Topics - Health Issues -
Cancer and the Korean War

 
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Cancer and the Korean War

Atomic Tests

Thousands of American veterans were exposed to nuclear radiation during atmospheric nuclear testing that took place during the 1950s through 1963.  To learn about the importance of obtaining a Film Badge Radiation Exposure History and how to get it, visit the Atomic Veterans website.  You or your loved one may be eligible to receive compensation under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act.

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Blue Water Navy.Org

Cancer issues are being brought to the forefront by the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Association at www.bluewaternavy.org.  Blue Water Navy provides Agent Orange information to veterans.  There is a special section on their website seeking information from Korean War veterans who might have been exposed to cancer-causing agents in Korea.  View the Blue Water Navy website here.

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Cancer Incidences Study - Australia

View the entire study of cancer incidences as they relate to Australia's Korean War veterans.  The study was funded by the Australian government in 2003.  The significance of this study to American Korean War veterans is that Americans served in the same areas in Korea as the Australians.  The conditions were the same for both nationalities.

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Contaminated Water - Camp Lejeune

Were you stationed at the US Marine Corps base at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina from 1957 to 1987?  If so you were likely exposed to contaminated water.  Water wells at the base were closed in 1984 and 1985, but not before an estimated half a million Marines and members of their families drank water that was contaminated with 40 times the current EPA limit of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene--both cancer causing agents.  These chemicals were dumped into ground water by an off-base dry cleaning business, as well as chemicals leaking from underground storage tanks and unsafe disposal practices at the base.

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry is currently conducting a study of the water contamination at Camp Lejeune.  A representative of the agency notes that women who were in their first trimester of pregnancy when exposed seem to have been affected more than others.  Miscarriages occurred in many cases.  So did skin cancer, boils, rashes, and cysts.

In 2008 President George W. Bush signed a law requiring the Marine Corps to notify those who may have been exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune.  To learn more about the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune and how you can be added to the registry of contamination victims, visit the website of cancer victim John Hartung at www.lifeaftercamplejeune.com.


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