston, Massachusetts.
  13. Mertens, Pfc. John Henry Jr. - Born February 06, 1934 in Belleville, Illinois, a son of John Henry Mertens Sr. (1905-1986) and Agnes T. Farmbauer Mertens (1910-1982).  One of his siblings was Paul J. Mertens (1933-2001).
  14. Mroseske, Pfc. William J. - Born October 29, 1933 in Detroit, Michigan.
  15. Obert, Pfc. Donald Charles - Born June 15, 1934 in Columbus, Ohio, a son of Herman Joseph Obert (1898-1975) and Ruth Anna Franks Obert (1904-1996).  His siblings were Herman Louis Obert and Mary Ellen Obert Brockelsby.  He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
  16. Phillips, Pfc. Billy L. - He was from Orlando, Florida.
  17. Rash, Pfc. Wilburn H. - Home State: Texas.  He was born February 11, 1931, a son of Elza Berry Rash (1895-1978) and Vera Mae Berry Rash (1898-1968).  His brother was Charles Aubryneal Rash (1936-2005).
  18. Roberts, Cpl. Leonard W. - Born September 17, 1930, he was from Anchorage, Alaska.
  19. Smith, Pfc. Clarence - He was from Washington, D.C.
  20. Smith, Pfc. Samuel A. - Born May 3, 1934, he was from Mutual, Oklahoma.
  21. Stein, Pfc. Gerald D. - Born February 28, 1935, he was from Pigeon, Michigan.
  22. Taylor, Pfc. Grover Cleveland Jr. - Born October 7, 1931, he was the son of Grover C. Taylor Sr. (1888-1965) and Blanche E. Taylor (1094-1995).  He was from the State of Maryland.
  23. Walk, Pfc. William W. - Born on May 03, 1933, in Pearl (Pike County), Illinois, his parents were Mr. and Mrs. George Walk.
  24. Wells, Pfc. Lawrence A. - He was born on August 10, 1934 in Sedro Woolley, Washington.
  25. Whyde, Pfc. Vinton O. - Born August 7, 1935, "Tiny" Whyde was one of three son of Drexel Whyde (1904-1977) and Laura B. Jones Whyde (1898-1960) of Winchester, Indiana.  His twin brother was Verlin O. "Hot Shot" Whyde (1935-2000).  His other brother, Charles Whyde, was serving in Alaska at the time of Tiny's death and got an emergency leave to come home for the funeral.
  26. Wilkie, Pfc. Marlin - Born February 2, 1932 in Fruita, Colorado.
  27. Zielinski, Pfc. Paul M. - Born in 1933, he was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Zielinski of St. Louis.  Home town: St. Louis, Missouri.
  28. Zurovetz, Pfc. Albert I. - Born September 19, 1934 in Texas, a son of John Zurovetz (1894-1941) and Frantiska Kubala Zurovetz (1894-1979).  He was from Granger, Texas.  His siblings were Frank, Johnny, Mary (Naizer), Frances (Antunes), Elick, and Sybil Frances (Mitchell).  Albert was a member of Company G, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marines, 3rd Marine Division.  A "Lost at Sea" memorial marker for Zurovetz can be found in Calvary Cemetery, Granger, TX.

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List of Survivors

The survivors included 17 Marines, two Navy Corpsmen, two Army men, and one Korean civilian.

  1. Chil, Kim Won, Korean civilian crewman
  2. Climie, LtCmdr. Charles Floyd Jr., San Clemente, CA (1914-1983)
  3. Fisher, HM3 Harold D., Oshkosh, WI
  4. Gates, Pfc. John D., Pensacola, FL
  5. Grimes, Pfc. Forest R. Jr., Flora, IL
  6. Heal, Pfc. Robert D., Wilmington, DE
  7. Lahiti, Pfc. Robert A., Berea, OH
  8. Locke, Pfc. Thomas C., Beaver, SD
  9. Malone, Pfc. Thomas H., Brooklyn, NY
  10. Mokry, Pfc. Wesley F., Rowena, TX
  11. Morrison, TSgt. Thomas L., Brownsville, TX
  12. Mose, Pfc. Albert, Brooklyn, NY
  13. Peterson, Pfc. Warren L., Kalamazoo, MI
  14. Pratt, Pfc. Samuel W., Sacaton, AZ
  15. Rothenberger, Maj. Elmer W., Arlington, VA
  16. Ryan, Pfc. Leo A., Wilkes-Barre, PA
  17. Sandman, Pfc. Leonard H., Tachatchi, NM
  18. Strangland, Pfc. Leroy J., Spokane, WA
  19. Stokes, Pfc. Arvin, Warren, AK
  20. Vance, Cpl. Jack M., St. Louis, MO
  21. Wellborn, Pfc. Carroll Don, Modesto, CA
  22. Wilinsky, Pfc. Lloyd, Frackville, PA

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Helicopter Crash - March 24, 1984


The San Diego Union (CA) - March 26, 1984

The bodies of all 29 U.S. and South Korean marines killed in a helicopter crash have been recovered from the mountain where they died during a joint military exercise, officials said yesterday. In Washington, the Pentagon identified the 18 U.S. Marines who perished.

Fourteen of the Americans were from Company L of the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment at the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps base near Oceanside and had been on a six-month assignment to South Korea, according to a base spokesman. Marine spokesmen at Camp Pendleton and in Washington yesterday said they could not say which of the victims on the Pentagon's list were from Camp Pendleton.

The Pentagon identified the victims by name and home town:

  1. Acquiston, Cpl. Jeffrey, San Dimas

  2. Andrews, Pfc. John M. III, Watchung, N.J.

  3. Burley, Capt. Steven, Magnolia, N.J.

  4. Crosby, Sgt. Kenneth B. Crosby, Houston

  5. Djelko, Gunnery Sgt. Richard L., Danbury, Conn.

  6. Dugas, Pvt. Anthony F., Opelousas, La.

  7. Ferrell, Pfc. Edwin C. , Clover, Va.

  8. Higgins, Sgt. David C., Somerset, Pa.

  9. Huston, Capt. John H., Gahanna, Ohio

  10. Kelly, Cpl. Tim V., Fresno

  11. Liddle, Staff Sgt. John, Independence, Mo.

  12. McComas, Cpl. Bradley, Camden, Ohio

  13. Mugoodwin, Sgt. Kevin J., Gary, Ind.

  14. Osceola, Lance Cpl. Herman L., Culewiston, Fla.

  15. Rooney, Pfc. James T., West Point, Iowa

  16. Rosales, Lance Cpl. Fernando Jr., Brentwood, N.Y.

  17. Soles, Pfc. William A., Baton Rouge, La.

  18. Zinck, Lance Cpl. Daniel B., Framingham, Mass.

Eleven South Koreans were killed. A U.S. military official in Seoul confirmed there were no survivors of the crash.

The remains were transported to Seoul to an army mortuary at Yongsan, the large U.S. base in the South Korean capital pending return to the United States. The search for the bodies in a mountainous coastal area about 200 miles southeast of Seoul had gone on since the U.S. Marine Corps CH-53D chopper smashed into a mountainside early Saturday morning.

The helicopter was one of six taking part in a night training exercise. The military said the weather was above minimum standards when the helicopters took off but that rain and high winds developed and the mission was scrubbed. The helicopter was heading back to the base at the southeast coastal port town of Pohang when it plowed into the mountainside.

The training was part of a combined program called Team Spirit '84 involving about 60,000 U.S. and 147,500 South Korean military personnel, which began Feb. 1 and will be completed in April. Team Spirit maneuvers have been held annually for the past nine years. Earlier this week, nearly 50,000 American and South Korean marines carried out a major amphibious assault landing on the beaches around Pohang. The U.S. Navy vessels supporting that operation included the aircraft carrier Kitty Hawk.
 

 
 

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