Topics - DNA of MIA Family Members Wanted

KWE visitors can help~


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Introduction

Efforts are being made by the United States government to locate the nation's Korean War missing in action.  When remains are discovered in North or South Korea that are believed to be those of an American serviceman, the remains are sent to the Central Identification Laboratory operated by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) in Hawaii.  This laboratory is the world's largest forensic anthropology laboratory.

The JPAC website explains the Command's work with regards to Korean War missing in action:

JPAC has five teams dedicated to finding those lost in the Korean War. With more than 8,100 American servicemen from the Korean War that have not yet been accounted for, the task is daunting. From 1954 to 1990 the U.S. sought, to no avail, to account for Americans missing in North Korea. Then, between 1990-1994, North Korea unilaterally excavated and returned more than 200 sets of remains to the U.S. However, due to co-mingling of the remains and other complicating factors, very few have been identified. The recovery techniques employed by North Korea clearly demonstrated that U.S. government technical expertise through joint operations is essential to potential identification of remains. JPAC teams are currently conducting remains recovery operations in the Unsan County and Chosin Reservoir areas of North Korea.

According to the JPAC website, gathering DNA samples from members of the families of the MIA is vital to the identification process.  Also, efforts are being made to locate photographs of the missing in action to further assist in the identification process.


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DNA Testing

JPAC is searching for a special type of DNA from surviving family members.  Called "Mitochondrial DNA or mtDNA," it is inherited only from the mother.  According to JPAC, "We use this type of DNA because it is long-lasting, abundant, and doesn’t change much from generation to generation....  If you are a family member of an individual who is Missing in Action, we may be able to use a sample of your DNA to help us with our identification process. However, we do not need a sample from just any family member – we can only use samples from family members who share the same mtDNA as the missing service member. Mitochondrial DNA is only passed on through the maternal line."  According to JPAC, DNA samples can be taken from brothers, sisters, a sister's children, and many other relatives.  Thus, even the DNA of distant relatives can be compared and often matched to unidentified remains.  JPAC cautions, however, "The downside is that children of a missing male cannot provide an mtDNA reference sample. The sex of the missing person and the donor are irrelevant. In a family tree linking the donor to the missing person, every intermediate person linking the donor to the missing person must be a female."  DNA samples are used only for the purpose of identifying military personnel missing in action and are not released to any agency or organization outside of this scope of interest.

Even if our viewers are not members of the family of a Korean War MIA, KWE visitors can help the family members of our missing in action to "bring them home" by researching that serviceman's family history to determine if there are living relatives who might be potential DNA donors.  JPAC relies not only on DNA samples, but also on other evidence that its researchers gather about the missing veteran, such as his last known location, what was happening on the day and at the place he went missing, testimony from eyewitnesses, battle reports, etc.

According to a news release from the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) on December 1, 2006, the remains of eight U.S. servicemen who were missing in action from the Korean War have recently been identified and returned to their families for burial with full military honors.  The eight are:

Master Sgt. Alfred H. Alonzo Sr., of Tampa, Fla.; Sgt. 1st Class Robert C. Bucheit, of Hamilton, Ohio; Sgt. Francis E. Lindsay, of Esther, Mo.; Cpl. Joseph Gregori, of West Pittston, Pa.; Cpl. Darrell W. Scarbrough, of Fayetteville, W. Va.; Cpl. Homer L. Sisk, Jr., of Ducor, Calif.; Cpl. Charles E. Sizemore, of Rushville, Ind.; and Cpl. William E. Wood, of Moorhead, Minn.; all U.S. Army.

Gregori was buried in August; Bucheit was buried in September; Scarbrough, Sisk and Sizemore were buried in October; Alonzo was buried in November; and at this writing (December 1, 2006), Lindsay and Wood’s burial dates are being set by their families.

The DPMO news release said that the soldiers were assigned to the U.S. 8th Cavalry Regiment and attached units (1st Cavalry Division), when their unit came under attack by Chinese forces near Unsan, North Korea on the night of Nov. 1-2, 1950. During the battle, these eight and nearly 400 others from the 8th Cavalry Regiment were declared missing or killed in action.  In 2000, a joint U.S.-Democratic People’s Republic of Korea team, led by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC), interviewed a farmer living in the vicinity of Unsan who told the team that while doing land reclamation work, he uncovered remains he believed were those of U.S. soldiers. The team excavated the burial site and uncovered the remains of at least 10 different individuals. They also recovered other items and identification tags belonging to these eight men.  Mitochondrial DNA was among the forensic methods used in the identification of the remains.


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Photographs of MIAs

The Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command is seeking photographs of Korean War servicemen who remain Missing in Action.  According to JPAC staff member Bob Maves, "The purpose of the photographs is to do facial superimposition as another means to support or exclude an identification along with location, time of incident, personal effects, mtDNA, etc., etc."  If any KWE readers have a photograph of their missing in action loved one, and if that picture especially focuses on the veteran's facial features, you are encouraged to scan the photograph and send it to the Korean War Educator at lynnita@koreanwar-educator.org.

Photographs of our Nation's Korean War Missing in Action

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

Jacobs, Herman

K

L

M

Mandra, Philip

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z


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List of MIAs

To obtain a JPAC list of missing in action for whom samples of DNA are needed, go to the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command website:

 http:///www.jpac.pacom.mil/pages/FRS_public/FRS_public.aspx


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Contact Information


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DNA Success Stories

JPAC has successfully used DNA testing to recover our nation's Korean War missing in action on several occasions.  To share your DNA success stories, contact the KWE.

Sgt. Harold R. Shreve

In September of 2006, the remains of Sgt. Harold R. Shreve, missing in action in the Korean War since 1950, were returned to his hometown of Fairfield, Illinois.  Harold was then given a proper burial with full military honors.  This page of the Korean War Educator is dedicated to Harold, as well as to his loving family members who searched for answers--and found them--through DNA testing.  Those family members want other families of Korean War Missing in Action to keep the faith and be aware that they might also find the same closure found by the Shreve family if only they will participate in our government's DNA testing project.  To learn more about the process that Harold Shreve's family followed in order to bring their missing loved one back home again, click the links below.

[KWE Note: The information about Sgt. Harold Shreve is currently being sterilized by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command.]

Jimmie Dorser

Korea MIA comes home
Written by Gordon Dillow, Register columnist
February 14, 2007

It's been more than 56 years since a young American soldier named Jimmie Dorser disappeared in the freezing, bloody cauldron that was the battle of the Chosin Reservoir in the Korean War. But today, finally, Jimmie is coming home.

Shortly after noon, if all goes according to plan, a commercial flight will land at John Wayne Airport with a coffin on board. Inside the coffin, at long last released from the hard cold earth of North Korea, will be Jimmie's skeletal remains, still bearing evidence of a gunshot wound he suffered in that terrible battle so long ago. His bones will be wrapped in a wool Army blanket, with a fresh uniform draped over him, complete with all his medals and insignia.

A delegation will greet the coffin on the tarmac and then, with a police escort, Jimmie Dorser will be taken to a funeral home in Huntington Beach. He will stay there until Saturday morning, when with full military honors he will be buried at El Toro Memorial Park – a half a world and more than half a century away from where and when he died in this nation's service.

And for his two sisters, Betty Neilson, 71, and Terri Bommarito, 66, of Huntington Beach, their brother's homecoming is nothing less than miraculous.  "There wasn't a day that I didn't hope this would happen," says Terri, who was just 10 years old when her brother was lost. "It really is a miracle."

We can start this story in November 1950, when Army Pfc. Dorser, an 18-year-old infantryman from Springfield, Mo., assigned to the 31st Regimental Combat Team, was part of a seemingly victorious American army marching north toward the Yalu River, driving a defeated North Korean army before it. Everybody thought they'd be home by Christmas.  But the American high command didn't know that hundreds of thousands of Red Chinese soldiers had slipped across the border into North Korea. In overwhelming numbers, and amid sub-zero temperatures, the Chinese fell upon the American soldiers and Marines near the Chosin Reservoir and elsewhere.

Although it was a strategic defeat for the Americans, U.S. Marines remember the Chosin Reservoir battle as a proud moment, a time when they "attacked in a different direction" and made a fighting withdrawal with virtually all of their wounded and most of their dead. Less well-remembered was the Army's 31st RCT – Pfc. Dorser's unit – which helped defend the Marines' flank until the soldiers were overwhelmed and overrun, with the wounded and dead often left where they lay.  In all, the Army and Marines suffered almost 8,000 dead, wounded and missing in the battle. Pfc. Dorser was one of them.

His sister, Terri, remembers when her family got the news that Jimmie was missing in action. (His status was later changed to missing presumed dead.) Her mother, she says, never got over not knowing what had happened to her boy. Later, after the family had moved to California, she died not knowing.

Skip ahead a half century, to when a North Korean farmer was working in a field near the Chosin Reservoir and uncovered some bones. He reported it to authorities, and in 2002 members of the Hawaii-based U.S. Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command were allowed by the North Koreans to excavate the site. Skeletal remains of five Americans were found and sent to Hawaii for possible identification.

The find wasn't unprecedented. Although they're currently suspended, since 1996 U.S. teams have made a number of MIA searches inside North Korea, recovering more than 200 sets of remains, and the North Koreans have handed over about 200 more. Of those, just over 40 have been positively identified.

Meanwhile, Terri Bommarito heard about MIA remains being found in North Korea and contacted the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office to see if any of them could be her brother. They asked for a DNA sample from her, which she sent.  Then, just before Thanksgiving, Terri and Betty got the word. Their brother had been positively identified as one of the five Americans discovered by the North Korean farmer.  "I never really thought they would find him," Betty says. "I just can't get over it."

"It's an amazing story," says Sgt. 1st Class Michael Giangregorio, a "casualty assistance officer" at Los Alamitos Joint Forces Training Base. Although the exact cause of death can't be determined, Giangregorio believes the circumstances indicate that Cpl. Dorser – he was officially promoted to corporal after he went missing – died doing his duty.  "It appears his position was overrun and he died still fighting the fight," Giangregorio says. "Cpl. Dorser was one of our brothers in arms, and we're going to do all we can to give him the honor he deserves."

There will be a visitation for Cpl. Dorser Friday from 4-8 p.m. at Advantage Funeral & Cremation Services, 627 Main St., Huntington Beach, and a military burial at El Toro Memorial Park in Lake Forest on Saturday at 11 a.m. Cpl. Dorser's sisters say the public is invited.  "We want people to know about this," Betty says.

Of course, there's still a long way to go in resolving the mysteries of the Korean War. The bodies of more than 8,000 Americans from that war remain missing – and many, perhaps most, may never be found and identified.  But at least for Cpl. Dorser's family there is an ending, a resolution, an answer.  Jimmie is coming home.

Contact the writer: Gordon Dillow served as a U.S. Army sergeant in Vietnam in 1971-72, and has several times been an embedded reporter with Marines in Iraq. Contact him at 714-796-7953 or GLDillow@aol.com.


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Harold Davis Lists

I am searching for the family of soldiers who are POW/MIA from the Korea War. When they entered service they gave the County/City, Illinois as their home of record.  When the Korean War ended the enemy never returned or accounted for over 8,000 of our servicemen. They died in their hands. That was over 50 years ago. Since that time DNA has been perfected and also they are recovering remains in North Korea. Our government is obligated to return those remains to the proper family. DNA samples have been obtained from most of the families of these missing soldiers. For various reasons some families have not been located.

When the remains are recovered and identified they will be returned to the family for proper burial. I am just an old (78 years) Combat Veteran out of the Korean War and thankful that I did return. I consider this a very noble cause and I hope that you can help in some way to find family members of the MIAs listed below.  For more information on the project you may go to http://www.jpac.pacom.mil/. My part in the program is to match up the lost families with the proper casualty agency. 

I have compiled and maintain the following list of missing Korean War veterans whose families have not yet been located.  If you know the whereabouts of a family member please contact me hgdavis@bellsouth.net. Harold Davis, 40th Infantry Division, Korea ’52-‘53, phone 910-791-2333.

Illinois

Alexander County:

Soldier: JAMES HARGET
Born: 1931 Caucasian
DOL Feb. 12, 1951 POW
C Co. 38th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: CHARLES E POWELL
Born: 1931 Black
DOL November 30, 1950
A Co, 9th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Brown County:

Soldier: WILLIAM EDWARD CALAWAY
Born: September 19, 1929 Caucasian
DOL July 16, 1950 POW
C Co, 19th Inf Rgt, 24th Inf Division

Champaign County:

Soldier: RICHARD ELBERT SMITH
Born: 1930 Black
DOL November 29, 1950 POW
I Co, 9th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Cook (45):

Soldier: ELLSWORTH L ANDERSON
Born: 1929 Caucasian
DOL: Feb. 12, 1951 POW
A Co. 38th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: JAMES ALSTON BAKER
Born: 1828 Black
DOL December 1, 1950, MIA
Hq Btry 503 Field Art Battalion, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: EUGENE A BARRICA
Born: 1932, Caucasian
DOL November 18, 1951 MIA
Med Co. 5th RCT

Soldier: ROBERT ALEXANDER BELL
Born: 1905
DOL December 1, 1950 KIA
Hq Hq Co, 2nd Eng Btn, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: EARL FRANKLIN BURRIS
Born: 1928 Black
DOL July 17, 1953 KIA
B Co. 65th Inf Rgt, 3rd Inf Division

Soldier: GEORGE CARROLL
Born: 1928 Black
DOL November 14, 1951
Co. G 31st Inf Rgt, 7th Inf division
Highly decorated

Soldier: PATRICK CORNELIUS
Born: 1930 Black
DOL November 27, 1950 MIA
L Co. 15th Inf Rgt 3rd Inf Division

Soldier: FRANK CORRIGAN
Born: 1932
DOL Feb. 15, 1951 MIA
G Co 23rd Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: MELVIN L COTTON
BORN; 1918 Black
DOL November 28, 1950 MIA
Co C 24th Inf Rgt, 25th Inf Division

Soldier: HENRY DAVENPORT
Born:1931 Black
DOL May 14, 1951 POW
Hq Co, 61st Field Art, 1st Cavl Division

Soldier: LEROY DAVIS
Born: 1921 Black
DOL November 26, 1950 MIA
K Coo. 9th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: PAUL GOMEZ EGAN
Born: 1928 Caucasian
DOL Jan. 24 1952 KIA
Co. C 279th Inf Rgt, 45th Inf Division

Soldier: MICHAEL JOHN HART, JR
Born: 1930 Caucasian
DOL July 20, 2950 POW
M Co. 24th Quartermaster Co., 24th Inf Division

Soldier: THOMAS JOSEPH HEALY
Born: 1930 Caucasian
DOL July 16, 1950 KIA
C Co. 19th Inf Rgt 24th Inf Division

Soldier: JOSEPH PATRICK HENRY
Born: 1929 Caucasian
DOL November 26, 1951 KIA
I Co. 17th Inf Rgt, 7th Inf Division

Soldier: RICHARD ARDELL HENRY
Born: 1930 Caucasian
DOL August 27 1951 KIA
Med Co. 9th Inf Rgt,2nd Inf Division

Soldier: JESSE EARL HILL
Born: 1923 Black
DOL November 27, 1950 MIA
Co. H 24th Inf Rgt, 25th Inf Division
Highly decorated

Soldier: MARTIN LUTHER HOWELL
Born: 1930 Black
DOL December 1, 1950 POW
Hq Co, 3rd Btn, 9th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: NORMAN RILEY JOHNSON
Born: 1925 Black
DOL December 1, 1950 POW
A Btry 503 Field Art Btn, 2nd Inf Division
Highly decorated

Soldier: ADOLPH JOSEPH
Born: 1928
DOL Feb. 14, 1951 POW
Co L 9th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: ROGER JOHN KRAFT
Born: 1929 Caucasian
DOL July 24, 1951 POW
Co. E, 23rd Inf Rgt., 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: ROBERT EDWARD LORENZ
Born: 11930 Caucasian
DOL July 20, 1950 POW
Svc Btry, 63 Field Art Btn, 24th Inf Division

Soldier: JOHN ALLEN MARTIN (Cook County?)

Soldier: JOHN FRANCIS MCALLISTER
Born: 1931 Caucasian
DOL November 5, 1950 POW
Co C, 19th Inf Rgt, 24th Inf Division

Soldier: EUGENE NICHOLAS MILLER
Born: 1916 Caucasian
DOL December 5, 1950 MIA
G Co, 7th Inf Rgt, 3rd Inf Division

Soldier: GEORGE MOLENAAR (Cook County?)

Soldier: ARTHUR WILLIAM MORGAN
Born: 1933 Black
DOL September 1, 1951 KIA
K Co. 9th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier; JOHN D MURPHY
Born: 1923, Black
DOL December 19, 1950 KIA
I Co, 15th Inf Rgt, 3rd Inf Division

Soldier: YEICHI NAKASATO
Born: 1925 Mongolian
DOL December 11, 1950 KIA
Co K, 8 Cav Rgt, 1st Cav Division

Soldier: CHARLES W NELSEN
Born: 1915 Caucasian
DOL July 31, 1950 MIA
E Co. 19th Inf. Rgt, 24th Inf. Division

Soldier: EDISON FAIRBANKS OWENS
Born: 1933 Black
DOL November 28, 1950 POW
Co C, 24th Inf Rgt, 25th Inf Division

Soldier: PAUL MARIO PIERI
Born: 1929 Caucasian
DOL December 5, 1950 KIA
Hq Btry, 57th Field Art Batn, 7th Inf Division

Soldier: JOSEPH CLEMENT RATTI
Born: 1928 Caucasian
DOL MIA
1st Psychological Warfare Leaflet Co. 8th Army

Soldier: JORGE LEGARRETA RIVERA
Born: 1927 Caucasian
DOL September 7, 1951 KIA
L Co, 35th Inf. Rgt, 25th Inf Division

Soldier: JOHN GILBERT SCHMITT
Born: 1930 Caucasian
DOL August 8, 1952 KIA
L Co, 17th Inf Rgt, 7th Inf Division

Soldier: PERCY ELWOOD STINE, JR
Born: 1932 Caucasian
DOL June 12, 1953 MIA
A Btry, 987 Field Art, IX Corps
Highly Decorated

Soldier: JOHN LOUIS STUMPF
Born: 1927 Caucasian
DOL December 1, 1950 POW
Med. Co, 9th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: ADAM SWORNOG
Born: 1926 Caucasian
DOL March 25, 1953 MIA
C Co, 32 Inf Rgt, 7th Inf Division

Soldier: ELIJAN TRANNON, JR
Born 1933 Black
DOL September 15, 1950 MIA
L Co, 24th Inf Rgt, 25th Inf Division

Soldier: RICHARD JOHN TUGMAN
Born: 1928 Caucasian
DOL July 20, 1950 POW
Hq Btry, 63rd Field Ary Btn, 24th Inf Division

Soldier: JAMES KENDIS WARNER
Born: 1922 Caucasian
DOL November 30, 1950 MIA
Hq Hq Co, 38th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division.
Highly decorated

Soldier: WALTER JOHN WATSON
Born: 1924 Black
DOL November 27, 1950 POW
G Co, 24th Inf Rgt, 25th Inf Division

Soldier: ERNEST ARTHUR WENDLING
Born: 1930 Caucasian
DOL July 12, 1950 POW
I Co, 21st Inf Rgt, 24th Inf Division

Soldier: EDWARD FRANCIS WHITE
Born: 1930 Caucasian
DOL July 12, 1950 POW
I Co, 21 Inf Rgt, 24th Inf Division

Soldier: FRANK PETER WOJNOWIAK
Born: 1930 Caucasian
DOL October 17, 1952 MIA
K Co, 5th RCT
Highly decorated

Soldier: EDWARD WOLFE
Born: 1923 Caucasian
DOL July 30, 1950 MIA
G Co, 19th Inf Rgt, 24th Inf Rgt

Soldier: RAYMOND WRIGHT, JR
Born: 1929 Black
DOL November 5, 1951 MIA
B Co, 7th Cav, 1st Cav Division

Dewitt County:

Soldier: JOHN EDWARD INGRAM
Born: 1931 Caucasian
DOL October 28, 1952 KIA
A Co, 23 Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: RALPH LEONARD PARKS
Born: 1922 Caucasian
DOL July 20, 1950 POW
C Co, 19th Inf Rgt, 24th Inf Division
Highly Decorated

Franklin County:

Soldier: PAUL ARDELL FROST
Born: 1932 Caucasian
DOL July 20, 1950
K Co 34th Inf Rgt, 24th Inf Division

Soldier: ALBERT EUGENE ROSE
Born: 1925 Caucasian
DOL July 7, 1950
K Co, 34th Inf Rgt, 24th Inf Division

Kane County (Montgomery):

Soldier: GLENN MAYNARD CLARK
Born: 1932 Caucasian
DOL July 12, 1950 POW
HqCo 3rd Btn 21st Inf Rgt, 24th Inf Division

Knox County:

Soldier: PAUL E HOOTS
Born: 1925 Caucasian
DOL July 7, 1950 MIA
K Co 34th Inf Rgt 24th Inf Division

1930 - Knox Co. IL Census

John H. Hoots - worked on the railroad,
W. Eunice, wife,
Carrie M., Dorothy F., Nellie R. and Esther E., daughters.
Paul E. Hoots was 4 yrs. Old

La Salle County:

Soldier: SAMUEL KENNETH MEAGHER
Born: 1931 Caucasian
DOL December 1, 1950
B Co. 2nd Eng. Combat Btn, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: FREDERICK E SCHROEN
Born: 1929 Caucasian
DOL Feb 13 1951 POW
A Btry 15th Field Art Btn, 2nd Inf Division

Lake County:

Soldier: LEO RALPH BRISENO
Born: 1928 Caucasian
DOL March 12, 1952 KIA
G Co 14th Inf Rgt, 25th Inf Division

Soldier: RAY WILLIAM HILDEMAN
Born: 1923 Caucasian
DOL Feb 13, 1951 MIA
L Co 38th Inf Rgt 2nd Inf Division

Macon County (Decatur):

Soldier: HAROLD EUGENE MIKESELL
Born: March 21, 1923 Caucasian
DOL November 4, 1950 KIA
Med Co. 29th Inf Rgt, 24th Inf. Division

Macoupin County:

Soldier: ELDER LOUIS BRAUER
Born: 1928 Caucasian
DOL August 8, 1951
I Co 7th Cavalry Rgt, 1st Cavalry Division

Marion County:

Soldier: GEORGE EUGENE HARTWELL
Born: 1912 Caucasian
DOL December 1, 1950 POW
B Co. 2nd Eng Combat Btn, 2nd Inf Division

McHenry County:

Soldier: GERALD W JUSTEN
Born: 1923 Caucasian
DOL Feb 12, 1951
C Co. 9th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

McLean County:

Soldier: JAMED D DUKE
Born: 1923 Black
DOL November 28, 1950 MIA
F Co 5th Cavalry Rgt, 1st Cavalry Division

Peoria County:

Soldier: ALBERT A SELF
Born: 1912 Caucasian
DOL November 4, 1950 POW
D Co. 19th Inf Rgt, 24th Inf Division

Peoria

Soldier: DALE ALLEN DEMMIN
Born: 1931 Caucasian
DOL July 20, 1950 POW
Hvt Mtr Co 34th Inf Rgt. 24th Inf Division

Pulaski County:

Soldier: JAMES MAXWELL
Born: 1924 Caucasian
DOL April 25, 1951 MIA
D Co. 6th Medium Tank Btn, 1st Cavalry Division
Highly Decorated

Saline County:

Soldier: EDWARD LEE BORDERS
Born: 1930 Caucasian
DOL Feb. 13, 1951 POW
D Btry 82nd Anticraft Art. AW Btn, 2nd Inf Division

St. Clair County:

Soldier: LAWRENCE R COCHRAN
Born: 1934 Caucasian
DOL October 14 1952 MIA
B Btry, 57th Field Art Btn, 7th Inf Division

Soldier: ARTHERIA M HARRIS
Born: August 1, 1930 Black
DOL December 1, 1950 POW
D Co. 9th Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Soldier: JOHN R STOVALL
Born: 1931 Caucasian
DOL July 7, 1950 MIA
K Co. 34 Inf Rgt, 24th Inf Division
Highly Decorated

Soldier: ROBERT WILLIAMS
Born: 1912 Black
DOL December 1, 1950 MIA
B Btry, 503 Field Art Btn, 2nd Inf Division

Stephenson County (Freeport):

Soldier: JACK EUGENE BAXTER
Born: December 25, 1924 Caucasian
DOL August 14, 1952 KIA
C Co. 9th Inf Rgt., 2nd Inf Division

Union County:

Soldier: KENNETH LEE GREEN
Born: September 14, 1929 Caucasian
DOL November 25, 1950 POW
G Co. 23 Inf Rgt, 2nd Inf Division

Wabash County:

Soldier: FRANKLIN D PORTER
Born: 1933 Caucasian
DOL October 10, 1951 KIA
B Co 72nd Medium Tank Btn, 2nd Inf Division

Whiteside County:

Soldier: RICHARD SELOOVER
Born: 1933 Caucasian
DOL September 6, 1950 MIA
Hvy Mtr Co. 9th Inf Rgt 2nd Inf Division

Will County:

Soldier: JAMES E MOLTON
Born: 1932 Black
DOL July 5, 1953 MIA
G Co. 223rd Inf Rgt, 40th Inf Division

Soldier; FRANK RUZON
Born: 1931 Caucasian
DOL December 3, 1950 KIA
7th Armored Reconnaissance Co. 7th Infantry Division

County unknown:

Soldier: CLAYTON LYLE BOGART
Born: ?
Date of loss December 25, 1950 MIA
Hq Hq Co 17th Inf Rgt, 7th Inf Division

 

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