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LIFE Goes to Korea


[KWE Note: This page is under heavy construction.  Material is slowly but surely being added to it.  The Year 1951 is not researched as yet.  Please return to see the finished product.]

Introduction

One week after the Korean War broke out, LIFE magazine began its coverage of the war and the home front. From then on, the popular magazine provided weekly reports from the Far East, as well as feature stories, editorials, photographs, and letters to the editor. The feature stories covered a wide range of subjects: political gaffs, production increases, hasty marriages, battles in Korea, and grieving families.

In the July 10, 1950 issue, the magazine’s publisher, Andrew Heiskell, explained on page 87 how his magazine’s coverage of the war began:

"I was in Tokyo just finishing a story on Japanese art and culture and I was trying to figure ways to caption my picture of one particularly exotic bronze so as to convince my editors that it deserved fullest play in the magazine. Then the news of war in Korea came.

That is LIFE photographer David Douglas Duncan, telling how it began for him. He got to Korea in a C-47 and as he landed near Seoul a battered jeep drove up. In it was Frank Gibney, TIME-LIFE correspondent in Tokyo who had beaten Duncan over by a few hours and become one of the war’s first American casualties: a mine blew up the bridge his jeep was crossing. Gibney cabled LIFE’s editors in New York that his wounds were minor. He followed with his description of the war. Then he sent a personal request. Please would someone have eyeglasses made up from his prescription and flown to Tokyo. His had broken in the explosion.

Gibney flew out but Duncan went on to maneuver through the fighting areas. On Thursday he telephoned from Tokyo to tell Managing Editor Ed Thompson that he had dispatched his first films and please would someone call up his father in Kansas City and tell him Dave was all right.

Back home our coverage of the war on domestic fronts had begun—at the White House, State Department, U.N. and in Sycamore, Ill. From the files came banks of material we had been gathering for years against the day it might be needed. All the while we waited impatiently for Duncan’s films. They had been put on Pan American flight 806, due to arrive in Los Angeles Friday night just in time to make an American Airlines plane that would arrive in New York Saturday afternoon—our editorial deadline. We cabled Honolulu to make sure the pictures could be gotten off quickly. The Washington customs office told Los Angeles customs to speed inspection. Our Los Angeles bureau head Gene Cook was about to start out for International Airport to transfer the pictures when word came that fog forced the plane to land at Burbank. He rushed to Burbank, had 25 minutes to get across Los Angeles to the International Airport. The trip is almost 35 miles. He made it with one minute to spare—and that included time out for a colloquy with a cop who stopped Cook, asked him what his hurry was, and then said OK but remember the Policeman’s Benefit.

You can see Duncan’s pictures taken barely a week ago in Korea in this issue. He and Gibney are back in Korea again. Carl Mydans, Tokyo bureau head for three years who had come back to the U.S. to settle down for a while, has gone back to join them. Other veterans of LIFE’s war coverage are being alerted to go to the front. Next week, and as long as trouble continues, LIFE’s news-gathering staff in the field and back home will help LIFE’s readers see and understand the events they are hearing about."

True to its word, LIFE did carry weekly stories about what was happening in Korea. In the three months immediately after the war, LIFE magazines sometimes carried several stories per issue about the war. However, by October of 1950, the stories were briefer because many thought that the short war in Korea was already winding down. Only a handful of LIFE’s 5,200,000-plus readers responded to the magazine’s Korean War coverage through Letters to the Editor. In fact, during the month of November 1950, there was not a single such letter. One issue of LIFE (Volume 29, No. 16, October 16, 1950) was devoted to the subject of education, and carried no news whatsoever of the Korean War. Various issues in October through December 1950 carried no editorials on the subject of the Korean War either.

The content of LIFE magazine began to change in the December 1950 issues. LIFE editors obviously realized that the notion that the Korean War would be a short war was wishful thinking on the part of the United States and the United Nations. When China entered the war, the death toll grew, and LIFE’s coverage of the war increased.

Korean War-related articles:

Following is a list of the articles found in LIFE magazine regarding the Korean War. They are listed by volume, issue number, and page. The title of each article is in quotes, followed by a short description of what Korean War enthusiasts and researchers can find within them. The description was written by Lynnita Brown of the Korean War Educator.

Volume 29 (January 1950 - ) -

Issue No. 2, July 10, 1950, pp. 19-27, "U.S. Gets into Fight for Korea: An Eyewitness Report in Words and Pictures"

This first LIFE coverage of the Korean War includes a brief introduction regarding the United States’ decision to get involved in Korea. It includes eight pages of photos and information by David Douglas Duncan, LIFE’s staff photographer. He covered five days of action at the battle front.

Issue No. 2, July 10, 1950, pg. 23, "Don’t Forget, On June 27…Bingo!"

Correspondent Frank Gibney tells of the June 27 blowing of the Han River Bridge.

Issue No. 2, July 10, 1950, pp. 28-29, "Korea is in Center of Explosive Area"

An overview of Communist countries in Asia, and their vicinity to Korea. A two-page map is included.

Issue No. 2, July 10, 1950, pp. 30-31, "Sycamore Backs the President"

A home front story about a team of LIFE reporters who went to Sycamore, Illinois (population 6,000) to get the townspeople’s opinions on whether or not they agreed with the U.S. involvement in Korea.

Issue No. 2, July 10, 1950, pg. 32, "The President Prays"

Photo of President Truman, along with a comment that he regretted sending our boys back into war.

Issue No. 2, July 10, 1950, pp. 73-79, "Korea: This strange land has bracing climate and depressing proverbs"

An informational article about the Korean people and their country, as well as the history of Korea.

Issue No. 3, July 17, 1950, pp. 27-39, "War by Jet and by GI: It Stirs Pride of U.S. but Exacts a Payment"

David Duncan tells about the second week of the war.

Issue No. 3, July 17, 1950, pp. 45-48, "The Home Front Becomes Aware of Korea"

War to some families has become a grim and personal thing. Farewells to servicemen leaving for Korea. News of deaths in Korea hit U.S. homes.

Issue No. 4, July 24, 1950, pp. 21-25, "Why Are We Taking a Beating?"

Questions about decreases in defense budget, sending our boys to war with faulty equipment, and more.

Issue No. 4, July 24, 1950, pp. 28-29, "Marine Muscle Heads Into War: 1st Division Men Sail for Korea"

The American Marines mobilize to the Far East.

Issue No. 4, July 24, 1950, p. 30-31, "The Nation Begins ‘Creeping Mobilization’"

Statistics about military manpower and production levels, comparing 1941 to 1950.

Issue No. 4, July 24, 1950, p. 32, "Out of the Mothballs: Crews begin peeling plastic off stand-by fleets"

Taking Navy equipment out of mothballs.

Issue No. 5, July 31, 1950, pp. 13-19, "The U.S. Tries to Catch Up on Tanks"

Extensive report about allied and enemy tanks in Korea.

Issue No. 5, July 31, 1950, pp. 20-21, "Washington Wears a Look of Concern"

Short article about politicians in Washington DC as they begin mobilization of supplies and troops.

Issue No. 5, July 31, 1950, pp. 22-25, "Yanks Hit a Beach in Korea"

The 1st Cavalry lands in Korea after leaving Japan on July 18, 1950.

Issue No. 5, July 31, 1950, pg. 26, "The Story of a Soldier"

General William F. Dean’s name shows up on the Korean War casualty (MIA) list.

Issue No. 6, August 7, 1950, pp. 25-29, "Silver City Goes to War Again"

National Guard units in Silver City, New Mexico are mobilized for yet another war.

Issue No. 6, August 7, 1950, pg. 31, "GI’s Best Friend, the New Superbazooka is Fired in Anger"

Story about the new 3.5-inch recoilless rocket launcher and how it is being used in Korea.

Issue No. 6, August 7, 1950, pp. 32-33, "’Agile Annie’ Gets into Trouble"

U.S. troops fight with a light tank in Korea.

Issue No. 6, August 7, 1950, pg. 41, "The Old Hoarder Changeth Not"

Stories about the hoarding that is going on across the nation now that war is in progress.

Issue No. 6, August 7, 1950, pp. 43-44, "Wounded GI’s shown in LIFE are flown home from Korean Front"

This is a sequel to LIFE’s July 17, 1950 story, "The Home Front Becomes Aware of Korea."

Issue No. 6, August 7, 1950, pp. 82-86, 89-90, 92, "Is Formosa Next?"

Double stories by John Osborne and David Douglas Duncan. Osborne was writing from Manila, Hong Kong, Formosa, and Tokyo. Duncan was with the Seventh Fleet.

Issue No. 7, August 14, 1950, pp. 23-25, "War on Two Fronts"

TIME-LIFE correspondent Frank Gibney gives his opinion on how Allied efforts are going in the Korean front and LIFE also looks at the "second front" in the U.N. Security Council.

Issue No. 7, August 14, 1950, pp. 26-29, "The Marine Landing…and a GI Battle"

Marines reinforce Army units in Korea and Army soldiers find fighting tough going near Yongdong.

Issue No. 7, August 14, 1950, pg. 36, "What the Marine Said to the Girl"

A goodbye conversation between Mary Montgomery and her boyfriend, Marine Glenn Mordene, as he was departing for Korea.

Issue No. 7, August 14, 1950, pp. 72-74, 77, "Our Peg-Leg Admiral"

Story about Rear Admiral John Hoskins, who was in charge of the U.S. Navy’s Carrier Division III.

Issue No. 8, August 21, 1950, pp. 15-23, "U.S. Counters Mass with Mobility"

Ten-page article in which four LIFE correspondents report on what happened in the Korean War the previous week. Includes 27th Infantry Regiment, the Marine Brigade, Gen. Walton Walker, Navy as a support for troops and supplies, refugees, etc.

Issue No. 8, August 21, 1950, pp. 26-27, "Everybody Watches U.N."

People on the home front watch TV and news of war (short article).

Issue No. 8, August 21, 1950, pp. 26-27, "Nobody Loves a Hoarder"

A reporter poses as a hoarder to get reaction from clerks and customers.

Issue No. 8, August 21, 1950, pp. 77-78, 81-82, 84-85, "Report from the Orient: Guns are Not Enough"

John Osborne called his article, "the ugly story of an ugly war." Korean civilians, war cost in lives, guerrilla war, etc.

Issue No. 9, August 28, 1950, pp. 32-33, "The ‘Wild Blue Yonder Boys’ Snap into a Salute for GI's"

A story about B-29’s in the Far East command.

Issue No. 9, August 28, 1950, pg. 34, "The Brave Men of No Name Ridge"

The battle for No Name Ridge.

Issue No. 9, August 28, 1950, pp. 45-48, "Plane Makers Turn It On"

The U.S. government steps up production of aircraft from 2,500 per year to 8,000.

Issue No. 9, August 28, 1950, pp. 84-90, "Bulwark in the Far East"

The importance of Japan to the Korean War.

Issue No. 9, August 28, 1950, pp. 100-104, 106, 109-110, "War and Politics"

How the war could possibly effect the outcome of the November 1950 election.

Issue No. 10, September 4, 1950, pp. 17-25, "Big Pipeline Arms Troops for Big Push"

How shipments of supplies were sent to troops in Korea; MATS Airlift; MSTS sealift.

Issue No. 10, September 4, 1950, pp. 35-36, "What the Corporal Saw"

Roy L. Day Jr. Survives Hill 303. What he remembers. What happened to his fellow soldiers.

Issue No. 10, September 4, 1950, pg. 38, "The Vengeance of Two Eight Four"

A story about a North Korean tank with the identification number 284.

Issue No. 11, September 11, 1950, pp. 43-47, "The Peripatetic 27th"

The 27th Wolfhound Regiment at Chonpong and the "Bowling Alley"

Issue No. 11, September 11, 1950, pp. 52-55, "The Durable ROK’s"

The performance of the ROK 17th Regiment and Hill 626.

Issue No. 11, September 11, 1950, 66-68, "A Babel of Voices on Foreign Policy"

A speech by Truman resolves confusion caused by longshoremen, two generals and a secretary.

Issue No. 12, September 18, 1950, pp. 41-46, "This Is War"

David Douglas Duncan’s photos of the Marines of Co. B, 5th Regiment in September 1950 in Korea.

Issue No. 12, September 18, 1950, pg. 50, "President’s Gaff"

President Truman made a slur against the US Marine Corps that would come back to haunt him.

Issue No. 12, September 18, 1950, p. 51, "Japanese Blow"

Short article about a typhoon that hit Japan.

Issue No. 12, September 18, 1950, pp. 76-78, "The War on the Testing Ground"

The United States develops a 6.5-inch rocket launcher.

Issue No. 12, September 18, 1950, pp. 79-81, "The Korean Air War in Color"

Aerial photographs taken by Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Jacob W. Dixon.

Issue No. 12, September 18, 1950, pp. 153-154, 156, "New Kind of Navy"

261 WAVES go on a two-day cruise to prepare them for possible sea duty.

Issue No. 13, September 25, 1950, pp. 36-39, "Planes Pave Way for the Landing"

Planes bomb targets before ground troops move in. They also destroy bridges and roads of supply routes.

Issue No. 13, September 25, 1950, pp. 42-43, "Farewell and Return"

Tragic story of Pennsylvania GI’s who died in the wreck of a troop train on the way to a training base.

Issue No. 13, September 25, 1950, pg. 44, "Truman Dumps Johnson"

Louis Johnson resigns from Truman’s Cabinet.

Issue No. 13, September 25, 1950, pp. 65-66, 68, "Two Kids Who Had So Little Time"

A Korea-bound Marine and his girlfriend get married.

Issue No. 13, September 25, 1950, pp. 105-105, 108, "Swedish Red Cross Girl"

Ingrid Jarnald visits the United States on her journey to Korea to be a Red Cross girl.

Issue No. 13, September 25, 1950, pp. 127-128, 130, 132, 134, 136, 141, "MacArthur and Asia"

MacArthur’s strategic idea of Asia.

Issue No. 14, October 2, 1950, pp. 23-33, "The Invasion"

Photographs, information, and maps about the Inchon Invasion

Issue No. 14, October 2, 1950, pp. 51-52, 54, 56, 59-60, "Girl War Correspondent"

Article about Marguerite "Maggie" Higgins, female war correspondent to Korea for the New York Herald Tribune.

Issue No. 14, October 2, 1950, pp. 104-106, 109-110, 112, 115-116, 118, "Home Front Boss"

Background information about W. Stuart Symington, the man in charge of mobilizing the home front’s war efforts during the Korean War.

Issue No. 15, October 9, 1950, pp. 29-37, "Seoul and Victory"

A record of the way that South Korea was reclaimed from the enemy

Issue No. 15, October 9, 1950, pp. 70-72, "Korea Five Years Ago"

A series of pictures drawn by U.S. combat artists showing scenes in the country of Korea after its liberation from Japan

Issue No. 17, October 23, 1950, p. 37, "Things Look Better in Korea"

Photo of an American G.I. with a Korean boy sitting next to him eating a popsicle.

Issue No. 17, October 23, 1950, p. 51, "Truman Flies to Meet MacArthur"

Short article about a three-hour meeting between Truman and MacArthur

Issue No. 17, October 23, 1950, pp. 67-70, "The Tank-Killing Shaped Charge"

Information about the new shells being used in bazookas in the Korean War

Issue No. 18, October 30, 1950, pp. 21-23, "Hard-Hitting U.N. Forces Wind Up War"

Early predictions that the war in Korea was nearly over

Issue No. 18, October 30, 1950, p. 34, "The Mysterious Voyage"

Short article about President Truman’s 59-hour plane trip to spend one hour alone with MacArthur. Speculation about what the meeting was about.

Issue No. 19, November 6, 1950, pp. 36-38, "Camera Records a Combat Jump"

Pictures and text of a paratroop drop into North Korea. Both authored by LIFE’s correspondent, Howard Sochurek.

Issue No. 19, November 6, 1950, p. 39, "In the Wake of War"

Short article about advancing ROKs and POWs

Issue No. 19, November 6, 1950, pp. 77-79, "Andy Walks In"

Andrew Faccini returns home from Korea to surprise his family. He is wounded and 55 pounds thinner.

Issue No. 20, November 13, 1950, pp. 43-44,"Chinese Communists Enter Korean War"

First inkling that China had entered the Korean War came from interrogation of captured Chinese troops in North Korea.

Issue No. 20, November 13, 1950, p. 144, "1950 Award Winners"

Two members of LIFE’s staff—Carl Mydans and David D. Duncan—received Gold Achievement Awards from U.S. Camera for their coverage of the Korean War.

Issue No. 21, November 20, 1950, pp. 31=37, "Aggressive China Becomes a Menace"

Questions and answers about Chinese Communists’ involvement in the Korean War

Issue No. 21, November 20, 1950, p. 49, "The Shifting Color Line"

Short article on integration and the Navy

Issue No. 22, November 27, 1950, pp. 14-16, "Speaking of Pictures: A determined Marine does a strip tease in reserve in Korean winter uniforms"

M/Sgt. Harold Miller of the Marines’ Supply Department in Washington DC models standard Marine gear in various stages of undress/dress. Also pictured is Col. Katherine Towle, director of the Women Marines.

Issue No. 22, November 27, 1950, pp. 28-29, "U.S. Feels First Pinch of the New Credit Curbs"

Fighting inflation during the Korean War

Issue No. 22, November 27, 1950, pp. 32-34, "Air War at the Boundary"

Russian MIG-15s attack U.S. planes

Issue No. 22, November 27, 1950, pp. 56-58, "Where the Red Shadow Fell"

American troops notice the Communist influence in Pyongyang.

Issue No. 22, November 27, 1950, pp. 109-110, "Marine Anniversary"

The Marine Corps celebrates its 175th anniversary.

Issue No. 23, December 4, 1950, pp. 157-160, "B-47 Swings Air War Balance to Offense"

The B-47 Boeing Stratojet making a difference in the Korean War. History of the jet’s development and production, plus photographs.

Issue No. 24, December 11, 1950, pp. 32-45, "Once More ‘We Got A Hell of a Beating’

The Chinese Communists entry in the Korean War "changed everything," making it an "entirely new war" according to MacArthur. Reference to U.S. preparedness, Task Force Cooper at the Yalu, Marines in the Chosin, arguing in the U.N., slow mobilization in the U.S., manpower and time shortages to re-supply.

Issue No. 25, December 18, 1950, pp. 23-31, "The Great Retreat Continues"

U.N. forces and thousands of anti-Communist Koreans retreat from North Korea. Information and dramatic photos. Also, news from LIFE correspondent Hugh Moffett, who was injured in a jeep accident and now covered the Korean War from an Army hospital.

Issue No. 25, December 18, 1950, pp. 32-33, "Sycamore Revisited"

LIFE reporters return to Sycamore, Illinois (follow-up of a July 10, 1950 story) to hear what the same people they interviewed in July now think of the Korean War.

Issue No. 25, December 18, 1950, pp. 38-39, "Diplomats Keep Trying"

Short article about the U.S. President and British Prime Minister’s efforts to bring peace to Korea.

Issue No. 25, December 18, 1950, pp. 65-68, 71-74, "Trouble in Red China"

Rodney Gilbert returned to the United States from Chungking to discuss conditions and unrest in China.

Issue No. 25, December 18, 1950, pp. 77-82, 85-86, "How U.S. Cities Can Prepare for Atomic War"

Growing Concern over Korea and possibility of World War III causes the U.S. to consider plans to prevent panic and limit destruction.

Issue No. 26, December 25, 1950, pp. 8-19, "There was a Christmas"

The story of the Chosin Reservoir campaign with photographs by David Douglas Duncan. Story also follows wounded Marine Walter McCorkle from hospital to home

Volume 30 (January-September 1951)

Issue No. 1, January 1, 1951, pp. 8-18, "U.S. Reaches for Its Arms"

A story about our country's lack of full mobilization for the Korean War, but willingness to do so if called up.  Some pages focus on Kankakee soldiers being activated; others about the life of a recruit; a look at our nation's war potential (natural resources and manpower); Charles Wilson and mobilization; and a LIFE Editorial about mobilization

Issue No. 2, January 8, 1951, pp. 10-13, "A Troubled Nation Weighs Its Future".

Debate of America's foreign policy, including involvement in the Korean War.

Issue No. 2, January 8, 1951, pp. 15-17, "We Walk, Not Run, to Exit."

Story about the Hungnam evacuation to fight again in the south.

Issue No. 3, January 15, 1951, pp. 17-21, "We Head for Another Perimeter"

A LIFE reporter and photographer go to the war zone to take pictures in the war zone and to report on the progress of the war in Korea.  Several excellent pictures taken in Korea.

Issue No. 3, January 15, 1951, pp. 40-42, "Corporal Does General's Job."

Wounded Marine Corporal Robert Steward Gray returned from Korea and substituted as Grand Marshal for General Eisenhower in the Year 1951 Tournament of Roses Parade.

Issue No. 4, January 22, 1951, pp. 77-89, "Air Defense of the U.S."

With the outbreak of war in Korea, the U.S. Government stepped up its military appropriations for air defense.

Issue No. 5, January 29, 1951, pp. 24-25, "U.S. Sabres Slash Red Jets"

Short report on U.S. Sabre jets against Russian MIG-15s in the Korean War.

Issue No. 5, January 29, 1951, pp. 26-30, "Recruit Stampede"

Thousands of volunteers sign up for the Air Force to avoid being drafted in the Army infantry.

Issue No. 5, January 29, 1951, pp. 67-68, 71-72, 75, "The Medal of Honor"

Information about the U.S.'s newest Korean War Medal of Honor recipients.

Issue No. 6, February 5, 1951, pp. 30-32 , "Japan Drills an Army of Sergeants"

U.S. was training Japanese sergeants because the war in Korea was so close to Japan.

Issue No. 6, February 5, 1951, pp. 82-84, "New Treatments for Frostbite"

Thanks to the multitude of frostbite cases that resulted from the winter of 1950 in Korea, new treatments for frostbite were being developed.

Issue No. 7, February 12, 1951, pp. 32-33, "The Inevitable Road Block"

A U.S. platoon runs into trouble on the road to Seoul.  Several photographs.

Issue No. 7, February 12, 1951, pp. 47-48, "Sick Switchmen - Sick Economy"

In spite of the war going on in Korea, a wildcat strike of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen" took place.

Issue No. 7, February 12, 1951, pp. 55-56, "Underwater Truck"

The government developed an underwater truck that could cross bottoms of rivers without flooding out.

Issue No. 8, February 19, 1951, pp. 14, 17-19,  "An Army Camp is Reborn"

Short story about the National Guard painting Camp Rucker to get it ready to receive recruits and draftees.

Issue No. 8, February 19, 1951, pp. 26-29, "GI's Become Soldiers -- and It Pays Off"

Report of the 8th Army's progress in Korea.  Lots of pictures.

Issue No. 8, February 19, 1951, pp. 32-33, "Order Obeyed, Trains Go"

The railroad switchmen strike ended when President Truman ordered the men back to work so that supplies could get moving on their way to Korea.

Issue No. 9, February 26, 1951, pp. 26-27, "The Best Light Tank"

The Army uncovers its secret new T-41 tank for Truman.

Issue No. 9, February 26, 1951, pp. 37-38, "An Old Soldier Retires at 16"

James E. Ward was shipped home from Korea and discharged from the Army after the Army found out that he had enlisted at age 14.  He was 16 when the government found out his age.

Issue No. 9, February 26, 1951, pp. 104-107, "Other U.N. Troops: They Also Serve"

Shows the record of the 13 U.N. units who had joined in the Korean War effort, and when they arrived in Korea.

Issue No. 10, March 5, 1951, pp. 28-31,"The Shells' Deadly Light

Story about the beginning of Operation Killer and how it was progressing at the time, including "Light of Day Shows the Red Death Toll" on page 30.  Several photographs.

Issue No. 10, March 5, 1951, p. 32, "This Way to Peace - Part I"

A LIFE Editorial

Issue No. 10, March 5, 1951, pp. 62-63, 65-66, "Air Pipeline to Korea"

Flying Boxcars drop supplies to cut-off units.  This is in particular about the Chosin Reservoir, with information about the 314th Combat Cargo Wing.

Issue No. 11, March 12, 1951, p. 36, "This Way to Peace - Part II"

A LIFE Editorial

Issue No. 11, March 12, 1951, pp. 38-39, "Gen. Matt and Gen. Mud"

Brief story about waterlogged Marines in Operation Killer.

Issue No. 11, March 12, 1951, pp. 42-45, "Production Gees But Labor Haws"

The U.S. Defense Department geared up mobilization, but labor forced a crisis on mobilization policy.  Resignations, boycotts, stalemates, pickets.

Issue No. 11, March 12, 1951, pp. 59-60, "Last of the Quadrupeds in the U.S. Army"

Impressive photo of the Army's last four-footed animals at Camp Carson.  Explanation of their use in the military.  Brief story only.

Issue No. 11, March 12, 1951, pp. 174-176, "LIFE Visits a Navy Boot Camp"

Story about the thousands of visitors who came to see relatives and friends in boot training at U.S. Naval Training Center in San Diego.  Included was Noreen Messina, bride of Claude Messina.  Lots of photos of the reunion.

Issue No. 11, March 12, 1951, pp. 179-180, 183, "Ingrid's Job is Done"

Swedish nurse Ingrid Jarnald goes home after caring for wounded soldiers in Korea for six months.

Issue No. 12, March 19, 1951, pp. 35-39, "Marines Come Home from the Front"

1,166 Marines return from Korea.  Photos of the crowd and individuals in the crowd waiting for them.

Issue No. 12, March 19, 1951, pp. 97-98, 101-102, 105, "Rebirth of BB64"

USS Wisconsin comes out of mothballs to join the fleet.  Details about her.  Photographs.

Issue No. 12, March 19, 1951, pp. 149-152, "Outranked Wife"

A married couple, Ensign Ralph "Mick" Sluis and Seaman Betty Sluis talk about life in the Navy at two different ranks.

Issue No. 13, March 26, 1951, pp. 115-116, 118, "Squeeze at Rollins"

The draft and high costs threaten the survival of Florida's small college, Rollins College.  Enrollment was expected to drop because of the draft.

Issue No. 14, April 2, 1951, pp. 37-38, 40, "Waynesville Cashes In"

The subtitle says it all: "Missouri town puts the squeeze on the soldiers by charging fancy rents for shacks and shanties."

Issue No. 15, April 9, 1951, pp. 29-35, "Airborne and Armor Link Up in Korea"

Story about an airborne regiment joining up with an armored column.

Issue No. 15, April 9, 1951, p. 36, "The Present Danger"

An editorial about US involvement in the Korean War, with discussion about MacArthur.

Issue No. 15, April 9, 1951, pp. 55-56, "Night Patrol Near the Han"

Article about Sgt. William Thomas of A Company, 19th Regiment, 24th Division taking a 10-man squad on a night patrol.

Issue No. 15, April 9, 1951, pp. 150-152, 155-156, "LIFE Goes on a WAC Bivouac"

Following the girls of Company E (900 WACS at Ft. Lee, VA) on bivouac.

Issue No. 16, April 16, 1951, pp. 35-39, "The Youngsters Ask Some Questions"

Students in high school in Lorain, Ohio ask Congressman William Ayres to discuss the draft laws.  Some 700 students showed up for the discussion.

Issue No. 16, April 16, 1951, p. 41, "Mo's Big Smack"

Caption on large picture of the USS Missouri

Issue No. 16, April 16, 1951, pp. 44-45, "And Once More, Parallel 38"

UN troops cross the 38th parallel a second time.

Issue No. 17, April 23, 1951, pp. 29-39, "Tattoo for a Warrior"

MacArthur was recalled from the Far East.

Issue No. 17, April 23, 1951, p. 42, "The Role of MacArthur"

An editorial

Issue No. 19, May 7, 1951 (LIFE miscounted the issue numbers, so there was no Issue No. 18 that year), pp. 33-37, "Reds Shove Fist into the Big Debate"

Chinese Communists try to push UN forces off the Korean peninsula.  Lots of pictures.

Issue No. 19, May 7, 1951, pp. 44-45, "Mac Rolls On"

Midwesterners welcome MacArthur.

Issue No. 19, May 7, 1951, pp. 137-138, 141, "Song Peddlers Never Die"

Crooners make a profit on MacArthur's "Old Soldiers" ballad.

Issue No. 20, May 14, 1951, pp. 27-31, "'Miss Jean' Has Her Own Day"

Jean MacArthur is well received in her hometown of Murfreesboro, TN.

Issue No. 20, May 14, 1951, pp. 32-33, 131-134, "What We Should Do: An American Policy by General MacArthur"

MacArthur expresses his opinions about Korea in a Senate hearing.

Issue No. 20, May 14, 1951, p. 40, "A Will to Win"

An editorial about Korea and possible victory there on the part of UN troops.

Issue No. 21, May 21, 1951, pp. 40-41, "Camera Records Big B-36 Crash"

A B-36D three hours out of Ft. Worth crashes with 25 onboard.  23 died.  Allyn Hazard had a movie camera and captured the scene on film.

Issue No. 21, May 21, 1951, pp. 46-52, "The Issues are Now Defined"

Gen. George Marshall's rebuttal to Gen. Douglas MacArthur's indictment of the Truman Administration's foreign policy.

Issue No. 21, May 31, 1951, p. 60, "General in Fireworks"

A photo of fireworks in Chicago that took the form of MacArthur's picture.

Issue No. 22, May 28, 1951 (mislabeled date)

No stories about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 24, June 11, 1951 (There was no Volume 23 in 1951 due to earlier miscount on issue number.), pp. 30-31, "Students Take Test of Tests"

Students attempting to get better than 70 on the Selective Service College Qualification Test in order to get draft deferment.

Issue No. 24, June 11, 1951, p. 43, "Chinese Travel Road of Defeat"

Picture and caption of "sensible" Chinese in Korea surrendering.

Issue No. 25, June 18, 1951

No stories about Korea appeared.

Volume 31 (July-December 1951)

Issue No. 1, July 2, 1951, p. 35, "...And live to wear it: Medal of Honor goes to three soldiers for Korean heroism"

Sgt. John A. Pittman of Tallula, Mississippi, Sgt. Ernest R. Kouma of Dwight, NE, and Lt. Carl H. Dodd of Kenvir, Kentucky, receive the MOH in a simple ceremony in Washington.

Issue No. 1, July 2, 1951, p. 77, 80, "How She Got to Korea"

Benita Lassetter, wife of Capt. Matthew Lasseter, made a surprise trip to Korea to see her husband.  A story about how she did it.

Issue No. 1, July 2, 1951, p. 100, "Taejon"

Photo and caption about South Korean children playing in the street in Taejon.

Issue No. 2, July 9, 1951, pp. 6-7, "Speaking of Pictures"

A jet pilot takes aerial pictures over Wonsan.

Issue No. 2, July 9, 1951, pp. 17-21, "Sunday in Korea: To Soldiers Reveille Still is Louder than Peace Talk"

How the men of the 1st Cavalry's 5th Regiment spend a Sunday in Korea.

Issue No. 2, July 9, 1951, pp. 22-25, "A Peace Move Gets a Reply"

The first U.S. soldier to die in the Korean War was buried in West Virginia and UN delegate Yakov Malik suggested cease fire and peace talks.

Issue No. 3, July 16, 1951, pp. 39-42, "Wilson Sounds the Alarm"

US Chief of Mobilization warns against a national relaxation.  Wilson emphasized the defense effort could not be relaxed.  Page 42 lists how the US stood at the time on military manpower, atomic weapons, planes, steel, petroleum, etc.

Issue No. 4, July 23, 1951, pp. 17-21, "Ridgway Gets Tough, Reds Take It"

Lots of photos associated with UN negotiations near Munsan.  Information about first and second day of full-scale cease fire talks.

Issue No. 4, July 23, 1951, pp. 91-94, 97, "The Little Boy Who Wouldn't Smile"

Story about a Korean orphan named Kang Koo Ri, age 5 years old.  Efforts to make him smile.

Issue No. 5, July 30, 1951

No story about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 6, August 6, 1951, p. 28, "What's the Use of Korea?"

A really good editorial on America's willingness to meet Communist aggression in Asia head on.

Issue No. 6, August 6, 1951, p. 107, "Medal of Honor"

Advertisement about buying savings bonds.  Ad featured MOH recipient Pfc Melvin Brown of Mahaffey, PA.

Issue No. 7, August 13, 1951

No story about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 8, August 20, 1951, pp. 49-50, 53, "The Sergeant's Souvenir"

Elverne Giltner of Pueblo, CO, a sergeant in Korea, sent a 48-pelt leopard rug home to his parents, sending it in a duffel bag.  He had purchased it from a peddler's cart. It was later discovered that the rug had been stolen from Queen Min's palace in Seoul.  (Sergeant Giltner was not the person who had stolen it.)

Issue No. 9, August 27, 1951, pp. 87-98, 100, "SAC: The Strategic Air Command Has Its Big Planes Ready for Intercontinental War"

Large story and lots of pictures about the air preparedness of the USA.

Issue No. 10, September 3, 1951

No story about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 11, September 10, 1951

No story about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 12, September 17, 1951, p. 171, "Medal of Honor"

U.S. Savings Bond ad featuring Sgt. Charles Turner of Boston, MA, Korean War MOH.

Issue No. 13, September 24, 1951, pp. 46-47, "Stern Canadian Discipline"

A drunken U.N. soldiers' raid in Chung Woon Myon, Korea, resulted in charges being brought against members of Canada's Princess Pat's Light Infantry.

Issue No. 13, September 24, 1951, pp. 67-68, "...She didn't feel sorry for him"

Pvt. Hubert Edward Reeves, quadruple amputee because of frostbite in Chosin campaign, marries Beverly Jean Hall of Wilmington, IL.  They were married in the 1st Baptist Church in Joliet, IL September 1951, with a reception in the VFW Hall in Joliet.

Issue No. 14, October 1, 1951

No stories about Korea appeared in this issue.

Issue No. 15, October 8, 1951, pp. 141-150, "How to Make Marines"

How recruits go from boots to Marines at Parris Island.

Issue No. 16, October 15, 1951, pp. 61-62, "Deluxe Strike at Douglas"

Douglas Aircraft plant in Long Beach, CA was shut down by a strike of union U.A.W. Local 148 of the C.I.O.

Issue No. 17, October 22, 1951, pp. 24-25, "All Along the Front in Korea Blood is Flowing"

A brief reminder that fighting was still going on in Korea.

Issue No. 17, October 22, 1951, pp. 26-29, "Housewife's Blood Goes to a G.I."

Housewife Margaret Burnett gave blood in New York and the pint was followed on a journey from the states to Korea.  The blood was given to Pvt. Richard C. Gilley.  The second part of the story is about lack of donors to give blood.

Issue No. 18, October 29, 1951, pp. 35-36, "This is Heartbreak Ridge"

The battle of Heartbreak Ridge began Sept. 3 and continued into October.  Many casualties.

Issue No. 19, November 5, 1951, pp. 40-41, "A War Bride Named 'Blue' Comes Home"

Sgt. Johnie Morgan brought his wife, Lee Yong Soon (Blue) home to the U.S.  She was the first war bride to arrive in the USA during the Korean War.

Issue No. 19, November 5, 1951, pp. 141-142, 145-148, "The Mission of the 'Pregnant Perch'"

Story of the submarine, "Perch" and her activities in the Korean War.  The Perch carried 67 British Royal Marines under the command of Lt. Col. Douglas B. Drysdale.  They were members of the 41 Independent Commando.

Issue No. 20, November 12, 1951, pp. 38-39, "New Weapon for the GI's"

Soldiers participate in atomic tests at Nevada Proving Grounds.

Issue No. 21, November 19, 1951

No stories about Korea in this issue.

Issue No. 22, November 26, 1951, pp. 18-19, "Recruits Share Bed and Boredom"

Two pages of photos of bored soldiers in Germany.

Issue No. 22, November 26, 1951, pp. 100-101, "'Bitter Birds' Return"

Members of Navy fighter squadron VF884, mostly from around Kansas City, return home from Korea.  Three were still MIA.

Issue No. 23, December 3, 1951, pp. 48-49, "Steel Starts a Scrap Hunt"

The Korean War was causing a critical shortage of scrap with which to make steel.

Issue No. 23, December 3, 1951, pp. 162-164, 167-168, 170, 172, 174, 177, "A Marine Tells His Father What Korea is Really Like"

World War II Marine officer Paul C. Harper receives "tell it like it is" letter from his son, 1st Lt. John W. Harper, who was stationed in Korea.

Issue No. 24, December 10, 1951, pp. 30-35, "Inside MIG Alley"

Aerial photos over MIG Alley in Korea.  Story about progress of peace talks also included.  Many photos of war correspondents.

Issue No. 24, December 10, 1951, pp. 133-145, "Our Underwater Defense"

Naval preparation for warfare against Russians and mines.

Issue No. 25, December 17, 1951, pp. 28-29, "The No Man's Land of Cease-Fire"

Aerial photos over Panmunjom, Kumsong, and Kosong.

Issue No. 25, December 17, 1951, pp. 30-31, "Two Jets Carry a Third at 30,000 Feet"

Due to lack of oxygen, Capt. John Paladino passed out while flying an F-84.  Two other planes put their wing tips under his and guided the plane down.

Issue No. 26, December 24, 1951, pp. 8-15, "The Best Present: A Family"

In California, the Pacific Fleet Air Force made sound movies of some 1,300 families of men serving in Korea and sent them to them.  The government also sent 1,000 wives and children to husbands and fathers stationed in Europe.  Lots of pictures of children.

Volume 32 (January-June 1952)

Issue No. 1, January 7, 1952, pp. 18-19, "Battle of Lightweights"

Paragraph about new T-47 rifle

Issue No. 1, January 7, 1952, p. 24, "Blood Drive, Texas Style"

University of Texas students collect blood for war-wounded in Korea in response to a similar drive at the University of Idaho.

Issue No. 2, January 14, 1952, p.  46, "Panmunjom Dude"

Caption for photo of North Korea's General Nam Il.

Issue No. 3, January 21, 1952

Article about Anna Rosenberg, assistant Secretary of Defense, visiting Korea.

Issue No. 4, January 28, 1952

Comment about the fact that as of January 28, 1952, University of Idaho students held the record of 33% of student body donating blood for Korea in three days.

Issue No. 5, February 4, 1952, pp. 58-68, 70,72, "The Bombers: From One Engine to Ten"

A story, photographs, graphics, and sketches of Navy and Air Force jets being used in Korea.  Page 66 includes a story by two LIFE correspondents entitled, "But Why are We Losing Air Supremacy over Korea?"

Issue No. 6, February 11, 1952, pp. 95-96, "Skin for a Twin"

Identical twins Pvt. Leonard Kijowski and Pvt. Leo Kikowski in Korea.  Leo was injured in Korea by an exploding grenade.  59% of his body was burned.  Leonard was in Korea w hen the government flew him home to donate skin for a graft.  Leonard talked into a microphone as the operation proceeded.  His words were heard on a later radio broadcast.

Issue No. 7, February 18, 1952, pp. 46-48, 51, "The Objective: $52.1 Billion"

In the year 1952, 60% of the federal budget was earmarked for military.  Interesting pictures showing high cost of military equipment.

Issue  No. 8, February 25, 1952, pp. 53, 55, "The Flak Tester"

U.S. destroys its older planes at Aberdeen Proving Grounds to make modern planes tougher.

Issue No. 9, March 3, 1952, pp. 41-42

USS Ernest G. Small lost her bow in a combination of heavy seas and a North Korean mine.  The ship backed up 300 miles to Kure, Korea, for repairs.

Issue No. 10, March 10, 1952

No stories about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 11, March 17, 1952, pp. 47-48, "LIFE on the Newsfronts of the World: Back and Forth in Korea"

A paragraph overview of what was happening in Korea at the time.

Issue No. 12, March 24, 1952, p. 85, "Modern Armor for Marines"

Information about the Marines' lightweight plastic armored vest.

Issue No. 13, March 31, 1952, pp. 92-98, "Prisoners' Island: Tension and Tedium Rule Koje's Barbed-Wire World"

Extensive story about life for the 170,000 prisoners on Koje.

Issue No. 14, April 7, 1952

No stories about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 15, April 14, 1952, pp. 22-23, "Speaking of Pictures...Reds Use These with Phony Captions to 'Prove' Their Big Germ-Warfare Lie"

Two pages of information about Communist propaganda against the United States.  Communists accuse the U.S. of germ warfare.

Issue No. 15, April 14, 1952, pp. 34-35, "The World's First Atomic Artillery"

The United States introduces atomic artillery to the news media.

Issue  No. 15, April 14, 1952, pp. 47-48, "General VanFleet's Son is Missing"

Short story about James A. VanFleet missing in action in Korea.

Issue No. 16, April 21, 1952, p. 45, "U.S. Shows Off a Hybrid Tank"

United States Army reveals its new medium tank, the 48-ton M-47.

Issue No. 17, April 28, 1952

No stories about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 18, May 5, 1952, p. 47, "70,000 Will Go but 103,000 Won't"

Short story about repatriation of prisoners in Korea.

Issue No, 19, May 12, 1952, pp. 103-106, 111-112, 114, "A Tough Man for a Tough Job"

An in-depth story about Lt. Gen. Matthew Ridgway

Issue No. 19, May 12, 1952, pp. 119-120, 122, "Goodbye Wave & Wallop"

Ted Williams recalled to active duty in the Marines.

Issue No. 20, May 19, 1952, p. 47, "Kidnapping on Koje"

Brig. Gen. Francis T. Dodd is held prisoner on Koje Island, Korea.  Enemy prisoners held him for three days.

Issue No. 20, May 19, 1952, pp. 51-52, "Red China's Captive Americans"

Story about Americans in China, confined there due to the outbreak of the Korean War.

Issue No. 20, May 19, 1952, pp. 162-163, "Your Marine Corps is Tackling a Long, Hard Job -- Expanding Marine Aviation"

Advertisement about the Marine Corps

Issue No. 21, May 26, 1952, pp. 23-25, "U.S. Gets Booby-Trapped by Reds"

In-depth story about the capture of Brig. Gen. Francis Dodd on Koje Island.

Issue No. 21, May 26, 1952, p. 131

Advertisement about buying defense bonds, featuring Medal of Honor recipient Lt (jg) Thomas Hudner Jr., USN

Issue No. 22, June 2, 1952, p. 35, "Everything's Uncozy on Koje"

Unrest on Koje island -- a one paragraph story.

Issue No. 22, June 2, 1952, pp. 75-76, 79-80, "Question: What is Ike Like?"

A story about Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Issue No. 23, June 9, 1952, pp. 31-35, "To Unify a Free World Reds Have One Reply: Riot!"

Story about global communism, with sub-story about Koje on pages 34-35.

Issue No. 23, June 9, 1952, p. 47, "Syngman Rhee Goes on a Rampage"

Short paragraph about Syngman Rhee, president of South Korea.

Issue  No. 24, June 16, 1952, pp. 15-21, "Voters See Close-up of Eisenhower"

Eisenhower as presidential candidate.

Issue No. 25, June 23, 1952, pp. 29-31, "A Doubt about Communism, A Spear Through the Heart"

Another story about Koje prisoners.

Volume 33 (July - December 1952)

Issue No. 1, July 7, 1952, p. 35, "These Seventeen Americans Are Korean War's Jet Aces"

Pictures and one-line of text on each picture about each ace's accomplishments.

Issue No. 2, July 14, 1952, p. 30, "Truce Beam Casts Ironic Light on a Dangerous Mission"

Picture of the week--two US Marines silhouetted in a searchlight's glare.

Issue No. 2, July 14, 1952, pp. 57-58, "Wounded Soldier Gets a New Thumb"

Lt. Orlando Campisi received a finger transplant.  Pictures and text.

Issue No. 2, July 14, 1952, p. 116, "Lt. Colonel Reginald R. Myers, USMC, Medal of Honor"

One page advertisement for Defense Bonds.

Issue No. 3, July 21, 1952

No stories about Korea.

Issue No. 4, July 28, 1952, pp. 95-96, 98, 101-102, 104, 107, "Robinson Crusoe of Schinz-do"

Lone Airman survives 37 days on a North Korean island.

Issue No. 5, August 4, 1952

No stories about Korea.

Issue No. 6, August 11, 1952

No stories about Korea.

Issue No. 7, August 18, 1952

No stories about Korea.

Issue No. 8, August 25, 1952

No stories about Korea.

Issue No. 9, September 1, 1952

No stories about Korea.

Issue No. 10, September 8, 1952, p. 153, "First Lieutenant Carl H. Dodd Medal of Honor"

One page advertisement for U.S. Defense Bonds.

Issue No. 11, September 15, 1952, p. 42, "An End to the Korean War"

A lengthy one-page editorial calling for an end to the Korean War.

Issue No. 12, September 22, 1952

No story about Korea.

Issue No. 13, September 29, 1952, p. 35, "Much Ado About 'Push-Button' War"

A short story about the Navy's "over-billed super-weapon"--pilot-less missiles.

 

Issue No. 14, October 6, 1952

No story about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 15, October 13, 1952, p. 59, "Jet Sky Jeep"

The U.S. Army gets a collapsible, one-man helicopter.

Issue  No. 15, October 13, 1952, pp. 89-90, "Pfc Fisher, Crooner"

Pfc. Eddie Fisher, soloist in a U.S. Army band, made a 46-day tour of Korea.

Issue No. 15, October 13, 1952, pp. 121-122, 124, "Atomic Cannon"

The Army unveils the atomic cannon at the Aberdeen proving group.

Issue No. 16, October 20, 1952, p. 42, "Red assault on White Horse Hill"

Very brief mention of what was happening in Korea that week.

Issue No. 17, October 27, 1952, p. 27, "Korean Issue"

Seeks the answers to questions, "How did we blunder into a situation that led to a war that seemingly we would not win?  And how could we end the war?"

Issue No. 17, October 27, 1952, pp. 28-31, "Fatigue, Boredom, Pain & Heroism"

Marines at Outpost Frisco; ROK troops at White Horse Hill

Issue No. 18, November 3, 1952

No stories about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 19, November 10, 1952, p. 53, "Costliest battle goes on in Korea and U.S. jet shows off its rockets"

Very brief mention of battles for Triangle Hill and Sniper Ridge.

Issue  No. 19, November 10, 1952, pp. 139-140, 143, "Christmas for the Boys in Korea"

Christmas list of items needed by American veterans serving in Korea.

Issue No. 20, November 17, 1952, pp. 26-28, "Speaking of Pictures"

Cartoons from the Tappan Printing Co. book, "Out of Line" show GI's looking at the funny side of the Korean War.

Issue No. 21, November 24, 1952

No stories about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 22, December 1, 1952, p. 23, "A Gallant Woman Joins Men Who Report War"

LIFE provides a brief intro to female photographer/reporter Margaret Bourke-White.

Issue No. 22, December 1, 1952, pp. 25-35, "The Savage, Secret War in Korea"

Margaret Bourke-White reports on the guerilla warfare in Korea.  Lots of pictures.

Issue  No. 22, December 1, 1952, p. 46, "India offers a Korean solution"

Brief mention of India's idea of how to end the Korean War.

Issue No. 22, December 1, 1952, pp. 51-52, 54, 56, 61-62, 64, "What Ike Faces in Korea"

New U.S. president to visit Korea as not just a President, but also a military strategist.  What awaits him in Korea.  No consistent strategy in politically-motivated Korean War.

Issue No. 23, December 8, 1952, pp. 37-39, "Korean Mansei"

South Korean students getting ready for a visit from Eisenhower.  Mostly pictures.

Issue No. 24, December 15, 1952, p. 21, "Winter, and the New Guard, Arrived Early"

Brief introduction to LIFE's story about Eisenhower's trip to Korea.

Issue No. 24, December 15, 1952, pp. 23-29, "A Man and His Mission"

Coverage of Eisenhower's trip to Korea.

Issue No. 25, December 22, 1952, p. 22, "Armor for the battle line"

Marine/Army troops test "iron pants" in Korea.  Brief story.

Issue No. 26, December 29, 1952, p. 30, "Biggest Mutiny Since Koje"

3,600 North Korean POW's rioted at Pongam Island in Korea.  84 killed & 118 wounded.

Volume 34 (January - June 1953)

Issue No. 1, January 5, 1953, page 5, Advertisement

Bell Telephone System advertisement welcoming home Sgt. Donald McIntyre, USMC veteran of Korea.

Issue No. 1, January 5, 1953, pp. 22-24, "Disaster on the Sleigh Ride"

A C-124 Globemaster carrying veterans home to Texas and points east crashed in Washington State, killing 87 men.

Issue No. 2, January 12, 1953

No stories about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 3, January 19, 1953, p. 33, "Life on the Newsfronts of the World"

Lists the number of deserters in the US Army since beginning of Korean War

Issue No. 4, January 26, 1953, p. 44, "Life on the Newsfronts of the World"

"Pvt. Irwin Rietz, 21, an Army medic, treating his first combat casualty on the front lines in Korea, bandaged a moaning soldier's chest wound.  As he was lifting him onto an evacuation litter jeep, he looked at the casualty's face for the first time and saw that it was his twin brother Edwin.  Thirty minutes later Edwin died of his wound at an aid station."

Issue No. 5, February 2, 1953, p. 24, "Salute to a Soldier"

LIFE compliments Gen. James VanFleet, who received orders to leave Korea.

Issue No. 5, February 2, 1953, "Life on the Newsfronts of the World: Air War Moves Outside Korea"

A Navy patrol bomber was shot down in Formosa Strait.  There were 11 survivors.

Issue No. 7, February 16, 1953

No stories about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 8, February 23, 1953, "Korean Veterans Rotate Backwards"

13 USMC veterans request to return to Korea.  They are: S/Sgt. Curtis E. Brown of Cincinnati; Sgt. Maynard A. Nielson of Minneapolis; Pfc. Ernest A. Raymond of Portland, ME; Pfc. John P. Belcher of Secane, PA; Sgt. Sheldon M. Anders of Jacksonville, FL; Cpl. Otis J. Cowan of Brush Creek, TN; Sgt. Richard B. Brooks of Cincinnati; Sgt. Donald D. Millet of New Orleans; Sgt. Carol E. Carley of Houston, TX; Cpl. George M. Foxworth Jr. of Liberty, TX; Cpl. Boyd A. Dowdell of Provo, UT; Sgt. Ronald J. Hamilton of Chicago; and Sgt. Golbert R. Stauss of Huger, SC.

Issue No. 8, February 23, 1953, pp. 121-122, 125-126, 128, 131-132, 134, "America and Asia"

LIFE editor in chief surveys U.S. relationships with Far East (Japan, Korea, Philippines, China, and Southeast Asia).

Issue No. 9, March 2, 1953

No stories about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 10, March 9, 1953

No stories about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 11, March 16, 1953, pp. 54-59, "A Frontline Picture No Camera Could Get"

An overall picture of the status of the Korean War in 1953 as seen by John Osborne, LIFE editor, who visited Korea to see for himself.

No. 12, March 23, 1953, p. 42, "Life on the Newsfronts of the World: Ammo is still hard to come by"

A subcommittee was appointed in Congress to find out who was responsible and why for the ammo shortage in Korea.

Issue No. 13, March 30, 1953, pp. 71-79, "Marine's View of Korea"

Pictures taken by Lt. Harries-Clichy Peterson appear on these pages of LIFE.

Issue No. 14, April 6, 1953, p. 57, "65 Medal of Honor Winners"

Photograph of 65 of the more than 280 Medal of Honor recipients still living.

Issue No. 15, April 13, 1953, pp. 27-31, "The Communist Peace Dove...and the Wife of a Prisoner of War"

Story about the hopes of Dot Beale that her Air Force POW husband was safe and would return home.

Issue No. 15, April 13, 1953, p. 32, "A Republic to be Preserved: Cease-Fire will be welcome but any settlement must guarantee Korea's independence"

A full-page LIFE editorial about the proposed cease fire.

Issue No. 15, April 13, 1953, pp. 38-39, "Sweating Out a Landing"

Story about returning Korean War veterans who were not permitted to leave the ship the Wm. Weigel until they had watched a mandatory show put on by Broadway entertainers.

Issue No. 15, April 13, 1953, p. 45, "Mary's Mighty Megaphone"

Mary Pickford approached the Treasury Department and offered her services in a six-week tour to promote the "bond-a-month" plan.

Issue No. 16, April 20, 1953, pp. 28-31, "The Long Road Home Shortens a Little"

Photos and brief information about the advent of the return of sick and wounded U.S. Prisoners of War from Korea.

Issue No. 17, April 27, 1953, pp. 27-31, "Big Exchange Gets Under Way"

The "Little Switch" of POWs in Korea began.  Lots of interesting photographs in this story.  The first American freed in this exchange was Pvt. Carl Kirchenhausen of New York.

Issue No. 18, May 4, 1953

No story about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 19, May 11, 1953, pp. 22-31, "Some GI's Not on Exchange List: Secret Photos from the Red Korea of 1950"

Early treatment of POWs in 1950.  Some POW pictures.

Issue No. 19, May 11, 1953, pp. 36-40, "Into Eager Arms a Few Come Home"

First of US POWs return to states from Korea.  Three pages follow the return of former POW Cpl. Donald Legay of Leominster, MA.  He received a gift car and $300 for appearing on "I've Got a Secret" TV show.

Issue No. 19, May 11, 1953, p. 43, "A Short Guide to the Truce Talks"

LIFE editorial about the peace talks and the need to press for cease fire.

Issue No. 19, May 11, 1953, pp. 126-130, 131-132, 134, 137-138, 140, 142, "The Truth About Korea: From a Man Now Free to Speak", Part I

James A. VanFleet speaks out about Korea.

Issue No. 20, May 18, 1953, p. 46, "A Lieutenant General's Private War"

Story about Glenn Barcus, a jet fighter pilot in Korea.

Issue No. 20, May 18, 1953, pp. 157-158, 160, 162, 164, 166, 169-172., "How We Can Win with what We Have" - Part II of "The Truth About Korea"

Van Fleet's story continues.

Issue No. 21, May 25, 1953, pp. 108-109, 113-116, 121-122, 124. , "Valley Forge GI's Tell of their Brainwashing Ordeal"

Story about Valley Forge 20, a group of American GI's who were brainwashed by the enemy.

Issue No. 22, June 1, 1953

No story about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 23, June 8, 1953, p. 29, "Communist Pilot is Catapulted from Crippled MIG"

Photos of Communist pilot ejecting from crashing MIG.

Issue No. 23, June 8, 1953, p. 41, "LIFE on the Newsfronts of the World: Reds and South Koreans attack U.N."

Communist armies launch their biggest and bloodiest attack of the year.  (Just a short paragraph.)

Issue No. 23, June 8, 1953, pp. 47-50, "PW Photos Stir Recognition and Memories"

Looking at LIFE pictures, families find relatives while ex-soldiers recall the horrors of captivity.  POW's quoted.

Issue No. 24, June 15, 1953, pp. 125-128, 130, 132, "An Issue Which Has 49,000 Parts"

What to do with 49,000 anti-Communist POWs who did not want to be repatriated.

Issue No. 24, June 15, 1953, pp. 143, 145, "Skyful [sic] of Troops"

Photos of parachutists at Ft.  Bragg, NC.

Issue No. 25, June 22, 1953, pp. 19-23, "One Old Man Against the Truce"

Syngman Rhee protested the truce so long as the Chinese were on the Korean peninsula.

Issue No. 26, June 29, 1953, pp. 26-31, "Empty Camps: Tardy Truce"

Syngman Rhee frees 26,000 North Korean POWs.  He did this to disrupt peace talks, insisting that no peace treaty should be signed as long as the Chinese were on the Korean peninsula.

Issue No. 26, June 29, 1953, pp. 48, "Worst Air Crash"

7 crew members and 122 servicemen returning to their units in Korea after leave in Japan were killed in an Air Force C-124 Globemaster crash at Tachikawa airport near Tokyo.  World's worst air disaster in history of aviation.

Volume 35 (July-September 1953)

Issue No. 1, July 6, 1953, p. 32, "LIFE on the Newsfronts of the World: The Courting of Syngman Rhee"

One paragraph about attempts to convince Syngman Rhee to accept a truce.

Issue No. 1, July 6, 1953, pp. 59-62, 65-72, 75-87, "The Bridges of Toko-Ri"

A condensed version of James A. Michener's new novel about Korea.

Issue No. 2, July 13, 1953

No story about Korea appeared.

Issue No. 3, July 20, 1953, pp. 26-27, "The Cause & Cure of the Korean Truce"

A LIFE editorial about the Korean War.

Issue No. 4, July 27, 1953, p. 7, Letter to the Editor

Written by Mrs. Charles Marion about the Bridges of Toko-Ri.

Issue No. 4, July 27, 1953, pp. 22-23, "Navy Finally Gets An Ace"

Lt. Guy Bordelon shot down five enemy planes over Korea.

Issue No. 4, July 27, 1953, p. 35, "LIFE on the Newsfronts of the World: The Reds in Korea say they accept the truce, the Reds in Russia start widespread purges"

One short paragraph about the truce in Korea.

Issue No. 5, August 3, 1953, p. 13, "A Look Back Makes Us Proud"

LIFE looks back at its reporters, photographers, and correspondents in the Korean War.

Issue No. 5, August 3, 1953, pp. 15-19, "No Whistles, No Cheers, No Dancing"

Fighting ends on the Korean peninsula.  Numerous photographs.

Issue No. 6, August 10, 1953, pp. 15-27, "How the Truce Came to Korea"

The drama of the truce in Korea - by photographs.

Issue No. 7, August 17, 1953, pp. 22-23, "Big Switch is Open"

Photo story of Operation Big Switch, which was the return of US prisoners.

Issue No. 8, August 24, 1953, p. 5, Letter to the Editor"

Written by Pvt. David Wassertheil in Korea.

Issue No. 9, August 31, 1953, p. 7, Letters to the Editor

Letters from Robert G. Zabel, Chicago (Navy Corpsman) and Capt. Bertrand R. Brinkley (HQ, FECOM)

Issue No. 9, August 31, 1953, p. 19, "Reds Photograph a GI Reaction to the Truce in Korea"

Picture of US POW's jubilant over news of truce.

Issue No. 10, September 7, 1953, pp. 26-27, "Almost All Released Prisoners Come Home Happily...But There is Word from a Few who Renounce U.S. for Communism"

POW friends of Cpl. Bennie Smith of Memphis, TN decide to stay in Communist China.  Smith has to break the news to their parents.

Issue No. 11, September 14, 1953, pp. 42-45, "Heroism of General Dean is Revealed When Most Famous POW is Set Free"

A North Korean refugee/POW writes about Major General William Dean as a POW.

Issue No. 12, September 21, 1953, p. 55, "LIFE on the Newsfronts of the World: News of VanFleet's Son"

Defense Department announced that James A. VanFleet Jr. was believed to be a POW.

Issue No. 13, September 28, 1953

No story about Korea appeared.

 

Letters to The Editor in response to articles

During the 1950-1953 time frame, there were several short Letters to the Editor in response to articles that LIFE magazine ran about the Korean War. One of the Korean War Educator’s personal favorites is this one, written by W.F. Bragg of Worland, Wyoming. It appeared in the January 15, 1951 issue on page 10. Bragg wrote the letter in response to "Christmas in Korea", a story in pictures by David Douglas Duncan. Bragg wrote:

"The scenes of the Marine retreat in your Christmas issue moved me strongly as I am a veteran of World War I, and have one son who served four years with the Marines in World War II. The indifferent attitude of the nation in general toward its fighting men in distant lands stirs me to an anger beyond words. Maybe these pictures of gaunt, frozen, undaunted men will stir that tiny spark of national pride and indignation which seems to be smothered in the cold, dead ashes of business and politics as usual."

Below are the names of persons whose Letter to the Editor appeared in LIFE magazine from July 1950 to the end of the war.  Most of the editorials were very small.

Volume 29, No. 5, July 31, 1950, p. 2:

Victor Stephen Petterson, Chicago, IL
Lawrence M. Schmidlapp, Cincinnati, OH
Col. Ralph W. Jones, Danville, IL
Eugene R. Hurley, Baldwin, NY
C.W. Marmaduke, Newark, NJ

Volume 29, No. 6, August 7, 1950, p. 7:

James L. Watson, Worcester, MA
Alfonso M. Magliacane, Passaic, NJ
Henri Hofer, Newark, NJ
Ansel Adams, San Francisco, CA

Volume 29, No. 6, August 7, 1950, p. 8:

Calvin H. Hall

Volume 29, No. 7, August 14, 1950, p. 6:

Samuel A. Stafford, Newport Beach, CA
C.P. Haseltine, M.D.
George F. Gotschalk, Kensington, MD
Richard A. Grimley, Yardley, PA
James H. Patton, Dalton, GA
Walter Watkins, Laurel, MS
Frank Dunn, Brunswick, GA
Mrs. Harold Holtz, Crystal Lake, IL

Volume 29, No. 7, August 14, 1950, pp. 6 & 8:

W.T. Bissell, Collinsville, CT

Volume 29, No. 7, August 14, 1950, p. 8:

Edgar H. Leoni, New York, NY

Volume 29, No, 8, August 21, 1950, p. 2:

Joseph R. Younglove, Johnstown, NY
John H. Ronayne, New York, NY
John W. Dienhart Jr., Chicago, IL
George J. Puniskis, Worcester, MA
Col. G.B. Jarrett, Aberdeen, MD
William Gardner Bell, Washington, DC
W. Paul DuPre, Paterson, NJ

Volume 29, No. 8, August 21, 1950, p. 3:

Warren F. Bush, Peoria, IL

Volume 29, No. 8, August 21, 1950, pp. 3-4:

Arthur Carter, New York, NY

Volume 29, No. 9, August 28, 1950, p. 8:

Ernest Murphy, Wayne, MI
Ed. McElhone, Philadelphia, PA

Volume 29, No. 9, August 28, 1950, p. 10:

John S. Nollen, Grinnell, IA
Louis R. Vocino, Hasbrouck Heights, NJ
R.W. Shook, N. Hollywood, CA

Volume 29, No. 10, September 4, 1950, p. 2:

Douglas Straton, Wooster, OH
Carl Harden, Pasadena, CA

Volume 29, No. 10, September 4, 1950, pp. 2 & 4:

W. Russell Bowie, S. Yarmouth, MA

Volume 29, No. 10, September 4, 1950, p. 4:

Chauncey Dolan, Lafayette, LA

Volume 29, No. 10, September 4, 1950, p. 7:

Mary Ellen Whittenmore, Courtland, CA

Volume 29, No. 11, September 11, 1950, p. 11:

Carroll D. Billinger, Kingston, RI

Volume 29, No. 11, September 11, 1950, p. 12:

Wayne L. Pearson, Kankakee, IL
Mrs. John C. Richardson, N. Linthicum Heights, MD

Volume 29, No. 12, September 18, 1950, p. 12 & 14:

1st Lt. David W. Rudolph, Tacoma, WA

Volume 29, No. 12, September 18, 1950, p. 14:

Lt. Lawrence J. Connors, Westover Field, MA

Volume 29, No. 13, September 25, 1950, p. 8:

Gerald P. Averill, Quantico, VA

Volume 29, No. 15, October 9, 1950, p. 4:

John N. Rathmell, Williamsport, PA
A.M. Current, Grand Rapids, MI
Seymoure Warsaw, Brooklyn, NY
Billie Ann Sinnott, Dallas, TX

Volume 29, No. 17, October 23, 1950, p. 12:

Comdr Harry Cross, San Francisco, CA
Stanley P. James, Lynchburg, VA

Volume 29, No. 25, December 18, 1950, p. 9:

John Z. Moore, Los Angeles, CA

LIFE Editorials

The following editorials were produced by the staff of LIFE magazine, rather than from reader's comments.

Volume 29, No. 2, July 10, 1950, p. 35:

Breaking a Monopoly
The Great Switcheroo
Action in Korea Involves the Future of Asia’s Millions

Volume 29, No. 3, July 17, 1950, p. 40:

Popular Response to Korea Means the U.S. has Mobility to Act

Volume 29, No. 4, July 24, 1950, p. 26:

Out on a Limb
Checklist of Errors
Johnson or Acheson?

Volume 29, No. 5, July 31, 1950, p. 31:

Five Fecund Years: The Record of 1945-50 Should Give Courage for Days Ahead

Volume 29, No. 6, August 7, 1950, p. 30:

What Australia Thinks of Us
Questions from Korea
Questions for Washington

Volume 29, No. 7, August 14, 1950, p. 30:

Program for America
Targets of Opportunity
Our Vast Resources

Volume 29, No. 8, August 21, 1950, p. 28:

MacArthur’s Detractors

Volume 29, No, 9, August 28, 1950, p. 24:

Sing a Song of Nonsense
Lessons from Combat

Volume 29, No. 10, September 4, 1950, p. 30:

Fighting for What?

Volume 29, No. 11, September 11, 1950, p. 56:

The U.S. Must Work to Reach the Goals Set by the President
What’s Gooking

Volume 29, No. 12, September 18, 1950, p. 59:

The Nature of Politics

Volume 29, No. 13, September 25, 1950, p. 34:

Johnson vs Acheson

Volume 29, No. 15, October 9, 1950, p. 38:

Salute to our Warriors, But What Comes Next?

Volume 29, No. 17, October 23, 1950, p. 36:

Why NOT Swap Horses?

Volume 29, No. 18, October 30, 1950, p. 39:

Will We Go to Sleep Again?

Volume 29, No. 19, November 6, 1950, p. 34:

Act of Faith

Volume 29, No. 21, November 20, 1950, p. 38:

The Elections and Asia

Volume 29, No. 23, December 4, 1950, p. 42:

Yardstick from Tokyo

Volume 29, No. 24, December 11, 1950, p. 46:

The Prospect is War

Volume 29, No. 25, December 18, 1950, p. 34

We’re in It Now!

Volume 32, No. 3, January 21, 1952, p. 28

Indo-China's in Danger

Volume 32, No. 6, February 11, 1952, p. 26

Our Korean Strategy

Volume 32, No. 11, March 17, 1952, p. 36

The Big Picture: It's Black

Volume 32, No. 17, April 28, 1952, pp. 28-29

The Struggle for Aerial Supremacy

Volume 32, No. 18, May 5, 1952, p. 40

The Terror in China: There are Good Reasons Why Chinese Prisoners Refuse to Be Repatriated





 

 
 
 

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