National Archives Records - RIP 103

Reference Information Paper 103 lists the declassified National Archives records holdings relating to the Korean War.  The list of records comes from a government booklet that is over 200 pages in length.  The document is available in its entirety on this page of the KWE after being hand-typed onto the website (RIP 103 is not available on the NARA website) by Lynnita Brown.

The contents of RIP 103 are a descriptive synopsis of what National Archives resources are available as they pertain to each particular subject.  Please note that all of these resources have been "accessioned" or catalogued by government employees, but these are not by any means the only Korean War-related holdings in the National Archives. Those documents which have not been accessioned are not listed below.  As with most preservation agencies, accessioning historical documents in the National Archives is an ongoing process that requires meticulous attention to detail and the sorting and cataloging of millions of pages of manuscripts and documents as they are declassified and made available to the public.

Contents - Reference Information Paper 103:


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PREFACE

This reference information paper provides descriptions of more than 39 series of textual, still picture, motion picture, sound recording, cartographic, and architectural records that provide information about the Korean War.  Six decades ago, the National Archives began publishing reference information papers (RIPs) as part of a comprehensive descriptive program designed to help people find their way through the voluminous records in our holdings.

Related topics addressed in other recent reference information papers include: "Records Relating to American Prisoners of War and Missing-in-Action Personnel from the Korean War and During the Cold War Era" (RIP 102, 1997) and "Records of Military Agencies Relating to African Americans from the Post-World War I Period to the Korean War" (RIP 105, 2000).  The best overall source of information about Federal archives is the comprehensive Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States (1996).  NARA's website, www.archives.gov, offers access to the text of this guide as well as to the Archival Research Catalog (ARC), the online catalog of NARA's nationwide holdings. 

As the nation's record-keeper, NARA safeguards records of all three branches of the Federal Government.  NARA meets an almost unlimited range of information needs, ensuring access to records on which both the credibility of government and the accuracy of history depend.  We welcome any comments you may have on the information products and services NARA provides.  Please e-mail your ideas to inquire@nara.gov.

- John W. Carlin
Archivist of the United States


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Part I

INTRODUCTION

Contents - Part I

Scope of the Paper

I.1

This reference information paper provides descriptions of over 39 series of textual, still picture, motion picture, sound recording, cartographic, and architectural records that provide information about the Korean War.  Descriptive entries in this paper focus on accessioned records that were housed in the College Park, MD, archival facility of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) as of September 1, 2000.  For information on records accessioned since then, researchers should contact the Textual Reference Division of the National Archives at College Park, MD.  Records described in the NARA publication "Records Relating to American Prisoners of War and Missing-in-Action Personnel from the Korean War and During the Cold War Era" (RIP 102), compiled by Tim Wehrkamp (1997) are not included in this paper.

Overview of the Events

1.2

For an overview of the Korean War, see the "Combat Chronology, 1950-52" in Appendix A.

Restriction on Access

1.3

Record series that remained security classified as of September 1, 2000, are noted in the appropriate record descriptions.  Occasionally, there are relevant files that have been declassified within security-classified records series.  When applicable, that fact is noted in the record descriptions.  As declassification review of NARA records proceeds under Presidential Executive Order (April 17, 1995), many of the security-classified records described in this paper may be declassified.  In addition, the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and E.O. 12958 define procedures by which researchers may request declassification of security-classified Federal agency records that pertain to their research. For further information on these procedures, researchers should contact the Textual Reference Division of the National Archives at College Park.

How to Use This Paper

1.4

The descriptive portions of RIP 103 are organized according to records format:

Part I      Introduction
Part II     Textual Records
Part III    Legislative Records
Part IV    Still Pictures
Part V     Motion Pictures and Sound and Video Recordings
Part VI    Cartographic and Architectural Records

Within each part of the paper, record descriptions are organized by record group, thereunder usually by creating organization (e.g., staff, office, division, or branch), and thereunder by series title.  In the case of motion picture, sound, and video records, some descriptions pertain to individual items.  The paper concludes with appendixes that consist of the following topics:

Appendix A     Combat Chronology, 1950-53
Appendix B     Commanders of U.N. Forces in Korea
Appendix C     Major U.S. Combat Unit Casualties in Korea
Appendix D     Microfilm Records Cited in This Reference Information Paper

All paragraphs (excluding those in the appendixes) have been numbered for indexing and cross-references.

1.5

Textual records descriptions (Part II) usually consist of the following elements, keyed to the following examples by letter:

A*     record group number and title
B*     agency/program, title and history
C*     series title (boldface, lowercase type font) and date span
D*     master location register entry number or series designator with findings aid notation
E*     linear measurement or item count
F*     arrangement, structure, or organization statement
G*     records format and subject narrative

Some series descriptions also include statements that identify access restrictions (H*) and finding aids (I*).  Series descriptions are preceded by agency histories only when such background was readily available and was considered to provide critical context for the record descriptions.

I.6

The following example, keyed to letters of the descriptive elements, illustrates the basic elements of textual record description.

Record Group 349     Records of Joint Commands (A*)

RECORDS OF THE FAR EAST COMMAND (FEC) (B*)

[Paragraph number] The textual records of the Far East command that are part of Record Group 349 include several series of general records of Headquarters, FEC, records of headquarters staff sections, and records of the Combined Command for Reconnaissance Activities, Korea.  For the most part, these records date from the later period of the Korean War and into the postwar era, primarily the years 1953-1954.  They clearly indicate that the Korean War was but part of the theater-wide interests of the FEC, which also had responsibilities such as providing military assistance to the Republic of China on Taiwan, supporting French military activities in Indochina, administering the civil government in the Ryukyus, and preparing to terminate the military occupation in Japan. (B*)

[Paragraph number] The J-3 security-classified (H*) correspondence relating to strategic plans and operations of the armed forces in Korea, January 1946-October 1953 (C*) [NLM-4, Entry 74] (D*) (4 ft.) (E*) is arranged by control number (401-655, with gaps).  (F*) The series contains Far East Command operational plans, strategic studies, and other formerly top secret reports, prepared or maintained by the Joint Strategic Plans and Operations Group (JSPOG) at Headquarters, FEC.  The plans, studies, and reports relate to specific contingencies planned for prior to the Korean War's outbreak in June 1950, to operations actually conducted during the war, and to a variety of post-armistice contingencies.  (G*) A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request. (I*)

I.7

Descriptive entries for some small textual series (under 5 inches) or others that are essentially unarranged do not include arrangement statements.  Other series are more complex. For example, some (usually the large military and State Department decimal correspondence files) are composed of "security-classified" and "unclassified" sub series.  These large series also tend to be divided into chronological segments that consist of functional sections (e.g., "decimal correspondence," "project files").  These sections may be further subdivided into topical and subtopical categories, under which records are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  Series descriptions in this RIP are arranged to reflect and clarify such organizational complexities through the use of hierarchically nested series, sub series, segment, section, and subsection files.

I.8

The description of textual records within a specific file or file category includes the file number (e.g., 319.1) and, when appropriate, the file or file category file.  When clarification is needed to locate the files cited, box numbers also are included in the descriptions.  In addition, the file or file category linear measurement may be provided.  However, many decimal file categories contain a mixture of records that are both relevant and irrelevant to a specific descriptive topic.  In those cases, there is no file size citation; description focuses on specific types of records within the file category, folder title or (less frequently) box number.  There are file size measurements for most Department of State decimal correspondence file and diplomatic post records series descriptions.  There are fewer file size measurements for Army, Air Force, and Department of Defense decimal correspondence file series. 

I.9

Nontextual records descriptions in Parts IV, V, and VI of this paper basically consist of the same elements that appear in textual records descriptions.  There is one exception: NARA has assigned series designators to many of its special media series.  This series designator is useful to researchers seeking information about the contents of a specific nontextual series in the NARA Archival Research Catalog (ARC) database (I.13).  For that reason, assigned series designators are cited as part of the nontextual records series descriptions in this paper.  The following example illustrates description of a still picture series.  (See I.5 for the letter key to descriptive elements.)

Record Group III    Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer (A*)

[Paragraph number] The series of color photographs of Signal Corps activity, 1944-81 (C*) [III-C} (D*) (ca. 102,300 prints, negatives, slides, and transparencies) (587 ft.) (E*) provides images of combat, Army posts, equipment, guns and weapons, aircraft, military units and exercises, special forces, medical facilities and procedures, military ceremonies, American and foreign prisoners of war, foreign landscapes and populations, foreign armies and equipment, and artwork from the U.S. Army Art Collection of the U.S. Army Center of Military History.  (G*) Typed captions appear on the backs of prints.  Most negatives, transparencies, and slides also have captions, noted either on envelope jackets or on accompanying slips of paper. 111-C is divided into two parts (by size--8x10 in. and 4x5 in.) and arranged thereunder numerically by Signal Corps assigned "C" or ""CC" number (F*).  Combat theater of operations photography within this series derives mostly from the Korean and Vietnam Wars.  Korean War images focus heavily on Army weapons, ordnance, equipment, and combat support operations.  Other items document forces deployed in or moving toward combat areas such as the Naktong River front (August 1950), the Han River (February 1951), and the Chorwon and Kumhwa valleys (the "Iron Triangle" area) (1951-52).  Many images document the day to day activities and living conditions of U.S. Army and some U.N. armed forces in the field.  111-C also includes a few photographic portraits of individual Korean citizens and scenes of daily commerce and activity among the Korean populace. (G*)

Related Finding Aids

I.10

Several other NARA publications supplement or amplify the research information contained in this RIP.  A good starting point is the ""Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" (1995).  This guide provides a concise overview of all permanently accessioned Federal agency records (textual, electronic, cartographic and architectural, still picture, motion picture, sound recording, and video) in the regional and headquarters facilities of the National Archives of the United States (exclusive of the individual Presidential libraries) as of October 1, 1994.  Descriptive entries are arranged by record group and include agency histories, subgroup and series titles, dates, linear measurements, contents, facility locations, citations to relevant NARA descriptive publications and microfilm editions, and notes on access restrictions. The "Guide" index provides access to entries and descriptions that relate to subjects, such as "Korea," "Korean War," "North Korea," and "South Korea."  NARA regularly updates record and agency descriptions in the electronic version of the Guide, which is available through the Internet on the NARA web site www.archives.gov/research_room/federal_records_guide/.

I.11

NARA has 10 preliminary inventories that provide descriptive information about the textual records of specific record groups mentioned in this RIP.  All of these are out of print, but may be available in the Textual Reference Room in College Park, MD.

1. "Supplement to Preliminary Inventory No. 6, Records of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery" [Record Group 52] (NM-48), compiled by Harry Schwartz (1965).

2. "Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General" [Record Group 92] (NM-81), compiled by Maizie H. Johnson (1967).

3. "Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the Office of the Surgeon General (Army)" [Record Group 112] (NM-20), compiled by Patricia Andrews and revised by Garry Ryan (1964).

4. "Preliminary Inventory of the Seized Enemy Records in the Office of Military Archives" [Record Group 242] (NM-44), compiled by Cleveland F. Collier, Ignaz Ernst, Steven Pinter, Julius Wildstosser, and Donald E. Spencer (1965).

5. "Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Army Staff, 1939-" [Record Group 310 plus Record Groups 247 and 407] (NM-3), compiled by Helene I. Bowen, Mary Jo Head, Jessie T. Midkiff, and Olive K. Liebman (1962).

6. "Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense" [Record Group 330] (NM-12), compiled by Helene L. Bowen, Mary Joe Head, Jessie T. Midkiff, and Olive K. Liebman (1962).

7. "Records of the Headquarters, United Nations Command" [Record Group 333] (Preliminary Inventory 127), compiled by Paul Taborn and Andrew Putignano (1960). 

8. "Preliminary Inventory of the Records of Interservice Agencies" [Record Group 334] (NM-16), compiled by Olive K. Liebman, Jessie T. Midkiff, and Mary Joe Minor (1963).

9. "Preliminary Inventory of the Records of Headquarters United States Air Force" [Record Group 341] (NM-15), compiled by Helen L. Bowen, Olive K. Liebman, Jessie T. Midkiff, and Mary Joe Minor (1963).

10. "Preliminary Inventory of the Records of Joint Commands" [Record Group 349] (NM-4), compiled by Mary Joe Head and Jessie T. Midkiff (1962). 

These publications usually consist of series descriptions (series title, dates, measurement, arrangement, subject content) organized hierarchically by creating agency. 

I.12

Many other NARA publications are listed in the Select List of Publications of the National Archives and Records administration (GIL 3), which also provides information on ordering and purchasing NARA books and pamphlets.  Copies of the select list can be obtained from:

Publications Distribution (NWCCI)
National Archives and Records Administration
700 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20408-0001
Telephone: 202-501-5235/1-866-325-7208
FAX: 202-501-7170

General Information Leaflet (GIL) 3 is also available through the Internet at www.archives.gov/publications/select_list_of_publications.html.

I.13

The NARA Archival Research Catalog (ARC) database (available through the Internet on the NARA website at www.archives.gov/research_roonm/arc/) is a useful tool for obtaining information about special media records that pertain to Korean War research.  For example, the database includes field searchable descriptions for most of the still picture records series in the National Archives.  In addition, ARC includes descriptive information about individual items from the largest and most significant Army (Record Group 111) and Navy (Record Group 428) motion picture film series.  ARC is a relatively new information resource.  At the time of this writing it covers only a small fraction of the holdings of the National Archives, but updates to the descriptions of nontextual records occur on a continuous basis, and there are plans to add more textual records descriptions to the database in the near future.

Acknowledgments

I.14

The main compiler of RIP 103 was Rebecca Collier (Parts I, II, V, and VI).  Ed Schamel and Kristen Wilhelm of the NARA Center for Legislative Records contributed Part III.  Tim Wehrkamp contributed Part IV.  The planning and initial writing and research for RIP 103 was conducted mostly by members of the Modern Military Records (NWCTM) staff.  Staff members volunteered to write the initial descriptions for various record groups--Susan Francis-Haughton (RGs 175 and 112), Dave Giodano (RG 342), Ken Heger (RGs 24, 38, 39, 84, 273, and 306), Tim Nenninger (RGs 330 and 554), Patrick Osborn (RGs 19, 24, 38, 52, 72, 74, 127, 313, and 428), Ken Schlessinger (RGs 218, 263, and 341), Army Schmidt (RG 156), Charlotte Seeley (RG 247).  Other staff members volunteered to conduct research--Richard Boylan (RG 242, and the KMAG portion of 554), Wil Mahoney (RGs 319, 340, and 330), Cliff Snyder (RG 111), and Jeannine Swift (RG 335 and the UNC section in RG 554).  Terri Hanna volunteered to design and print out the RG 407 Korean Command Report database.  Two non-NWCTM staff members volunteered their assistance as well--Bill Getchell wrote part of the description for RGs 338 and 554, and Tim Wehrkamp wrote the product plan and edited several of the initial descriptions.

I.15

Several NARA staff members (some previously mentioned) reviewed drafts of this paper for subject content and phrasing, sharing their expertise and experience in ways that have added clarity, depth, and perspective to the narrative.  The compiler thanks Daryl Bottoms, Barbara Burger, Bill Getchell, Susan Francis-Haughton, Ken Schlessinger, Debby Lelansky, Richard Smith, Tim Wehrkamp, and Kris Wilhelm for their indispensable and much appreciated comments and suggestions.  Several individuals affiliated with the Access Programs Staff have influenced and shaped the format and presentation of this paper.  Tim Wehrkamp's organization and descriptive approaches in Reference Information Papers 102 and 107 served as models for this one.  Benjamin DeWhitt made several editorial suggestions based on his extensive experience in describing NARA records and edited the manuscript.  Katherine Coram's copy editing made the book more consistent and accessible.  Susan Carroll's index has provided the paper with a clear and comprehensive subject focus that is critical for any finding and publication.  Sharon Thibodeau, Director of Access Programs, and Sandra Glasser, Manager of the Product Development Staff, provided encouraging advice for addressing various issues associated with this project.  Therefore, the work of a compiler reflects the knowledge, dedication, and sustained efforts of many people. 

The compiler wishes to dedicate this RIP to the men and women who served in the Korean War.

SOURCES OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT RECORDS DESCRIBED IN THIS PAPER
 

NARA Records Source of Additional Information
Part II

Textual Records of Military and Civilian Organizations

Textual Reference Division
National Archives at College Park
8601 Adelphi Road
College Park, MD 20740-600l
Telephone: 301-837-3510 (Modern Military Records)
301-837-3480 (Civilian Records)
Part III

Textual Records of the U.S. Congress

Center for Legislative Archives
National Archives and Records Administration
700 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20408-0001
Telephone: 202-501-5350
Part IV

Photographs

Still Picture Branch
Special Media Archives Services Division
National archives at College Park
8601 Adelphi Road
College Park, MD 20740-6001
Telephone: 301-837-0561
Part V

Motion Pictures, Sound Recordings, and Video Recordings

Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch
Special Media Archives Services Division
National Archives at College Park
8601 Adelphi Road
College Park, MD 20740-6001
Telephone: 301-837-3520
Part VI

Maps, Plans, and Engineer Drawings

Cartographic and Architectural Records Branch
Special Media Archives Services Division
National Archives at College Park
8601 Adelphi Road
College Park, MD 20740-60001
Telephone: 301-837-3200

 


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PART II

TEXTUAL RECORDS
RELATING TO THE KOREAN WAR

 

Contents - Part II

Record Group 19 Records of the Bureau of Ships
Record Group 24 Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel

  • Records of the Decorations and Medals Branch
  • Records of the Casualty Assistance Branch
  • Records of the Policy Division

Record Group 38 Records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations

  • Records of the Office of Naval Intelligence
    • Records of the Foreign Intelligence Branch
    • Records of the POW Desk, Operational Section

Record Group 52 Records of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery
Record Group 74 Records of the Bureau of Ordnance
Record Group 84 Records of the Foreign service Posts of the Department of State
Record Group 92 Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General (OQMG)

  • OQMG Central Correspondence Files
  • Records of the Office of the Quartermaster Historian
  • Records of the Memorial Division
  • Records of the Procurement Division
  • Records Relating to Food Services, Preparation, and Research

Record Group 111 Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer

  • Records of the Executive Office
  • Records of the Control Division
  • Records of the Army Communications Service Division
  • Records of the Army Pictorial Services Division
  • Records of the Office of Inspector General
  • Records of the Legal Division
  • Records of the Personnel Training Division
  • Records of the Plans and Operations Division
  • Records of the Procurement and Distribution Division
  • Records of the Research and Development Division
  • Records of the Signal Corps Center

Record Group 112 - Records of the Office of the Surgeon General (Army)

  • Records of the Historical Division
  • Other Records

Record Group 127 - Records of the U.S. Marine Corps
Record Group 156 - Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance

  • Records of the Executive Office
  • Records of the Inspector General Office
  • Records of the Legal Division
  • Records of the Office of the Ordnance Comptroller
  • Records of the Field Services Division
  • Records of the Industrial Division
    • Records of the Weapons and Fire Control Branch, Plans & Policy Section
    • Records of the Ammunition Branch
    • Records of the Automotive Branch
  • Records of the Plans and Programs Division
  • Records of the Research and Development (R&D) Division
    • Records of the Ammunition Branch
    • Records of the Artillery Branch
    • Records of the Rocket Branch
    • Records of the Small Arms Branch
    • Records of the Artillery and Vehicle Systems Branch
    • Records of the Infantry and Aircraft Weapons Systems Branch
  • Other Records

Record Group 175 - Records of the Chemical Warfare Service
Record Group 218 - Records of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS)
Record Group 242 - National Archives Collection of Foreign Records Seized

  • Collection of Records Seized in Korea 1921-52
  • Korean, Russian and Other Records
  • Shipping Advice Inventory Lists
  • Translations

Record Group 247 - Records of the Office of the Chief of Chaplains
Record Group 263 - Records of the Central Intelligence Agency
Record Group 273 - Records of the National Security Council
Record Group 306 - Records of the U.S. Information Agency
Record Group 313 - Records of Naval Operating Forces
Record Group 319 - Records of the Army Staff

  • Records of the Office of the Chief of Staff (OCS)
  • Records of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1 (Personnel)
  • Records of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2 (Intelligence)
    • Records of the Administrative Division
    • Records of the Cable Section
    • Records of the Document Library Branch
    • Records of the Investigative Records Repository, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command
  • Records of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3 (Operations and Plans)
    • Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, Force Development
    • Records of the Far East and Pacific Branch
  • Records of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff G-4 (Logistics)
    • Records of the Special Ammunition Staff Section
  • Records of the Office of the Comptroller of the Army
    • Records of the Budget Division
    • Records of the Office of the Chief of Foreign Financial Affairs
    • Records of the Program Review and Analysis Division, Records of the Statistics Branch
  • Records of the Office of the Chief of Special Warfare (successor to the Office of the Chief of Psychological Warfare)
  • Records of the Office of the Executive for Reserve and ROTC Affairs
  • Records of the Chief of Civil Affairs
  • Records of the Office of the Chief of Information and Education
  • Records of the Office of the Chief of Military History (OCMH)
  • Records of the United States Army War College

Record Group 330 - Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense

  • Records of the Office of the Administrative Secretary, Correspondence Control Section
  • Records of the Cable Section
  • Records of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs (ASDISA)
  • Records of the Office of Military Assistance (OMA)
  • Records of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower, Personnel, and Reserves Personnel Policy Board
  • Records of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Legislative and Public Affairs, Office of Public Information
  • Records of the Special Assistant to the Secretary of Defense

Record Group 334 - Records of Interservice Agencies
Record Group 335 - Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Army

  • Records Relating to Official Actions of the United States Army Chief of Staff
  • Records Relating to the National Security Council
  • Records of the Office of the Under Secretary of the Army
    • General Correspondence Files and Indexes
    • Other Records
  • Records of the Army Representative on the Munitions Board
  • Records of the Army Policy Council

Record Group 338 - Records of Army Operational, Tactical, and Support Organizations (World War I and Thereafter)

  • Records of United States Army Commands During the Korean War
    • Records of the Eighth Army
      • Records of the Chief of Staff, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Adjutant General Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Armor Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Artillery Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Aviation Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Chaplain Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Chemical Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Engineer Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Finance Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of Headquarters, Special Troops, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Information Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Inspector General Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Judge Advocate Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Labor Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Medical Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Military History Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Ordnance Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Provost Marshal Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Quartermaster Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Signal Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Special Services Section, Eighth Army
      • Records of the Transportation Section, Eighth Army
    • Records of Corps
      • Records of I Corps
      • Records of IX Corps
      • Records of X Corps
    • Records of Divisions
    • Records of Nonorganic Units

Record Group 340 - Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force

  • Records of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force, Materiel
  • Records of the Office of Information Services
  • Records of the Air Coordinating Committee Liaison Section
  • Records of the Munitions Board

Record Group 341 - Records of Headquarters U.S. Air Force (Air Staff)

  • Records of the Director of Plans
  • Records of the Director of Intelligence

Record Group 342 - Records of U.S. Air Force Commands, Activities, and Organizations

  • Records of the Engineering Division, Air Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH
  • Mission Reports
  • Recent Accessions

Record Group 389 - Records of the Office of the Provost Marshal General, 1941-

  • Records of the United States Army Prisoner of War/Civilian Internee Information Center (USPWCHC)

Record Group 407 - Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1917-

  • The Adjutant General (AG) Central Decimal File, 1940-62
    • AG Central Decimal File
  • Records of the Legislative and Precedent Branch
  • Records of the Operations Branch, Administrative Services Division
  • Other Records

Record Group 428 - General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1947-
Record Group 550 - Records of the United States Army, Pacific

  • Records of the Military History Office, United States Army, Pacific

Record Group 554 - Records of the General Headquarters, Far East command, the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, and the United Nations Command, 1945-57

  • Records of the Far East Command, 1950-52
    • Records of the Chief of Staff, Far East Command
    • Records of the Public Information Office, Far East Command
    • Records of the Joint Strategic Plans and Operations 137 Group (JSPOG), Far East Command
    • Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1, Far East Command
    • Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Far East Command
    • Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, Far East Command
    • Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4, Far East Command
    • Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-5, Far East Command
    • Records of the Adjutant General Section, Far East Command
    • Records of the Chemical Section, Far East Command
    • Records of the Civil Information and Education (CI&E) Section, Far East Command
    • Records of the Medical Section, Far East Command
    • Records of the Military History Section, Far East Command
    • Records of the Provost Marshal Section, Far East Command
    • Records of the Psychological Warfare Section (PSYWAR), Far East Command
    • Records of the Signal Section, Far East Command
  • Records of the Far East Command (FEC), 1953-54
    • Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Joint Staff, Far East Command
    • Records of the Office of the Adjutant General, Far East Command
    • Records of Headquarters Staff Sections, Far East Command
    • Records of the Combined Command For Reconnaissance Activities, Korea (8242nd Army Unit) (CCRAK)
  • Other Records Relating to the Far East Command
  • Records of Headquarters, United Nations Command
    • Records of the Secretary, General Staff, United Nations Command
    • Records of the J-1 Personnel Division, United Nations Command
    • Records of the J-3 Section, United Nations Command
    • Records of the Adjutant General Section, United Nations Command
    • Records of the Civil Information & Education Section, United Nations command
    • Records of the Liaison Section, United Nations Command
      • Records of the Secretary, General Staff
      • Records of the Adjutant General Section, Mail & Records Division
    • Records of the United Nations Command Military Armistice Commission
      • Records of the Secretariat
      • Records of the Logistics and Liaison Division
    • Records of the United Nations Command Planning Group, Administrative Office
    • Records of the United Nations Command Repatriation Group
      • Records of the Adjutant General Section
  • Records of Headquarters, United Nations Command/U.S. Forces Korea (UNC/USFK)
    • Records of the Armistice Affairs Division
  • Records of Headquarters, Army Forces, Far East and Predecessor Commands
    • Records of Headquarters, Army Forces, Far East (HQ AFFE)
    • Records of the Adjutant General Section, Army Forces, Far East
    • Records of the Provost Marshal Section, Army Forces, Far East
    • Records of the Military History Officer, Army Forces, Far East
    • Other Records Relating to Army Forces, Far East
  • Records of the Japan Logistical Command (JLC)
  • Records of Other Commands
    • Records of the Korea Military Advisory Group (KMAG)
      • General Records of the Adjutant General Section
        • Records of the Adjutant General Section, Administrative Services Division
    • Records of the 2nd Logistical Command
    • Records of the 3rd Logistical Command
    • Records of the Korean Communications zone (KCOMZ)
      • Records of the Korean Base Section
    • Records of the Prisoner of War Command
    • Records of the United Nations Civil Assistance Command, Korea (UNCACK)

PART II

Record Group 19 - Records of the Bureau of Ships

II.1 The Bureau of Ships (BUSHIPS) supervised the design, construction, conversion, procurement, maintenance, and repair of ships and other craft for the U.S. Navy.  The Bureau also developed specifications for the various components and supplies used to construct and maintain naval vessels and coordinated all Department of Defense (DoD) shipbuilding activities. During the Korean War, the Chief of BUSHIPS was Rear Adm. David H. Clark (1949-February 1951), followed by Rear Adm. Homer N. Wallin (February 1951-August 1953).

II.2 The bulk of the records created during the Korean War consist of unclassified and formerly classified general correspondence, 1940-62 [for the 1950-53 period: A1, Entries 1004-1007, 1017E-1017H, and 1017AA-1017AF] (3,283 ft).  Correspondence files are arranged by year, thereunder by security classification, thereunder according to the Navy Filing Manual, and thereunder in reverse chronological order.  Documents relating to a particular ship are filed under its hull designation (e.g., BB63 for the battleship USS Missouri), while documents relating to insulation and lagging would be found under filing classification S39 and documents concerning fire control systems would be under filing classification S71.  Filing classifications may also be used in combination (e.g., BB/S71 for fire control aboard battleships).  In addition to correspondence files, there is also a smaller volume of ship specification files, design history and data files, documents relating to war damage and protection of ships, and technical manuals.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.3 Damage Control Books, 1942-64 [UD, Entry 1053B] (120 ft.), are arranged by hull designation (mostly APD, DD, DE, and LST).  The books were "prepared to assist in the understanding and teaching of damage control by embodying in a single volume the fundamental principles of damage control, together with sufficient data to apply these principles" to specific ships or types of ships.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

Record Group 24 - Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel

II.4 The Bureau of Naval Personnel (BUPERS), established in 1942 with the abolition of the Bureau of Navigation, administered all personnel matters for the U.S. Navy.  This included training and educating officers and enlisted personnel; supervising the U.S. Naval Academy and other schools; establishing complements for Navy ships; and the recruiting, assigning, and separating Naval personnel.  During the Korean War, BUPERS was headed by Vice Adm. John W. Roper, followed by Vice Adm. Laurance T. DuBose.

II.5 Deck logs of U.S. Navy ships, 1801-1971 [for the 1945-52 period: A1, Entries 118U-118X] (4,173 ft) are brief records of the daily administrative activities of a ship, that usually include journal-style entries of the ship's administrative activities, location and course of travel, disciplinary procedures, monthly rosters of officers, and any unusual events.  The logs sometime include information related to operational activities.  In addition, when a ship is in port, the log frequently documents the arrivals and departures of individuals and other administrative details.  The level of content and detail vary widely from log to log.  All commissioned Navy ships are required to maintain deck logs.  Among the ships that played prominent roles during the Korea Conflict were the amphibious force flagship Mount McKinley, the battleships Missouri and North Carolina, the cruisers Helena, Juneau, and St. Paul, and the aircraft carriers Boxer, Princeton, and Valley Forge.  There are lists of deck logs.  Each list is arranged by year, and thereunder into two sections.  The first section is an alphabetical list of named vessels.  The second section is a list of unnamed ships arranged alphabetically by hull designation and thereunder by number.  These lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.6 Muster rolls of ships, stations and other naval activities, 1860-1971 [for 1949-56; A1, Entry 1361 (44 ft.), consist of quarterly reports of a ship/unit's enlisted personnel with monthly updates of personnel changes.  For the years of the Korean Conflict, they only list the names of enlisted personnel who were officially attached to a particular ship or nonship unit; they do not list officers.  (Prior to May 1956, names of officers are listed in the ship's deck log for each month.)  Muster rolls typically contain the names, ranks/ratings, and service numbers of the individual servicemen.  Some of the rolls include the original place of enlistment. For the years of the Korean Conflict, muster rolls are arranged by the ship/unit's unique "activity number."  There are two primary finding aids to assist researchers determine pertinent activity numbers.  An electronic database includes the activity numbers for all named ships and some hull designations for unnamed ships.  There are also Navy-created Activity Number Lists.  These lists are divided into two sections.  The first section is arranged alphabetically by name or ship or hull designation.  The second section is arranged alphabetically by the type of nonship unit and thereunder alphabetically or numerically by individual unit.  Both finding aids are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD.

 

RECORDS OF THE DECORATIONS AND MEDALS BRANCH

II.7 Awards given to ships or units during the Korean War are documented in case files for Navy unit commendations and Presidential Unit Citations, 1941-53 [A1, 1032A] (14 ft.).  The records are arranged alphabetically by the name of the ship or unit designation.  The file for each ship or unit generally includes a copy of the unit citation, a list of component or attached units, and a list of names of personnel with those units who were eligible for the award.

II.8 The Branch also kept records documenting awards given to foreign nationals for service during the Korean War.  Documents pertaining to awards given to Korean nationals for service during the conflict can be found in correspondence relating to U.S. Navy awards of armed forces of foreign nations, 1942-63 [A1, Entry 1030) (13 ft.).  The files are arranged alphabetically by country and thereunder chronologically.  The records include copies of the citation, background correspondence relating to the recipient, and "clearances" from the State Department, the Defense Intelligence Agency, and the Office of Naval Intelligence concurring on the award.  Virtually all of the awards are for commendable or meritorious service, mostly awards of Legions of Merit to foreign naval officers.

 

RECORDS OF THE CASUALTY ASSISTANCE BRANCH

II.9 Included in these records are ship, station, unit, and incident casualty information files, 1941-45 and 1950-60 [A1, Entry 1024] (94 ft.).  Documentation covering the 1950-60 period (4 ft.) typically contains lists, radio messages, and correspondence relating to casualties sustained by particular naval organizations or during particular actions or events.  Documentation includes notification received by BUPERS that an individual is a casualty, preliminary reports on the status (confirmed casualty or missing), ultimate disposition of the case (sometimes a finding a year or more after the event of presumptive death), and indication of notification of next of kin.  Some cases contain considerable detail, other cases simply include lists of names.

II.10 Casualty notification case files for Korean War-era Navy POWs and MIAs, 1950-56 [A1, Entry 1025] (2 ft.), are arranged into two sub series--POWs returned to military control and POWs presumed dead.  Both sub series are arranged thereunder alphabetically by surname.  Each file contains correspondence relating to the notification of next of kin that a serviceman is missing and a description of the known circumstances surrounding the incident. Subsequent documentation relates to the individual's ongoing casualty status.  The files relate to all 31 Navy personnel (aviators and hospital corpsmen) who were POWs returned to military control, as well as 5 of the 9 Navy POWs that died in captivity.

II.11 The Casualty Branch also prepared an alphabetical listing of casualties, 1941-45 and 1950-53 [A1, Entry 1026] (5 ft.), that consists of machine-generated lists.  The Korean War list (1 ft.) is arranged alphabetically by surname and include rank, organization, date of casualty, and casualty code (indicating KIA, WIA, POW, or MIA).]

II.12 Post-World War II casualty lists and related records, 1950-59 [A1, Entry 4] (1 ft.), primarily consist of records relating to the Korean Conflict.  These include chronological lists of casualties sustained over distinct periods of the war, alphabetic lists of deceased POW/MIAs, and Naval Academy graduates who became casualties.  There is also a machine-generated list of casualties by state of residence, thereunder arranged alphabetically by surname.  The remainder of this series relates to a Navy PB4Y-2 aircraft shot down by Soviet fighters over the Baltic Sea in April 1950.

 

RECORDS OF THE POLICY DIVISION

II.13 The Policy Division compiled summary periodic statistical reports on military personnel, 1941-1973 [A1, Entry 1018] (12 ft.).  These monthly machine-generated aggregate reports are from 100 to 200 pages in length and contain basic information about numbers of personnel on duty; losses by retirement, resignations, and casualties; and separations, reenlistments, and extensions.

 

Record Group 38 - Records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations

II.14 It was the responsibility of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) to advise the President and Secretary of the Navy on the administration of the Navy and on naval warfare.  It also administered naval programs to support manpower, materiel, weapons, and logistical needs; research and development activities; strategic planning; and the organization, training, and readiness of forces.  The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) was chief officer of OPNAV.  The CNO commanded the naval operating forces and was responsible to the Secretary of the Navy for their use, as well as for the coordination and direction of the activities of the bureaus and offices of the Department of the Navy in meeting the personnel and materiel requirements of the operating forces.  He was also a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and, as such, participated in the strategic direction of the armed forces.  The CNOs during the Korean War were Adm. Forrest P. Sherman (November 1949-July 1951), followed by Adm. William M. Fechteler (August 1951-August 1953).  Although post-World War II OPNAV and CNO records remain with the Navy, the National Archives has custody of some records of the subordinate Office of Naval Intelligence created during the Korean War.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF NAVAL INTELLIGENCE

II.15 Although the Office was established in 1882, the responsibilities of ONI were not codified until after World War II.  Under the 1946 Navy Regulations, ONI was formally assigned cognizance over the collection, evaluation, and dissemination of intelligence within the Naval establishment under OPNAV.  During the Korean War, the head of ONI, or Director of Naval Intelligence (DNI), was Rear Adm. Felix L. Johnson (September 1949-June 1952), followed by Rear Adm. Richard F. Stout (July-November 1952), and Rear Adm. Carl F. Espe (December 1952-May 1956).

II.16 ONI intelligence reports (IRs), 1947-55 [A1, Entries 1001A-1001P and UD, Entry 85] (628 ft.) primarily consist of reports submitted by naval attaches posted in foreign capitals around the world and cover a wide variety of topics--economic, political and military.  For 1950, the only year of the Korean War period for which these documents are currently available, these reports are divided into two sub series: confidential [A1, Entry 1001E] (46 ft.); and secret [A1, Entry 1001F] (22 ft.).  Included among these are reports compiled in Moscow (2 ft.), Taipei (1 ft.), and Seoul (1 ft.).  The records of the Naval Attaché Moscow, 1943-53 [UD, Entry 43) (10 ft.), also include a small amount of documentation (5 in.), from the Korean Conflict, as do the records of the Naval Attaché Tokyo, 1952-53 [UD, Entry 58] (5 in.) and Naval Attaché Taipei, 1953-55 [UD, Entry 59] (3 ft.).

 

RECORDS OF THE FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE BRANCH

II.17 The series Requirements Desk of the Collection and Dissemination Section, 1949-53 [UD, Entry 18] (1 ft.), includes records of military attaché conferences held in the several months prior to the outbreak of war in the Far East (5 in.).  These conferences involved lengthy discussions about the military capabilities and political aims of the Communist bloc.

 

RECORDS OF THE POW DESK, OPERATIONAL SECTION

II.18 The records of the POW Desk, Operational Section, 1949-54 [UD, Entry 42] (14 ft.), are primarily concerned with the Korean Conflict.  Some of the records relate to training, doctrine, and equipment utilized by Communist bloc naval and military forces, rosters of POWs, and repatriation.  The bulk of the series, however, pertains to the treatment and interrogation of POWs captured by both U.N. and Communist forces and resistance to Communist indoctrination.  They are arranged according to the Navy Filing Manual.  Folder lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 52 - Records of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery

II.19 The Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) managed all naval hospitals and other medical-related facilities such as laboratories, supply depots, and the Naval Medical Center.  It also supervised the operation of all technical schools established for the education of members of the Medical corps, Dental Corps, Nurse Corps, and Hospital Corps.  The specific mission of BUMED was the maintenance of the health of the Navy, care of its sick and wounded, and professional education and training of officers and enlisted personnel.  Rear Adm. Herbert L. Pugh was chief of the bureau during the entire period of the Korean War.

II.20 BUMED headquarters general correspondence, 1926-76, known as Administrative Division general correspondence from 1952, is divided into several chronological segments, two of which cover the Korean War period--1947-51 [NM-48, Entry 15C] (89 ft.) and 1952-55 [A1, Entry 1004] (220 ft.),--and is arranged according to the Navy Filing Manual.  The footage for entry 1004 is for 1952-55 only; the entire entry totals 878 feet.  Index to general correspondence "history card," 1947-71 [NM-48, Entry 16C and A1, Entry 1003] (90 ft.), includes many index headings for Korean War-related topics, including Korea, mobilization, mobile medical and dental units of various types, prisoners of war, and casualties.  Information found on the "history cards" includes the date of correspondence, the specific subject, and the filing designation under which the correspondence was filed.

II.21 Medical Corps general correspondence, 1919-57 [A1, Entry 1012] (47 ft.), is arranged chronologically and thereunder by subject.  The segment that covers the years 1950-53 (3 ft.) includes subjects such as Fleet Marine Force, miscellaneous units, naval hospitals, and ships.  The correspondence relates to the qualifications, recruitment, training, assignment, and strength of medical personnel throughout the Naval establishment.

 

Record Group 59 - General Records of the Department of State

II.22 Established in 1789 as the first executive department of the Federal Government, the Department of State assists the President in planning and implementing his constitutional responsibility for conducting relations with foreign governments.  State Department responsibilities related to the Korean War included collaboration with the National Security Council on the development of foreign and military policies in the Far East, coordinating U.N. military activities and civil assistance programs, and negotiating levels of military and economic assistance with officials of the Republic of Korea.  Dean Acheson and John Foster Dulles served as Secretary of State during the Korean War, 1949-53 and 1953-59, respectively.  Three assistant secretaries for Far Eastern Affairs, Dean Rusk, U. Alexis Johnson, and Walter S. Robertson, were largely responsible for the conduct of diplomatic negotiations with South Korean President Syngman Rhee.

 

CENTRAL FOREIGN POLICY FILE OF THE UNITED STATES

II.23 The most important source of information on diplomatic relations during the Korean War is the central foreign policy file of the Department of State, which includes the decimal file, 1910-63.  The long title is "central foreign policy file of the United States," but the collection is generally referred to as the "central file."  The pre-February 1963 "central file" is also known as the "decimal file," reflecting the Department of State's long usage of a decimal classification system to organize its central files.  In 1950, the Department of State implemented an important revision in the decimal classification system governing arrangement of the "decimal file."  Consequently, the 1945-49 decimal file chronological block is arranged in accordance with one system; the 1950-54 decimal file, with another.  File manuals for both systems are maintained by the Textual Archives Services Division (Civilian) in College Park, MD.

II.24 Within the decimal file the component "decimal file, 1945-54" (3,619 ft.), is arranged by chronological blocks (1945-49 and 1950-54) and thereunder according to a State Department-devised subject and country file classification system that underwent major revision in 1950.  To assist researchers with these arrangement details, the Textual Reference Division of the National Archives at College Park, MD, maintains State Department file manuals and National Archives informational handouts that facilitate access to documents in this series.  Onsite researchers can also use State Department-created name index card, source index card, and "purport" list series to identify documents in the decimal file.

II.25 The "decimal file, 1945-54" provides significant information about the State Department's activities prior to and during the Korean War.  The records include documentation such as diplomatic and consular correspondence, telegrams, dispatches, and instructions; correspondence between the Department of State and other Federal agencies; summaries of newspaper accounts of the war from around the world; and information pertaining to psychological warfare.  Many relevant decimal files are listed below.  Other pertinent file designations may be determined by examining the Department of State's file manual and State Department publications, such as "Foreign Relations of the United States."  Reference copies for some of the cited decimal files are contractor-produced 35mm microfilm publications (noted parenthetically in the decimal file descriptions).  Researchers may view these reels in the Microfilm Reading Room in College Park, MD, or purchase copies upon request.  Appendix D provides more information about microfilmed records cited in this reference information paper.  The following files are some examples of topics covered in the records:

  1. File 330, 1950-54 (1 ft.), includes American activities on the U.N. Security Council
  2. File 611.95, 1950-54 (7 in.), includes American relations with the Korean peninsula
  3. File 795.00, 1950-54 (4 ft.) (contract microfilm LM-81[SR], rolls 1-29), contains political matters in the Korean peninsula
  4. File 795.5, 1950-54 (2 in.) (contract microfilm LM-81[SR], rolls 29-30), pertains to military/defense matters in the Korean peninsula
  5. File 795.56, 1950-54 (2 in.) (contract microfilm LM-71[SR], roll 30), includes military equipment and supply issues in the Korean peninsula
  6. File 611.95A, 1950-54 (1 ft.), concerns American relations with North Korea
  7. File 795A.00, 1950-54 (3 in.), includes political matters in North Korea
  8. File 611.95B, 1950-54 (1 in.), contains American relations with South Korea
  9. File 795B.00, 1950-54 (1 ft.), concerns political matters in South Korea
  10. File 795B, 1950-54 (3 ft.), pertains to military/defense matters in South Korea.  This file provides extensive cable traffic, correspondence, and other records created or amassed by the Department of State concerning the diplomatic aspects of the war.

II.26 Researchers may also wish to examine the following file categories:

  1. File 511.00, 1950-54 (6 ft.), concerns general American informational programs worldwide.  This file designation includes instructions and techniques devised to counter Communist anti-American propaganda during the Korean War
  2. File 611.93, 1950-54 (1 ft.) (contract microfilm LM-151[UPA], rolls 3-6), pertains to Sino-American relations
  3. File 793.00, 1950-54 (6 ft.) (contract microfilm LM-152[UPA], rolls 1-13), includes political matters in the People's Republic of China
  4. File 793.5, 1950-54 (3 ft.) (contract microfilm LM-152 [UPA], rolls 20-26), concerns military/defense matters in the People's Republic of China

 

RECORDS OF THE BUREAU OF FAR EASTERN AFFAIRS

II.27 The Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs was responsible for managing relations of the United States with all nations of Far Eastern and Southeastern Asia and the South Pacific Islands.  The Bureau was involved in area politics, security, economics, public affairs, social affairs, and consular activities.  It also maintained and supervised relations with Far Eastern missions in the United States and guided U.S. Foreign Service organizations in the Far East.  The Bureau's constituent offices handled issues in smaller geographic areas.  For example, the Office of Northeast Asian Affairs dealt with Korea, China, and Japan, and the Office of Chinese Affairs with China.  Reference copies for several of these series are microfilm publications available for viewing in the Microfilm Reading Room, in College Park, MD.  Further information on these publications is available in Appendix D.

II.28 In June 1950, with the outbreak of combat operations in Korea, the Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs began to collect records relating to the war.  The resulting "Black Book," initiated by Dean Rusk while he was Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs, documents State Department and Defense Department efforts to negotiate a cease-fire agreement.  Sixteen of the chronologically arranged "Black Book" volumes are in the series "Black Book on cease-fire, December 12, 1950-December 25, 1952" [A1, Entry 1256] (3 ft.) (Lot File 55D128) (contract microfilm C-0042 [UPA], rolls 1-7).  Each volume includes Department of State letters, memorandums, communiqués, press releases, memorandums of conversation, Department of State and Department of the Army telegrams, intelligence reports, extracts from National Security Council numbered documents, and various drafts and notes.  There are tables of contents for most volumes.  Within each volume there are also lists of its top secret security-classified documents.  Box 1 of the series includes a series box contents list.  The series reference copy is the 7-roll microfilm publication cited above.

II.29 The "Korean War Black Book, January 1, 1954-December 1954," section (1 ft.) of files relating to Southeast Asia and the Geneva Conference, 1954 [A1, Entry 1200] (7 ft.) (Lot Files 55D480 and 55D481), consists of chronologically arranged Department of State and Department of the Army memorandums, statements, messages, reports, memorandums of conversations, and other records that relate to several political and military issues that arose during implementation of armistice agreement provisions.  Some of the records, for example, document procedural disputes between U.N. and Communist forces concerning the Neutral Nations Repatriations Commission's efforts to resolve POW repatriation.  Others detail discussions between the United States and the Republic of Korea concerning postwar economic and assistance, which led to enactment of the Korean Mutual Defense Treaty of 1954.  A fairly large segment of records in this series consists of position papers, comments, and observations pertaining to issues considered and proposals set forth by Department of State staff involved in the Korean Phase sessions of the 1954 Geneva Conference.

II.30 Miscellaneous subject files of the Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs, [1951]-1953 [A1, Entry 1198] (4 ft.) (Lot File 55D388), contain records illuminating U.S. and U.N. views of President Syngman Rhee’s political confrontations with the Republic of Korea National Assembly (spring and summer 1952). British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden’s discussions with Secretary of State John Foster Dulles in Washington on common Far East policy goals (March 1953), South Korean hostility toward continued armistice negotiations (May-June 1953), and initial efforts to stage the fall 1953 Korean political conference mandated by article IV, item 60 of the Korean War armistice agreement. [Endnote 1]

II.31 With the United Nations Command’s successful blunting of communist offensive actions in the winter and spring of 1951, President Truman sought to forge a policy that would provide sharper focus to U.S. war aims in Korea and open the door for a negotiated settlement of hostilities. Truman began this quest with a thorough solicitation of views from his chief allies, military commanders, and foreign policy advisors. Much of the resulting documentation and State Department analysis is present in relevant reports, memorandums of conversation, instructions, guidelines, and position papers found in the subject file, 1945-53 [A1, Entry 1222] (1 ft.), and the general correspondence, 1945-53 [A1, Entry 1223] (1 ft.) (both in Lot Files 54D278, 58D529 and 56D527) (contract microfilm C-0044 [UPA], rolls 1-4), known as "records of the Director of the Office of Northeast Asian Affairs (U. Alexis Johnson), 1945-53.} During the Korean War, Johnson served as Director of the Office of Northeast Asian Affairs, and later as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs. His files are particularly instructive for the light they cast on views expressed in the winter and spring of 1951 by Great Britain, South Korea, and General Ridgway on the desirability and potential scope of negotiations with Communist forces. Johnson’s files also include dispatches, correspondence, telegrams, and other documents relating to topics such as potential U.N. courses of military policy and action in response to Communist force advances in the winter of 1950-51, General MacArthur’s policies and actions as Commander in Chief of U.N. forces, and program and staffing needs for a plan of economic aid and assistance to the Republic of Korea (1950-51).

II.32 Records [of the Office of Northeast Asian Affairs] relating to foreign policy decisions, 1950-56 [A1, Entry 1221] (2 ft.), (Lot Files 58D184, 58D208 and 59D476) (contract microfilm C-0044 [UPA], rolls 5-6) (see Appendix D), include documentation concerning issues that arose during late stages of the armistice negotiations and continued into the immediate postwar period. There are, for example, aide-memoires, memorandums of conversation, and other records concerning U.S. negotiations with President Syngman Rhee to elicit or force his acquiescence to continued United Nations Command armistice negotiations with Communist forces in the spring and summer of 1953. The results of these efforts are documented in series records such as a copy of the U.S. aide memoire delivered to President Rhee by Gen. Mark Clark, Commander in Chief, United Nations Command, and Ellis O. Briggs, U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea, on May 28, 1953, and in file documents relating to the visit of Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs Walter S. Robertson with Rhee in June and July, 1953. The aide memoire and related records are located in Folders "III-2 Korea Armistice, 1953-54" and "III-4 Armistice Negotiations, 1953-54". The aide memoire suggested terms of the Korean Mutual Defense Treaty of 1954. Robertson’s discussions with Rhee in Seoul are partially documented in folder "III-21 Robertson-Rhee Meetings, 1953." Other records, chiefly memorandums of conversations between the Department of State and Government of India diplomatic officials, detail disputes and controversies confronted by the Neutral Nations Repatriation Commission while carrying out its POW repatriation responsibilities and Indian criticism of the U.S. and U.N. for failure to support the commission. Additional reports illustrate issues raised by the Republic of Korea and India concerning participation in the postwar political conference recommended in article IV, item 60 of the armistice agreement.

II.33 The briefing books and reference materials relating to Korea [maintained by the Office of Northeast Asian Affairs], 1947-56 [A1, Entry 1225] (2 ft.) (Lot File 60D330) (contract microfilm C-0044 [UPA], rolls 10-14) (see Appendix D), include background material, talking points, correspondence, memorandums of conversation, meeting minutes, and other documents pertaining to several diplomatic issues. In early August 1953 Secretary of State John Foster Dulles met with President Syngman Rhee in Seoul to discuss several issues, including the postwar Korean political conference recommended by armistice negotiators, South Korea’s economic assistance requirements, its relations with Japan, and a United States-Republic of Korea treaty of mutual defense. At the conclusion of these meetings, Rhee and Dulles announced that they had initialed a draft treaty. Records pertaining to these discussions include copies of meeting minutes, joint statements, and various "black books" and briefing papers prepared for use by Dulles in preparation for the talks. Between December 1953 and January 1954 representatives from the People’s Republic of China, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, and the United States met to discuss preliminary arrangements for the Korean political conference recommended by armistice agreement negotiators. Records relating to these inconclusive discussions include transcripts of proceedings and meetings of liaison secretaries, staff advisors, and subcommittees. There are also copies of plenary session proceedings, briefing and background papers, and other records pertaining to the Korean Phase of the 1954 Geneva Conference. Other records in the series focus on actions of the United Nations Commission for the Unification and Rehabilitation of Korea in President Rhee’s dispute with the South Korean National Assembly in 1952.

II.34 The top secret subject file [of the Office of Chinese Affairs], 1945-50 [A1, Entry 399A] (4 ft.) (Lot File 56D151) (contract microfilm C-0012 [UPA], rolls 15-16) (see Appendix D), includes files documenting Office of Chinese Affairs positions on several early Korean War issues and contemplated United Nations Command war actions, including intervention by Communist China, the possibility of Soviet intervention, the bombing of Yalu River hydroelectric facilities (Suiho Dam), "hot pursuit" of Communist aircraft in Manchuria, attacks on Communist airfields in Manchuria, and the acceptance of Chiang Kai-Shek’s offer of Chinese Nationalist troops for combat in Korea.

II.35 File 312.4 (3 in.) in the numeric file of the Office of Chinese Affairs, 1949-55 [A1, Entry 1208] (13 ft.) (Lot File 57D633) (contract microfilm C-0012 [UPA], rolls 21-22), contains documentation on various Korean War issues considered by the United Nations in 1951.

RECORDS OF THE HISTORICAL STUDIES DIVISION

II.36 The Department of State’s Historical Studies Division was responsible for producing historical monographs documenting the course of events in important foreign policy issues. Report lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.37 The series research memorandums ("slash series"), 1946-54 [A1, Entry 1468] (1 ft.) (Lot File 87D236), includes 10 reports dealing with various aspects of the Korean War. Report number RM 51/20, for example, analyzes Communist China’s entry into the war in November, 1950. RM 51/51 evaluates issues in the "Truman-MacArthur controversy." Other reports focus on topics such as Russian policy in the Korean War (RM 53/2), President Truman’s definition of combat in Korea as a "conflict" rather than a "war" (RM 52/39), prisoner of war issues and proposals, and United Nations Command "concessions" to Communist negotiators during the armistice talks (RM 52/30, March 13, 1952).

II.38 The series research projects, 1945-54 [A1, Entry 1471 (11 ft.) (Lot File 87D236), includes 53 relevant reports, including monthly chronologies of principal events relating to the war from June 1950 through June 1953.

II.39 The records of the Historical Division also include the "Korea Project" of the Division of Historical Policy Research, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 1251] (20 ft.) (Lot File 78D174). This project was a large-scale effort to document the events of the Korean War and American diplomacy and policy. The records are arranged chronologically and include embassy and consular dispatches, intelligence estimates and reports, Department of State policy statements, opinion surveys, memorandums of conversations and U.N. agendas and proceedings.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF UNITED NATIONS AFFAIRS

II.40 This office was created in 1955 as the Office of Special Political Affairs and assigned responsibility for international organization, international security, and related affairs. In January 1948 the name of the office was changed to the Office of United Nations Affairs.

II.41 The subject files of the Office of United Nations Political and Security Affairs, 1945-57 [A1, Entry 1265] (6 ft.) (Lot Files 59D237 and 59D742), contain material pertaining to the Korean War, including information on Communist charges that U.N. forces engaged in bacteriological warfare and minutes of ambassadors’ briefings.

 

Record Group 72 - Records of the Bureau of Aeronautics

II.42 The Bureau of Aeronautics (BUAER) was responsible for non-operational matters related to naval aviation, including testing, procurement, maintenance, repair and salvage of aircraft. During the Korean War, the chief of BUAER was Rear Adm. Alfred M. Pride (May 1947-May 1951), followed by Rear Adm. Thomas S. Combs (May 1951-June 1953) and Rear Adm. Apollo Soucek (June 1953-March 1955).

II.43 The preponderance of BUAER records created during the Korean War are found in the unclassified, classified and formerly classified general correspondence, 1922-59] [for the 1`950-55 period: UD, Entries 1001B-1001E and 1004C-1004F] (1,321 ft.). But there are also contract correspondence, 1940-60 [UD, Entry 911] (3,043 ft.), arranged by contract number, drawings of aircraft carriers, 1942-51 [UD, Entry 135] (8 ft.); and quarterly flight deck operations reports, 1936-53 [UD, Entry 132] (8 in.). The correspondence files are arranged according to the Navy Filing Manual. Documents relating to a particular aircraft type were filed under its designation preceded by a "V". For example, the Chance-/Vought Corsair would be found under VF4U, while documents relating to machine guns carried on a particular Corsair variant might be found under VF4U5/F41. Secret correspondence files from the 1950-53 period remain classified.

II.44 In addition to the correspondence, there are several other much smaller record series that include documents from the Korean War period. These include Aeronautical Engine Lab reports, 1922-65 [UD, Entry 95] (45 ft.); aircraft mock-up reports, 1946-56 [UD, Entry 121] (4 ft.); aircraft specifications, 1930-61 [UD, Entry 126] (116 ft.); and formerly classified technical handbooks, 1943-60 [A1, Entry 1003] (16 ft.). Finally, miscellaneous contract records, 1940-60 [UD, Entry 91] (3,043 ft.), pertain to the procurement of aircraft for the Navy and are arranged by contract number. Box lists and other finding aids for these records are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 74 - Records of the Bureau of Ordnance

II.45 The Bureau of Ordnance (BUORD) procured, stored, and issued ordnance and ordnance-related equipment used by the Navy. During the Korean War, the chief of BUORD was Rear Adm. Malcolm F. Schoeffel (1950-54).

II.46 Records created during the Korean War include general correspondence, 1942-59 [A1, Entries 1003A-1005 and 1017A-1071B] (2,115 ft.), which is arranged according to a refined version of the Navy Filing Manual. Of these records, only Entry 1003A (324 ft.) is currently unclassified. Other records that touch on the Korean War era include contract correspondence, 1946-62 [A1, Entry 1018] (524 ft.), arranged by contract number; ordnance specifications, 1949-61 [A1, Entry 1023] (16 ft.), and technical and scientific reports, 1946-61 [A1, Entry 1021A] (1,668 ft.) both of which remain classified; and research and development documents pertaining to guns, gun mounts and breech mechanisms, 1925-53 [A1, Entry 1024] (14 ft.). Box lists and other finding aids for these records are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 84 - Records of the Foreign Service Posts of the Department of State

II.47 Record Group 84 consists of records that were originally created and maintained by American embassies, legations, and consulates. For correspondence between the State Department and foreign service posts, consult the central file records in Record Group 59. Post files may contain correspondence with local officials or with other posts. For a few posts there may be discrete bodies of records relating to unique activities. Foreign Service post files are arranged alphabetically by name of country and thereunder by series and thereunder according to the Department of State’s Foreign Service4 post decimal filing manual. At one time consulate records were maintained in one of two series: unclassified "general records," and as "security classified general records" (now declassified).

II.48 Several declassified series of embassy and consular records that contain substantial documentation of the Korean War are as follows:

  1. Japan - Office of the Political Advisor (POLAD) for Japan classified general records, 1950-52 [UD, Entry 2828] (32 ft.), under file 321 "War. Peace" (3 in.) pertain to the conduct of the war.
  2. Japan - Tokyo Embassy general records, 1952-55 [UD, Entry 2826C] (34 ft.), under file 321 "War. Peace" (1 in.) include documents pertaining to the conduct of the war in the 1952 segment.  The 1953-55 segment under file 310 "Political Conferences" (1 in.), includes documents relating to the international political conference on Korea; file 321 "War. Peace" (2 in.) pertains to the conduct of the war and includes folders on Indian and American troops in the war; and file 321.9 concerns the "Termination of Hostilities" (1 in.).
  3. Japan-Tokyo Embassy classified general records, 1952-55 [UD, Entry 2828A] (54 ft.), under file 321 "War. Peace" (2 in.) include records pertaining to the conduct of the war in the 1952 and 1953-55 segments and under file 321.9 "Termination of Hostilities" (3 in.) in the 1953-55 section.
  4. Korea-Seoul Embassy classified general records, 1953-55 [UD, Entry 2846] (8 ft.), contain documents under file 310 (8 in.) that pertain to the international political conference on Korea and to the Geneva peace conference and under file 321.9 "Armistice Negotiations" (1 ft.) that concern efforts to end the war.
  5. Switzerland-Bern Embassy general records, 1953-55 [UD, Entry 32009B] (7 ft.), include file4 321.9 (2 in.) that relates to the Geneva peace conference.
  6. Switzerland-Geneva Consulate records relating to the Geneva conference, 1954 [UD, Entry 3238] (2 ft.) consist of an extensive subject file maintained by the American delegation to the conference, and includes correspondence, minutes of meetings, and transcripts of speeches.

 

Record Group 92 - Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General (OQMG)

II.49 During the Korean War the Office of the Quartermaster General was the Army's principal procurement and distribution agency for non-ordnance equipment, supplies, and services common to all Army combat arms and services.  The Quartermaster General (QMG) located, purchased, stored, and distributed nearly everything that servicemen ate, wore, slept in, traveled on, or otherwise depended upon, ranging from powdered eggs and field jackets to tents, trucks, fuels, and lubricants.  The QMG also developed commodity selection standards or specifications to ensure that Army equipment and supplies served required needs and purposes.  The Procurement Division and its predecessors carried out much of the acquisition work--determining the availability of raw materials, commodities, and equipment; assessing the needs of Army units and functional areas; and then obtaining and allocating materiel on the basis of its assessments and strategic requirements, OQMG commodity standards and specifications rested on research, development, and field testing evaluations of the Research Division and its predecessors.  The Food Services Division largely determined what Korean War GIs ate and how it was processed, shipped, preserved, prepared, and served.

II.50 Throughout the war, OQMG graves registration service units in Korea and Japan served as the primary agents for recovering and identifying remains of United Nations Command servicemen killed in action.  Working under policies and programs set by the OQMG Memorial Division, these units also provided remains disposition and transportation services.  They also maintained United Nations Command cemeteries in Korea.  The Memorial Division supervised operations of national military cemeteries in the United States and its territories during the Korean War.

II.51 Korean War records of the OQMG were often integrated with World War II records.  The most important Army quartermaster records of the Korean War era are located in the OQMG central correspondence files and within various office files and historical reports maintained by the OQMG historian.  Records relating to American military personnel who were prisoners of war (POWs), missing in action (MIAs), and killed in action (KIAs) are more fully described in Reference Information Paper 102.  The Quartermaster General from March 21, 1949, through September 30, 1951, was Maj. Gen. Herman Feldman.  He was succeeded by Maj. Gen. George A. Horkan, who served from October 9, 1951, to January 31, 1954.

 

OQMG CENTRAL CORRESPONDENCE FILES

II.52 The unclassified general correspondence [relating to places] ("geographic file"), 1936-54 [NM-81, Entries 1892A-E] (720 ft.), is organized into chronological sub=series, arranged thereunder alphabetically by geographic location, and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Korean War-era records are located within the 1949-50, 1951-52, and 1953-54 sub series, under various geographic location terms and decimal file numbers.  Quartermaster Corps activities are most commonly documented in such file classifications as: 319.1 (e.g., progress and personnel reports, forms control and standardization reports); 333.1 (e.g., inspection reports of storage facilities and distribution operations); 337 (conferences, military and naval, and other); 353 (training); 680.35 (memorial services); and 687 (cemeteries).  The unclassified "geographic file" primarily documents QMC activities at specific locations in the U.S. (cities, states, forts, camps, and military cemeteries).  Under names of cemeteries (e.g., "Arlington National Cemetery," "Port Hudson National Cemetery"), decimal classifications 293 and 314.6 contain some records pertaining to funerals, burials, and cemetery maintenance, including burial lists of interred service personnel.  Some records provide information about Quartermaster Corps activities in U.S. territories and foreign countries.  For example within the 1953-54 sub series, under the geographic location "Korea," file 314.6 contains records that deal with the disposition and shipment of deceased personnel remains.  The unclassified "geographic file" generally contains less substantive documentation than the "miscellaneous file" and the "subject file" central correspondence described below.  However, "geographic file" document cross-reference sheets provide leads to correspondence, reports, studies, and other records that may have been maintained by the OQMG within these two series or within other OQMG records series.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request. 

II.53 The formerly classified "geographic file," 1936-52 [NM-81, Entry 1892F] (23 ft.), supplements the general "geographic file" with information considered worthy of a higher security classification.  It is organized into two chronological sub series (1936-45 and 1946-52), arranged thereunder alphabetically by geographic location, and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The series includes reports and other records ranging from topics such as United Nations Command civil assistance activities in Korea (see 1946-52 sub series, "Korea", decimal file 319.1 51 md) to 8th Army and 2nd Logistical Command petroleum operations and facilities in Korea (same sub series and geographic location, decimal file 333.1 1951 mjr).  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.54 Most useful for information concerning overseas operations of Quartermaster corps units are the formerly classified [general correspondence relating to organizational units] "miscellaneous file," 1936-52 [NM-81, Entry 1894D] (27 ft.), and the unclassified general correspondence [relating to organizational units] ("miscellaneous file"), 1939-54 [NM-81, Entry 1894A] (268 ft.).  Each of these series consists of chronologically organized sub series that are arranged alphabetically by category, name of unit, or subject, and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The unclassified 1949-50, 1951-52, and 1953-54, and formerly security-classified 1946-52 sub series are the most relevant for Korean War research.

II.55 A brief overview of Army Quartermaster activities, facilities, and organization in Korea can be found in a copy of the 1952 report "Brochure of Korean Base Section Quartermaster Activities, Prepared for Brigadier General Frank C. Holland" in the formerly security-classified "miscellaneous file," 1946-52, under "Army Forces in Korea," decimal file 401.  Within that same section and sub series, "Far East Command" decimal file 319.25 contains copies of some policy and program correspondence between Brig. Gen. Kester L. Hastings, Far East command Quartermaster, and Major General Feldman.  This correspondence, which extends from August to December 1950, focuses on many substantive Korean War logistics issues, including supply and transportation problems, graves registration services, and the field performance of equipment and supplies.  For example, Hasting's letter to Feldman, dated December 25, 1950, evaluates the naval evacuation of X Corps troops, supplies, equipment, and accompanying refugees from Hungnam and the performance of the Japan Logistical Command.  Other letters assess the effectiveness and troop acceptance of winter issue clothing, with examples from 7th Infantry Division experiences in the Chosin Reservoir campaign.

II.56 "Far East Command" decimal file 319.25 and "Army Forces in Korea" decimal file 400.314 (both in the formerly security-classified "miscellaneous file," 1946-52 sub series include copies of the periodically issued "Basis for Planning supply Requirements and Service Support for Military Operations in Korea."  This report, covering various operational periods from August 15, 1950 to July 1, 1951, emphasized logistical requirements to support ground force offensive operations north of the 38th parallel.  "Army Forces in Korea" decimal file 400.34 (formerly security-classified "miscellaneous file," 1946-52) consists of records that document Republic of Korea Army and U.S. Army in Korea table of organization and equipment (T.O.& E) and table of allowances (T.O. & A.) requirements, changes, references, and recommendations. [Endnote 2]

II.57 The Korean War offered an ideal opportunity for Army field evaluators to test the performance of supplies and equipment.  "Army Forces in Korea," decimal file 319.26 (1951) (in the unclassified "miscellaneous file," 1951-52 sub series) contains a copy of the OQMG Research and Development Division report "Field Observer Comments on Performance of Quartermaster Equipment. 3. Korea, Summer 1951" (November 1952).  Conducted by the Division's Field Observation Office, this report covers textiles, clothing, footwear, chemicals and plastics, mechanical equipment, fuels and lubricants, and food and containers.  A July 1953 report of travel "to observe methods of handling, storage, and condition of v-based containers for subsistence presently under field test by Quartermaster Board, Ft. Lee, Virginia" (QMB Project S-297) is located in "Army Forces, Far East" decimal file 331.1 (unclassified "miscellaneous file," 1953-54 sub series).

Winter clothing and equipment performance, a major Army Quartermaster concern during the Korean War, was the subject of a "requirements" conference held at Tokyo Quartermaster Depot, December 3-6, 1952.  A copy of the conference record, in report form, is located in "Army Forces Far East" decimal file 337 (unclassified "miscellaneous file," 1953-54).  Early Korean War Army Quartermaster correspondence and reports pertaining to development of the winter and Arctic clothing program for Korea, August-December 1950, are located in "Far East Command" decimal file 319.25 (unclassified "miscellaneous file," 1949-50).  The records include lists of specific items issued to the troops.

II.58 "Graves Registration Service," "Army Forces in Korea," "Far East Command," and "Army Forces, Far East" 293 and 314.6 decimal files in both the formerly security-classified and unclassified series sections contain substantive information regarding recovery, identification, and disposition of the remains of deceased American servicemen.  Other decimal file classifications contain additional information on graves registration services, U.N. cemetery, and mortuary services operations and facilities in Korea.  For example, "Far East Command" decimal file 333.1 (unclassified "miscellaneous file," 1953-54 sub series) contains Arm mortuary facilities inspection reports.  American Battle Monuments Commission reports, correspondence memorandums and other records relating to military cemeteries in Korea, with focus on the U.N. cemetery at Tanggok (Pusan), Korea, are located in "Army Forces in Korea" decimal file 687 (unclassified "miscellaneous file," 1951-52).  And, an early OQMG report on graves registrations services in Korea, November 1950, is located in "Army Forces in Korea," decimal file 333.1 (formerly security-classified "miscellaneous file," 1946-52). 

II.59 During the Korean War, the Army, the Department of State, and the Economic Cooperation Administration (ECA) formed the Committee for the Coordination of Non-Military Assistance to Korea (CCONMAK) to administer a program of Civilian Relief to Korea (CRIK).  OQMG, coordinating with the Commander in Chief, Far East (CINCFE), served as the distribution agent for CRIK food, clothing, and relief items.  To a lesser extent, the Army also participated in ECA and Mutual Defense Assistance Program (MDAP) assistance to the Republic of Korea.  Unclassified and formerly security-classified "miscellaneous file" documentation of OQMG participation in these programs includes information on CRIK program policies and standard statistical form shipping reports that enumerate shipped ECA, CRIK, and other assistance program commodities (by long ton, account number, and/or commodity name) and their value.  These records are located in both the unclassified "miscellaneous file" (1946-52 sub series), under "Foreign Aid," and "Mutual Defense Assistance Program (MDAP)" decimal files 319.1, 400.3591, and 462.  Box lists for the formerly security-classified and unclassified "miscellaneous file" are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.60 The largest collection of records concerning the distribution of equipment and supplies is the unclassified general correspondence ("subject file"), 1936-61 [A1, Entries 1890A-I] (1,185 ft.), organized into chronological sub series and arranged thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Korean War data is in the 1949-50, 1951-52, and 1953-54 correspondence sub series (242 ft.).  Decimal file classification 400.112 in these sub series comprises approximately 51 ft. of documentation pertaining to the testing and development of named equipment and supply items, arranged alphabetically under decimal file 400.112.  These items range from ambulances, tractors, and trucks to goggles, insignia, and cartridge belts.  Decimal 400.112 includes subsistence items (e.g., "Cans, Food"; "Ration, Combat"), basic materials (e.g., "Cloth"), and finished products (e.g., "Overcoats"; "Shoes").  Additional data for many of these items can be found in the following decimal file ranges: "materials, machines, and hardware" (410-418); "clothing and equipage" (420-429); "subsistence stores" (430-439); "medical, surgical, and veterinary instruments, supplies, and equipment" (440-458); "other supplies" (460-469); and "ammunition, armament, and other similar stores" (470-478).

II.61 These same sub series document additional topics, such as contracts with private businesses and labor (decimal classifications 160-164); meetings of the Quartermaster Technical Committee (334); mobilization planning (381); and the requirements, production, and storage of oil and petroleum products (classification 463).  Decimal file 461 includes copies of baking manuals for Army cooks, the book of standards for all Quartermaster items, and general Quartermaster manuals.  Information concerning deaths and burials of military personnel is located in decimal files 293 and 314.6.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.62 Formerly classified general correspondence ("subject file"), 1936- 54 [A1, Entry 1890AA] (72 ft.), contains additional records pertaining to topics and subjects covered in the unclassified and formerly security-classified "subject file."  This series is also organized into chronological sub series (e.g., 1946-52) and arranged thereunder according to War Department decimal file system.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.63 Closely related to the "subject file" general correspondence is the general correspondence regarding research and development, 1928-54 [A1, Entry 1890J] (304 ft.), divided into chronological sub series (e.g., 1949-50, 1951-52, 1953-54), and arranged thereunder alphabetically by subject within decimal 400.1141 (the only decimal classification in the series).  Subjects in the 1949-54 sub series (153 ft.) essentially duplicate those filed under classification 400.112 in the general correspondence ("subject file") series described above. Where the latter series documents testing and development of specific equipment and supply items, the research and development correspondence provides final production specifications for the same items.  In addition to correspondence and reports, this series includes illustrations and sketches for some equipment items.  It also includes some subsistence item topics (e.g., ice cream) not found in the "subject file" correspondence.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE QUARTERMASTER HISTORIAN

II.64 Following World War II, Quartermaster historians gathered copies of official records (letters, memorandums, reports, orders, issuances, directives), and other documentation such as newspaper clippings, magazine articles, and research notes to support wartime histories of the Quartermaster Corps.  These records were then organized as three topically arranged research series.  They provide a comprehensive and conveniently organized overview of QMC policies, programs, and operations from the beginning of World War II through the formal cessation of combat operations during the Korean War. For that reason, these three series offer a convenient starting point for research on topics relating to the Quartermaster Corps during the Korean War:

  1. Copies of documents relating to the postwar history of the Quartermaster Corps, 1946-62 [A1, Entry 21151] (22 ft.), were used to write a post-World War II history of the Quartermaster Corps.  Topical focus concentrates on core QMC functional responsibilities and programs (e.g., procurement, graves registration, and food services), with some emphasis on how the Korean War influenced QMC's organizational development and led to supply, equipment, and administrative changes and innovations.  Thus there are series records relating to commodities such as dehydrated foods, field rations, and clothing.  Other records document organizational and program changes within major QMC functional areas (e.g., research) or organizational entities (e.g., the Memorial Division).
     
  2. Copies of formerly security classified documents relating to the Quartermaster Corps in the Korean War, 1950-54 [A1, Entry 2116] (17 ft.), include records relating to QMC functional support of combat operations (e.g., food services, clothing and equipment, and graves registration) and QMC items of issue (e.g., rations, footwear, winter clothing, casualty bags, and equipment).  Records under other topical headings document QMC's responsibilities for supplying other U.N. force contingents with items such as food rations for Thai forces and clothing for the Republic of Korea Army. This series also includes G-4 and Quartermaster Section periodic reports of the U.S. 8th Army and of some component infantry divisions.  Under various topics, there is detailed policy and program correspondence (1950-52) between Far East Command Quartermaster Brigadier General Hastings and other subordinate and superior command quartermasters (including Major General Feldman and Major General Horkan).  Another large topical category in this series consists of reports, summaries, tactical narratives, and other records that detail QMC's operations during the various phases and campaigns of the Korean War.  Under the topical category "Quartermaster Support in Korea," these records are arranged chronologically under campaign or war phase subtopics (e.g., "Pusan Perimeter," "Inchon," "1st Counter Offensive," and "3rd Winter").
     
  3. Copies of unclassified documents relating to the Quartermaster Corps in the Korean War, 1948-52 [A1, Entry 2116K] (3 ft.), also consist of records relating to QMC functional support of combat operations and specific items of issue.  The series includes a number of QMC observer and travel reports that focus on combat performance and effectiveness of supplies and equipment (e.g., boots, bath units, and nurse's clothing), programs (e.g., cold weather indoctrination instruction and publications), and QMC organization (e.g., the structure and performance of various logistical commands and QMC service units in Japan and Korea).  Under the topic "Brig. Gen. K.I. Hastings," there is a substantial run of the 1950-52 Far East Command Quartermaster's policy and program correspondence with Army quartermasters and other military commanders.  These exchanges allude to a number of large and small Korean War innovations such as the use of IBM data processing technology in remains identification operations, spare parts inventory and control improvements, clothing item coatings designed to resist chemical warfare agents, synthetic shrouds, and dehydrated vinegar.  The series also includes a number of postwar reports written by Army officers summarizing logistics lessons learned during the Korean War.  There is, for example, [Brig. Gen. Kester I.] "Hastings 14 Lessons," (see under topic "FEC Organization, 1949-50").  Thirty Second Infantry Regiment Commander Charles Beauchamp's "Command Action in Korea (Q-122)" describes policies he instituted to correct the tendency of his troops to abandon burdensome winter issue clothing--a practice that frequently entailed consequences such as frostbite (see under "Clothing and Equipment"). 

II.65 Historical reports, 1946-62 [A1, Entry 2116L] (1 ft.), includes copies of three QMC Historian-produced studies that relate to the Korean War.  The two-volume "Global Mission of the Quartermaster Corps, September 1951-March 1953" (March 1953) and "Quartermaster Activities Relating to the Korean Conflict, June 1950-September 1951," (October 1951) detail QMC Korean War programs, activities, and organizational changes.  The "Global Mission" study tends to place the Army's Korean War logistical experiences and growth in the context of a larger worldwide commitment.  "Care of the Dead: Historical Summaries of the Memorial Division, Army Mortuary Service, and the National Cemetery System," (1958) includes two chapters on the selection and interment of two unknown soldiers from World War II and the Korean War at Arlington National Cemetery (see also paragraph II.67).  A list of reports is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE MEMORIAL DIVISION

II.66 Records of the Memorial Division include over 1,750 ft. of records relating to the identification, recovery, and interment of deceased military personnel, including those who served during the Korean War.  Other records relating to the identification, location, and disposition of American military remains are described in Reference Information Paper 102.

II.67 General records relating to the selection and interment of unknown soldiers of World War II and the Korean War, 1957-58 [A1, Entry 1898D] (1 ft.), includes records documenting the Department of defense program for selection and commemorative interment of an unknown soldier from World War II and from the Korean War at Arlington National Cemetery.  The series consists of correspondence, reports, pamphlets, and other records that focus on activities such as program approval and implementation; remains selection, transportation, and disposition; and formal program ceremonies leading up to the Memorial Day, 1958, interment of selected unknowns at Arlington.  The series also includes a destruction certificate pertaining to the files of all candidate remains, a published pamphlet and program for the Arlington ceremony, and newspaper clippings relating to that event.

II.68 Rosters of military personnel whose remains were not recovered, 1951-54 [A1, Entry 2110A] (15 ft.), consist of Logistical Compilations Branch computer printouts, arranged alphabetically by name of deceased.  Printouts cite the following information pertaining to each serviceman: armed forces branch (e.g., Army, Navy); general area last seen; pinpoint area where last seen; name of deceased; rank; serial number; branch of service (e.g., infantry, artillery, medical); and date of death or date last seen.  For some entries there are also hand annotations.

II.69 General records relating to national cemeteries, 1920-60 [A1, Entry 1898C] (7 ft.), are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  Decimal 293 includes records relating to requirements for burial, verification of service, group burials, and veterans' services.  Decimal 687 includes records documenting transfer of the national cemeteries from military to Veterans Administration (VA) control and of installation cemeteries from Continental U.S. (CONUS) numbered armies' jurisdiction to the VA's National Cemetery Commission.  Other records pertain to topics such as the transfer of remains to national cemeteries; cemetery regulations, operations and maintenance; and grave site availability.

II.70 Interment control forms, 1928-62 [A1, Entry 2110B] (232 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by name of deceased.  Form categories include rank of the deceased, his unit, date of death, date of interment, grave location and name of the national cemetery, name and address of next of kin (not always recorded), and remarks.  The forms for 1950-54 pertain to those who died during the Korean War as well as any veteran who died during that period.

II.71 Interment control forms for unknowns, 1928-62 [A1, Entry 2110E] (11 ft.), are arranged by name of cemetery.  The series encompasses unknowns from all wars.  Little information is provided on the forms beyond interment date and grave location.

II.72 Applications for headstones, 1925-63 [A1, Entry 2110C] (297 ft.), and applications for headstones and markers, 1964-70 [A1,Entry 1942A] (201 ft.), are arranged in year segments and thereunder alphabetically by name of deceased.  Veterans from all wars are filed together. Application information includes name of deceased, date of death, dates of military service, unit, rank, location of grave, interment date, name and address of person requesting the headstone, deceased's religion, and sometimes the name of the attending funeral home.  After 1970 the applications were submitted to the VA, and records from 1970 through 1985 have been retired to the National Archives as part of Record Group 15, Records of the Veterans Administration.

 

RECORDS OF THE PROCUREMENT DIVISION

II.73 Procurement planning schedules, studies, and reports, 1950-55 [NM-81, Entry 2112] (4 ft.), consist of commodity and equipment procurement plans, production schedules, and progress synopsis reports compiled as part of the Federal Government's Korean War-era industrial mobilization program.  The records are arranged alphabetically by name of quartermaster-acquired item (e.g., apples, armor, containers, rations).

 

RECORDS RELATING TO FOOD SERVICES, PREPARATION, AND RESEARCH

II.74 Master menus, 1941-54 [NM-81, Entry 2108] (6 ft.), arranged chronologically by month and year, detail the daily food categories, quantities, and meal menus recommended for service personnel by the War Department and later by the Department of the Army and the Department of the Air Force.  This series was maintained by the Menu Planning Branch of the Food Services Division.

II.75 The topically arranged [records of the] Quartermaster Food and Container Institute, ca. 1945-ca. 1959 [A1, Entry 1003] (98 ft.), document selected OQMG food research activities.  The largest group of records in this series (24 ft.) consists of food irradiation case files that contain information about the development of methods for improving the quality and preservation of food used by the Army.  Another large series segment (22 ft.) documents combat rations research and development during World War II and the Korean War.

 

Record Group 111 - Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer

II.76 The Office of the Chief Signal Officer (OCSIGO) administered the activities of the U.S. Army Signal Service (Signal Corps) during the Korean War, with overall responsibility for research and development in communications; procurement, testing, and operation of signal equipment; maintenance of signal security; and collection of communications intelligence.  The Chief Signal Officer served as principal adviser to the Secretary of the Army and the Chief of Staff on all aspects of communications.  The OCSIGO also provided Army motion picture and photographic services.  Serving successively as Chief Signal Officer before and during the war were Maj. Gen. Spencer B. Akin (April 1, 1947-March 31, 1951) and Maj. Gen. George I. Back (May 2, 1951-April 30, 1955).

 

RECORDS OF THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE

II.77 This office included the Chief Signal Officer (OCSIGO) and his principal assistant, the Executive Officer.  The textual records of the OCSIGO for the most part consist of central files.  The unclassified central decimal files, 1940-57 [A1, entries 1023 C-E] (1,221 ft.), are arranged in nine chronological sub series (1940-45, 1946-48, 1949-50, 1951-52, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, and 1957) and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The 1949-50, 1951-52, and 1953 sub series (approximately 363 ft.) provide considerable information on all aspects of wartime activities of the Signal Corps.  Because of its unclassified status, much of the documentation concerns routine but important matters, e.g., training (decimals 352-353), correspondence regarding changes and revisions in field, supply, and technical manuals, instruction booklets, and maintenance bulletins (decimal 461); and the production, procurement, distribution, and replacement of radio and other wireless parts and equipment (decimal 413.44).  Decimal 062.2 provides extensive documentation of the Army Pictorial Service's activities in training and combat motion picture films, including correspondence concerning policy on the use and release of such media.  Several files provide information of unique value.  Decimal 319.1 consists of a large number of regularly issued reports such as monthly activities, progress, status, and district reports.  Information on mobilization planning and unit affiliations can be found in decimal file 381.  Decimal 314.7 includes several diaries of specific officers within the Legal Division and the beginnings of the Signal history program.  A box list for Entry 1023C is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.78 Perhaps the most valuable wartime documentation of the OCSIGO is in two series of records that formerly constituted the "Signal Corps Historical Section File."  The historians' files, 1908-62 [UD, Entry 1036 A&B] (394 ft.), are arranged in part according to the War Department decimal file system and in part by subject. These historical materials, collected or created by the Historical Section during the period 1943-62, date as far back as 1908 and as recently as 1962.  Items of interest include the general situation in Korea, the T-33 file (agreement between Ordnance and the Signal Corps regarding the use of White Sands), the history of the Korean War, Signal Corps activities in the Far East Command, chronology history of Army activities in the missile/satellite field, and problems in utilization of U.N. forces. A box list for the first 142 boxes is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.79 Wartime research and development case files involve three series, each of which is arranged alphabetically by a letter prefix designation of equipment and thereunder numerically by a number suffix of equipment model (e.g., "AD-1," "BM-305").  The "SCR" series radio equipment research and development case files, 1923-54 [UD, Entry 1030] (33 ft.) document Signal Corps development of specific models of radio and radar sets.  A two-volume "SCR-Radio Catalog" is located at the beginning of the series.  The Signal Corps equipment parts and components case files, 1941-53 [UD, Entry 1031] (150 ft.), are arranged by component number.  The files cover a wide range of communications and electronics equipment spare parts such as antennas, batteries, control units, cords, transmitters, and panels and include both WWII and Korean War developments.  The "AN" series communication equipment parts and components case files, 1943-56 [UD, Entry 1032] (19 ft.), are arranged by component number and pertain to specific types of radar instruments and radio- and radar-jamming equipment developed during WWII and the Korean War.

II.80 Publication files, 1931-55 [A1, Entry 1017A] (10.5 ft.), are arranged by publication and thereunder chronologically.  The publications cover a wide variety of Signal Corps functions such as procurement, distribution, cost analysis, officer directories, and technical information letters.  Signal corps Distribution Operations and cost analysis for the Korean War are available.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.81 Numbered and unnumbered memorandums, 1941-63 [A1, Entry 1026] (36 ft.), are arranged by type of file (numbered memorandums followed by unnumbered memorandums).  The numbered memorandums are arranged in order of file number and year; the unnumbered memorandums are grouped only by year.  Memorandums consist of those that have been rescinded, expired, or are obsolete and relate to the overall operations of the Signal corps, including subjects such as procurement, manpower, dissemination of information, security, policy, and personnel.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.82 Office regulation memorandums and related background files, 1942-53 [A1, Entry 1027] (9 ft.), are arranged chronologically by type of file (Background Files, Executive Office Bulletins, and Office Regulation Change Sheets) and consist largely of Executive Office notifications used to inform and update the various organizational units on matters pertaining to Signal Corps administration, funding, communications policies and procedures, equipment maintenance, training and assignment of personnel, and other related functions.  Other records include related background files and office regulation change instructions for the guidance of Signal Corps staff and routine office functions.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.83 Signal Corps Technical Committee minutes, 1920-54 [A1, Entry 1019A] (14 ft.), are arranged chronologically by meeting date.  This series contains minutes of the meetings of the Signal Corps Technical Committee.  The committee consisted of representatives of the Signal Corps as well as other services and met to discuss technical problems with various types of military equipment.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.84 Miscellaneous administrative files, 1947-57 [A1, Entry 1020A] (3 ft.), are arranged by subject and contain records on a variety of administrative subjects, including budget files, organizational files, contract files and general correspondence.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.85 Administrative Branch records, 1940-60 [A1, Entry 1043] (17 ft.), are arranged chronologically in the following blocks: 1940-45; 1946-49; 1950-51; 1952-53; 1954-56; 1957-60 and thereunder by subject.  The records include committee reports, projects, annual reports, Army frequency reports, Alternate Joint Communications Center (AJCC) files, and other subjects.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE CONTROL DIVISION

II.86 This division was established in 1942 to replace the former Executive Control Branch and to serve as a consultant to the Chief Signal Officer on problems of administration and management in the Signal Corps.

II.87 Records of the Control Division, 1940-55 [A1, Entry 1021] (15 ft.), are arranged by type of document or subject and thereunder chronologically.  This series includes official memorandums, directives, and special orders as well as subject files concerning field offices of the Signal Officer, budget files, manpower files, scientific advisor files, inspection files, and other miscellaneous files.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE ARMY COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE DIVISION

II.88 Established as a division in 1942, the Army Communications Service Division supervised the installation, operation, and maintenance of fixed radio and wire communication equipment throughout the Army and participated in equipment development; operated the War Department Signal Center and other headquarters communications facilities; exercised technical supervision over the fixed communications outlets elsewhere throughout the world; prepared and reviewed technical manuals and other training literature and formulated training and tactical doctrine relating to them; and, for training purposes, cooperated with the Army Amateur Radio System.

II.89 Decimal files, 1923-59 [A1, Entry 1062] (26 ft.), are arranged chronologically in the following segments: 1923-48, 1949-50, 1951-52, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Some years are further broken down into secret and confidential files.  These files contain a wide variety of information on subjects including personnel and equipment, but primarily deal with the installation and maintenance of equipment, and management and operation of the Army Command and Administrative Network (ACAN), Army Anti-Aircraft Networks (AAA), and other communications facilities.  Decimal 600.12 includes project files for the Eighth army.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

II.90 Secret control files, 1951-55 [A1, Entry 1065] (6 ft.), are arranged chronologically by year and thereunder by "S" number.  The records contain control copies of secret documents and include files on administration of telephone, telegraph, teletype and radio systems and general administrative files.  The 1952 section contains files concerning Eighth Army and the Japan Logistical Command.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

 

RECORDS OF THE ARMY PICTORIAL SERVICES DIVISION

II.91 Beginning in 1943 the division controlled: the production, processing, and distribution of training films, film strips, and other photographic aids, prepared either in Signal Corps facilities or commercial facilities under contract to the Signal Corps; the research, development, design, and standardization of photographic equipment; the preparation of photographic manuals and other training literature; the administration of photographic and related training; production and other activities regarding films; and the preservation of photographs and motion pictures produced by the Signal Corps.

II.92 [Classified] decimal files, 1944-60 [A1, Entry 1068] (11 ft.), are arranged chronologically in the following blocks: 1944-45, 1946-48, 1949-50, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1959-60, and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The series contains information concerning motion pictures and film strips produced for the Army concerning projects and equipment, training exercises, and other subjects such as foreign aid and enemy films.  Under decimal 319.1, there are "Dissemination of Combat Information" reports and the report "Close Air Support Operations in Korea."  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

II.93 Project files of the Motion Picture Branch, 1944-53 [A1, Entry 1069] (2 ft.) are arranged by project number.  This series concerns motion pictures being produced and includes information on escape and evasion training and foreign aid for motion picture production.  It also contains film scripts of various motion pictures.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

II.94 Records of the Army Pictorial Service, 1944-63 [A1, Entry 1024] (56 ft.) is arranged in the following chronological blocks: 1944, 1949-50, 1951-52, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1957-59, 1960-63, and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system except for a handful of files with no decimal numbers.  The records contain a variety of administrative and programmatic records relating to the Pictorial Service's photographic operations; decisions concerning Army photographic and film equipment; policies relative to procurement, distribution, storage and issue of U.S. Army training films; and the determination of still and motion picture requirements.  It also contains a substantial amount of information concerning the Service's involvement with Military Assistance Programs overseas.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

II.95 Inspection reports, 1952-61 [A1, Entry 1037] (9 ft.), are arranged chronologically by year and thereunder alphabetically by subject.  There are no records for the years 1954 and 1955.  The inspection reports of Signal Corps installations, contracts, and methods of operation include four types of inspections--Annual General Inspections, Special Inspections, Special Contract Inspections, and Reports of Inquiry.  Each report consists of analyses on the results of the inspection and other supporting data.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE LEGAL DIVISION

II.96 The Legal Division acted as general legal counsel to the Chief Signal Officer and the Signal Corps.  It was responsible for the application and interpretation of common law, statutes, regulations, and directives affecting the Corps; the review of purchase plans and formal or informal contracts; and legal issues pertaining to problems of civilian personnel and contract labor in the Signal Corps.

II.97 Legal administrative files, 1942-58 [A1, Entry 1078] (8 ft.), are arranged chronologically in the following blocks: 1942-47, 1948-50, 1951-52, 1953-54, 1955-56, 1957-58, and thereunder by subject.  This series contains a wide variety of subjects of general interest to the Legal Division, including investigations (e.g., Hubbell and Miller, and Cosmos Industries), patents, foreign aid, gifts and gratuities, and Congressional inquiries.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.98 Reports of proceedings of the Signal Corps Intelligence Agency Board ("SCIA Board Reports"), 1951-52 [A1, Entry 1014A] (1 ft.), are arranged by board file number.  The Board was appointed to investigate the apparent loss of top secret documents.  The reports include a copy of the report of proceedings with findings issued in June 1952 and supporting documentation such as testimony and Army regulations.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.99 Security Branch files, 1951-56 [A1, Entry 1015A] (14 ft.), are arranged chronologically in the following blocks: 1951-52, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  This series is primarily composed of foreign liaison files, which include requests from foreign governments for release of classified documents, requests by foreign nationals to visit U.s. research facilities, and requests by U.S. researchers to visit foreign facilities.  Also included are requests by U.S. contractors for clearance to handle classified material and other miscellaneous correspondence.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.100 Records relating to the investigation of the Signal Corps Procurement Agency, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 1016A] (1 ft.), are arranged by jacket and file number.  The investigations concerned abuses by employees such as accepting gifts and other bribes from contractors, especially Hubbell and Miller.  The files include hearings held before the House Investigations Subcommittee on Expenditures in Executive Departments.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.101 Records of the Legal Division, 1918-57 [A1, Entry 1022] (27 ft.), are arranged by type of file (license agreements, patent files, and general files) and thereunder by subject.  The series is primarily composed of license agreement files, patent files, contract files, and litigation files.  Other miscellaneous files cover Congressional relations, Signal Corps laboratories, labor disputes, Project CIRRUS (controlling precipitation), and other subjects.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in college Park, MD, or upon request.

II.102 [Records of the] Procurement Law Branch, 1949-53 [A1, Entry 1076] (1 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by general subject (boards, commissions, and committees; claims; communications; contracts; foreign nationals; fraud; investigations; miscellaneous; procurement; property; reports; and security) and thereunder alphabetically by subject.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

 

RECORDS OF THE PERSONNEL TRAINING DIVISION

II.103 The general functions of the Division were to formulate plans and policies for the mobilization, organization, training, and tactical and technical employment of signal troops and troop units; to review and revise training doctrines of Signal schools; to prepare budget estimates and allocate funds for training; to inspect the training progress and status of Signal troops; to supervise the preparation, printing, and distribution of training literature; to administer civilian and military personnel; and to coordinate all personnel, training, and related activities of the Signal Corps.

II.104 [Records of the] Military Training Branch, 1949-53 [A1, Entry 1105] (8 ft.), are arranged chronologically by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  This series includes records on military maneuvers, Signal Corps training centers, courses, training of foreign nationals, and visits by foreign nationals.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

 

RECORDS OF THE PLANS AND OPERATIONS DIVISION

II.105 The Division was responsible for the development of plans, policies, and projects relating to the strategic and tactical communication doctrines, procedures, and techniques; the allocation and assignments or radio frequencies and call signs; the evaluation and study of reports from overseas commands; the collection, compilation, and dissemination of intelligence information on enemy communications equipment and techniques; and follow-up work on decisions of various boards.

II.106 Records of the Operations Planning Branch, 1944-55 [A1, Entry 1102] (42 ft.), are arranged chronologically in the following blocks: 1944-45, 1947-48, 1949-50, 1951-52, 1953, and 1954-55, and thereunder by subject.  This series contains a wide range of files concerning the policies and operations of electronic counter measures, doctrine, interagency operations, maneuvers, equipment, and Signal Corps units.  Specific items of interest include "Report of AFF Observer No. 6 in FECM," "Dissemination of Combat Information," FECOM reports for 1952, and Eighth Army and other Korean projects for 1950-53.  Box lists are available for use int he Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

II.107 Publication background file of the Plans and Operations Division, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 1030] (0.8 ft.), is arranged chronologically by year and thereunder by subject.  This series consists of drafts and related background files of Signal Corps field manuals including reports, technical manuals, announcements, and other similar publications pertaining to Signal corps intelligence, communications, photography, and base operations.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.108 Records of the Doctrine Section, 1953-54 [A1, Entry 1099] (1 ft.), are arranged by subject and contain general files covering subjects such as Army exercises and tests, equipment, the status of the Pigeon Service, and training.  The files include reports titled "Report on the Group Investigation of Communications in the FEC & Korea, 1950-51;" "Signal Corps personnel and training aspects, 8th Army;" and "Report of the Baker Electronic and Communication Mission to Korea."  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

II.109 Distribution operations reports, 1943-62 [A1, Entry 1031] (4 ft.), are arranged by record type (operations reports, supplement reports, and background files) and thereunder chronologically. This series contains monthly reports and summary data pertaining to individual installation performance and overall operations of the Signal Corps distribution system.  Files contain information on subjects such as depot operations, supply control, disposal, inventory, and workloads and personnel.  The series also includes supplemental and background files.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.110 Communications projects files, 1940-60 [A1, Entry 1034] (10 ft.), are arranged by subject and contain records pertaining to the specifications, cost, procurement, installation, repair, and improvement of Signal Corps communications systems.  Projects during the Korean War include Operation CIRRUS (controlling precipitation), using radar for weather forecasting, and studies of the impact of rain on aircraft.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.111 Records of the Communications Liaison Branch, 1942-43 [A1, Entry 1098] (9 ft.), are arranged chronologically in the following blocks: 1942-46, 1951-52, 1953-54, 1955-57, 1958-60, 1961-63, and thereunder by subject.  This series contains records that concern communications issues that required coordination with other branches of the military or other agencies of Government.  Subjects include the Army frequency utilization plan, frequency assignment, and equipment.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

II.112 Records of the Electronic Warfare Branch, 1945-53 [A1, Entry 1100] (7 ft.), are arranged chronologically in the following blocks: 1945-50, 1951-52, and 1953, and thereunder by subject.  This series contains information concerning electronic warfare (including jamming), mobilization planning, radios, FEC policy, guided missiles, training, and technical service units.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

II.113 The unit files, 1950-55 [A1, Entry 1096] (4 ft.), are arranged chronologically by year and thereunder by type of unit.  This series contains general orders, movement orders, messages, reports, and memorandums of signal detachments, battalions, and companies and technical service units.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

 

RECORDS OF THE PROCUREMENT AND DISTRIBUTION DIVISION

II.114 This Division supervised the quantity procurement, purchase, inspection, storage, issue, reclamation, repair, and salvage of Signal Corps equipment and supplies; contractual and pricing activities, adjustments, renegotiations, and terminations; and the training of personnel from supply and maintenance.

II.115 Office memorandums and publication background files, 1935-56 [A1, Entry 1040] (6 ft.), are arranged by type of file or subject.  This series contains files on a variety of administrative subjects including procurement responsibilities and priorities for items shipped overseas during the war, contracts, personnel distribution, regulations, operations, and general correspondence.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.116 Expendable supply distribution files, 1951-60 [A1, Entry 1042] (5 ft.), are arranged in two parts.  The first part of the series is arranged by table of allowance (TA) number and the second part is arranged by subject or Army area.  Tables of allowances were prepared by Signal Corps installations for needed supplies, equipment, and provisions and authorized the requisitioning of Signal Corps expendable  supplies in accordance with pertinent Department of the Army directives.  Other files include general correspondence and background documentation.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.117 [Records of the] Procurement Branch, 1942-59 [A1, Entry 1087] (4 ft.), are arranged by subject.  The series contains records on subjects such as companies doing business with the Signal Corps, awards, types of equipment, inspections and investigations, and procurement planning.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT DIVISION

II.118 The Research and Development Division was responsible for directing and coordinating Signal Corps research and development projects, supervising signal Corps research labs, and coordinating research and development efforts in the private sector.

II.119 The [classified] decimal files, 1949-59 [A1, Entry 1053] (30 ft.), are arranged chronologically by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  This series contains the central files which cover a wide range of interests of the Division including budgets, personnel, meetings, security, and foreign liaisons.  But the bulk of the files concerns research and development projects such as fire control systems, batteries, radar, radio direction finders, radio relay systems, and air defense systems.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

II.120 Records of the Systems and Programs Office, 1949-52 [A1, Entry 1055] (7 ft.), are arranged by subject and contain files concerning various equipment used by the Army (such as navigation systems, radio, and radar) and research projects concerning that equipment.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

II.121 Records of the Signal Research Office, 1949-55 [A1, Entry 1059] (3 ft.), are arranged chronologically in two sections, 1949-53 and 1954-55, and thereunder by subject.  The records concern the Office's interest in meteorology and its effects on Signal Corps operations, including subjects such as cloud seeding (Project CIRRUS), balloon leafleting, weather effects on Army operations, and other subjects.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  This series is security classified.

 

RECORDS OF THE SIGNAL CORPS CENTER

II.122 Most Signal Corps training was held at Fort Monmouth, NJ, which was designated as Signal Corps Center in 1949.  The Center was to include, in addition to the school and laboratories, the Signal Corps Board, the Signal Patent Agency, the Signal Corps Publication agency, the Signal Corps Intelligence Unit, and the Pigeon breeding and Training Center.

II.123 The records of the Signal School at Fort Monmouth, NJ [A1, Entry 1004] (10 ft.), include general correspondence, conference files, organizational planning files, program analysis files, staff studies, or unit histories.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  Additional records of the Signal School at Fort Monmouth, NJ, 1946-53 [UD, Entry 1052] (8 ft.), include several types of records such as memorandums, periodic reports, general correspondence, universal military training records, Operation LOGEX records, and Officer Candidate Department records.  Series listings and box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.124 Records of the Signal Corps Publications Agency include general administrative records, 1951-53 [UD, Entry 1037] (1 ft.); formerly security-classified general administrative records, 1952 [UD, Entry 1038] (0.2 ft.); organization planning, 1951-53 [UD, Entry 1039] (0.1 ft.), and records regarding organization planning, 1953-54 [UD, Entry 1040] (0.1 ft.); and technical and tactical training manuals, 1952-58 [UD, Entry 1042] (0.1 ft.).  Series listings and box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.125 The records of the Signal Corps Intelligence Agency, 1941-50 [UD, Entry 1044] (3 ft.), include memorandums and research and development project records.  Series listings and box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.126 Records of the Signal Corps Engineering Laboratories, 1916-54 [UD, Entry 1054] (344 ft.), include research and development project records; records pertaining to foreign and captured equipment; general orders and memorandums for White Sands Proving Ground; memorandums, bulletins, and team reports of the Procurement-Maintenance Engineering Division; general records of the Evans Signal Laboratory; and bulletins, charts, and general correspondence of the Coles Signal Laboratory.  Series listings and box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.127 The records of the Signal Corps ROTC Summer Camp at Fort Monmouth, NJ, 1947-51 [UD, Entry 1055] (2 ft.), include training memorandums, daily bulletins, final reports, and miscellaneous records.  Series listings and box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.128 The records of the Signal Corps Electronic Warfare Center and Signal Corps Board, 1947-51 [UD, Entry 1056] (0.4 ft.), include general orders, memorandums, status reports, and appendixes to tables of equipment and organization (Study No. 60).  Series listings and box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 112 - Records of the Office of the Surgeon General (Army)

II.129 From 1818 to 1963 the Surgeon General's Office (SGO) served as the administrative head and headquarters, respectively, of the Army Medical Service.  The mission of this service, known as the Medical Department until 1950, was to maintain the health of the U.S. Army and conserve its fighting strength.  To accomplish this mission the Army Medical Service developed plans and programs designed to provide the best possible medical service in war and peace.  Specific responsibilities of the SGO included the proper selection of physically fit military personnel; the conservation of manpower through appropriate disease-preventive measures, adequate medical, dental, and surgical treatment and suitable hospitalization and reconditioning; the training and supply of specialized types of medical military and civilian personnel; and the furnishing of specialized medical supplies and equipment.  These responsibilities involved the SGO in activities such as determination of physical standards for military personnel; organization and training of medical troop units; research on and development of new or improved items of medical equipment; procurement or production of medical supplies and equipment; and compilation of medical statistics.  The Surgeon General of the Army from June 1947 through May 1951 was Maj. Gen. Raymond W. Bliss.  He was succeeded by Maj. Gen. George E. Armstrong, who served from June 1951 to May 1955.

 

RECORDS OF THE HISTORICAL DIVISION

II.130 In 1941 the Surgeon General of the Army, "feeling that some steps should be taken for the organization of the historical work of the medical department," established a historical subdivision within the SGO Administration Division.  By 1944 the subdivision had evolved into a new Historical Division with plans to write a history of the medical department in World War II.  The Division's focus expanded to include histories of other wars as well as that of Army medical centers and medical programs.  With the move of the historical program to Walter Reed Army Medical Center in 1952, the Historical Division changed its name to The Historical Unit.  In 1972 the unit moved to Fort Detrick in Frederick, Maryland.  In addition to producing publications, the unit maintained background files for historians and provided reference services on its collections for researchers.  In 1975 the Historical Unit was absorbed by the U.S. Army Center of Military History.

II.131 U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) records, 1947-61 [UD, Entry 1001] (146 ft.), are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  Large decimal files (such as 319.1) are generally sub arranged geographically by Army command (Headquarters, Continental U.S., Overseas), thereunder alphabetically by component (arsenal, brigade, company, hospital), and thereunder numerically by unit designation or alphabetically by unit name.  Materials relating to the Korean War are scattered throughout the series, but there are two particularly significant decimal file runs.  Decimals 319.1 "(Miscellaneous, Reports) Unit Annual Reports--Far East" and 350.05 "(Military Information) Essential Medical Technical Data-Far East," include copies of operations reports and medical statistics submitted by units that served in Korea.  Additionally, under decimal 314.7 (Military Histories) there is a "Korean War Chronology."  A folder list titled "List of Historical Reports," for only the decimal 319.1 file segment, is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.132 The somewhat misleadingly titled series, historical unit medical detachments ("HUMEDS") records used for preparing World War II era medical unit histories, [1941-54] [UD, Entry 1012] (255 ft.), incorporates records of medical units for the period extending from World War II through the Korean War.  The records are arranged by category of medical unit and thereunder numerically by unit designation.  These files comprise original historical reports (often bearing decimal number 314.7) that apparently were withdrawn from original unit files as background materials for official histories; after action reports; essential medical technical data; general orders; and correspondence files.  The first category in the series is Army hospitals, subdivided by type (general, field, evacuation, and station hospitals), and arranged thereunder numerically by hospital designation.  For each hospital, documentation includes historical reports and periodic summaries of activities, sometimes supplemented by photographs and copies of essential medical technical data reports.  The second series category is specialized medical units, with subcategories for medical laboratories, general dispensaries, medical ambulance and depot companies, dental prosthetic detachments, malaria control units, medical battalions, hospital trains, medical hospital ship platoons, and medical squadrons.  Mixed within the final subcategories are folder titles for regular army units (e.g., infantry divisions, military government detachments, corps) that include medical reports as well as general historical reports for those units.  The third category is miscellaneous medical and regular army unit records, with a mingling of World War II and postwar materials.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  Reports and other records found in HUMEDS and the AMEDDS series (see paragraph II.131 and II.459), to obtain the fullest documentation of army medical unit activities and programs during the Korean War.

II.133 Biographical background files, 1950-74 [A1, Entry 1016] (23 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by last name of subject.  This series, created to provide background information on prominent military and medical personnel from the Civil War to the Vietnam War, was used in the selection process for naming medical facilities.  The files often consist of a biographical summary, newspaper clippings, photographs, illustrations, and obituaries.  There are dossiers for such Korean War era notables as Maj. Gen. George E. Armstrong, Maj. Gen. Edgar Hume, Col. Carlton Goodiel, col. Nell Wickliffe, and PFC Richard Wilson.

II.134 The bound, chronologically arranged minutes of the Surgeon General's early morning conferences, 1947-69 [A1, Entry 1019] (5 ft.), contain minutes of the Surgeon General's formal meetings with his staff.  The minutes are accompanied by meeting handouts such as newspaper clippings and memorandums pertaining to the topics discussed.  Conference discussion ranged over various issues, from supply needs and physician shortages to policy initiatives.  The minutes also provide a top-level view of the Army Medical Service during the Korean and Vietnam Wars.  The early morning conferences were held three times a week until 1968.  Volumes before 1952 have few handouts.

II.135 In 1951 and 1952, the Association of American Medical Colleges, the American Medical Association, and the Department of Defense met to discuss means of supplementing medical school curriculums to cope with national emergency and disaster situations.  As the result of these discussions, the Department of Defense issued Directive 6000.1 on June 1, 1952, to initiate and fund a pilot program of medical education for national defense (MEND) at five colleges.  By 1969, the program had expanded to include 90 schools.  Files of medical education for national defense (MEND), 1950-70 [A1, Entry 1020] (14 ft.), arranged by subject, consist of files accumulated by Dr. Chris J.D. Zarafonetis while serving as MEND coordinator at Temple University and the University of Michigan.  Program and activity records include semiannual and annual reports; financial and expenditure reports; civil defense education program records; journals, bulletins, and pamphlets of the U.S. Air Force and Army; general correspondence; course lecture records; teaching aids; and symposium materials.  Report No. 113 includes a cold injury study conducted during the Korean War.

II.136 Medical unit annual reports, 1950-69 [A1, Entry 1012] (41 ft.), are arranged chronologically by decade (1950-1959, 1960-1969), thereunder geographically by Army Command (e.g., CONUS [Continental United States], USAREUR [United States Army, Europe], USARPAC {United States Army, Pacific], USARV [United States, Vietnam]), thereunder alphabetically by component (e.g., arsenal, battalion, corps, hospital), and thereunder numerically by unit designation or alphabetically by unit name.  These annual reports, also known as activity reports and historical reports, were prepared by Army Medical Department components and sent to the Office of the Surgeon General.  There are gaps in the series.  Individual reports summarize past year medical and dental activities, focusing on such topics as the unit's mission, organization, personnel, training, patient care, preventive medicine, improvements, construction, and supply.  Larger components generally filed more extensive reports, which sometimes included photographs.  Wartime Medical Department expansion led to an increase in the number of reporting units.  There is one box of Korean War era records which includes the following report categories: Hospitals--8th Field; Activities--Army Airfield, Fort Belvoir; Activities--Medical Optical and Maintenance; Activities--Army Medical Supply Support; Activities--Regional Dental, Alameda; Activities--Regional Dental, Fort McPherson; Activities--Regional Dental, St. Louis; Activities--Regional Dental, Walter Reed; and Activities--Fort Benning.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  Most of the 1949-59 records are located in the U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) records, 1947-61 (see paragraph II.131).

II.137 The inventory of medical unit annual reports, 1950-59 [UD, Entry 1010] (2 ft.), is an index to the 1950-59 segment of the medical unit annual reports, 1950-69.  The beginning portion of the index is a list of annual reports arranged chronologically and thereunder by Army-designated "R" number.  After this section, the cards are arranged by type of unit (for example veterinary dispensary, combat team, division, or battalion), and thereunder sequentially by unit number.  These cards are useful for quickly ascertaining whether or not a particular unit serving in Korea filed a report with the Office of the Surgeon General and when that report was created.

II.138 Medical unit general reports, 1950-69 [A1, Entry 1013] (14 ft.), are arranged chronologically by decade (1950-1959, 1960-1969), thereunder geographically by Army Command (e.g., CONUS, USARPAC, USARV), thereunder alphabetically by component (e.g., arsenal, battalion, corps, hospital), and thereunder numerically by unit designation or alphabetically by unit name.  These report files mainly consist of annual and quarterly progress reports that outline the status of ongoing activities such as research and construction projects.  Other types of reports include research findings, program documents, reviews and analyses, and combat developments.  A few reports are accompanied by photographs.  Even though the series dates from 1950; it only contains one file for the 1950s entitled "Laboratories--Army Medical Research; Research Report, 1950-1959."  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  Additional annual reports are located in medical unit annual reports (see paragraph II.136).

II.139 Medical report file series are supplemented by essential technical medical data files, 1943-56 [A1, Entry 54B] (35 ft.).  This series, arranged by geographical area (e.g., Pacific, Far East), thereunder by command, and thereunder chronologically, consists of summaries of monthly medical activities of U.S. Army medical units.  Files include data on battle and non-battle casualties, the effects of climate on troops, organization of medical services, and surgical and medical activities.  Most of the records cover the period 1943-46.  Those in the "Far East" geographic area category (10 in.) include statistical summaries submitted by the Japan Logistical Command, the Korea Communications Zone, the Eighth Army, and the Far East command, 1950-1956.

 

OTHER RECORDS

II.140 The [formerly] security-classified administrative file, 1940-75 [UD, Entry 1011] (18 ft.), arranged according to the War Department decimal file system, includes records relating to Korean War helicopter service, and a summary of medical services, medical planning, and support for the attack on Hill 598 Triangle (under decimal 314.7). Decimal 319.1 includes SGO annual reports and documentation on the utilization of installations and health of the U.S. Army.  Reports of the Board on Dispensary and Field Medical Service (Martin Board), 1951-53; the U.S. Army Chief of Staff General Council, 1949-50; and the Armed Forces Medical Policy Council, 1949-53, are filed under decimal 334.  Other files contain information about mobilization plans (decimal 370.2) and the handling of POWs (decimal 383.6).

II.141 Hospital Division laboratory reports, 1942-50 [NM-20, Entry 282] (3 ft.), arranged by subject, consist mostly of reports from the Medical Department Field Research Agency at Fort Knox, KY.  The Korean War era reports include studies on footwear, burns, improvements in X-rays, blood pressure, and the effects on living in the cold.

II.142 Records relating to post-WWII armed forces medical service, 1947-55 [UD, Entry 1025] (1 ft.), also arranged by subject, include a 1953 report on the system of medical supply.

II.143 The general headquarters records of U.S. Army hospitals, 1919-67 [A1, Entry 1031] (48 ft.), consist of records arranged into sections pertaining to "major stateside hospitals," "foreign hospitals," and types of hospitals (e.g., evacuation, field, general, station, surgical, and center) and thereunder by unit number.  The "foreign hospitals" section includes some records pertaining to U.S. Army hospitals in the United States.  This series supplements the previously described AMEDD and HUMED records (see paragraphs II.131-II.132).  For example, the Walter Reed Army Medical Center records in this series (3 ft.) include general orders, general correspondence, annual reports, command report files, management improvement project files, management survey files, military historians' files, newspapers, operations planning files, organization planning files, research and development case files, and professional staff program files.  Brooke Army Medical Center records (7 ft.) include general orders, memorandums, unit history files, general correspondence, annual reports, guides, management improvement project files, organizational planning files, professional staff program files, and research and developments project control files for the Korean War era.  Fitzsimmons General Hospital records (5 ft.) include general orders, general correspondence, annual reports, management improvement project files, management survey files, medical committee files, organizational planning files, and professional staff program files.  Box lists for all sections are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  Additional series documentation includes Korean War era records of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Medical Research and Development Board, the Army Medical Service Graduate School, the Training Center, and the Institute of Research (all located at Walter Reed).  There are also separate files for the Alameda [CA] Medical Depot; the Army and Navy General Hospital in Hot Springs, AZ; the William Beaumont General Hospital in El Paso, TX; the Brooke Army Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, TX; the Fitzsimmons General Hospital in Denver, CO; the Letterman General Hospital in San Francisco, CA; the Louisville Medical Depot; the St. Louis Medical Depot; the Madigan General Hospital at Fort Lewis, WA; the Murphy General Hospital in Waltham, MA; the Oliver General Hospital in Augusta, GA; the Percy Jones General Hospital at Fort Custer, MI; the San Francisco Medical Depot; the Valley Forge General Hospital in Phoenixville, PA; and Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

 

Record Group 127 - Records of the U.S. Marine Corps

II.144 During the Korean War, the Marine Corps commandants were Gen. Clifton B. Cates (January 1948-December 1951) and Gen. Lemuel C. Shepherd (January 1952-December 1955).  An overview of Marine Corps activities during the early phases of the Korean Conflict is included in reports and other records relating to Korean War military operations, 1950-58 [A1, Entry 1017] (4 ft).  The records are arranged according to type of report and include interviews with Marine Corps officers regarding their wartime experiences; reports relating to Marine troop withdrawals and redeployments from Hungnam, December 1950; copies of operational reports prepared by the Pacific fleet; and National Intelligence Surveys of North and South Korea.  There is an agency-prepared folder list available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.145 Although NARA does not have custody of the main body of Marine Corps operational records, there is some operational information among the records relating to operations and exercises, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 1018] (18 ft).  these records include correspondence, plans, orders, and reports relating to combat operations, troop movements, and training exercises.  There are also copies of contractor and Defense Department studies of the war, including a chronology of the Chosin Reservoir Battle, reports of Navy air combat operations; and comments on the overall course of the war by the Commanding General, 8th U.S. Army.  There is a NARA-prepared box list and an agency prepared folder list available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.146 Further operational information is located among records relating to the Korean War and subsequent operations, 1950-59 [A1, Entry 1019] (6 ft.).  This collection of documents was assembled from the records of the headquarters and staff agencies and U.S. Marine Corps field commands.  It includes printed evaluation reports of Korean Conflict operations compiled by the Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet; Korean Conflict chronologies; intelligence estimates; and periodic intelligence reports.  There is an agency-prepared folder list available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.147 Documentation of Navy amphibious and air forces that were used in amphibious landings can be found among the records relating to Korean War prisoners, amphibious operations and air combat, 1950-54 [A1, Entry 1020] (3 ft.).  The records in this series include reports and questionnaires relating to POWs interviewed in conjunction with Operation Little Switch, reports pertaining to the organization of the Marine Corps, a draft Navy manual for amphibious operations, and special action reports of Marine Aircraft Group 33 and its fighter squadrons during July 1950.  There is an agency-prepared folder list available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.148 There are also pertinent records dispersed throughout the Marine Corps general subject file, 1940-53 [A1, Entry 1023] (25 ft.).  They include a report on the Marine's involvement in the amphibious assault at Inchon, a two-volume evaluation of the influence of the Marine Corps on the course of the Korean Conflict, and periodic intelligence reports of the First Marine Division, October 1950-November 1952.  There is an agency-prepared folder list available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.149 In addition to the casualty records created by the Bureau of Naval Personnel (see paragraphs II.9-II.12), there are also records relating to Marine Corps strength and casualties, 1775-1971 [A1, Entry 107L] (19 ft.).  These records are arranged in three sub series--strength, casualties, and miscellaneous records--and thereunder in rough chronological order.  The first sub series has records pertinent to the Korean War dispersed throughout (6 ft.), while the second has more concentrated records (2 ft.).  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 156 - Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance

II.150 The Office of the Chief of Ordnance (OCO), established in 1832 and abolished in 1962, was responsible for overseeing the development, quantity procurement, distribution, and maintenance of U.S. Army ordnance materiel.  By the Korean War OCO's maintenance responsibilities encompassed tanks and combat vehicles, artillery and artillery ammunition, machine guns, small arms and small arms ammunition, bombs, grenades, pyrotechnics, mine equipment, rockets, rocket launchers, and guided missiles.  The OCO's varied functions and activities at this time are not only reflected in the breadth of its organizational structure, but also in the wide topical range of NARA-held OCO series.  Korean War material generally is included in series that predate and postdate the war years.  While only the most pertinent series are described here, virtually all OCO records dating from 1950-53 pertain in some way to the development, procurement, distribution, and maintenance of U.S. Army Korean War ordnance.  And, because United Nations Command forces fought the Korean War largely with World War II equipment and ordnance, many OCO records from the 1940s and earlier are also relevant to the subject of this reference information paper.

II.151 Post-World War II demobilization entailed significant military funding reductions that affected all levels of OCO operations.  In June 1950 OCO was a skeleton organization with unbalanced stocks, severe shortages, a complete lack of specific items, and large quantities of unserviceable ammunition.  The first troops in Korea paid the price for this lack of readiness.  Alerted to their plight, American planners began to transform a defunct munitions industry into an effective instrument of war.  OCO appropriations increased astronomically during the war years. This resulted in large-scale personnel recruitment, the rapid expansion of nationwide procurement operations, plant renovations and construction, and the growth of research and development programs.  Nevertheless, the prevalent view that the Korean War would be short impeded the full mobilization of U.S. industry.  More importantly, the lag time between allocation of Congressional appropriations and delivery of finished products--an average of 18 to 24 months--meant that needed ordnance material did not become available in Korea until late 1952 or early 1953.  Low ammunition reserves and extraordinarily high rates of usage in Korea led to battlefield rationing in the winter and spring of 1952.  This situation triggered a lengthy investigation of the ordnance ammunition program by the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee and its Preparedness Investigating Subcommittee (sometimes referred to as the Senate Subcommittee on Ammunition Shortages).  Although congressional findings were inconclusive--testimony revealed myriad practical problems and confusion regarding the causes and effects of the shortages--the Korean War experience led to significant domestic change.  After the Korean War armistice there was no effort to disband the armed forces or curtail OCO programs.  In the context of the Cold War most U.S. leaders were convinced that military spending on a large scale would be necessary to counteract the growing communist threat.  Maj. Gen. Elbert L. Ford served as Chief Ordnance Officer before, during, and after the war (November 1, 1949-October 31, 1953).

 

RECORDS OF THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE

II.152 OCO general correspondence, 1946-54 (654 ft.), consists of unclassified [A1, Entry 1049], confidential [A1, Entries 1055A-B], and secret [A1, Entries 1056A-B] series.  About half of the confidential series [A1, Entry 1055B] remains security classified.  Each series is divided into early or multiyear files, which are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  There are series decimal files for inventions (decimal 070), patents (072), reports from ordnance installations (319.1), inspections and investigations of various ordnance installations (333.1), military information collection and dissemination (350.05), training (353), preparedness for war (381), specifications of supplies (400.114), vehicles (451.2), ammunition (471), cannons or guns (472), and construction of installations (600.1).  The size and usefulness of the files depend on the activity in a particular year.  As examples, there are abundant patent files for the years 1949-52 and large clusters of inventions files in the 1953 and 1954 files.  Box lists for these series are available for use in the Textual Records Research Room of the National Archives at College Park, MD, or upon request.  There are also alphabetically arranged subject card indexes for each of the above series.  These declassified indexes list documents by subject term, decimal file number, originator, and document title or topic.  The 202 ft. of subject card indexes are listed on the Master Location Register as A1, Entries 1048A-D and 1054 A-D.

II.153 Records of the Publications Branch include an OCO publications records set, 1946-54 [A1, Entry 1014A] (38 ft.), arranged alphabetically by type of publication and thereunder by publication date or number.  The series include OCO bulletins, manuals, memorandums, orders, pamphlets, procurement and technical instructions, standard inspection and operating procedures, special orders, research and development newsletters, and progress and status reports.  Most of these records date from the period 1950-1953.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Records Research Room of the National Archives at College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.154 History Branch records are particularly useful for documenting the OCO response to the 1953 congressional investigation of Korean War ammunition shortages.  An eight volume, sequentially numbered study titled "The Ordnance Ammunition Program, 1 July 1950-31 December 1952" [A1, Entry 1035] (2 ft.), examines OCO mobilization planning, production, and procurement activities.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Records Research Room of the National Archives at College Park, MD, or upon request.  Government Printing Office (GPO) publications of congressional hearings, newspaper clippings, draft copies of statements before Congress, and miscellaneous related reports and correspondence constitute most of the unarranged records of the congressional investigation of ammunition shortages during the Korean War, 1953 [A1, Entry 1036] (1 ft.).  Three volumes of ordnance mobilization plans, March 1950-January 1953 [A1, Entry 1037], and records pertaining to congressional investigations of procurement at Ridgewood and Rossford Ordnance Plants, 1950-52 [A1, Entry 1038], provide additional relevant material on the congressional committee inquiries, as do Legislative Coordination Branch unarranged copies of transcripts of proceedings before the Preparedness Investigation Subcommittee on Armed Services, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 1046] (1 ft.), and records pertaining to congressional investigations of ordnance procurement, 1950-52 [A1, Entry 1047] (1 ft.).  The last series is arranged by facility or corporate name (e.g. Rossford Ordnance Plant, Elvair Corporation).  Box lists for Entries 1046 and 1047 are available for use in the Textual Records Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.155 History Branch histories of staff and operating divisions of OCO, 1946-54 [A1, Entry 1019] (7 ft.), and the histories of ordnance field installations and activities, 1946-54 [A1, Entries 1023A-B] (76 ft.), present a broad overview of OCO policy, programs, and activities before, during, and after the Korean War.  Both series are arranged alphabetically by office, division, or installation.  Box lists for both series are available for use in the Textual Records Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.156 History Branch historical studies, 1942-62 [A1, Entry 1025] (4 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by subjects such as ammunition, armored vehicles (Patton tank), artillery, automation at ordnance plants, board history, contracts, fuzes, gages, inspections in Detroit, intelligence activities, laboratories for human engineering, packaging, procurement planning, research and development, research sector, safety at ordnance depots and arsenals, small business programs, and training.

II.157 History Branch historical reports, photographs, intelligence reports, statistical reports, and other documents regarding ordnance activities in Far East and Korea, 1946-55 [A1, Entry 1029] (3 ft.), are arranged by alphabetical source categories and include personal papers of Gen. Urban Niblo, Chief Ordnance Officer, General Headquarters, Far East Command-United Nations Command.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.158 During the Korean War era Eighth U.S. Army ordnance unit commanders shared vital administrative and logistical information through "ordnance operations bulletins" (issued daily) and "ordnance operations reports" (issued biweekly).  These two printed serials reported on similar matters, including ordnance shipments and inventories, ordnance field test results and performance problems, commodity transportation and distribution priorities, and unit tactical ordnance requirements.  The bulletins and reports also list Eighth Army ordnance unit organizational hierarchies and base locations.  Copies of the Eighth Army ordnance bulletins and reports gathered by the Historical Branch are located in ordnance operations bulletins, 1951-55 [A1, Entry 1030 (11 ft.), and Eighth Army ordnance field operations reports, 1953-54 [A1, Entry 1031].  The operations bulletins series are arranged by issuing unit (EUSAK [8th Army], Korean Base Section, Korean Communications Zone [postwar], 60th Ordnance Group, 314th Ordnance Group, and 8046th Army Unit), and thereunder in chronological order.  The operations reports are arranged chronologically by date of report [see also RG 338, Eighth U.S. Army, Records of the Ordnance Section, paragraph II.400].  Both series are security classified.

II.159 Office of Executive Management organization planning files, 1948-62 [A1, Entry 1042] (1 ft.), arranged sequentially by folder number, include an interim report (August 10, 1953) and related papers regarding proposals to reorganize and improve OCO Army procurement in the aftermath of congressional hearings.  Records of this branch also include management engineering services contract files, 1951-60 [A1, Entry 1043] (3 ft.), arranged by arsenal or contractor, and management surveys and service reports, 1949-57 [A1, Entry 1044] (4 ft.), arranged by subject.  Both series concern matters such as budgeting, labor costs, and stock control during the Korean War.  Office of Executive Management general records, 1953-55 [A1, Entry 1041] (1 ft.), arranged by subject, include correspondence, memorandums, studies, and other records relating primarily to the organization and functions of Ordnance Department administrative components and proposed changes and realignments.

 

RECORDS OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE

II.160 General administrative files, 1950-54 [A1, Entry 1122] (3 ft.), which include records of inspections and investigations of Ordnance Department field offices, are arranged alphabetically by name of district or installation.  General investigative files, 1950-55 [A1, Entries 1124A-B] (14 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by name of contractor, individual, or installation.  The files were accumulated as a result of the investigation of complaints and allegations of dishonesty, misconduct, or irregularities involving Ordnance Department civilian or military personnel or ordnance contractors and their employees.  Box lists for both series are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE LEGAL DIVISION

II.151 Staff studies relating to ordnance contractors and procurement practices, 1947-62 [A1, Entry 1075] (13 ft.), are divided into two sections, unclassified and declassified, and arranged thereunder alphabetically by name of contractor.  Individual files include technical manuals, audits, records of hearings and related legal materials.  Congressional investigative files, 1950-56 [A1, Entry 1076] (5 ft.), arranged alphabetically by investigative body or subject of investigation, provide additional material on ammunition procurement problems identified in the course of Senate Armed Services Committee and the Preparedness Investigating Subcommittee hearings in 1953.  Other records in this series focus on matters such as cost overruns and pricing practices.  General Counsel records accumulated in the course of special studies [A1, Entry 1084] (4 ft.), arranged by study or survey topic, include approximately 2 ft. of Army testimony and statements, correspondence, reports, transcripts of hearings, newspaper clippings, and other records gathered by the OCO in preparation for testimony before the above mentioned Senate committee and subcommittee.  Many of these records are gathered in topically arranged, OCO-devised "Ordnance Ammunition Program, July 1, 1950-December 1952" volumes.  An agency-furnished inventory is located in the first box of the series.  General Counsel records regarding procurement of rockets for use by the Air Force, 1951-54 [A1, Entry 1085] (1 ft.), consist of ten consecutively numbered files documenting OCO efforts in 1951-52 to procure military ordnance from the Swiss company Oerlikon.  Some of the sought-after ordnance included 80 mm. aircraft rockets for use in Korea.  Correspondence indicates that the army and air force competed for procurement authority for this transaction.

II.162 Special Counsel for Litigation, Taxes, Legislation, and Publications weekly reports, 1949-54 [A1, Entry 1088] (2 ft.), arranged chronologically, concern congressional inquiries, investigations of ordnance activities, legislation and litigation affecting production, patents, procurement legal issues, and ordnance publication issuances.  There is a subject index for each year.  Office of the General counsel administrative files, 1941-52 [A1, Entry 1083] (1 ft.), arranged alphabetically by subject, include reports on Rockford Ordnance Plant and ammunition production by automatic machinery (1952) and labor disputes affecting ordnance production at George Roper Company, Rockford, IL (1952).  There is also a 1950 survey of procurement "safeguards" (procedural controls) exercised over Army personnel.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE ORDNANCE COMPTROLLER

II.163 As a companion series to records of the History Branch, records relating to ammunition procurement, 1950-56 [A1, Entry 1105] (3 ft.), consist of fiscal data compiled in response to various congressional inquiries, including the 1953 investigation of OCO Korean War ammunition procurement by the Senate Armed Services Committee and its Preparedness Investigating Subcommittee.  The series is arranged in accordance with an agency-devised alphanumeric filing plan.  The first box in the series includes an alphabetically arranged subject index to the alphanumeric files.  Korean War ordnance program budgeting is covered in records of the Budget and Programming Branch, such as management engineering improvement files, 1951-55 [A1, Entry 1106] (5 ft.), arranged alphabetically by subject, organization, or ordnance installation and programming and budgeting files, FY 1951-FY 1954 [A1, Entry 1107] (19 ft.), arranged by fiscal year.  Box lists for Entry 1106 are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.164 Reports and Statistics Branch graphic charts and related worksheets, 1951-54 [A1, Entry 1109] (1 ft.), report forecast and actual deliveries of motor carriages, self-propelled artillery, and tanks.  The series is arranged alphabetically by name of ordnance item and thereunder chronologically.  Another Branch series, "supply control study charts" and "data on selected items of ammunition for FECOM," 1951 [A1, Entry 1110], consists of two binders that focus on various types of ammunition, detailing current and anticipated stocks, scheduled and actual production, and port requisitions ("quantities called forward by ports").

 

RECORDS OF THE FIELD SERVICES DIVISION

II.165 Administrative Office Ammunition Task Force files, 1950-52 [A1, Entry 1339] (4 ft.), mostly consist of numbered and sequentially arranged Army Ammunition Program document source volumes.  The numbered volumes contain reports, statistical compilations, budget figures, and other records that concern Army ordnance program procurement issues, production output, fiscal management, and the status of manufacturing facilities.  The chronological scope of documentation in these volumes is July 1, 1950, through December 1952.  Other records include field service reference books; artillery ammunition procurement and supply reports and statistics; statements of OCO and other Army staff before the Armed Services Committee and the Preparedness Investigating Subcommittee in 1953; an April 2, 1953, statement of Gen. Mark Clark, Investigating Subcommittee in 1953; an April 2, 1953, statement of Gen. Mark Clark, Commanding General, Far East Command, on the status of ammunition supplies in the Far East; Ammunition Task Force project folders; and various cables regarding ordnance shortages.  An agency-furnished inventory is available in the first box of this series.

II.166 The OCO Management Control Intelligence (MCI) and management improvement programs were two efforts by Department of the Army policymakers to correct deficiencies identified during the 1953 Senate Armed Services Committee and Preparedness Investigating Subcommittee investigations.  Many of the reports from the two programs are located in the Systems Improvement Office management improvement administration and project files, 1953-54 [A1, Entry 1351] (5 ft.), arranged numerically by folder number.  The reports document MCI program standards and labor costs and the progress of OCO management improvement programs that focused on specific OCO functions and facilities.  An agency-furnished inventory is available in the first box of this series.

 

RECORDS OF THE INDUSTRIAL DIVISION

II.167 The Industrial Division planned and supervised procurement, production, and inspection of all ordnance materiel; construction and modification of ordnance plants; and preparation of OCO publications.  Several Korean War-era records of the Staff and Management Office, including unarranged records pertaining to procurement problems, 1951-54 [A1, Entry 1239] (2 ft.), unarranged records pertaining to procurement activities during the Korean War, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 1240] (1 ft.), and industrial mobilization and procurement planning files, 1949-54 [A1, Entry 1246] (14 ft.), focus on OCO program review and analysis of industrial mobilization and procurement planning.  The last series, a substantial file arranged by fiscal year, includes Department of Defense Munitions Board publications and war procurement plans, OCO mobilization plans, budget estimates, lists of contractors, and monthly progress reports.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  Records of the facilities and resources section regarding the ordnance military construction program, 1950-54 [A1, Entry 1243] (2 ft.), arranged by fiscal year, and records maintained by the ordnance representative on the Army Installations Board Subcommittee No. 4, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 1244] (5 ft.), arranged generally by name of installation or arsenal, document OCO construction projects at ordnance arsenals and industrial installations during the Korean War.  Both series include project descriptions and reviews as well as blueprints and photographs of physical plants.  The first box of Entry 1243 contains an agency-produced inventory.  Box lists for Entry 1244 are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.168 Administrative Section industrial mobilization and procurement planning files, 1953-62 [A1, Entry 1295] (12 ft.), arranged by subject, include information gathered in 1953 and 1954 for the Senate Armed Services Committee and Preparedness Investigating Subcommittee investigation of Korean War ammunition shortages.  Box 1 of this series contains a topics listing for files in the first six boxes of the series.  Records in the remaining boxes include copies of the bound "Ordnance Ammunition Program, 1 July 1950-December 1952" (records described in paragraph II.161).

 

Records of the Weapons and Fire Control Branch,
Plans and Policy Section

II.169 Records accumulated as the result of the Industrial Mobilization Planning Production Study (Phase I), 1945-52 [A1,Entry 1286] (1 ft.), are arranged generally by name of corporate firm and include information concerning reactivation of Twin Cities Arsenal (MN), emergency production of ammunition, covering links for metallic belts, and the conversion of small arms and sporting ammunition to military use.

II.170 Unarranged records relating to the production of small arms and components, 1948-52 [A1, Entry 1287], consist of "Phase II" studies concerning increased production of cartridge cases, metallic belts in automatic weapons, ammunition, and industrial preparedness procedures.

II.171 Records relating to the construction of a pilot plant to test out preliminary techniques for the mass production of cannon tubes, 1950-54 [A1, Entry 1288] (1 ft.), include information concerning acquisition of property near the West Virginia Ordnance Works and an Army contract with National Tube Company to manufacture cannon tubes.  The series is arranged by folder number.

II.172 Records relating to development of production facilities for planned mobilization production, 1950-61 [A1, Entry 1289] (9 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by name of the ordnance facility or corporate name.  The files include Korean War mobilization plans for establishing, expanding, rehabilitating, and modernizing ordnance facilities.  The series also contains plans for post-armistice facility demobilization.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the Ammunition Branch

II.173 Facilities and Resources Section, standards and performance files, 1944-55 [A1, Entry 1305] (21 ft.), are divided into two sections, "facilities" and "depots," and arranged thereunder alphabetically by name of facility or depot.  The files include industrial and manufacturing schedules, unit costs reports, and production versus schedule reports.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.174 Plans and Policies Office minutes of meetings of the Ammunition Coordination Committee, 1952-54 [A1, Entry 1311] (1 ft.), are arranged chronologically.  The committee was involved with several functional aspects of the ordnance mission.  Meeting agendas centered on coordinating production of needed ammunition and other ordnance, controlling costs and reducing duplication of effort.  Facility survey reports and summaries and Industrial Engineering Phase II studies, 1953 [A1, Entry 1312] (8 ft.), are arranged by ordnance type and size.  The studies consist of Mead Carney and Company survey reports, which measured minimum and maximum industrial production capabilities, and Proctor and Gamble Industrial Engineering Phase II studies on ammunition items and how to increase production.  A list of folders is contained in the first box of the series.

II.175 The following Ammunition Branch records series provide facility- and project-level data on questions raised regarding OCO Korean War mobilization and procurement:

1. Facilities and Resources Section records relating to mobilization planning--general correspondence, 1946-52 [A1, Entry 1307]

2. Facilities and Resources Section studies and progress reports, 1946-52 [A1, Entry 1308] (6 ft.), arranged by plant or arsenal

3. Facilities and Resources Section mobilization planning studies, 1946-52 [A1, Entry 1309] (4 ft.), arranged alphabetically by product

4. Plans and Policies Office briefings and conference notes on ammunition shortages, mobilization planning and other matters, 1950-55 [A1, Entry 1310] (2 ft.), arranged chronologically.  The first box of this series contains an agency-produced inventory.

Box lists for entries 1308 and 1309 are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the Automotive Branch

II.176 Plans & Policy Section [records] relating to industrial mobilization production preparedness, 1948-53 [A1, Entry 1323] (3 ft.), are arranged by tab number.  The records include proposed specification studies, budget estimates, production studies, and mobilization reports.  A list of the tabs is available in the first box of the series.

II.177 Plans & Policy Section records used in justification and defense of industrial mobilization, procurement, and material requirements, 1952-55 [A1, Entry 1324] (3 ft.), arranged by fiscal year, include estimated dates of release for production of ordnance development type items, a prior list of work projects, and justification of projects regarding appropriations.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in college Park, MD, or upon request.

II.178 Procurement Operations Section programming files, December 1950-June 1954 [A1, Entry 1325] (6 ft.), are arranged chronologically and include Ordnance Tank Automotive Center production schedules and estimates for tanks, combat vehicles, and trucks.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  Unarranged procurement control files, 1951-54 [A1, Entry 1326] (1 ft.), include production schedules for various ordnance and equipment such as trailers, trucks, howitzers, and tanks.  These schedules were used to maintain control over procurement needs.  A file listing is available in the first box of the series.

II.179 Vehicles Section unarranged records of the chief of the Tank Automotive Branch [Warren, MI], 1949-55 [A1, Entry 1329] (1 ft.), include a variety of files that contain studies on particular ordnance items, engineering psychological reports, and records relating to ordnance item tests and deficiencies.  The files also contain records relating to abuse by contractors and contract problems.  A file listing is available in the first box of the series.

 

RECORDS OF THE PLANS AND PROGRAMS DIVISION

II.180 The OCO May 1, 1951, mobilization plan for the Korean War is included among records of the Plans Branch mobilization planning files, 1948-59 [A1, Entry 1095].  The 1951 plan includes sections on staff, manpower, procurement and industrial mobilization, field services, research and development, training, facilities and construction, and installations.

 

RECORDS OF THE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (R&D) DIVISION

II.181 A substantial number of the Division's records are security classified.  The two largest series consist of reports and technical documents accumulated as a result of OCO contracts, 1946-54 [A1, Entries 1128A&B] (342 ft.), and reports and technical documents prepared by elements of OCO divisions and field stations, 1946-54 [A1, Entries 1129A&B] (285 ft.).  Arranged by year and thereunder by contractor or OCO field installation (Aberdeen Proving Ground, Detroit Arsenal and Watertown Arsenal Laboratory), these series include specifications, engineering reports, test results, blueprints and photographs for a variety of military vehicles and ordnance materiel.  Most of the records in these two series are security classified.  Another major series, reports prepared by Army Field Forces Boards, 1946-51 [A1, Entry 1130] (18 ft.), includes unclassified technical studies for ordnance materiel ranging from rocket launchers and submachine guns to optic filters and battlefield illuminators.  The reports are arranged by project number.  Cancelled specifications files, 1933-60 [A1, Entry 1140] (37 ft.), arranged by year and thereunder by specification number, provide copies of official U.S. Army specifications for ordnance materiel and information on annual changes and upgrading.  Box lists for these series are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.182 The OCO Ordnance Technical Committee's responsibilities included review of Army ordnance project development, procurement, specifications, and classification status (e.g., "standard issue," "obsolete").  Minutes of meetings of the Ordnance Technical Committee, 1946-62 [A1, Entry 1210 (27 ft.), are arranged by meeting number and ate.  An agency-produced index [NM-26, Entry 918] (11 ft.), provides some measure of subject access to meeting minute topics and documents.  Box lists for Entry 1210 are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.183 The Ordnance Technical Committee's book of standards, ca. 1923-ca. 1958 [A1, Entry 1219] (6 ft.), provides a listing of the Army's ordnance requirements linked to ordnance inventory items that either fulfilled or partially satisfied a specific requirement.  The committee's "book of standards" consists of several unarranged volumes, each organized according to some combination of year or years (e.g., 1924, or 1943-57) and ordnance class (e.g., class "S" grenades, pyrotechnics, and aircraft bombs).  Under class letter, there are individual ordnance line entries with columns for ordnance requirement, and remarks.  Thus, the books show that, following World War II, the Army's requirement for a "Bomb, General Purpose, 250 lb.," was satisfied by the standard item titled, "Bomb, Gp., 250 lb., AN-M57."  The books were updated as the requirements changed, as fulfilling standard items were developed, or as the requirements or fulfilling items became obsolete.  The committee's book of standards was not a complete set.  There are World War II and Korean War-era volumes for the following ordnance categories: small arms and hand arms (class B); light and medium field artillery (class C); heavy field artillery (class D); tanks, artillery tractors, tractor and trailer caissons, armored motor cars (class G); target and target supplies (class L); harbor defense, railway and major caliber artillery ammunition (including 155 mm. gun) (class P); minor and medium caliber ammunition for mobile artillery, trench mortar ammunition (class R); small arms and automatic gun ammunition (class T); and high and low explosives (class V).

II.184 Reports of ordnance observers, 1946-51 [A1, Entry 1138] (1 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by name of installation, command, task force, or exercise and include reports pertaining to desert condition climatic tests conducted at the Yuma, AZ, Test Station (1951-52) and various cold weather and wet conditions exercises conducted in locations such as Adak, AK (Task Force Williwaw, 1946-47), and Camp McCoy, WI (Task Force Frost, 1946-47).  There are also reports of various ordnance liaison officers and ordnance representatives at the Air Materiel Command at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH, the Field Command of the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project, and the Naval Ordnance Test Station (NOTS) Annex in Pasadena, CA.  The NOTS reports focus on the results of tactical rocket tests.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.185 Miscellaneous reports, treatises, publications, and other records, 1946-54 [A1, Entry 1139A-B] (5 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by subject such as aircraft armament, armor (weapons for the defeat of), data reduction program (using computers to store data), and intelligence (which includes studies on Soviet Union military ordnance).  Most of this series (3 ft.) remains security classified.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD), or upon request.

II.186 Declassified (1 ft.) and security-classified (5 ft.) project reports from Johns Hopkins University, 1946-54 [A1, Entry 1143A-B] (6 ft.), consist of Army contract project reports produced by the Johns Hopkins University Operations Research Office.  The reports cover numerous topics, ranging from general studies of psychological warfare to analyses of weapons and tactics in specific combat situations.  Examples of the latter include several 1951 security-classified studies focusing on the performance of infantry, armor, and close air support in the Korean War.  Military historian S.L.A. Marshall wrote two of the studies on infantry tactics and operations early in the war.  Other reports evaluate U.N. and Communist propaganda and psychological warfare programs and operations, and the potential use of nuclear weapons in tactical operations.  The reports are arranged by Operations Research Office (ORO) report or study number.

 

Records of the Ammunition Branch

II.187 The branch project files, 1946-51 [A1, Entry 1162] (10 ft.), include correspondence, reports, studies, design specifications, plans, drawings, and photographs generated by projects to research, design, develop, and test shells and cartridges (e.g. high explosive, canister, smoke, and illuminating) for recoilless rifles, tank guns, howitzers, mortars and antiaircraft artillery, ranging in size from 37 mm to 105 mm.  The files are arranged sequentially by alphanumeric project number.

II.188 Bomb and Pyrotechnic Section research and development files, 1946-54 [A1, 1165B] (15 ft.), consist of studies, reports, research articles, plans, drawings, photographs, and other records relating to the development of bombs, cluster bombs and grenades, bomb components and aerodynamics, flares, and marine markers.  The series also contains OCO correspondence pertaining to project work authorizations, ordnance item requirements, and ordnance studies.  The first 14 boxes of the series are arranged by type of ordnance; the last 20 (K1633-K1652), by project number.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.189 Electro-Mechanical Fuze Section records relating to the development and testing of fuzes, 1943-52 [A1, Entry 1166] (1 ft.), arranged by folder title, contain OCO field reports that analyze the performance of variable time (VT) fuzes in the Far East Command (1950 Korean War combat operations).  Other records include standard operating procedures for the use of VT fuzes in field artillery units.  All of these records are located in box K1653, Folder Title "Development of Ammunition Correspondence, 25 Sept 1943-4 Sept 1951."

II.190 The following Electro-Mechanical Fuze Section series document combined service project work of the 1940s and 1950s to develop and test variable time fuze devices for various ordnance applications:

1. records relating to the administration of JANAF [Joint Army-Navy-Air Force] fuze projects and other matters, 1947-57 [A1, Entry 1169] (2 ft.), arranged alphabetically by subject

2. records relating to the funding of JANAF fuze projects, 1951-57 [A1, Entry 1170] (1 ft.), arranged alphabetically by subject or type of document

3. records accumulated by the JANAF or JAN [Joint Army-Navy] fuze committee, 1948-57 [A1, Entry 1171] (2 ft.), arranged generally by name of subcommittee

Records in the three series include proposals, specifications, plans and drawings, progress and test reports, technical studies, research reports, project correspondence, and committee meeting minutes.  Similar records pertaining to foreign fuzes (principally British) can be found in the section's records relating to foreign fuzes, 1947-55 [A1, Entry 1172] (2 ft.), which is arranged alphabetically by country of origin or by manufacturer.  Box lists for all of these series are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.191 Explosives Section records relating to the characteristics and development of explosives and shaped charges, 1917-54 [A1, Entry 1173] (4 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by subject (e.g., chemical or explosive agent).  The series consists of research reports, technical studies, committee reports, and other records pertaining to explosive charge chemical test reactions.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II,192 Grenades and Demolition Section security-classified project files, 1946-55 [A1, Entry 1174] (7 ft.), contain correspondence, reports, studies, design specifications, plans, drawings, photographs, and other records that originated with projects to research, design, develop, and test weapons and weapons components such as demolition charges, detonating cord, mine fuzes, grenades (hand, rifle, antitank, illuminating), and antipersonnel mines.  The series is arranged in rough alphabetical order by folder title.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.193 Projectile Section project files, 1939-53 [A1, Entry 1176] (18 ft.), arranged by project number (e.g., TA1-1540), include project correspondence and testing information focusing on development of ordnance such as ammunition for the 105 mm. battalion antitank (BAT) recoilless rifle (TA1-1540), high velocity armor piercing (HVAP) ammunition (TM1-5002A), high explosive and chemical mortar shells (TA1-1546A&B), and ammunition for 90 mm. guns T119 and T125 (TA1-1460).  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.194 Variable Time (VT) Fuze Section security-classified project files, ca. 1944-ca. 1955 [A1, Entry 1181] (22 ft.), contain correspondence, reports, studies, design specifications, plans, drawings, photographs, and other records that originated with projects to research, design, develop, and test conventional and variable time fuzes for ordnance such as antiaircraft ammunition, bombs, mortars, and rockets.  Some of the reports and studies pertain to fuzes developed by the British military.  The series is divided into two sections.  The first is arranged alphabetically by fuze topic (e.g., "fuze bombs," "fuzes, mortar," "fuzes, rocket").  The second section is arranged sequentially by alphanumeric project number.  One foot of records in this series have been declassified.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.195 Variable Time (VT) Fuze Section general records, 1941-53 [A1, Entry 1178] (7 ft.), are arranged in accordance with an agency-devised subject numeric classification scheme.  File documentation focuses on various topics, including problems with fuzes (171), patent applications for timing delayed and proximity fuzes (403), industrial mobilization (409), contracts (414), proposed projects (420), and fuze testing at Aberdeen Proving Ground (807).  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.196 Variable Time (VT) Fuze Section publications, 1943-57 [A1, Entry 1180] (3 ft.), arranged chronologically by year of publication, include several domestic and foreign studies and reports pertaining to the development and testing of VT fuzes.  Box K1866 contains two 1951 U.S. Army studies of aircraft armament for attack on surface troops authored by the Army Ordnance Corps Ballistic Research Laboratories located at the Aberdeen, MD, Proving Ground.  The same box contains a 1952 Johns Hopkins University Office of Operational Research report on the effectiveness of radar controlled night bombing.  The report narrative centers on Korean War bombing operations.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the Artillery Branch

II.197 Cannon Section security-classified records relating to design, test, and procurement of artillery, 1942-54 [A1, Entry 1182A-B] (9 ft.), are divided into two sections.  The first is arranged by weapon caliber; the second, alphabetically by subject.  The records consist of reports, photographs, drawings, blueprints, correspondence, minutes of committee meetings, and other documents pertaining to the design, modification, testing, development, and procurement of cannons, guns, howitzers, and mortars.  Approximately 2 ft. of records in this series have been declassified.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.198 Carriage Section security-classified project files, 1942-54 [A1, Entry 1183] (7 ft.), are divided into three sections.  The first is arranged by project symbol and number; the second, by weapon caliber; and the third, alphabetically by item or subject.  The files consist of reports, blueprints, drawings, correspondence, minutes of committee meetings, and other documents pertaining to the testing and development of gun carriages.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.199 Fire Control Section project files, 1922-55 [A1, Entry 1184] (75 ft.), are divided into two sections.  The first is arranged by project symbol and number; the second, alphabetically by materiel item name or subject term.  The files pertain to the design, testing, and development of antiaircraft and field artillery fire control equipment.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the Rocket Branch

II.200 Rocket and Launcher Section security-classified project and case files, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 1196] (27 ft.), are divided into three sections.  The first section is arranged by project symbol and number; the second by ordnance nomenclature.  Files in these two sections contain correspondence, reports, studies, and other records pertaining to the design, testing, development, and standardization of conventional rockets, rocket launchers, and propellants. Records in the third section of this series are alphabetically arranged subject files that relate to coordinated (interservice) research, gas turbines and igniters, igniter and propulsion chemical compounds, and specifications.  "Test and Inspection Techniques and Theories" files documents the refinement of tests and inspections for igniter and propulsion compounds. Five inches of records in this series have been declassified.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.201 Rocket and Launcher Section security-classified administrative files, 1942-51 [A1, Entry 1107] (4 ft.), arranged alphabetically by subject, document the section's liaison work with other agencies on various ordnance development projects.  The series consists of test reports, correspondence, photographs, plans, and other records relating to conventional rockets (e.g., antiaircraft, bazooka) and rocket components (e.g., launchers and ramps, fins, motors, switches, propellants).  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the Small Arms Branch

II.202 Following World War II, President Truman and the Congress carried out significant reductions in military budgets and manpower.  Some of the deepest cuts were implemented in the two years preceding war in Korea.  In 1949, the Army Chief of Staff instructed the Chief of Army Field Forces at Fort Monroe, VA, to convene a panel that would reexamine and reformulate Army equipment and supply policies governing service materiel requirements.  The Chief of Staff sough panel policy recommendations that would reduce "quantitative" and some "qualitative" materiel requirements to make the most efficient use of reduced peacetime appropriations, while also insuring that Army mobilization requirements--along with those identified by the Navy and Air Force--would not exceed the nation's industrial capacity.  For the next two years, the Army Equipment Policy Panel met to deliberate, gather testimony, and compile study recommendations for reducing supplies, equipment, and ordnance.  Small Arms Branch copies of the resulting reports of the [Army Field Forces] Army Equipment Policy Panel, 1949-50 [A1, Entry 1199] (1 ft.), arranged by report volume number, contain panel recommendations for reducing the range and types of ammunition, calibers of guns, and the numbers and types of equipment, supply, and ordnance items listed on the Army's tables of organization and equipment (TOE).  The reports thus provide some background on strategic assumptions, policy considerations, and budget constraints affecting the Army's state of ordnance and logistical combat preparedness in June 1950.

II.203 Machine Gun Section records relating to development and testing of machine guns and small arms, 1932-51 [A1, Entry 1200] (14 ft.), consist of correspondence, drawings, photographs, charts, and other documents arranged by a subject-numeric classification scheme known as the Koded Small Arms (K.S.A.) System.  A listing of these codes is located in the first box of the series.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the Artillery and Vehicle Systems Branch

II.204 Antiaircraft Artillery Section project control files, 1942-61 [A1, Entries 1203A-E] (21 ft.), consist of reports, studies, and correspondence relating to the development and testing of antiaircraft ordnance (guns, rockets, launchers, fire control systems, instrumentation) and gun turret systems.  The five component sub series are arranged roughly by project number or title.

II.205 Combat Vehicle Section project control files, 1943-58 [A1, Entries 1205A-E] (24 ft.), consist of proposals, reports, studies, correspondence, and other records relating to the development and testing of tanks, amphibious vehicles, cargo carriers, troop carriers, and other tracked or armored vehicles.  The five component sub series are arranged roughly by project number or title.  Two Korean War-era projects in the sub series titled project control files, July 1944-December 1956 (A1, Entry 1205A), pertain to the application of titanium armor to ordnance vehicles (project TT 1-5c, box 9) and the rectification of design and mechanical problems with the M-46 tank before and during the Korean War (project TT 2-668, boxes 3 and 4).

II.206 Transport Vehicle Section project control files, August 1940-1959 [A1, Entries 1209A-C] (4 ft.), consist of correspondence, reports, studies, and other records that, for the most part, originated with projects to design, develop, and test vehicles such as ambulances, buses, trucks (3/4 ton and 1/4-ton), and motor scooters.  Other projects documented in this series pertain to work on cranes and engines.  The files are arranged in rough alphabetical order by subject.  Series records totaling 5 in. remain security-classified.

 

Records of the Infantry and Aircraft Weapons Systems Branch

II.207 Bomb, Pyrotechnic, and Warhead Section project control files, 1941-56 [A1, Entries 1231A-C] (34 ft.), consist of correspondence, reports, studies, plans, drawings, and other records that document research and development projects pertaining to bombs and bomb design, bomb fuzes, bomb aerodynamics, shaped charges, flares, grenades, marine markers, and signal devices.  There are also files that provide information on bombs developed by the Soviet Union prior to the Korean War.  The series is subdivided into three sub series, each of which is arranged in rough alphabetical order by file subject.  Approximately 4 ft. of records in A1, Entries 1231 A and C are security classified.

 

OTHER RECORDS

II.208 The unarranged Rock Island Arsenal and Springfield Armory manufacturing description files, [ca. 1941-ca. 1955] [NM26, Entry 1072B] (33 ft.), consist of correspondence, drawings, or studies of various ordnance items such as .30 caliber rifles (T25), M-1 and M1A1 carbines, M-3 .45 caliber submachine guns, metallic belt links, and howitzer carriages.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.209 Department of Defense/Department of the Army records of the Tank and Automotive Center/Command, 1942-64 [A1, Entry 1362] (ca. 363 ft.), consist of records from the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, Tank and Automotive Center/Command, Warren, MI.  The series is divided into the following file titles:

1. military historians files, 1952-53 (1 ft.)

2. general orders, 1951-52 (3 in.)

3. general correspondence, 1951-56 (8 ft.)

4. master planning files, 1950-59 (1 ft.)

5. research and development case files, 1942-62 (168 ft.)

6. material engineering case files, 1944-61 (89 ft.)

Records within a specific file title are arranged by year within each box, and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system or TAFFS (The Army Functional Files System).  Some plans and drawings from this series were transferred to the Special Media Archives Services Division and are described in paragraph VI.5.  A textual records box list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.210 U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Command, Engineering Support Directorate technical report record files, 1931-58 [UD, Entry 62] (193 ft.), arranged by report title, consist of printed and "near print" report drafts prepared by various research and development program activities based at the Aberdeen, MD, Proving Ground.  The reports document the development and testing of items such as tanks and other armored vehicles, trucks, and their components.  The series finding aid is a report title-date-number listing that is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.211 [Records of the] Diamond Ordnance Fuze Laboratory [and predecessor organizations], 1942-[53] [UD, Entry 1135] (5 ft.), consist of fuze project records generated by the Ordnance Department's Diamond Fuze Laboratory and its predecessor, the Ordnance Development Division of the National Bureau of Standards, Department of Commerce.  The series is divided into two file sections.  The first, arranged by subject, includes correspondence, testing reports, and other records that deal mostly with the development of World War II rocket fuzes.  The second section, arranged chronologically, consists of 9193rd Technical Service Unit (TSU), Variable Time (VT) Fuze Detachment quarterly progress reports that cover topics such as VT fuze teams training, technical liaison between the OCO Research & Development Division and U.S. Army ordnance laboratories, and fuze tests.

 

Record Group 175 Records of the Chemical Warfare Service

II.212 The Chemical Warfare Service (CWS), established in June 1918, was responsible during World War II for the research, development, manufacture, and procurement of smoke and incendiary materials, toxic gases, bacteriological warfare agents, and protective equipment and devices against the same agents.  CWS also organized, equipped, and trained chemical warfare units, supervised Army training in chemical warfare, and administered special schools.  From 1939 to 1942 CWS was a technical service reporting directly to the Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army.  In March 1942 CWS functioned as a subordinate agency directed by the Commanding General, Services of Supply (later designated the Army Service Forces).  In August 1946 the Chemical Warfare Service was renamed the Chemical Corps.  In 1950, the Corps was transferred to the office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4 (Logistics).  From October 1, 1949 until July 31, 1951, Maj. Gen. Anthony C. McAuliffe served as Chief of the Chemical Corps; Maj. Gen. Egbert F. Bullene succeeded him in August 1951 and held the position for the remainder of the war.  CWS records pertaining to the Korean War that are in National Archives custody consist mostly of central files maintained by the Office of the Chief Chemical Officer.  CWS records are also located among the files of other Army organizations.  There are, for example, some relevant chemical warfare files in records of the Far East Command Chemical Section (see paragraphs II.508-II.509), records of the Eighth U.S. Army Chemical Section (see paragraph II.389) and records of specific "nonorganic" chemical units attached to either of these commands (see paragraph II.415, RG 336 and RG 407, Records of Nonorganic Units).  National Archives RG 175 accessions include few of the project and test report records series that constitute an abundant part of other Army technical service agency record groups such as RG 92 (Quartermaster) and RG 156 (Ordnance).

II.213 Records of the Office of the Chief Chemical Officer, 1946-54 [UD, Entries 1A-B] (262 ft.), are arranged by year, thereunder by former security classification (unclassified, confidential, and secret), and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system (except for the secret files, which were assigned individual document control numbers instead of decimal file numbers).  There are also sub series of station lists, miscellaneous files, and commercial files (all arranged by year and thereunder by former security classification); unclassified budget files; and unclassified patent files (both arranged by year).  The Army Chemical Corps was assigned primary responsibility for research and development in the fields of biological warfare, chemical warfare, and the dissemination of radiological warfare agents.  Records from the Korean War occur throughout this series under headings such as Army regulations (decimal 300.3), special regulations (SRS) (300.3), field manuals (300.7), technical manuals (decimal 300.7), procurement records (400.12), tables of allowances (400.34), and tables of organization and equipment (400.34).  Other decimal files include lists of research and development projects, test results, and training requirements.  The miscellaneous files sub series includes files of the Far East Command and other entities such as the Chemical Corps Board, the Chemical Corps Materiel Command, and the Chemical Corps Technical Committee.  The station files include records pertaining to Pine Bluff and Rocky Mountain Arsenals, Edgewood Proving Ground, and the Army Chemical Center.  All records are declassified.  A box list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.214 Minutes of meetings of the Chemical Corps Technical Committee, 1935-63 [UD, Entry 2] (4 ft.) are arranged chronologically.  The Committee met in order to establish priority research and development projects and provide justifications for the continuation or cancellation of projects.  The minutes include discussions, recommendations, and concurrences relating to biological, chemical, and radiological projects.  During the Korean War, the committee agenda included topics such as waterproofing projective masks, flame thrower development, requirements for chemical munitions, reclassification of guided missile materiel, obsolete smoke grenades and smoke bombs, protective clothing policies, reclassification of various chemicals, and gas rockets.

II.215 Historians background files, 1922-67 [A1, Entry 6] (8 ft.), are arranged by type of file or creating unit.  These records cover a variety of records deemed of interest to the organizational historian, including general orders and memorandums of the Army Chemical Center during the Korean War-era.  A box list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 218 Records of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS)

II.216 The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) were originally the United States members of the Combined Chiefs of Staff, an agency that was created, as announced by the War Department on February 6, 1942, to ensure coordination of the war effort of Great Britain and the United States.  The National Security Act of 1947 established the JCS within the National Military Establishment (now the Department of Defense) and provided that its members should act as the principal advisers to the President and the Secretary of Defense.  Major duties of the Joint Chiefs of Staff include the preparation of strategic plans and joint logistic plans, the establishment of uniform commands in strategic areas, the review of major material and personnel requirements of the military forces, and the formulation of policies for joint training of the military forces.

II.217 The JCS central correspondence files ("decimal files"), 1942-63 [1,425 ft.), consist of separate "security-classified" (640 ft.) and "formerly security-classified" (785 ft.) sub series.  Each sub series is arranged in chronological segments (1948-50, 1951-53, and 1954-56 are relevant to the Korean War) and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system (1942-58) or the Navy's standard subject identification code (SSIC) system (1959-63).  Examples of relevant files include file 319.1 (7-19-50) Sections 1-2 (1948-50), which contains a record of actions relative to the Korean situation.  File 013.36 (4-20-51) Bulky Package (BP) (1951-53) contains the record of actions taken by the JCS relative to U.N. operations in Korea, 25 June-11 April 1951.  Folder lists for each sub series are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.218  The JCS geographic correspondence files ("geographic files"), 1942-58 (387 ft.), consist of separate "security-classified" (114 ft.) and "formerly security-classified" (273 ft.) records sub series.  The two sub series are divided into chronological segments (e.g., 1948-50, 1951-53, 1954-56).  Each segment is then divided alphabetically by country name (e.g., Formosa, Japan, Korea) or geographic area (e.g., Asia, Far East) and thereunder arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  Relevant sections of the 1948-56 geographic files include records relating to Asia (7 ft.), China (3 ft.), the Far East (3 ft.), Japan (4 ft.) and Korea (11 ft.).  The files contain a mixture, from planning papers and reports, of JCS and other U.S. Government agencies, as well as some U.N. documents.  The documents cover a variety of topics including broad policy (JCS 1483/64--"The Position of the US with Respect to Korea" and JCS 1776/4--"Implications of a Possible Full-Scale Invasion from North Korea Subsequent to Withdrawal of US Troops from Korea"), as well as more pedestrian concerns (JCS 1776/26--"Use by the Commander-in-Chief, Far East, of the United Nations Flag" and JCS 1776/34--"Increase in Strength of the First Marine Division").  The files also contain documents about contributions of various allies (JCS 1776/31--"Ground Force Assistance for Korea from British commonwealth Nations" and JCS 1776/78--"Assistance by the Union of South Africa in the Korean situation").  Folder lists for each sub series are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.219 Records of the chairman, 1942-70 [378 ft.), include the mostly declassified files of JCS chairmen Omar N. Bradley, 1949-53 [UD, Entry 48] (4 ft.), and Arthur W. Radford, 1953-57 [UD, Entries 50-51] (25 ft.).  Chairman records contain country-specific files relating to the Korean War such as 091 China (1950), 091 Korea (1950), and 091 Korea (1952).  There is a separate security-classified chairman's index, 1953-57 (UD, Entry 59) (19 ft.), for the Radford files.  Folder lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.220 Messages relating to operations in the Far East, May 29, 1950-July 31, 1953 [UD, Entries 94A-B] (5 ft.), consist of dispatches between the JCS and the Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Far East Command (CINCFE) and United Nations Command (CINCUNC).  The series consists of two sub series, declassified dispatches [UD, Entry 94A] and security-classified dispatches [UD, Entry 94B].  Within each sub series, there are separate, chronologically arranged "incoming" and "outgoing" message sections. The messages contain information about military strategy and planning, combat operations, treatment of POWs, and armistice negotiations.

II.221 History of the Korean conflict: Korean armistice negotiations, May 1952-July 1953 [UD, Entry 101] (1 ft.), was compiled by the Military History Section, HQ, Army Forces Far East/Eighth Army.  Topics included in the history are background information regarding negotiations, the results of negotiations, characteristics and weakness of U.N. and Communist negotiators, Communist methods of negotiation, debates on repatriation, special problems affecting negotiations, efforts to break deadlock, disposition of non-repatriated POWs, the final POW agreement, implementation of the armistice, Republic of Korea (ROK) opposition to negotiations, the campaign for ROK cooperation, and an appraisal of the armistice.

II.222 A copy of the Korean armistice agreement of June 8, 1953 and the temporary supplement to the armistice agreement of July 27, 1953 [NM-41, Entry 31] (4 ft.), has been microfilmed and is available on Microfilm Publication T826 (35 mm., 1 roll), which is available for use in the Microfilm Reading Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.223 Chronologically arranged Korean highlights, 1950-July 1953 [UD, Entry 100] (2 ft.), volumes consist of day-by-day summaries of events that include photographs of daily situation maps.  The summaries are prepared by the JCS for U.S. Senate "Committees on Korean Operations."

 

Record Group 242 National Archives Collection
of Foreign Records Seized

II.224 For most of the Korean War, enemy records captured on the Korean Peninsula were transported to General Headquarters, Far East Command (FEC), Military Intelligence Division (G-2) in Tokyo.  There the G-2 Allied Translator and Interpreter Section (ATIS) organized the captured documents, analyzed them for intelligence value, and then prepared translations, excerpts, and briefs for theater-wide dissemination.  On December 1, 1951, ATIS was redesignated the Military Intelligence Service Group (MISG), Far East (8238th Army Unit).  The 8238 Army Unit then became the 500th Military Intelligence Service Group on September 1, 1952.  The 500th MISG was detached from the FEC on December 30, 1952, but continued to exercise its original ATIS responsibilities for organization, analysis, and translation of captured documents.

 

COLLECTION OF RECORDS SEIZED IN KOREA, 1921-52

II.225 These materials were seized by United States military forces, mostly in Pyongyang, North Korea, but also at other locations that had been occupied by Communist forces or had been under the temporary control of United Nations Command forces.  The documents cover numerous subjects, including aeronautics, agriculture, the Chinese People's Volunteer Army in Korea, classical and modern literature, history and activities of the Communist Party, construction projects, economics, engineering, geography, industry, Korean-Russian trade, life in the Soviet Union and in Soviet satellite countries in Europe, mathematics, medicine, motion pictures, navigation, North Korean courts, the North Korean Army, politics, propaganda, sociology, and U.N. forces in Korea.  Most of the records pertain to the Soviet Union and North Korea.  The records consist of correspondence, office files, personnel files, printed materials (i.e. books, periodicals, newspapers), bulletins, and photographs.  Although most of the records are in Russian and Korean, there are also materials in Bulgarian, Chinese, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, and Polish.  There are three large blocks of records--Russian materials, captured Korean documents, and captured enemy documents.  The first two blocks begin with the designation "SA" which stands for "Shipping Advice."  These, in turn, are broken into smaller segments that are numbered sequentially 2001 through 2013 and contain 2,394 boxes of records.  Within the SA segments, the individual documents are numbered sequentially according to the original shipment box number and by specific item number (e.g., SA 2001 1/12).  Records in the third largest block of records were assigned six-digit numbers starting with 200000 and ending with 208072.  This block contains 173 boxes of records.

 

KOREAN, RUSSIAN, AND OTHER RECORDS

II.226 Russian materials captured in Pyongyang, North Korea in November 1950 [NM-44, Entry 300] (ca. 496 ft.), are arranged by shipping advice number (SA 2001 through SA 2004) and thereunder by original shipping box number and item number.  In Preliminary Inventory NM-44, this series is titled library materials containing Russian books on world literature, art, music, technology, politics, and government, 1921-52.  The records were taken from Soviet facilities in Pyongyang and all are in Russian:

1. Material in SA 2001 (461 boxes, ca. 202 ft.) pertains to art, biographies, Russian literature, music, politics, and theater and includes elementary and high school textbooks.  All boxes are indexed on 3- by 5-inch cards in the subject index, 1951-52 [UD, Entry 300A] (1 ft.), and also on "shipping advice inventory lists" (see paragraph II.230 [UD, Entry 300E]).  Information on the cards and lists includes title, author, date of publication, size of document, format, and number of pages.

2. SA 2002 (227 boxes, ca. 100 ft.) and SA 2003 (226 boxes, ca. 99 ft.) consist of technical books and manuals.  Although only the first 111 boxes of SA 2002 are indexed on subject index cards, the contents of all boxes in SA 2002 and SA 2003 are inventoried on shipping advice lists.

3. SA 2004 (209 boxes, ca. 95 ft.) contains magazines, booklets, and miscellaneous loose paper relating to a broad array of cultural, historical, political, and technical topics.  SA 2004 contents are inventoried on shipping advice lists.

II.227 Captured Korean documents 1921-[54] [NM-44, Entry 299] (ca. 579 ft.), are arranged generally by shipping advice number and thereunder by original shipment box number and item number.  In Preliminary Inventory NM-44, this series is titled records of North Korean military, governmental, and party organizations and library materials, 1921-52.  The series consists of records numbered SA 2005 to SA 2013; SA 10181; SA 10177; an additional eleven shipping advice numbers; and some unnumbered individual documents.  The records include diaries, pamphlets, newspapers, leaflets, posters, maps, blueprints, overlays, transparencies, and photographs, along with business, police, and personal records.  They relate broadly to Communism, culture, propaganda, agriculture, industry, history, labor, and economics.  The most important shipping advice numbers in this series with capture location(s) are listed below:

1

SA 2005 (156 boxes, ca. 72 ft.) Pyongyang

2

SA 2006 (155 boxes, ca. 70 ft.) Pyongyang, Kimpo

3

SA 2007 (144 boxes, ca. 64 ft.) Topdong, Kimpo, Yonpo Air Field and Seoul

4

SA 2008 (157 boxes, ca. 69 ft.) Seoul, Yonpo, and Pyongyang

5

SA 2009 (183 boxes, ca. 80 ft.) Inchon, Seoul, Yonpo Air Field, Kimpo area, Hamhung, Pyongyang, Suwon area, and Wonsan area as well as various numbered hills and vicinities

6

SA 2010 (146 boxes, ca. 64 ft.) Onchon, Kaeson area, Taejon area, Sinri, Wonsan, Pyongyang, Hamhung, Okchon area, Seoul, Koyong, Yonpo Air Field, and Kimpo as well as various numbered hills and vicinities

7

SA 2011 (123 boxes, ca. 55 ft.) Pyongyang, the Changjin Reservoir, Seoul, and various other vicinities

8

SA 2012 (121 boxes, ca. 55 ft.) Pyongyang, Seoul, and the Onjin area as well as other vicinities

9

SA 2013 (33 boxes, ca. 14 ft.) Wonsan, Subakkol, Taejon area, Chiri-San sector, and Pyongyang and other vicinities

II.228 Documents in the smaller SA 10181 (9 boxes, ca. 4 ft.) are arranged by item number and thereunder by issue, volume, or copy number.  They consist of books, periodicals, and booklets, dated 1937-45, from the Navy Hydrographic Department.  Held at Yokosuka Naval Base in Japan, the records comprise meteorological reports, tide tables, hydrographic data on coasts and rivers of the Far East, weather condition analyses and charts, and depictions of water routes.  SA 10177 (24 boxes, ca. 11 ft.) consists of records written in Japanese selected as part of a special document project.  An additional 11 shipping advices in this series (47 boxes, ca. 21 ft.) include mostly printed materials such as books, periodicals, and booklets.  All of these shipments are arranged by shipping advice number and item number.

II.229 Captured enemy documents (North Korean documents), 1950-55 [UD, Entry 300C] (52 ft.), are arranged in numerical order starting with 200000 and ending with 208072.  Most of the records are in Korean, although there is a collection of Russian documents.  shortly after their capture by United Nations forces, some Korean documents were determined to have potential intelligence value.  These were translated or summarized by the Allied Translator and Interpreter Section (ATIS) and then printed in the ATIS publications "Enemy Documents," and "Bulletin, Enemy Documents, Korean Operations."  The physical format of these 186 boxes is similar to that described for SA 2005 through SA 2013.  There are gaps in the sequentially numbered documents.  Many, such as most of the maps, were removed before the records were accessioned by the National Archives.

 

SHIPPING ADVICE INVENTORY LISTS

II.230 Accessioning paperwork for seized Korean documents (shipping advices), [1950-54] [UD, Entry 300E] (5 ft.), is arranged generally by shipping advice (SA) number and consists mostly of legal-sized inventory lists for SA 2001 through SA 2013, along with supplementary inventory lists for SA 2002 through SA 2009.  These lists provide the shipping advice number, the original shipment box number, document item number, a brief document description (or title), its capture location, language (i.e., Russian, Chinese, or Korean), and date of capture.  There are also inventory lists for SA 10181, SA 10177, and 11 shipping advice numbers from the 500th Military Intelligence Service Group.  These lists generally include shipping advice number, document item number, sometimes a document description (or title), and occasionally a volume or copy number.  The series also includes additional listings of captured Soviet Union civilian and military agency records.  The inventory lists for SA 2001 through SA 2004 act as an index for the corresponding numbered records in the Russian materials captured in Pyong Yang, North Korea in November 1950 (see paragraph II.226).  SA 2005 through SA 2013 and SA 10181 inventories serve the same purpose for the captured Korean documents (see paragraph II.227).  Inventory lists for SA 2005 through SA 2013 and SA 10181 were microfilmed and are available as National Archives Microfilm Publication M1950; Shipping Advice lists (SA 2005-SA 2013 and SA 10181) for Records Seized by U.S. Military Forces during the Korean War, 1950-1954, formerly titled "Annotated Lists: Records Seized by U.S. Military Forces during the Korean War" (NNG 77-1212).  Researchers may view this reel in the Microfilm Reading Room in College Park, MD, or purchase a copy (see Appendix D).  Lists for the other 11 shipping advice numbers as well as captured Japanese (SA 10177) and Soviet documents are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

TRANSLATIONS

II.231 Far East Command staff began the review of captured Korean, Russian, and Chinese language records seized from enemy forces and facilities during the Korean War, evaluating individual documents for strategic and tactical value.  Those selected were then translated in full, presented as excerpts, or summarized by the FEC Military Intelligence Section (G-2), Allied Translator and Information Section (ATIS) for inclusion in the printed serial compilations titled "Enemy Documents [various subtitles]," issues 1 (September 26, 1950) through 103 (December 19, 1957) and "Bulletin, Enemy Documents, Korean Operations," issues 1 (June 18, 1951) through 136 (June 2, 1958).  These two compilations cover some of the records located in captured enemy documents (North Korean documents), 1950-53 [UD, Entry 200C] (see paragraph II.229).  Translations, excerpts, and briefs (summaries) run roughly sequentially, from captured document item number 200144 to 208168, through the numbered issues of "Enemy Documents" and "Bulletin, Enemy Documents, Korean Operations."  This generally consistent order indicates that the two translation digests also serve as a partial index for captured enemy documents (North Korean documents), 1950-53.  Each record translation, excerpt, or brief n "Enemy Documents" and "Bulletin, Enemy Documents, Korean Operations" specifies the captured document number, document physical characteristics, where captured, date received by ATIS, and whether the document was translated in full or in excerpts.

II.232  The "Enemy Documents" format for issue number 1 (September 26, 1950) through issue number 44 (June 16, 1951) consisted of two parts.  Part I incorporated full and excerpt ATIS translations of documents judged to contain military value.  Part II featured briefs of documents considered to be of theater- or Army-wide interest that ATIS would translate upon request--usually as an "Enemy Documents" supplement bearing the same issue number in which the brief first appeared.  After June 16, 1951, FEC G-2 and ATIS narrowed the scope of "Enemy Documents" to focus solely on complete translations of enemy documents printed "either to satisfy requests by user agencies or to exploit intelligence considered by ATIS to be of tactical and strategic value."  Thereafter, briefs of documents and short items of current intelligence value appeared in the ATIS "Bulletin, Enemy Documents, Korean Operations," beginning with issue number 1 (June 18, 1951).  ATIS staff thought that the new "Bulletin, Enemy Documents" compilation would "speed up dissemination of intelligence exploited from captured documents."  A complete set of "Enemy Documents" is located in the Record Group 319, Records of the Army Staff, Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence (G-2), intelligence documents file, ID numbers 9500 52 (Korean Operations) and 950053 (North Korean Forces) (see paragraph II.273).  ATIS and its immediate successor, the Military Intelligence Service Group (8238th Army Unit) continued to issue both "Enemy Documents" and "Bulletin, Enemy Documents, Korean Operations" as separate, sequentially numbered compilations until the fall of 1952.  After that, the 500th Military Intelligence Service Group assumed responsibility for both titles.

II.233 The following five series contain collections of "Enemy Documents [various subtitles]," and "Bulletin, Enemy Documents, Korean Operations":

1. allied translations [of] enemy documents [UD, Entry 300B] (6 ft.), consisting of a partial set of "Enemy Documents," and supplements, issues 1 through 103

2. translation of enemy documents--North Korean forces, 1950-53 [UD, Entry 300D] (4 ft.), consisting of an intermixed set of "Enemy Documents," and "Bulletin, Enemy Documents, Korean Operations"

3. [formerly] security-classified Korean records collection, 1950-52 [UD, Entry 300F] (1 ft.), consisting of "Enemy Documents," issues 3 through 78 (with gaps)

4. seized Korean records, translation of enemy documents, 1952-[54] [UD, Entry 300G] (5 in.), consisting of "Enemy Documents," issues 81, 83, 86, 87, 95, and 98

5. enemy documents, bulletins, 1951-58 [UD, Entry 300H] (1 ft.), consisting of "Bulletin, Enemy Documents, Korean Operations," issues 1 through 136

 

Record Group 247 - Records of the Office of the Chief of Chaplains

II.234 The Office of the Chief of Chaplains (OCC), established as an independent bureau within the War Department in 1920), served as the headquarters of the Army's Corps of Chaplains.  The latter provided facilities for religious worship and furnished religious and moral guidance to all military personnel and enemy POWs in the continental United States and overseas.  The Army reorganization of March 1942 placed the OCC under the newly-established Services of Supply, later redesignated the Army Service Forces (ASF).  From May 1943 through war's end, the Office of the Chief of Chaplains was subordinated to the ASF's Director of Personnel.  A 1946 general postwar reorganization designated the office as an "administrative service" of the War Department.  In 1950 the OCC became one of the independent administrative services of the Department of the Army.  The mission of the Chief of Chaplains was to provide and supervise moral training and religious ministration for the Army.  His specific responsibilities included duties such as enlistment of church cooperation in providing trained clergy to serve as chaplains; maintenance of liaison with church leaders and groups; procurement and disposal of supplies and equipment; coordination of public information; preparation of statistical reports pertaining to the chaplaincy; supervision of the publication, procurement, and distribution of religious materials; and personnel administration of the chaplaincy.  The Chief of Chaplains also maintained liaison with the chaplains of other armed services, furnished information to other Federal Government agencies, maintained liaison with religious agencies outside the Federal Government, and furnished representation to several interdepartmental chaplains' boards and committees.  The Chief of Chaplains had among his principal assistants the executive office, the personnel officer, and the administrative assistant.  Maj. Gen. Roy H. Parker served as Chief of Chaplains from 1949 to 1952, when he was replaced by Maj. Gen. Ivan L. Bennett.

II.235 General correspondence, 1920-75 [A1, Entry 1] (253 ft.), is divided into chronological blocks (1920-45, 1946-48, 1949-50, 1951-53, 1954-62, 1962-63) and one non-integrated accretion (1954-75).  Each block is arranged generally in accordance with the War Department decimal file system.  As with many military records thus divided and arranged, records of particular interest may be found under unlikely as well as likely combinations of chronological blocks and decimal file numbers.  There are records filed at decimals 080 (for correspondence with societies and associations), 200.6  (awards and decorations), 314.7 (histories), and 319.1 (recurring reports, and letters to the Secretary of the Army [though not exclusively].  Decimal 320.2 (chaplains on duty), a statistical file, is complemented by decimal file 312.1 (OCC monthly letters) in which there are lists of Army Post Office (APO) numbers and assignments of some chaplain posts.  Records filed under decimal 231.26 include reports from auxiliary chaplains overseas.  The latter are arranged alphabetically by name of chaplain.  Another decimal number of possible interest is 000.3 (religion), which includes Armed Forces Preaching Mission files (arranged generally in sequential order by numbered army).  The 1954-62 chronological block, while mostly a post-Korean War body of records, may contain other decimal files of possible interest.  Decimal 062, for example, includes a folder that contains shot lists and other records for the training and instructional motion picture film "The Army Chaplain in Combat" (ca. 1953), which incorporates footage from the Korean War.  The 1954-75 block, which consists mostly of general records and statistical reports, includes a command and management program file for FY 1950-55.  The file is a continuation of the chaplains active duty statistical report.  Statistical reports, 1946-55 (UI), Entry 2) (2 ft.), an oversized addendum to the general correspondence, consists of consolidated statistical reports based on the chaplain's monthly reports.  There are segments for 1945-51 and 1952-55.

II.236 Chaplain reports relating to activities and services rendered by reserve and regular army chaplains, 1917-50 (NM-3, Entries 484A-G) (1054 ft.), arranged generally in alphabetical order by chaplain surname, identifies deceased soldiers and civilians for whom funeral or memorial services were provided.  Two sub series, chaplains' reports & 201 files: 1949-50 regular army (NM-3, Entry 484E) (10 ft.) and chaplain's reports, 1923-55 [NM-3, Entry 483] (121 ft.), is of assistance in using these sub series.

 

Record Group 263 - Records of the Central Intelligence Agency

II.237 The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) was created under the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Statutes 495) approved July 26, 1947, and established under the National Security Council (NSC) in the Executive Office of the President.  Headed by a director appointed by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate, the CIA is responsible for coordinating the intelligence activities of several Government departments and agencies.  Its primary function consists of correlating and evaluating intelligence relating to national security and disseminating it within the government.  The CIA also advises and makes recommendations to the NSC concerning intelligence matters and performs additional services of common concern that the NSC decides can be more efficiently carried out by a central organization.  CIA records currently in the custody of the National Archives consist mostly of formal intelligence estimates and some organizational histories.  Except for records of the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS), these documents are mostly copies (some are sanitized) of selected material.  The National Archive's CIA holdings include few records of "evidential value," that is, records that would illustrate the agency's policies, programs, and operations.

II.238 The Foreign Broadcast Information Service was transferred to the CIA in September 1947.  It had been established under the Federal Communication Commission in 1941 to record, translate, and analyze foreign radio broadcasts.  Foreign Broadcast Information Service daily reports, 1941-59 [A1, Entry 24] (416 ft.), consist of bound volumes with each volume covering a 2-day period.  The volumes are arranged by geographical area (e.g., Latin America, Far East, U.S.S.R. & East Europe).  Each geographical section contains a summary of significant broadcasts for the region, as well as reports for individual countries such as Korea.  This series contains approximately 90 feet of material dated 1950-53.

II.239 The Murphy collection on international communism, 1917-58 [A1, Entry 18] (93 ft.), was compiled by State Department official Raymond E. Murphy.  Most of the materials were used to study the international Communist movement in the United States and to judge its subservience to Moscow.  The collection consists mainly of newspaper clippings, Department of State and a few other U.S. Government agency documents, and a small number of CIA documents.  Some of the State Department documents refer to CIA presence, activities, and information.  The CIA took control of the collection in the late 1950s or early 1960s.  The files are arranged by country or subject and contain approximately 2,000 pages of material relating to Korea from 1945 to 1953.  A country list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in college Park, MD, or upon request.

II.240 The Office of Research and Estimates (ORE) produced a series of intelligence reports during the early days of the CIA.  NARA holds copies of 138 Office of Research and Estimates reports, 1946-50 [A1, Entry 22] (2 ft.).  Several of them relate to the situation in Korea, including ORE 3-49, February 28, 1949, "Consequences of US Troop Withdrawal From Korea in Spring, 1949," and ORE 18-50, June 19, 1950, "Current Capabilities of the Northern Korean Regime."  A list of report titles with dates is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.241 The ORE was abolished in November 1950, and replaced with the Board of National Estimates.  This office produced a new series of intelligence reports called National Intelligence Estimates or NIEs.  NIE reports, 1950-85 [A1, Entry 29] (10 ft.), contain approximately 21,000 pages of copies of reports arranged chronologically in six separate sub series, reflecting the manner in which the documents were transferred from the CIA to the National Archives.  The reports cover a variety of political, military, economic, social and industrial matters relating to the Soviet Union and the Soviet Bloc.  Examples of relevant reports include NIE 43, November 13, 1951, "The Strategic Importance of the Far East to the USSR," and special Estimate (SE) 25, April 25, 1952, "Military Indications of a Possible Large-Scale Communist Attack in Korea in the Immediate Future."  A list of report titles with dates is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.242 The [records relating to] the CIA historical review program, 1945-68 [HRP 89-2/01034] [A1, Entry 17] (3 ft.), consist of copies of primary source material used by the CIA's History Staff of the Center for the Study of Intelligence to produce such works as General Walker Bedell Smith as Director of Central Intelligence, October 1950-February 1953, by Ludwell Lee Montague (1992), and CIA Cold War Records: The CIA Under Harry Truman, edited by Michael Warner (1994).  The review program records contain a number of documents dated 1950-53, including speeches, intelligence reports relating to Korea, and administrative documents concerning how the CIA responded to the Korean War.  The records include a subject index for this material.  The index is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.243 The national intelligence surveys (NIS), 1948-65 [A1, Entry 48] (173 ft.), are arranged by geographic area (e.g., Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America) and thereunder by country within the particular area.  This series consists of reports and analyses concerning individual nations during the period of the 1950s and 1960s.  The information in these analyses covers a wide range of political, geographic, industrial, military and social subjects.  Topics concerning Korea include national policies, naval forces, map and chart appraisal, propaganda, public order and safety, minerals and metals, and sociology. There is a compilation of agency box lists prepared for this series during agency declassification review.  Some of the box list contents are themselves security classified.  These box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 273 - Records of the National Security Council

II.244 The National Security Act of 1947 established the National Security Council (NSC) to advise the President on achieving workable and integrated foreign, military, and domestic policies pertaining to national security.  Since its establishment, the membership of the NSC has consisted of the President, the Vice President, and the Secretaries of State and Defense, with advisors including the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, and various professional staff.  In 1953 Robert S. Cutler was President Eisenhower's Special Assistant for National Security Affairs.

II.245 The birth of the People's Republic of China in 1949, followed by war on the Korean Peninsula, forced the NSC to consider American objectives, commitments, and risks in East Asia in light of actual and potential U.S. military power.  The council's deliberations led to a number of formal policy papers that would guide U.S. actions before, during, and after the war.  Consequently, NSC records are an important source of information about the Korean War and the evolution of American policy regarding East Asia after World War II. The heaviest concentration of NSC records held by NARA resides in the office, staff, and personal papers in the individual Presidential libraries and the Nixon Presidential Materials Staff.  The Records of the National Security Council held at the National Archives at College Park--much less voluminous and complete--constitute Record Group 273.

II.246 Within RG 273, the declassified series of numbered and sequentially arranged formal policy papers, 1947-61 [UD, Entry 5] (24 ft.), contains copies of the most important policy documents pertaining to the Korean War debated or approved by the NSC.  Three of these (NSC 8, NSC 8/2, NSC 48/2) define Korea's position in the U.S. defense perimeter prior to June 1950.  Several of the policy papers relate, in whole or in part, to U.S. war aims (NSC 48/5, NSC 118/2) and Korean War strategic planning (NSC 76, NSC 81, NSC 95, NSC 147).  These and two other papers (NSC 92, NSC 101) also chart responses illustrating the war's influence on U.S. perceptions of the People's Republic of China as an adversary.  Additional papers document a hardening of views toward the Soviet Union following the Korean War (NSC 68), and strategic cooperation with the Republic of Korea following the armistice agreement (NSC 154/1, NSC 156/1, NSC 157/1).  There are three finding aids for this series:

1. a list of all policy papers from the Truman and Eisenhower Administrations in the order in which they were created

2. a list of papers from those administrations arranged by general subject area

3. a list of papers arranged cy country

II.247 Two other declassified series that consist of papers that did not become formal policy documents are the procedure files ("p" papers), 1947-59 [UD, Entry 4] (1 ft.) (electrostatic copies), and current or "in the mill" papers known as "mill" papers, 1947-59 [UD, Entry 3] (2 ft.) (document copies).  Each series is arranged sequentially by NSC paper number.  There are numerically arranged file title listings for both the "mill" papers and the "p" papers.

II.248 A third declassified series, National Security Council meeting minutes, 1947-61 [UD, Entry 6] (11 ft.) (document copies), includes agendas and minutes, with reports and other documents submitted to the NSC for consideration at specific meetings.  There is a subject card index and a chronological list of meetings for this series.

 

Record Group 306 - Records of the U.S. Information Agency

II.249 The Federal Government quickly comprehended the role of public opinion as a foreign policy tool during the Cold War.  Following World War II numerous Government agencies began the systematic exploitation of motion pictures, radio, and other media to influence public opinion abroad toward support of American foreign policy initiatives.  In 1953 the Federal Government created the United States Information Agency (USIA) to oversee most activities in this area.  The USIA supported American foreign policy makers through programs of information gathering, analysis, and dissemination.  Although most of the USIA's records date later than the Korean War, RG 306 contains records of some predecessor agencies that include documentation pertaining to that conflict.

II.250 The Office of Research maintained a series of research reports on German public opinion, 1949-62 [A1, entry 1005] (5 ft.), that contains 12 reports on how West Germans viewed the Korean War and America's role in it.  The series is arranged by year and thereunder by report number.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  The record group also includes a series of special papers of the Coordinator for Psychological Intelligence, 1952-54 [UD, Entry 1044] (5 in.).  This series contains eight reports analyzing world opinion relating to important issues in the Korean War, including the Communist bacteriological warfare propaganda campaign and the intensified U.N. air offensive of spring and summer 1952 in Korea.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 313 - Records of Naval Operating Forces

II.251 The records of Naval operating forces, World War II and later, 1931-63 (15,625 ft.), also known as the "Navy flag files," are divided into two main sub series.  The "Red" includes records of high level operational commands; the "Blue" contains records of lower level commands.  These sub series are divided into "folders."  Each folder corresponds to an individual command for a particular time period.  Included in the Red series are commands such as Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC), 7th Fleet, Commander, Naval Forces Far East (COMNAVFE), and 1st Marine Air Wing.  Among the Blue series are Commander, Amphibious Forces, Pacific (COMPHIBPAC), Commander, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific (COMFMFPAC), and Commanding General, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific (COMGENFMFPAC).  Included in the documentation is correspondence, usually relating to training and war operations, as well as action reports and command diaries submitted by subordinate units.  The bulk of the records--known as "flag files"--constitute a single accession that has not been processed or fully described.  However, there are many Navy-created box lists (which are often unreliable) and a small number of NARA-created finding aids that are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  The NARA-created finding aids are primarily for records produced during World War II.  This series is partially security classified.

 

Record Group 319 - Records of the Army Staff

II.252 From 1947 the Army Staff was the military staff of the Secretary of the Army.  It included the Chief of Staff and his immediate assistants, the Army General Staff (G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4), the Special Staff, and the Administrative and Technical Staffs.  The duties of the Army Staff included preparing plans relating to the Army's role in national security, investigating and reporting on Army operations, and representing the Secretary of the Army and the Chief of Staff in coordinating actions of all Defense Department organizations.  The Army Chief of Staff, August 16, 1949-August 14, 1953, was Gen. J. Lawton Collins.  He was succeeded by Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway, who served August 15, 1953-June 29, 1955.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF STAFF (OCS)

II.253 The Army Chief of Staff was the principal military advisor to the Secretary of the Army and was responsible for the planning, development, execution, review, and analysis of Army programs.  He presided over the Army staff, sent plans and recommendations of the staff to the Secretary of the Army, acted as agent of the Secretary in implementing plans and recommendations, and exercised supervision over members and organizations of the U.S. Army as directed by the Secretary.  In addition, the Chief of Staff of the army was a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Armed Forces Policy Council.

II.254 The decimal file, 1948-62 [formerly part of NM-3, Entry 2; currently A1, Entries 2A-B] (389 ft.), is arranged into seven sub series: 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951-52, 1953, 1954, and 1955-62 (only the 1955-62 sub series remains classified) and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The records consist of the correspondence of the Chief of Staff, the Deputy Chiefs of Staff, the Vice Chief of Staff, and the Secretary of the Army programs.  The series includes memorandums, reports, studies, correspondence, and minutes of meetings, boards, committees and staff conferences.  The records relate primarily to the planning, development, and execution of programs by the General Staff with Army staff divisions and other components.  Many important documents relating to the Korean War are filed under decimal 091 (countries) Korea especially in the 1951-52 segment which includes policy papers and a report by Dr. Edward Bowles for the Weapons System Evaluation Group.  Decimal 350.09 (9 April 1951) contains intelligence aspects for the Far East Command.  Documents filed under decimal 383.6 (prisoners of war) include policy papers relating to prisoners of war and examples of safe conduct passes for enemy soldiers in the 1951-52 segment and plans for handling repatriated POWs from Korea in the 1953 segment.

II.255 Security-classified indexes to Series 2, 1948-62 [formerly part of NM-3, Entry 1; currently A1, Entry 1] (201 ft.), are arranged by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The records are 5- by 8-inch slips ("Record cards") that bear the date, a summary of the incoming document and a notation of its routing for further action.  White slips indicate documents that are filed under the same decimal as the index slip.  Pink slips indicate documents filed under another decimal.  In both cases the location of the document is indicated by the decimal in the top left corner of the slip.  The white slips generally have additional entries on the front or back noting subsequent action on the document.  There are indexes available for 1950 (boxes 60-90), 1951-52 (boxes 90-137), and 1953 (boxes 137-155).

II.256 Top secret correspondence, 1948-62 [formerly part of NM-3, Entry 4; currently UD, Entries 2A-B] (33 ft.), is arranged into five chronological sections (1948, 1949, 1950, 1951-52, and 1953-62) and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The records are partially declassified.  Documents filed under decimal 091 Korea (1950) include a compilation of military assistance offers from U.N. countries for aid in Korea, an August 1950 report from G-2 on North Korean lines of communication, and a July 1950 memorandum on consideration of possible use of the atomic bomb in Korea.  Decimal 091 Korea (1951-1952) includes a report on ammunition, which was a continuing problem in Korea.

II.257 Top secret decimal file indexes, 1948-62 [formerly part of NM-3, Entry 3; currently UD, Entries 1A-B] (12 ft.), which are partially declassified, are arranged into annual chronological segments and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The indexes provide file locations, names of senders and recipients, and content descriptions for individual documents located within Entries 2A-B.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, G-1 (PERSONNEL)]

II.258 This office is responsible for the recruitment, administration, and management of Army personnel, including all servicemen and servicewomen on active duty, the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, and civilian personnel.  These matters include classification, procurement, geographic distribution, and separation of personnel.

II.259 The decimal file, 1949-54 [NM-3, Entry 26] (561 ft.), is arranged into three chronological portions (1949-50, 1951-52, and 1953) and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Many documents relating to the Korean War are consolidated under decimal 091 Korea, including case briefs of Korean War crimes in the 1953 segment.

II.260 The Assistance Chief of Staff, Intelligence is responsible for the management of Army intelligence and counterintelligence activities, personnel, equipment, systems, and organizations; Army cryptography, topography, and meteorology; coordination of Army requirements for mapping, charting, and geodesy; and Army industrial security.

 

RECORDS OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION

II.261 The TS (top secret) decimal correspondence file, 1942-52 [NM-3, Entry 47A] (7 ft.) is arranged by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system with a "country cut-off" at the beginning of each year.  In box 12 filed under "Italy thru Korea 1950," there is a July 1950 intelligence estimate of worldwide and Soviet reaction to the use of atomic bombardment in the Korean conflict and a July 1950 report from the War Office in London stating that there were 100,000 Chinese troops deployed in the neighborhood of the Yalu.  An accretion to this file is the "top secret" project decimal and decimal file, 1953-62 [UD, Entry 1001E] (26 ft.), which is arranged by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  In the 1953 segment there are files for Nationalist China and the U.S.S.R. (box 2).

II.262 The decimal file, 1941-53 [NM-3, Entries 47B-J for 1941-52 and UD, Entries 1001A-D for 1953] (1,949 ft.) is arranged primarily into chronological segments (1941-45, 1946-48, 1949-50, 1951-52, and 1953).  Within each chronological portion, the records are usually subdivided into decimal files and project decimal files.  The decimal files consist of records pertaining to virtually all of the Army Staff's activities and are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  The project decimal files are usually arranged hierarchically by broad topic such as "Army Attaches," "Liaison Offices" (foreign attaches), "Armies," "Small Army Units," "International Organizations or Defense Pacts," "Special Projects," "Camps, Posts and Stations," "Schools," and "Countries and Geographical Areas," then by specific subtopics and thereunder according to the War Department decimal system.

1. Filed under decimal 385 Psychological (11 July 1950-31 August 1950) in box 168 [NM-3, Entry 47E], are copies of North Korea propaganda leaflets and leaflets prepared by Psychological Warfare Branch, Military Intelligence Section, GHQ, Far East Command.  Documents concerning Korea in boxes 170-171, [NM-3, Entry 47F] include a report on Chinese Communist intervention in Korea (November 6, 1950) filed under decimal 381 Korea and reports on captured enemy material filed under decimal 386.3 Korea (24 September 1950).

2. Records pertaining to Korea in boxes 163-164 [NM-3, Entry 47G] include combat observations under 350.07 Korea, communist plans in the Far East (1951-52) filed under decimal 350.09 Korea, and military capability of the ROK under decimal 381 Korea.  Situation reports are located under decimal 319.1 (supplemental file) in boxes 231-233 [NM-3, Entry 471].

3. Classified records concerning Korea are located in boxes 21 and 70-72 in the 1953 project decimal section and boxes 183-184 in the 1953 "secret" project decimal section [UD, Entry 1001A].  Under decimal 385 bacteriological in the 1953 decimal file is a "Report of International Scientific Commission for the investigation of the facts concerning bacterial warfare in Korea and China, 1952" (box 157).

II.263 A finding aid to this complex series is furnished by cross-reference sheets to Army intelligence decimal files, 1949-52 [A1, Entries 81A-B] (3 ft.), which are reproduced rolls of 16 mm microfilm and arranged into sub series by year segments (1949-50 and 1951-52) and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.

II.264 Cross-reference sheets relating to persons, 1941-52 [A1, Entry 47A] (26 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by name.  This series consists of cross-reference sheets, orders, memorandums, and reports pertaining to files on individuals and to related files in both the decimal correspondence files (see paragraphs II.262-II.263) and records regarding individuals (see paragraph II.265).  Information on the sheets typically includes the main subject, names of correspondents, the classification number, document dates, a classification process, and additional cross-reference file numbers.

II.265 Records regarding individuals, 1941-56 [A1, Entry 47B] (126 ft.) are arranged alphabetically by name and are declassified.  This series consists of cross-reference sheets, memorandums, reports, letters, cables, questionnaires, pay statements, contracts, orders, applications, vouchers, photographs, fingerprint cards, and records regarding foreign nationals who received military training in the United States; awards or decorations given to foreign nationals by the United States or to American citizens by foreign governments; foreign military attaches and other foreign military personnel; American governments; foreign military attaches and other foreign military personnel; American military attaches and other military or civilian personnel assigned to either foreign or domestic duty stations; requests for information, including biographical data on individuals; miscellaneous information on notable individuals; and other miscellaneous information regarding a wide variety of individuals investigated by or of interest to various American intelligence agencies.

II.266 "Secret" records regarding individuals, 1941-56 [A1, Entry 47C] (2 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by name and are declassified.  This series contains the same categories of records described in Entry 47B, above.  The records in this series originally were maintained separately for security reasons.

 

RECORDS OF THE CABLE SECTION

II.267 Incoming and outgoing messages, 1949-53 [NM-3, Entries 57E-J] (196 ft.), are arranged primarily in chronological segments.  Each segment is arranged alphabetically by name of country, command, or other geographical location.  The documents include messages, paraphrases of messages, teletypes, cross-reference sheets and telegrams sent from military attaches, military observers, and military post commands relating to the collection, evaluation, and dissemination of military intelligence.  Topics include foreign combat operations, troop movements and strengths; patrol, casualty, and weather reports; personnel and training of foreign armed forces; guidelines on liaisons with other nonmilitary agencies; censorship procedures; propaganda; and psychological warfare.  There are messages concerning the Korean War filed under "Japan CINCFE" (1950, boxes 43-48; 1951, Box 60; 1952, Boxes 31-36; 1953, box 31), "Japan AFFE" (1953, boxes 32-33), "Korea" (1951, box 61; 1952, box 34; 1953, boxes 35-36), and teletype messages under file designation "Far East" (1950, boxes 71-72).

 

RECORDS OF THE DOCUMENT LIBRARY BRANCH

II.268 Publications ("P") files, 1946-51 [NM-3, Entry 82] (1,517 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by title of publication.  The series consists of bulletins, books, directories, handbooks, intelligence summaries and weeklies, pamphlets, photograph albums, and other types of publications accumulated by the Document Library Branch for use in evaluating and disseminating military information.  The publications were produced by numerous organizations and agencies.  While most of these were American organizations and agencies, some were foreign.  Files of interest include "Eyewitness Reports from North of the 38th Parallel, Russian Occupation Zone in Korea" (box 1174); "Order of Battle - North Korean Army" and "Order of Battle - North Korean People's Army" (box 2634); and "Project 5822: Estimate of Soviet Stockpiles, 26 July 1950," "Project 5942: North Korean Order of Battle, 1 September 1950," "Project 5990: To Estimate the Most Notable Soviet and communist [Chinese] Courses of Action, Regarding Korea in the Near Future, 26 September 1950" (box 2905).  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.269 Part of the "P" file is arranged alphabetically by organization and referred to as reports and messages, 1918-51 [NM-3, Entry 82A] (491 ft.).  For example in the CIA segment for 1950, there is ORE 18-50 "Current capabilities of the Northern Korean Regime."  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.270 Army intelligence document ("ID") file, 1944-54 [NM-3, Entries 85A-B] (4,495 ft.), is arranged numerically with bulky files located at the end of the series.  The "ID" files constitute records originated by the Military Intelligence Service (MIS) and its subordinate organizations, together with intelligence data supplied by other U.S. army, Navy, and civilian organizations and by British and other Allied intelligence agencies.  Many individual reports in this series have been withdrawn or transferred to other intelligence collections (e.g., the "P" file), usually indicated by a pink or beige withdrawal sheet.  Often an ID file consists of a single page of raw intelligence on a military, political, or economic subject.  ID numbers 660000 through 949999 are most pertinent for 1950-54.  Currently, ID nos. 1-69360, 912425-923289, and 940006-948410 have been declassified.

II.271 Geographical index to the numerical series of intelligence documents ("ID file"), 1944-51 [A1, Entry 84E] (93 ft.), is arranged by geographical subdivision code, thereunder alphabetically by geographical location (usually country name), and thereunder by Basic Intelligence Directive (BID) number.  The 3- by 5-inch cards include the country or area of concern, the BID number, the subject, the date, the source, the MIS ID number, and a short description of document.  There are approximately five documents listed on each card.  Cards for Korea are located in boxes 83-87 and for the Far East in boxes 68- 69.  A box list and a copy of the Basic Intelligence Directive are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.272 Secret Document (SD) Intelligence Documents [UD, Entry 1042] (3 ft.), are arranged by SD number and the documents are currently classified.  Top Secret Intelligence Documents [UD, Entry 1043] (5 ft.), are arranged by TSC number.  Documents from both series are covered by the geographical index to the numerical series of intelligence documents ("ID file"), 1944-51 [A1, Entry 84E] and are security classified.

II.273 Intelligence Documents File--Publications (950000 File), 1947-62 [UD: Entry 1004H] (503 ft.), is arranged by ID number and is security classified.  Files that would be of special interest include the following:

1. ID 950007--General Headquarters, Far East Command, Military Intelligence Section, General Staff, Intelligence Summary.

2. ID 950041--Far East Land Forces, Military Intelligence Review

3. ID 950052--GHQ, Far East Command, Military Intelligence Section, General Staff, Allied Translator and Interpreter Section, Bulletin, Enemy Documents Korean Operations

4. ID 950053--GHQ, FEC, MIS, General Staff, ATIS, Bulletin, Enemy Documents, North Korean Forces

5. ID 950054--GHQ, FEC, General Staff ATIS Interrogation Reports North Korean Forces

6. ID 950057--GHQ, FEC, ATIS Research Supplement, Interrogation Reports

7. ID 950059--GHQ, FEC, Military Intelligence Section, General Staff, Counter Intelligence Division, CIC District Field Reports

8. ID 950061--FEC Intelligence Digest

9. ID 950098--HQ, US Army Forces Far East, G-2 Technical Intelligence Bulletin

10. ID 950126--U.S. Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea, Weekly Intelligence Summary

11. ID 950131--HQ, FEC, G-5 United Nations Civil Affairs Activities in Korea, April 1952-July 1953

12. ID 950243--HQ, 3519th Unit, Republic of Korea Army, Seoul HID Interrogation Reports

13. ID 950359--Situation Maps, Korea 1 October 1950-31 July 1951

14. ID 950789--GHQ, U.N. Command, Summary of Activities Civilian Relief and Economic Aid in Korea

A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.274 CI files, 1950-58 [A1, Entry 1013A&B] (23 ft.), are partially classified.  The files are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system (e.g., "383.6--Korea") and thereunder chronologically.  The series consists of intelligence reports and other records concerning Korea and the Korean War.  Topics include brainwashing, prisoners of war, collaboration, American voluntary non-repatriated, the treatment and handling of U.N. POWs by North Korea and the People's Republic of China, propaganda, bacteriological warfare claims against the United States, and the "Returned, Exchanged or Captured American Personnel--Korea Program."

II.275 Organizational history files, 1941-66 [UD, Entry 1077] (39 ft.), are arranged by organizational unit and are declassified.  This series documents the history and administration of the Counter Intelligence Corps (CIC), and military intelligence units under the operational control of the Chief, CIC and the Chief, Intelligence Corps (INTC).  Histories include files of the 2nd, 7th, 181st, 191st, 201st, 441st, 442nd, and 308th Counter Intelligence Corps Detachments.  A folder file is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.276 The history of the CIC (Volumes I-XXX), 1917-53 [UD, Entry 151] (2 ft.), is arranged by volume number.  Volume XXX contains a history of the CIC during the occupation of Korea (box 4).  Although most of the information contained in the volume is before the Korean War, it includes background intelligence material for the conflict.

II.277 Card index to "The History of the Counter Intelligence Corps in the U.S. Army, 1917-53" [UD, Entry 1079] (6 ft.), is arranged in two sections.  The first is alphabetical by subject; the second is numerical by unit designation.  The series lists people, places, and organizations referred to in "The History of the CIC in the U.S. Army, 1917-53."  The cards give the volume and page number of the history where the reference appears.

II.278 Historian's background materials file concerning the CIC history, 1917-53 [UD, Entry 1084] (15 ft.), is classified and is arranged by TAFFS number.  The file consists of materials collected in order to write an official history of the CIC.  It includes command reports for the 442nd CIC Detachment; a report of CIC operations in Korea; CIC employment and deployment in Korea; and standard operating procedures of the 181st CIC Detachment.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.279 Historical photographic files, 1917-53 [UD, Entry 1081] (2 ft.), are declassified and arranged by TAFFS number.  This series consists of photographs collected in order to write an official history of the CIC and includes photographs of CIC detachments during the Korean War.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE INVESTIGATIVE RECORDS REPOSITORY,
U.S. ARMY INTELLIGENCE AND SECURITY COMMAND

II.280 Formerly security-classified intelligence and investigative dossiers--impersonal file, 1939-76 [A1, Entry 134A] (59 ft.), are arranged by subject and are known as the "IRR--Impersonal File."  The Investigative Records Repository of the U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command created and maintained case files pertaining to war crimes, espionage, indoctrination programs, postwar Soviet military and espionage programs, communist and socialist political organizations in Europe and Asia, and alleged Communist infiltration of the United States.  The files contain reports, memorandums, statements, affidavits, lists, cables, and other records.  Files of interest include cases for the "Korean Labor Party" (boxes 51-52), "Counterintelligence Corps in North and South Korea" (box 62), "Korean War CI Activities" (box 99), "North Korean Indoctrination--ROK PW" (box 100), "Russian Activities in Korea" (box 104), "North Korean People's army" (box 112), and "North Korean Espionage Ring" (boxes 116-118).  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.281 Index to security-classified intelligence and investigative dossiers, 1939-76. [UD, Entry 57] (6 ft.), is arranged in two segments.  The first part is alphabetical b name of individual for the personal name file; the second part is alphabetical by subject for the impersonal file.  This series serves as an index to Entries 134A&B described above and below.  Cards that index individuals typically include the person's name, date of birth, investigative case file number, reasons for the investigation, information about the history and disposition of the case, and the security classification level of the case.  This series is declassified.

II.282 Formerly security-classified intelligence and investigative dossiers--personal file, 1939-76 [A1, Entry 134B] (370 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by surname of the individual and are known as the "IRR--Impersonal File."  The dossiers contain investigative reports, memorandums, statements, affidavits, testimony, biographical information, newspaper and magazine clippings, photographs, and other records accumulated by Army investigative and intelligence activities.  Documents related specifically to the Korean War include a file on Syngman Rhee (Box 185A) as well as various North Korean officials and alleged spies.  An electronic database and a folder list are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD.

II.283 POW/MIA/detainee Intelligence files, 1944-1976 [A1, Entry 134E] (341 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by last name of individual.  The records relate to and contain information concerning U.S. personnel who had been declared Prisoner of War (POW) or Missing in Action (MIA), civilian personnel who have been held hostage, or personnel who have been recovered from hostile control and then debriefed for intelligence/counterintelligence information.  Dossiers are predominately for American POWs in Korea and include dossiers for 10 of the 21 POWs who refused repatriation: Howard G. Adams (box 2-8), William A. Cowart (boxes 125-127), Rufus E. Douglas (boxes 168-170), John R. Dunn (boxes 178-179), Andrew Fortuna (boxes 215-216), Lewie W. Griggs (boxes 254-255), Arlie H. Pate (boxes 479-483), Larance V. Sullivan (boxes 652-658), James G. Vereris (boxes 700-703), and Aaron P. Wilson (boxes 747-749).  This series is security classified.  A searchable database for the records is being created by the Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO).  An electronic copy of the completed database will be available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, G-3
(OPERATIONS AND PLANS)

II.284 This office is responsible for all Army plans, such as Army aspects of joint plans; for advising the Chief of Staff on Joint Chiefs of Staff matters; and for all strategic, tactical and organizational matters and training activities.  This Deputy Chief of Staff also served as the Army Operations Deputy for the Joint Chiefs of Staff.  These activities relate to the organization, demobilization, and training of all Army components, including the training of foreign nationals as well as strategic planning and maneuvers conducted jointly by the Armed Forces of the United States and Canada.

II.285 The decimal file, 1950-55 [formerly part of NM-3, Entry 95; currently part of A1, Entries 137A&B] (1,063 ft.), is arranged by chronological segment and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Records pertinent to the Korean War include decimal 091 Korea (1950-51, boxes 121-130; 1952, boxes 124-125; 1953, boxes 39-40) and decimal 322 Ranger (1950-51, box 380) that contains information on deployment of Ranger units to Far Command.  In the "bulky" section, relevant records are filed under decimal 091 Korea (1952, boxes 394-395, and 574; 1953, boxes 292 and 464-465).

II.286 Subject indexes to security-classified and top secret correspondence, 1950-55 [formerly part of NM-3, Entry 94; currently A1, Entry 135]] (86 ft.), are arranged by chronological segment and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The list of papers on the sheets contain the file number (decimal number), origin, date of document and subject of document.  After the decimal the document is filed under has been determined, the case number for the document can be determined from the master sheet filed at the beginning of each file (decimal) in the General Correspondence (Decimal File).  The master sheet lists the case number, origin, date, and subject of all documents filed under that decimal number.  The case number is written, often in red and located in the bottom right hand corner of the sheet.  Pertinent files include decimal 091 Korea (1950-51, box 17; 1952, box 33; 1953, box 525) and decimal 323 KMAG (1950-51, box 41; 1952, box 51).

II.287 General decimal file, 1950-52 [NM-3, Entry 97] (263 ft.), is arranged by year segments (1950-51 and 1952) and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Documents related to the Korean War are filed under decimals 091 Korea (1950-51, boxes 33-38A; 1952, boxes 17-20) and 381 Korea (1950-51, boxes 157-158).  In the "bulky decimal file" section, a logistic study for Korea (LD-SL-17) and other logistic records are filed under decimal 091 Korea (1950-51, boxes 225-226) as well as a Project Rand research memorandum titled "Communist Reaction in Korea to American Possession of the A-Bomb and its Significance for U.S. Political and Psychological Warfare" by H. Goldhamer, 1 August 1952 (1952, box 180).

II.288 Korean armistice negotiations, 1951-58 [NM-3, Entry 99] (11 ft.), are arranged by subject and include topics such as peace proposals, cease-fire missions, liaison officers meetings, violations of armistice agreements, sub-delegates meeting agendas, United Nations Command reports, repatriations of POWs, Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission records, and Military Armistice Commission records.  A box list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.289 The formerly security-classified joint situation reports relating to combat operations in Korea, 1951-53 [UD, Entry 58] (2 ft.), are arranged chronologically and numerically.  The reports consist of a discussion of the situation in brief, the weather, the U.N. situation, maps, and Chinese Communist participation in Korea.

 

RECORDS OF THE ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, FORCE DEVELOPMENT

II.290 Troop basis files, 1950-70 [UD, Entry 136] (12 ft.), are arranged chronologically and include the troop program and troop list for the Korean War in box 1.

 

RECORDS OF THE FAR EAST AND PACIFIC BRANCH

II.291 Korean message file, June 1950-May 1954 [NM-3, Entry 99A] (118 ft.), is arranged in three segments: geographical file (boxes 724-727), G-3 operations journal (boxes 728-847), and CINFE situation reports (SITREPS) (boxes 848-862).  The geographical file segment is arranged alphabetically and consists of reports of troop availability to the United Nations Command from member countries.  The G-3 operations journal and the CINFE SITREPS segments are arranged chronologically.  The G-3 journals contain carbons of daily teleconferences and sometimes joint situation reports.  The SITREPS include daily cables covering topics such as the enemy situation, activities in the forward and rear areas, the Navy and Air Force situations.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, G-4 (LOGISTICS)

II.292 This office was responsible for planning, development, and supervision of logistics programs. Within the budget policies developed by the Comptroller of the Army, it was also responsible for the formulation of those portions of the annual military budget pertaining to logistics programs.  More specifically, the Assistant/Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics established policies and evaluated results in matters of logistics requirements, procurements, supply services, and materiel activities.  He also exercised manpower control over military and civilian personnel in the technical services.

II.293 Decimal file, 1947-54 [NM-3, Entry 113] (1,393 ft.), is arranged by chronological segment and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Records of interest are filed under decimals 091 Korea (1949-1950, box 698; 1951-1952, box 1573; 1953, box 2502) and 400.3591 Korea (1949-1950, boxes 1248-1249; 1951-52, box 2205; 1953, box 2765).

II.294 Central decimal file, 1949-51 and 1954 [NM-3, Entry 114] (51 ft.), is arranged by chronological segment and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Records pertinent to the Korean War are filed under decimals 091 Korea (1949-50, box 15; 1951, box 5); 370.2 LD-SL-17 (1949-50, box 39), which includes "Logistic study covering operations in Korea prepared by Strategic Logistics Branch, Plans Office, Assistant Chief of Staff G-4, September 1950;" and 471.6 (1951, box 43) that contains "ORO-T-1 (FEC) Technical Memorandum--Tactical Employment of the Atomic Bomb in Korea, 22 December 1950" and "Department of the Army conference on probable effects on atomic weapons developments upon the structure of army operations, 20 March 1951."

II.295 Record set of publications, 1943-57 [NM-3, Entry 119] is arranged by section and thereunder chronologically.  Section 4K provides the army progress reports for 1949-54 including Korea.

 

RECORDS OF THE SPECIAL AMMUNITION STAFF SECTION (SASS)

II.296 Records relating to the ammunition shortage during the Korean Conflict, 1953 [NM-3, Entry 111] (17 ft.) is arranged alphabetically by subject.  Topics include SASS information, General Larkin's files, ammunition files, budgetary guidance files, congressional investigation files, expenditures of artillery ammunition, procurement, publications regarding ammunition, ammunition policy, and tank program files.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE ARMY

 

RECORDS OF THE BUDGET DIVISION

II.297 Budget estimate records relating to the military functions of the Department of the Army, 1949-64 [formerly part of NM-3, Entry 212; currently A1, Entries 251A&B] (212 ft.), are arranged by fiscal year and thereunder by subject.  Budget estimates for the Far East including the Eighth Army are located in boxes 621-623 (FY1951), Boxes 688-692 (FY1952), and boxes 800-801 (FY1953).  Costs of the Korean operations for FY1952 are located in box 713.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF FOREIGN FINANCIAL AFFAIRS

II.298 General correspondence, 1942-64 [formerly part of NM-3, Entry 207; currently A1, Entry 243] (137 ft.), is arranged chronologically and thereunder alphabetically by country.  Relevant records are filed under Korea (1942-51, boxes 413-416; 1952, boxes 430-433; and 1953, boxes 440-443) and contain messages, directives, reports, memorandums concerning civilian relief agreements, Korean inflation, payments to ROK, U.S. economic aid, T/O&Es (see end note 2) for ROK division, and TASCA mission.  (Henry J. Tasca was the Special Representative for Korean Economic Affairs).

 

RECORDS OF THE PROGRAM REVIEW AND ANALYSIS DIVISION,
RECORDS OF THE STATISTICS BRANCH

II.299 Statistical reports, 1918-53 [NM-34, Entry 218] (51 ft.), are arranged chronologically and include troop lists and programs for July 1950 through December 1953 in boxes 1199-1220.  The reports contain information concerning different military programs such as the National Guard, reserve corps, foreign military aid, foreign civilian aid, mobilization, and training as well as listing the troops assigned to particular areas (Korea/Far East).

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF SPECIAL WARFARE
(SUCCESSOR TO OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF PSYCHOLOGICAL WARFARE)

II.300 Confidential correspondence, 1951-58 [formerly part of NM-3, Entry 338; currently A1, Entries 153 A&B] (17.5 ft.), is partially declassified and arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  Records relevant to the Korean War are filed under decimal 091 Korea (box 7).

II.301 Secret correspondence, 1951-58 [formerly part of NM-3, Entry 339; currently A1, Entries 154 A&B] (26 ft.), is arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  Pertinent records are filed under decimal 091 Korea (box 7).

II.302 Top secret correspondence, 1951-57 [formerly part of NM-3, Entry 340; currently A1, Entry 155] (14 ft.), is arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  Information concerning the Korean War is filed under decimal 091 Korea (box 5), which contains a G-3 Plan for demobilization of North and South Korean Armed Forces and an estimate of the probable psychological impact upon various audiences dated February 29, 1952, and decimal 383.6 Prisoners of War (box 19).  It includes a plan for utilization of anti-communist prisoners of war for propaganda purposes dated 26 November 1952.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE FOR RESERVE AND ROTC AFFAIRS

II.303 Unclassified decimal correspondence, 1952-54 [NM-3, Entry 300] (9 ft.), is arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  Records of interest are filed under decimal 091 Korea (boxes 5-6) and include a survey of civilian labor, administration of foreign aid, rebuilding Korea, and termination of the Korean emergency.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF CIVIL AFFAIRS

II.304 Security-classified correspondence of the Public Affairs Division, 1950-64 [A1, Entry 60] (19 ft.), is arranged alphabetically by subject and includes files concerning Korea in boxes 18-19.  Topics include civil information and education in Korea, adoption of Korean War orphans, "Our Stand in Korea" (July 1950), "Korea's Other Battle" (April 1953), and Korean relief programs.

II.305 Security-classified records of Economic Division 1946-61 [A1, Entry 62' (14 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by subject and include claims by Republic of Korea (ROK) civilians arising out of wrongful acts by members of the U.S. Forces in Korea (boxes 22-24).

II.306 Records of the Economics Division relating to Korea, Japan and the Ryukyu Islands, 1949-59 [A1, Entry 65] (4 ft.), are arranged alphabetically.  Records relating to Korea are in boxes 4-5 and include topics such as natural resources and Korean labor supply.  The formerly security-classified correspondence of the Economics Division relating to Korea, Japan and the Ryukyu Islands, 1949-59 {A1, Entry 64] (12 ft.) is arranged alphabetically by country and thereunder alphabetically by subject.  Records pertaining to Korea are located in boxes 2-24 and include subjects such as mineral deposits--strategic, South Korea in box 13.

II.307 Decimal file, 1943-54 [NM-3, Entry 299] (12 ft.), is arranged by chronological year segments (1948-51 and 1952-54) and thereunder by the War Department decimal file system.  Relevant files to the Korean War are filed under decimal 091 Korea (1948-51, box 2; 1952-54, box 3-4) and decimal 334 TASCA Mission to Korea (1952-54, boxes 17-19 (see paragraph II.298).  There is one stray box located between the two year segments titled ORO (Operations Research Office) Technical Reports (box 1) which is arranged by report number and includes "ORO-R-4 (FEC) Utilization of Indigenous Manpower in Korea, 1 March 1951" and "ORO-T-270 Korean Claims Against the U.S."

II.308 Records relating to economic assistance to Korea, 1952-56 [UD, Entry 145] (7 ft.), are arranged by an alphanumeric system (e.g., SUN 60-0-101).  No key to the numbering system has been located.  Files concern materials provided for Korean relief such as nursing bottles, canned fish, and cotton blankets.  This series is security classified.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF INFORMATION AND EDUCATION

II.309 Unclassified decimal files, 1949-54 [NM-3, Entry 360A] is arranged by year segment and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Documents of interest are located under decimal 091 Korea (1949-50, box 17, 1951-52, box 73; 1953, box 134), deci9mal 062.2 (1951-52, boxes 70-72), and decimal 291.2 (1951-52, box 81) concerning the racial integration of troops.

II.310 Formerly classified decimal file, 1950-53 [NM-3, Entry 260B] (13 ft.), is arranged by year segment and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Documents of interest are filed under decimal 091 Korea (1950, box 194; 1953, box 215).

II.311 Korean War communiqués and press releases, July 1950-December 1951 [A1, Entry 50] (2 ft.), are arranged chronologically and include press releases and communiqués from the Far East Command about various topics concerning the war.

II.312 Summaries of Korean War armistice negotiations, July 1951-July 1953 [A1, Entry 51] (1 ft.), are arranged by volume number and thereunder by subject.  The summaries compiled by the War Briefing Section of the News Branch consists of press policies and official POW releases during the negotiations.

II.313 Formerly security-classified correspondence of the Troop Information and Education Division, 1952-58 [A1, Entry 54], is arranged by subject.  The records in box 6 pertain to former POWs unaccounted for by Communist forces, listings of POWs, collaboration incidents, treatment of POWs, and a report on operation "Big Switch."

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF MILITARY HISTORY (OCMH)

II.314 Publications, unpublished manuscripts, and supporting records, 1943-77 [A1, Entry 145] (504 ft.), are arranged by an alphanumeric system.  This series includes background papers for files

1. CMH-89--(Korean War) Policy and Direction: The First Year in boxes 714-717

2. 2-3.7A AB 1950--Korea 1950 and 2-3.7A AB 1951-1953--Korea 1951-1953 in boxes 718-719

3. 2-3.7A AD--Combat Support in Korea in boxes 722-724

4. 2-3.7A AE--Military Advisors in Korea: KMAG in Peace and War in boxes 725-728

5. 2-3.7A BA4--Truce Tent and Fighting Front in boxes 729-731

6. 2-3.7A BA2--South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu in boxes 732-747

7. 2-3.7A BA1--Command and Decision: The First Year [Korea] in boxes 1-5

8. 2-3.7A AH--Personnel Policies in the Korean Conflict in box 1

9. Truce Tent and Fighting Front in boxes 1-5

II.315 Miscellaneous records relating to writing projects, 1945-1978 [A1, Entry 1819] (37 ft.), are arranged by subject.  Files pertinent to Korea are contained in box 7 and include documents concerning Korea 1950; Korea 1951-1953; military advisors in Korea; KMAG in peace and war; South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu; and combat support in Korea (Combat Forces Press).

 

RECORDS OF THE U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE

II.316 The U.S. Army War College, established in 1903, was originally located in Washington, DC.  Early on it functioned as part of the General staff, preparing selected officers for high command.  Distinguished graduates of that period included John J. Pershing (Class of 1905), Dwight D. Eisenhower (1927), and Omar N. Bradley (1934).  Classes were suspended in 1940 during the preparedness mobilization for World War II and not resumed until a decade later at Fort Leavenworth, KS, beginning with the 1950-51 academic year.  The new commandant, Lt. Gen. Joseph M. Swing, relocated with the college to Carlisle Barracks, PA, in July 1951 and turned over command to his successor, Lt. Gen. Edward M. Almond, just in time for the arrival of the first Carlisle-based class.  Following relocation, the Army War College grew steadily while performing its mission of preparing officers for high-level leadership.  Two specialized agencies evolved into integral parts of the Army War College--the Strategic Studies Institute, first formed in 1954, and the Military History Institute, established in 1967.  The Center for Strategic Leadership, a state-of-the-art gaming complex which opened in 1994, contributed another unique dimension to the college and to Carlisle Barracks history as a distinctive U.S. Army campus.

II.317 Staff studies (committee reports), 1951-53 [UD, Entries 1216 and 1216A] (6 ft.), are arranged by problem or course number and thereunder by committee number.  Study topics with a Korean War focus include wartime manpower procurement, communications zone planning, national logistics support agencies, mobilization requirements, and strategic logistic studies.  Entry 1216A is security classified.

II.318 Staff studies (individual studies), 1951-54 [UD, Entries 1217 and 1317A] (8 ft.), are arranged by "AWC" number and thereunder by author surname.  Korean War study topics include control of refugees in combat, the basis of Soviet policies with respect to the Far East, organization and composition of major army units for combat, mobility versus firepower, use of the helicopter in support of a field army, organization for limited war, army morale in combat, U.S. security in the Far East and Pacific Ocean Area, and the determination of joint doctrines and procedures.  Entry 1217A is security classified.

 

Record Group 330 Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense

II.319 The Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) was created in 1947 to head the National Military Establishment, renamed the Department of Defense following a reorganization in 1949.  The Secretary of Defense is the principal assistant to the President in all matters relating to national security.  The OSD is responsible for establishing general policies and programs for the departments and agencies of the National Military Establishment/Department of Defense; for exercising general authority, direction, and control over those departments and agencies; and for preparing the budget estimates and supervis8ing the budget programs of those departments and agencies.  For the period of the Korean War, the definitive account of OSD's activities is Doris M. Condit, History of the Office of the Secretary of Defense: Volume II: The Test of War, 1950-53 (1988).  The notes in that work can also serve as a means to identifying and accessing some of the records described in this reference information paper.  The textual records of the OSD include a number of series containing important policy documentation relating to the Korean War.  Of particular note are the several chronological blocks of the OSD central files, the records of the Assistant Secretary for International Security Affairs, the studies of the Personnel Policy Board, and the records of the Office of Public Information.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETARY,
CORRESPONDENCE CONTROL SECTION

II.320  The Office of the Administrative Secretary, specifically the Correspondence Control Section, maintained the OSD central files and indexes for the period 1947-1954.  The [formerly] confidential through top secret subject correspondence files, 1947-53 [NM-12, Entry 199] (196 ft.), were maintained by the OSD Administrative Secretary in the five chronological segments: September 1947-June 1950, July-December 1950, 1951, 1952, and 1953.  These files contain important policy papers formerly classified up to top secret.  The first segment, September 1947-June 1950, is arranged by a three-part numerical file system and the boxes are labeled as "numeric file."  For example, file no. CD 9-1-38 contains the office copy of a December 8, 1947, memorandum to Mr. Blum (Office of Special Programs and Deputy to John H. Ohly) forwarding various papers concerning Korea.  The third part of the numerical file is filed in descending numerical order.  The most important file relating to Korea (file CD 6-6-6) contains a Chief of Naval Operations memorandum (June 26, 1950) "Invasion of South Korea by North Korean Forces" that summarizes the situation one day into the war and analyzes the military capabilities of the respective Korean forces.  Other documents in that file include a letter, dated June 28, 1950, from the Secretary of State to the Secretary of Defense proposing a policy statement regarding the U.S. commitment of forces and the possibility of Soviet intervention.

II.321 In July 1950 the OSD Administrative Secretary began maintaining the subsequent chronological segment according to the War Department decimal file system and the box labels change to "decimal file" to reflect this.  The most significant Korean War related file (CD 092 Korea) in each of the four chronological sub series contains a substantial amount of material about the prosecution of the war and related policy matters.  For example, documents in the July-December 1950 segment include a Joint Chiefs of Staff recommendation dated July 8, 1950 on actions by the United States in response to possible Soviet moves in Korea.  The JCS stated that Soviet "action in Korea and employment of Soviet satellite forces there should be viewed as part of a general plan in which might involve correlated action in other parts of the world.  Therefore U.S. forces in Europe must be instructed to show vigilance and firmness in the face of Soviet encroachments."  There are a number of documents from July and August 1950 concerning offers of military assistance by other countries.  On September 18, 1950, the Secretary of State prepared a memorandum for the Secretary of Defense on "policies" and "understandings" between the Commander of the United Nations Command (General MacArthur) and the President of South Korea (Syngman Rhee) concerning the future course of the war--in the wake of the recent successful Inchon landing and Eighth Army counter-offensive.

II.322 Important policy and informational files continue in the subsequent chronological segment.  In the 1951 segment the two key decimal files are decimal 091.3 (MDAP)-["Mutual Defense Assistance Program"] Korea and decimal 092 Korea.  Interesting documents (filed under decimal 092 Korea) include a May 1, 1951, tabulation of military assistance offers by various countries, several memorandums on alleged violation of Soviet borders by U.S. aircraft, and a number of documents relating to U.S. policy on repatriation of Chinese and North Korean prisoners.  As the war and the stalemate progressed, the records reflect the growing policy concerns with the war's termination and postwar rebuilding of Korea.  The 1952 segment contains a June 2, 1952, exchange between the Secretary of Defense and the Assistant Secretary for International Security Affairs on "whether the plenary truce negotiations in Korea should be continued" and a memorandum of conversation by Adm. William Fechteler, the Chief of Naval Operations, held at the September 17, 1942, State-Defense Conference on the Korean Armistice negotiations (decimal 092 Korea).  But there is also a note from the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Omar Bradley, to the Secretary of Defense on the removal of restrictions on U.S. air attacks against the Yalu River hydroelectric plants dated June 2, 1952.  In the 1953 segment, there are cables relating to the use of the Eighth Army to assist in the reconstruction of Korea (decimal 091.3); a memorandum dated March 13, 1953, from the JCS that planning should assume hostilities in Korea will continue through June 30, 1954 (decimal 092 Korea); and a series of JCS and OSD papers from January through February 1953 relating to military budget, manpower, and equipment needs following the termination of hostilities in Korea (decimal 092 Korea).  In the general correspondence, November 1953-December 1954 [A1, Entry 200B] (32 ft.), most of the documents relating to Korea are filed under decimal 091 Korea, rather than under decimal 092, which becomes the principal file for documents relating to NATO.  The documents related to Korea largely concern relief, rehabilitation, and defense support for the country following the July 1953 armistice agreement.

II.323 The index [to formerly] security-classified decimal files, 1947-1953 [NM-12, Entry 198] (14 ft.), is arranged alphanumerically for each chronological segment.  The September 1947-January 1949 and February 1949-June 1950 segments are labeled "index, classified numerical file."  The July 1950-December 1951, 1952, and 1953 segments are labeled ""index, classified decimal file."  There are many documents indexed under "K" for "Korea" in each time segment.  Other relevant indexed topics include "casualties" and "China" filed under "C," "Far East" filed under "F," "mobilization" filed under "M," "Russia" filed under "R," "UN" filed under "U," and "Wake Conference" and "war plans" both filed under "W."  The index provides a brief description of each document indexed, date of the document, and a file number.  An index for November 1953-1954 period is located in the [formerly] security-classified index to correspondence, November 1953-December 1954 [A1, Entry 200A] (8 ft.), and contains the same information as Entry 198.

II.324 The unclassified subject correspondence, 1947-53 [NM-12, Entry 200] (243 ft.), is arranged in five chronological sub series: September 1947-December 1949, 1950 (boxes are mislabeled as "Jul-Dec 1950"), 1951, 1952, and 1953.  One part of the September 1947-December 1949 segment is arranged by an alphanumeric filing scheme (e.g., "D81-4-6") and the boxes are labeled "central numeric file."  The other part is arranged alphabetically by subject and the boxes are labeled "central subject file."  The subsequent chronological segments are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system and are labeled as "central decimal file."  There are a few formerly security-classified documents among this series of records.  Although this series shares many of the characteristics of the formerly security-classified subject correspondence files described above (see paragraphs II.320-II.322), the content is significantly different.  The unclassified files contain more information about the aspects of congressional and public support for the war and about logistics, but less about the strategic and international dimensions of the war compared to Entry 199.  The 1950 segment includes a memorandum, dated September 1, 1950, from Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson and approved by President Harry Truman providing logistic support to foreign forces for participation in Korean operations (filed under decimal 091 Korea).  In the 1951 portion there is an exchange of operations (filed under decimal 091 Korea).  In the 1951 portion there is an exchange of memorandums on whether it was possible to greatly increase the size of Republic of Korea military forces.  Secretary of Defense Marshall decided that needs of Korean economy and lack of opportunity for training new Korean units prevented the creation of new Korean units.  Marshall's statement is undated but was apparently written about April 8, 1951 (decimal 091 Korea).  The 1952 segment contains a letter, dated November 26, 1952, from President Truman requesting that then Secretary of Defense Robert Lovett send him a complete set of important State/Defense documents on U.S. policy with respect to Korea.  There is a discussion on how best to implement this.  Office of the Secretary of Defense historian R.A. Winnacker, in a letter dated January 16, 1953, admitted that the President as the Commander in Chief had the right to make this request but added that "the whole transaction had the flavor of bundling up a flock of documents in the last days of the administration before departing town."  In both the 1952 and 1953 segments, there are a number of documents relating to prisoners of war (decimal 383.6 POWs).  After the armistice, the records reflect the change of focus to more peaceful pursuits, such as a memorandum dated August 7, 1953, from Secretary of Defense Charles E. Wilson for the Secretary of the Army on medical rehabilitation assistance to the Republic of Korea.  There is also a letter dated July 29, 1953, from Secretary of State John Foster Dulles to Wilson requesting logistical support for his trip to Korea to visit Syngman Rhee (decimal 091 Korea).

II.325 The indexes [to the unclassified] central numeric, 1947-53 [UD, Entry 198A] (91 ft.), are arranged in chronological segments and thereunder alphabetically by name, organization, and subject.  The September 1947-December 1949 segment is labeled "index [to] central numeric file" (boxes 1-57 and 248-261) and pertinent information is filed under "K" for "Korea."  The 1950-52 and 1953 segments of the index are labeled "index [to] central decimal file" (boxes 445-535 and 699-724) and are a reading file that includes copies of outgoing correspondence and cross-reference sheets to the unclassified subject correspondence.  The cross-reference sheets indicate date, to, from, subject, and file designation of the document.  In addition, there is another 1950-52 segment that is labeled "VIP's correspondence" and is arranged alphabetically by name of the correspondent.

 

RECORDS OF THE CABLE SECTION

II.326 The messages and teletypes, June 1950-November 1951 [NM-12, Entry 208] (11 ft.), consist of three segments, two of which contain records that pertain to the Korean War.  The first segment includes copies of daily joint situation reports or "SITIN-REPS" (boxes 403-404), prepared by the Department of the Army staff, that indicate the enemy situation and the friendly situation and summarize recent operations in Korea.  The third segment consists of Far East incoming messages (boxes 418-428), which are even more detailed daily situation reports, prepared by the Commander in Chief, Far East.  Each report provides and intelligence, operations, logistics, and personnel summary for each United States unit in Korea from the Eighth Army down to each division and the equivalent Navy and Air Force organizations.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
FOR INTERNATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS (ASDISA)

II.327 The Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs (ASDISA) began as an Assistant to the Secretary for Political-Military Affairs.  In 1949 it became the Assistant to the Secretary of Defense (International Security Affairs) and then in February 1953 it was changed to the Assistant Secretary of Defense (International Security Affairs).  The Assistant Secretary (ISA) coordinated political-military planning within the Department of Defense particularly on matters involving foreign military affairs, the Mutual Defense Assistance Program (MDAP), and North Atlantic Treaty Organization affairs.  Most of the ISA records relate to European and NATO matters, concern about the U.S.S.R., and to United States military assistance to foreign military forces.  There are ISA subject-decimal, project-decimal (mostly country), and subject files for the period roughly 1949-1954.  Only a few files among these records actually bear directly on the war in Korea.

II.328 The State Department papers, 1952-54 ("State Papers") [NM-12, Entry 16] (7 ft.), are unarranged and include two files with information relating to Korea--"Working Group on United Nations Collective Measures" and "D-8 Papers of the Far East (Four-Power Meeting in Berlin), January 1954."  These documents are of some interest because they place the war in Korea in a larger context, particularly demonstrating the concern of United States policy makers to limit the war to Korea and to insure that the U.S.S.R. did not use the Korean situation to its advantage elsewhere.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF MILITARY ASSISTANCE (OMA)

II.329 During the Korean War the Office of Military Assistance, under the Assistant Secretary for International Security Affairs, was responsible for day-to-day direction and control of foreign military assistance authorized b y the Mutual Defense Assistance Act of 1949, while the Joint Chiefs of Staff handled the planning and implementation of the Mutual Defense Assistance Program (MDAP).

II.320 The [formerly security-classified]  general [and project] decimal files, 1949-53 [NM-12, Entries 17-18 and UD, Entry 18B] (75 ft.), are arranged in four chronological segments: 1949-52, 1950-52, January-June 1953, and June-December 1953.  Each chronological segment includes a "decimal" sub series arranged according to the War Department decimal file system and a "project" decimal sub series, arranged alphabetically by country or geographic region and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The June-December 1953 segment includes a "top secret decimal" and "top secret project" sub series arranged according to the War Department decimal file system and a "project" decimal sub series, arranged alphabetically by country or geographic region and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The June-December 153 segment includes a "top secret decimal" and "top secret project" sub series.  In the other chronological segments, top secret documents are interfiled with secret and confidential documents in both the decimal and project sub series.  There is some chronological overlap, with no apparent difference in content, among the several sub series.  Box lists for the three entries are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  Most of these records of the Office of Military Assistance relate to policies, programming, and budgeting for assistance provided to Western European countries and particularly those in NATO.  Indirectly, as they were allies in the U.N. effort in Korea, some of the records do relate to the Korean War.  There are files, particularly in most of the chronological "project" sub series for "Korea," "Far-East," and "china," which are more directly relevant.  For instance, in the 1949-52 project decimal sub series (decimal 091.3 Korea) there are important policy papers relating to military assistance to the Republic of Korea from before the outbreak of hostilities through the first years of the war.  There are a number of exchanges between the Secretaries of State and Defense titled "MDAP Funds for Support of the Korean Operation."  The file also includes copies of semiannual reports of the Military Assistance and Advisory Group to Korea.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
FOR MANPOWER, PERSONNEL, AND RESERVES PERSONNEL POLICY BOARD

II.331 The Personnel Policy Board was established by Joint War and Navy Department directive August 19, 1947, as amended by Joint Army, Navy, and Air Force directive November 12, 1947, to make a thorough study of all decorations authorized by the departments for the purpose of bringing the decorations systems of the three departments into the closest practicable uniformity.

II.332 The Joint Board for Decorations and Medals studies, 1945-51 [NM-12, Entry 125] (4 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by type of award and consist of studies, statistics, and legislative background papers concerning eligibility for various Department of Defense and service decorations and awards.  There are also some statistics relating to receipt of certain awards.  These records relate to policies, not to awards for particular individuals.  A folder is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
FOR LEGISLATIVE AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS, OFFICE OF PUBLIC INFORMATION

II.333 The Office of Public Information was responsible for the development of public relations policies for the Department of Defense, for dissemination of military information to the public from the seat of Government, and for coordinating and supervising public relations procedures within the field commands and the several services.

II.334 The Analysis Branch utilized several press clipping services to keep abreast of media coverage of various defense-related topics, including the Korean War.  The general subject file, 1940-July 1952 [UD, Entry 135G] (80 ft.), is arranged alphabetically by subject.  It contains war-related entries under "Asia," "Congress/Far East," "Far East," "Korea-Korean War," and "MacArthur, Gen."  The contents are from contemporary U.S. newspapers and magazines.  There is also a series of miscellaneous clippings, 1952 [UD, Entry 135H] (2 ft.), arranged chronologically.

II.335 The records of the Motion Picture Branch include topical files, 1943-52 [NM-12, Entry 140] (16 ft.), and subject files, 1951-53 [NM-12, Entry 141] (6 ft.), arranged by subject or motion picture title.  Most of the files relate to specific Hollywood-produced motion pictures and contain correspondence between military authorities and the film producers concerning service support for the films and the critique of scripts.  There are files on Korean War-era films such as "Fixed Bayonets," "Steel Helmet," and "Battle Circus" (the original "MASH" movie about the 8666th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital during the fall of 1950).  A folder list for Entry 140 is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.336 There is also a series of Press Branch press releases relating to Korean War casualties, June 29, 1950-September 13, 1953 [A1, Entry 149A] (13 ft.), arranged chronologically by date of release.  For each casualty, the releases contain name, rank, service, address of next of kin, and casualty status (killed, wounded, or missing).  The press releases are microfilmed and the 20 rolls of 35 mm. positive film, labeled as National Archives Microfilm Publication P2264: Press Releases and Other Records Relating to Korean War Casualties, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 157C] (2 ft.), can be viewed by researches in the Microfilm Reading Room in College Park, MD, or copies of the rolls can be purchased (see Appendix D).

 

RECORDS OF THE SPECIAL ASSISTANT TO THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE

II.337 In April 1954 in the wake of the Korean War armistice and other events in Asia, Secretary of Defense Charles Wilson dispatched Gen. James A. Van Fleet, former Eighth Army commander, to the Far East to survey U.S. military assistance programs in the area and particularly to determine the size and composition of the ROK military and the level of U.S. support.  Van Fleet undertook the mission as a special representative of the President, with personal rank of ambassador.  The formerly security-classified Van Fleet report files, 1954 [NM-12, Entry 185] (7 ft.), are unarranged and include correspondence, working papers, and a copy of the final report (July 23, 1954) of the survey of U.S. military assistance programs, and the military forces in Korea, Formosa, the Philippines, and Japan.

 

Record Group 334
Records of Interservice Agencies

 

II.338 The unit histories of military assistance groups, 1950-54 [UD, Entry 2] (14 ft.), contain mostly files regarding Korea and consist of the following types of records:

1. command reports, 1952 (5 ft.), arranged chronologically and including historical reports, operation journals, staff studies, and other documents produced by KMAG, and its staff or units.  These records describe activities of support and advice rendered to the Republic of Korea Army (ROKA).

2. general correspondence 1952-54 (5 ft.), arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  The files include letters, messages, memorandums, and other records concerning organizational and tactical units (decimal 322), the training of various ROK units (decimal 353), and defense plans (decimal 381).  There are also recurring reports on various schools (decimal 319.1), manning tables (decimal 320.4), and operation reports on ROK units (decimal 370.2).

3. military histories, 1951-52 (4 in.), including a report on the conduct of anti-guerrilla operations in southwest Korea and Korean Army strength reports

4. intelligence reports, July-December 1952 (2 in.), consisting of reports from the KMAG Field Training Command and the KMAG Unit Training Center concerning supervision of the training of ROKA units.  These reports consist of maps, descriptions of camp facilities, KMAG personnel rosters, lists of units being trained, the names of U.S. supervisory personnel, inspections information, and lists of supplies needed.

5. unit histories, 1950-52 (2 ft.), arranged chronologically and including quarterly historical reports, historical data, and semiannual historical reports of KMAG and its supporting units such as the G-1 and G-2 sections.

 

Record Group 335
Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Army

 

II.339 The Office of the Secretary of the Army was established when the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Statutes at Large 499) transformed the War Department into the Department of the Army.  The Secretary of the Army (formerly the Secretary of War) became accountable to the Secretary of Defense, head of the National Military Establishment (Department of Defense beginning in 1949).  The Department of the Army provided support for national and international policy and the security of the United States by planning, directing, and reviewing the military and civil operations of the Army establishment.  The Department organized, trained, and equipped the land forces of the United States for the conduct of combat operations on land in accordance with plans for national security.  The Secretaries of the Army during the Korean War were Frank Pace, Jr. (April 20, 1950-January 20, 1953) and Robert T. Stevens (February 4, 1953-July 20, 1955).

II.340 The Office of the Secretary had a central records office which maintained most of the records of the Secretary and the officials who served under him.  The Office of the Secretary of the Army initially maintained two series of central correspondence [A1, Entry 5] (627 ft.).  Each series is divided into the following chronological segments: July 1947-December 1950; January 1951-January 1953; January 1953-December 1956; January 1957-December 1960; and January 1961-December 1964.  Typically each chronological segment consists of a numerical files section (under which documents are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system), and a project (subject) files section (arranged alphabetically by subject and thereunder by decimal number, chronologically, or alphabetically by a more specific subject).

II.341 The central records office used an elaborate system based upon separate series of cross-reference sheets and often cross reference sheets interfiled with the various general correspondence series under the primary decimal number and related decimal numbers.  Information on the 5- by 8-inch sheets includes the indexed document's primary decimal number, [3] decimal numbers for other cross reference sheet copies filed in the general correspondence, the indexed document's security classification (if applicable), the originator's and recipient's names, date of creation, date of receipt in the central records office, subject and brief contents summary, and notations concerning enclosures and disposition.  Cross-reference sheet series organization and arrangement generally parallels that of the general correspondence (see paragraph II.340) with one exception.  The Korean War era chronological segments for the cross-reference sheet series generally run as follows: July 1947-June 1949, June 1949-December 1950, January 1951-January 1953, and January 1953-December 1954.  The chronological breakdown for top secret cross-reference sheets for security-classified general correspondence, 1953-62 [A1, Entry 1] is 1953-54, 1955-56, 1957-58, 1959-60, and 1961-62.  The Office of the Under Secretary of War employed a nearly identical system of cross-reference sheet access for its centralized general correspondence (see paragraph II.349).

II.342 The security-classified general correspondence, July 1947-December 1964 [A1, Entries 3A&B] )387 ft.), consists of mostly declassified memorandums, letters, reports, studies, directives, and other records concerning sensitive areas of defense policy formulation involving the secretary and various components of the Office of the President, members of the Presidential cabinet, the offices of the secretaries of Defense, Air Force, and Navy, Army staff officers, the Central Intelligence Agency, other Federal agencies, members of Congress, and private citizens.  Topics pertaining to Korea include defense mobilization plans (decimals 004.04 and 381); the security of strategic materials (decimal 401.1); the development of new weapons systems (decimal 334); Research and Development Board activities, (decimal 471.6); ammunition and other logistical shortages during the Korean War (decimal 471, January 1951-January 1953 and January 1953-December 1956); Department of the Army participation in Department of Defense level decision making (decimal 334, Armed Forces Policy Council and Joint Secretaries); military assistance to foreign nations (decimal 092.3); requirements for overseas bases (decimal 686); loyalty cases (decimals 201, 230, and 741); minority group recruitment and service (decimal 291.2); and departmental organization (decimal 320).  The consolidated project files include information relating to economic relief and technical and military assistance to Korea.  There are some cross-reference sheets filed throughout the series, and in top secret cross reference sheets for security-classified general correspondence, 1953-62 [A1, Entry 1] (u ft.) and in the partially declassified cross reference sheets to security-classified general correspondence, 1947-64 [A1, Entries 2A&B] (118 ft.), which includes some top secret cross-reference sheets.

II.343 The scope and content of unclassified general correspondence, July 1947-December 1964 [A1, Entry 5] (627 ft.), is similar to that of the security-classified general correspondence.  There are records concerning high level policy discussions on overseas civil affairs functions such as prosecuting war crimes (decimal 000.5), foreign aid (decimal 092), training (decimal 353), and logistics and procurement procedures (decimal 400.2).  Departmental organization (decimals 020, 040 Defense, 319.1 semiannual reports, and 320), and race relations (decimal 291.2) may also relate to Korea.  There are some cross-reference sheets filed throughout the series, and in the cross-reference sheets to general correspondence, 1947-64 [A1, Entry 4] (National Archives Microfilm Publications M1101) (485 rolls of 35 mm. microfilm) (see Appendix D).

 

RECORDS RELATING TO OFFICIAL ACTIONS OF THE U.S. ARMY CHIEF OF STAFF

II.344 Two series contain copies of security-classified summaries of official actions taken in the Office of the U.S. Army Chief of Staff.  The summaries usually list several different actions for a particular date, note the originators of these actions, and give brief statements of the facts of each case.  Topics covered in the top secret Chief of Staff summaries of action, January 12, 1951-December 30, 1952 [A1, Entry 7] (3 in.), include the development of new weapons systems, logistical and procurement problems in Korea, Army strength, and sensitive matters in overseas areas.  Security-classified Chief of Staff summaries of action, January 3, 1951-December 29, 1952 [A1, Entry 8] (3 in.), arranged chronologically and numbered sequentially for each year, include information on the deployment of weapons and troops, industrial mobilization, and manpower utilization.  Summaries for January through March 1952 (1-26) are missing.

 

RECORDS RELATING TO THE NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL

II.345 The Secretary of War received records as a member of the National Security Council (NSC).  NSC policies and deliberations during the Korean War years are described in paragraphs II.244-II.248.  Security-classified records of actions taken by the National Security Council, October 1947-July 1962 [A1, Entry 11] (1 ft.), are arranged chronologically by date of NSC meeting.  The actions are numbered, 1-2452.  This series consists of copies of the record of action taken on items considered at NSC meetings or decided by memorandum between meetings.  Army officials annotated some of these documents.  Each record of action typically includes information such as a brief summary of subjects discussed, with citations to pertinent NSC-numbered documents filed in the series of security-classified numbered documents, November 10, 1947-January 18, 1961 (see paragraph II.346) and to other records of actions; lists of NSC meeting attendees; and the title of the person who presided.  Comments by the President are also noted.  For those records most pertinent to the Korean War (actions for 1947-52) there are subject indexes in the appendixes to the volumes described in policies of the government of the United States of America relating to the national security, 1947-52 (see paragraph II.348).

II.346 Security-classified numbered documents, November 10, 1947-January 18, 1961 [A1, Entry 12] (3 ft.), are arranged numerically with some gaps.  Records concerning the Korean War are numbered 2-175, and cover November 10, 1947-December 21, 1953.  At the beginning of the series are subject indexes for January-November 1949 and January-December 1952, an annotated list of all numbered documents for 1947-19 60, and a list prepared by the National Archives showing number and date of each document in this series.  There are also copies of reports prepared for the NSC by Federal agencies and the NSC staff or submitted by the NSC to the President.  They primarily analyze situations affecting U.S. security.  Army officials annotated some of these documents.

II.347 Security-classified progress reports received by the National Security Council, 1950-61 [A1, Entry 14] (1 ft.), are arranged chronologically.  The records consist of reports submitted to the NSC by the State and Defense Departments, the Operations Coordinating Board, and other Government agencies assessing the implementation of various NSC policy directives.  Each report contains a citation to the pertinent NSC-numbered document or NSC action number; some are cross-referenced to other Department of the Army records.  The reports cover such topics as evaluations of U.S. policy in various parts of the world, contingency plans, overseas communications, and early warning defense.  At the end of the series are copies of several miscellaneous reports.  Some relate to United States policy on Korea.  Lists of progress reports for 1952 are in the appendixes to volumes III-V of the records described in the next paragraph.

II.348 Security-classified policies of the government of the United States of America relating to the national security, 1947-52 [A1, Entry 15] (5 in.), consist of chronologically arranged volumes prepared by NSC staff for the use of council members and their staffs.  The volumes consist of national security policy statements approved by the President upon the advice of the NSC.  The statements relate to subjects affecting national security, the Government's national security procedures, and intelligence matters.  Each volume has appendixes listing NSC members, council actions, progress and other reports, and related papers.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY OF THE ARMY

General Correspondence Files and Indexes

II.349 The partially declassified top secret general correspondence, 1947-53 [A1, Entries 24A&B] (18 ft.), is divided into three chronological segments--August 1947-December 1950; January 1949-December 1950; and January 1951-January 1953.  Records are arranged thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Each chronological segment consists of a numerical files section (under which documents are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system), and a project (subject) files section (arranged alphabetically by subject and thereunder by decimal number, chronologically, or alphabetically by more specific subject).  The records consist of letters, memorandums, reports, cablegrams and registers, messages, document receipt sheets, and other records relating to the under secretary's responsibilities for politico-military affairs, procurement, and logistics.  The under secretary's correspondents included the Secretary of the Army and various assistant secretaries, the Secretary of Defense and various assistant secretaries, U.S. Army General Staff officers, cabinet and sub cabinet level officials, foreign officials, members of Congress, and the public.  Subjects pertinent to the Korean War include treaty negotiations (August 1947-December 1950, decimal 092.2) and Army procurement (decimal 400).  there are some cross-reference sheets filed throughout the series, covering correspondence received or sent between August 1947 and December 1949.  Cross-reference sheets for the periods January to December 1950 and January 1951 to January 1953 constitute a separate series of cross-reference sheets to top secret general correspondence, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 23] (1 ft.), Paragraph II.341 describes cross-reference sheet format and content.

 

Other Records

II.350 The formerly security-classified records relating to the Under Secretary of the Army's tour of the Alaska and Far East commands, 1951 [A1, Entry 27] (2 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by subject.  The records include memorandums, reports, briefing books, charts, blueprints, and photographs relating to Under Secretary Archibald Alexander's tour of June 24-July 7, 1951.  The tour focused on logistical matters such as the ordnance and supply situation in various corps and defense areas in Korea.  Records include a detailed day-by-day summary of the trip and various documentary exhibits prepared for the under secretary by the Alaska and Far East commands.  Some documents bear decimal numbers, indicating they were originally in the under secretary's security-classified general correspondence, 1947-54 [A1, Entries 26A&B] (293 ft.).

II.351 Security-classified records relating to ammunition shortages in the Army, 1950-54 [A1, Entry 28] (4 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by subject.  Some subject folders contain lists of contents.  The series includes memorandums, directives, reports, and other records relating primarily to the congressional investigation of severe ammunition supply problems in Korea between 1950 and 1953 and resulting high-level policy decisions.  Several RG 156 textual series document the testimony in Congress of Army policymakers during the preparedness and Korean War ammunition shortages investigations conducted by the Senate Armed Services Committee and its investigating subcommittee in the spring of 1953 (see paragraph II.161).  There are also records concerning the depletion of ammunition supplies reserved for use in Indochina and Europe, the broadening of the procurement base at home, and the relative priority of foreign military aid as compared to economic aid to Europe.

 

RECORDS OF THE ARMY REPRESENTATIVE ON THE MUNITIONS BOARD

II.352 The Munitions Board was created by the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Statute 495) replacing a joint Army-Navy board established by administrative action in 1922.  The new board was given expanded responsibilities to coordinate procurement, production, and other activities within the military establishment after unification; to plan the military phases of industrial mobilization; to recommend assignment of procurement responsibilities; to determine priorities for procurement programs; and to make recommendations to regroup, combine, or dissolve interservice agencies operating in the fields of procurement, production, and distribution.  For correspondence related to the two following entries (Entries 126 and 129) see paragraphs II.349 and II.350 (Entries 24A-B and 26 A-B).  The main body of records of the Munitions Board is in Record Group 330, Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

II.353 Security-classified lists of agenda items and minutes of meetings of the Munitions Board, January 1948-January 1953 [A1, Entry 126] (12 ft.), are arranged chronologically and consist of the Army representative's copies of minutes of the Munitions Board as well as numerous memorandums and reports prepared by the board staff or the Army representative's staff, discussing the proposed agenda items and offering comments and recommendations.  Topics discussed included security at industrial installations, procurement and mobilization planning, ordnance production policy, interservice agencies dealing with procurement and administrative matters such as Munitions Board funds, and personnel decisions.

II.354 Security-classified records relating to unresolved agenda items, July 1949-August 1951 [A1, Entry 127] (0.4 ft.), are arranged chronologically and consist of reports, memorandums, extracts from minutes of meetings, and other records relating to agenda items not resolved at Munitions Board meetings.  Included are numerous briefs or summaries of board staff reports and recommendations containing such information as the agenda item number, board staff report number (if any), the date of the board meeting at which the item was discussed, board staff recommendations, Army staff comments and recommendations, and action taken at the board meeting which postponed a decision.  There also are copies of board staff reports and memorandums prepared by members of the Army representative's staff discussing in detail their reasons for concurrence or nonconcurrence with the board staff's recommendations on such matters as guided missile production, procurement policy, and charters for joint agency boards.

II.355 Security-classified briefs of Munitions Board staff reports, 1953 [A1, Entry 128] (0.4 ft.), are arranged chronologically and consist of briefs of Munitions Board staff reports prepared for the Army representative by his staff on items discussed and approved at board meetings or circulated and approved outside the meetings.  Briefs contain the board staff report number, a summary of the topic, Army Staff comments and recommendations, the name of the preparer of the brief, and concurrences and approvals.  Topics discussed include armed services procurement regulations, stockpile objectives, additions to the "List of Strategic and Critical Materials for Stockpiling," and mobilization production schedules.  Some briefs are accompanied by copies of the Munitions Board staff reports and Department of the Army memorandums discussing certain items in detail.

II.356 Subject file, 1948-1953 [A1, Entry 129] (1 ft.), is arranged alphabetically by subject and some of the records are security classified.  The files include memorandums, issuances, reports, orders, policy registers, and other records relating to the organization and functions of the Munitions Board, armed forces industrial security regulations, and joint agency charters.  A manuscript on the origins of the Munitions Board and its predecessor is included.

 

RECORDS OF THE ARMY POLICY COUNCIL

II.357 The security-classified Army Policy Council Minutes, 1942-50 [UD-UP, Entry 50] (8 cubic feet), are arranged sequentially by chronologically assigned meeting number.  Meetings numbered 18 (September 27, 1950) through 170 (July 30, 1953) concern the Korean War.  The council, composed of senior Department of the Army civil and uniformed members, included the under secretary, the Assistant Secretary, the U.S. Army Chief of Staff and Vice Chief of Staff, the Comptroller of the Army, and the Chief of Information.

 

Record Group 338
Records of Army Operational, Tactical, and Support Organizations
(World War II and Thereafter)

 

RECORDS OF U.S. ARMY COMMANDS DURING THE KOREAN WAR

II.358 Records of Korean War U.S. Army commands are located in RG 338 and RG 554 and among the Army-AG command reports, 1949-54 in RG 407 (see paragraph II.459).  There are records in RG 338 for ground commands such as the Eighth Army and all its subordinate corps, divisions, and nonorganic units.  Beginning in October 1943 certain categories of records regularly maintained by individual units were forwarded to the Adjutant General's Office (AGO) Operations Division for permanent retention.  Now located in RG 407, the records thus collected--generally known as the "command reports"--are described below, along with those records in RG 338 retained by the commands as headquarters files or "working files."  The headquarters files are particularly significant for the higher-level commands (e.g., armies and corps).  For these headquarters, records in RG 407 and RG 338 complement each other in providing comprehensive documentation of headquarters activities.  For example, "command reports" in RG 407 detail a command's conduct of military operations.  Headquarters files in RG 338, on the other hand, are broader in scope.  They illustrate organizational and training activities of a United States-European, or Japan-based command preceding its commitment to combat.  Files in RG 338 also document the command operations, frequently revealing staff procedures and practices for executing and reporting operational activities.  In so doing, these files convey important administrative aspects of the command's everyday existence during the Korean War era.  On occasion, records identified as "command reports" were not forwarded to the AGO and are available only in RG 338.  RG 338 also contains duplicate copies of command reports and histories of various units that are filed in RG 407.  Records at Army headquarters level in RG 338 are generally more extensive than those found in RG 407.  Corps headquarters records are fairly evenly distributed between RG 407 command reports and RG 338 headquarters files.  By contrast, records of divisions and nonorganic units found among command reports in RG 407 are virtually complete in their coverage.

II.359 Headquarters files in RG 338 are usually organized in the following manner--general staff sections (G-1 through G-5, sometimes accompanied by Chief of Staff files) and special staff sections (e.g., adjutant general, engineers, signal, ordnance, medical).  Thereunder, records are organized into series, which are arranged generally according to the War Department decimal file system, by subject, or by type of record.  Records of the Adjutant General (AG) Section, which usually served as the recordkeeping office of each headquarters, constitute a general file for all of the command's activities.  In some cases records maintained by the general and special staff sections are quite extensive.  In others the AG Section records contain the majority of the headquarters staff sections' records.  In the latter instance, staff section records are interfiled with the AG Section's general correspondence, which is arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  The correspondence typically includes copies of general and special orders (decimals 200.6 and 300.4) and other issuances of the command (decimal 300.5), information on training and instruction (decimal 353), and copies of regularly issued reports on a variety of topics, including operations and intelligence information (decimal 319.1).

II.360 Records relating to the recommendation and award of medals and decorations to individual military personnel are generally located in the AG Section's general correspondence under decimal classification 200.6.  However, the AGO later removed awards files from the records of many Far East Asia commands, combining them with similar files for other Korean War-era commands and armies.  (NARA has since accessioned many of the combined awards files into RG 338.  These records will retain the AGO-imposed organization and arrangement pending a final NARA processing decision.)  Eighth Army awards files were among the records affected by this procedure.  When the National Archives accessioned these files, it did so with the determination to segregate and main them as an Eighth army series.  Consequently, Eighth Army awards files are now located in other Eighth army series (see paragraphs II.379-II.380).

II.361 Records of army headquarters-level special staff sections vary considerably in quantity and content.  Such staff sections include air (liaison), artillery, antiaircraft artillery, chemical warfare, engineers, finance, ordnance, quartermaster, signal, medical or chief surgeon, inspector general, judge advocate general, provost marshal, and special services.  In some cases, particularly for medical staff sections, records were withdrawn and retained by the appropriate technical service headquarters (e.g., Office of the Army Surgeon General) for use in the preparation of historical studies.  Records thus removed are now located with other accessioned records of the technical service (e.g., RG 112, Records of the Office of the Surgeon General [Army]}.  Other records were withdrawn or received by the Office of the Chief of Military History (now the U.S. Army Center of Military History) for similar use.  As NARA continues to accession these latter records, they will be allocated to RG 319, Records of the Army Staff.

II.362 Many headquarters files of armies and corps were received from the Army in piecemeal fashion and are, therefore, disarranged.  Such records are noted in the descriptions that follow.  NARA has achieved less than complete physical and intellectual control over most of the Korean War-era records in RG 338.  For that reason, it is occasionally infeasible to provide linear footage measurements for records, files, and series in this section of the paper.

 

RECORDS OF THE EIGHTH ARMY

II.363 The Eighth Army constituted the largest organic unit in the Far East command organizational hierarchy.  An army typically comprised two or three corps, six or more divisions, several nonorganic combat units (including artillery, engineer, and armor formations), and a variety of nonorganic support units (e.g., medical, signal, and transportation).  In combat, the nonorganic combat units were usually distributed for tactical use to the constituent corps, whose operations were directed, coordinated, or supplied by army headquarters.

II.364 As noted in paragraph II.358, records of army and corps headquarters are divided between two record groups--407 and 338.  Army-AG command reports in RG 407 contain basic staff journals and unit war diaries.  These were combined into large monthly command reports arranged according to an alphanumeric file classification scheme.  Records of army headquarters usually include only the historical records of headquarters general staff sections (G-1 through G-4 or G-5), sometimes accompanied by summary reports of the special staff sections (e.g., adjutant general, medical, engineer, signal).  Files of nonorganic units attached to army headquarters generally remain among nonorganic unit records holdings (see paragraph II.419).  The level of information provided in RG 407 army headquarters records is often more operational than tactical in scope.

II.365 The much larger body of less well organized army headquarters records in RG 338 constitute working files maintained by the army's field headquarters.  These records are arranged by general and special staff section and thereunder usually according to the War Department decimal file system, by subject, by date, or by type of record.  Army headquarters files in RG 338 often contain detailed documentation that is only summarized in the RG 407 "command reports."  For example, RG 338 records frequently include correspondence or report file series generated by army special staff sections (e.g., adjutant general, engineer, medical, signal).  Typically, such series are not found in RG 407.  Moreover, organized records of a field army's Adjutant General (AG) staff section frequently provide the best source of information for all of the command's activities.  This reflects the fact that the AG usually served as the recordkeeping office of each army headquarters.

II.366 All of the pre-1957 Eighth army records in RG 338 have been processed.  Finding aids for each series include arrangement and description statements with attached box listings.  These are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

Records of the Chief of Staff, Eighth Army

II.367 Correspondence, 1951 [A1, Entry 100] (10 in.), arranged generally by subject, consists of correspondence of Lt. Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway, Commanding General, Eighth Army, and Deputy Eighth Army Commander, Gen. John B. Coulter.  The series relates to the administration of U.S. Army forces in Korea.  Topics covered include road surveys, North Korean guerrilla activities, buildings and grounds, and POWs.  Each folder includes a list of papers.  Other Chief of Staff series include chronologically arranged resumes of staff activities, September 1952-March 1953 [A1, Entry 101] (5 in.) which were published semimonthly and contained transcripts of the Chief of Staff's briefings and outgoing radio messages, July 1950-December 1951 [A1, Entry 102] (5 in.).

Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1, Eighth Army

II.368 Personnel daily summaries, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 105] (5 ft.), are arranged by unit and thereunder chronologically.  The summaries consist of division tabular strength reports which include units assigned and attached to the division.  There are separate fields for actual and authorized strength, daily casualties, cumulative battle and non-battle casualties, days in combat, and number of POWs taken.  These reports include data for U.N. units attached to U.S. divisions as well as KATUSA (Korean Augmentation to United States Army) troops.  There are chronological gaps in the summaries for some units.  The divisions and chronological periods covered in these reports are as follows:

1. 1st British Commonwealth Division--July 1-Dec. 31, 1953

2. 1st Marine Division--December 30-31, 1950; July 1, 1952-Dec. 30, 1953

3. 1st Cavalry Division--July 21-Dec. 31, 1950

4. 2d Infantry Division--Aug. 5-Dec. 31, 1950; July 1, 1952-Dec. 30, 1953

5. 3d Infantry Division--July 1, 1952-Dec. 30, 1953

6. 7th Infantry Division--July 1, 1952-Dec. 30, 1953

7. 24th Infantry Division--July 12-Dec. 31, 1950; Nov. 5-Dec 30, 1953

8. 25th Infantry Division--July 20-Dec. 31, 1950; July 1, 1952-Dec. 31, 1953

9. 40th Infantry Division--July 1, 1952-Dec. 31, 1953

10. 45th Infantry Division--July 1, 1952-Dec. 31, 1952

II.369 For units that were in Korea in 1951, division-level statistical reports are found in the consolidated personnel daily summaries, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 106] (2 ft.).  These summaries include U.S. and U.N. formations as well as personnel statistics for the ROK Army.

II.370 G-1 daily personnel status reports, Nov. 1950-53 [A1, Entry 107] (5 in.), are arranged chronologically.  These U.S. division-level tabular reports provide statistical data on actual and authorized strengths, replacements (officers and enlisted), and numbers of personnel rotated to the Zone of the Interior (i.e., the United States).  Also included are total figures for numbers of POWs, ROK division casualties, and U.S. and allied casualties.  Time periods covered are Nov. 11-Dec. 31, 1950, July 1-Dec. 1, 1952, January 1-February 1, 1953, March 2-June 1, 1953, and July 1-Dec. 31, 1953.

II.371 G-1 battalion strength reports, August 1950-53 [A1, Entry 108] (5 in.), also arranged chronologically, are tabular reports of authorized and actual battalions strengths and include data for the period July-December 1950, July 1-December 31, 1952, and July 5-December 27, 1953.

II.372 Other G-1 records include chronologically arranged command reports, December 1951-55 [A1, Entry 104] (1 ft.), general records, 1950 [A1, Entry 109] (5 in.), and documentation pertaining to a table of organization and equipment study, 1940-50 [A1, Entry 103] (5 in.).

Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Eighth Army

II.373 Sporadically published intelligence estimates, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 121] (10 in.), are intelligence reports.  They include general summaries and tactical estimates that briefly state the mission of friendly forces, weather factors, available enemy forces and reserves, and probable enemy courses of action.  Typically, estimates will also include enclosures that provide a 5-day weather forecast, climatological charts, terrain studies, a map detailing possible future courses of action, and data on enemy locations and strength.  Formats for these chronologically arranged reports are not consistent; therefore, not all informational elements appear in the same report.

II.374 Periodic Intelligence Reports (PIRs), Jan. 1952-July, 1953 [A1, Entry 122] (8 ft.), are arranged chronologically and numbered sequentially.  Published daily, the reports include map coordinates for points of contact with the enemy, summaries of enemy operations, observations of enemy operations, enemy vehicle sightings, and changes to the enemy order of battle ("Order of Battle Highlights").  A duplicate set of PIRs was routed to and maintained by the Adjutant General Sections; this matter set includes the PIRs for 1951 and part of 1953 (see paragraph II.381).

II.375 Agent reports, Jan.-Sept. 1951 [A1, Entry 123] (5 in.), prepared by the 308th CIC Detachment, consist of brief summaries of information submitted by "Confidential Informant 8-23" on matters relating to the People's Republic of China government, Communist Chinese forces in Korea, Communist forces in the Far East, and the International Communist Volunteer Army.

II.376 Other G-2 records include the following series:

1. chronologically arranged G-2 situation reports, Sept.-Nov. 1950 [A1, Entry 120] (5 in.)

2. formerly security-classified general correspondence 1946-53 [A1, Entry 112] (1 ft.), arranged according to the War Department decimal file system

3. security-classified general correspondence, 1946-53 [A1, Entry 113] (5 ft.) arranged chronologically and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system

4. intelligence administrative files, 1950-55 [A1, Entry 117] (3 ft.), arranged chronologically by year and thereunder by subject

5. the chronologically arranged EUSAK [Eighth U.S. Army, Korea] Advance CP [Command Post] journal and file, Oct. 1-12, 1950 [A1, Entry 114] (5 in.)

6. the G-2 action file, 1950-Nov. 1951 [A1, Entry 118] (2 ft.), arranged chronologically

7. incoming miscellany, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 119] (5 in.), arranged generally chronologically

8. incoming radio messages, Aug.-Dec. 1950 [A1, Entry 115] (5 in.), arranged chronologically

9. outgoing radio messages, Dec. 1950-Feb. 1951 [A1, Entry 116] (5 in.), arranged chronologically

Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, Eighth Army

II.377 Command reports, July 1952-May 1953 [A1, Entry 126] (9 ft.), are brief military operations narrative summaries, with enclosures and annexes, covering a specific reporting period (usually monthly).  A separate enclosure was prepared for each day's operations.  Each enclosure contains eight annexes, designated A through H:

1. Annex A consists of the G-3 Journal and Summary.  The journal is made up of brief excerpts of Far East Command, Eighth Army, and U.S. and ROK corps and division radio traffic.  The excerpts reflect a nearly minute-by-minute account of operations, with reports of reconnaissance and combat patrols and ambushes, casualties, and changes in operational boundaries.  Appended to the journal is a daily summary of operations including troop movements and enemy contacts.

2. Annex B, the Periodic Operations Report, was prepared daily by the Assistant chief of Staff, G-3, for the signature of the commanding general, Eighth Army.  It features a brief general summary of operation at the Eighth army level followed by detailed results for the corps and divisions.  These operational summaries indicate the geographic location of enemy contacts, enemy force size estimates, and numbers of friendly and enemy casualties.  Another section of the annex briefly describes operations scheduled for certain units and changes in unit assignments and attachments.  A final section details U.S. and allied naval gunfire with data on ammunition expenditure and observed results.

3. Annex C, Radios and Orders, consists of copies of radio messages relating to troop movements, assignments and attachments, unit deployment, distribution of arms, and other matters.

4. Annex D is the G-3 Air Report.  It includes information on personnel, unusual events or incidents, and weather.  Attached to this report is so-called "bomb line information" and a sortie report.  The latter is grouped by service, i.e. Air Force (including Marine Corps sorties) and Navy.  It records the number of sorties by type of mission, including close support, armed reconnaissance, counter-air, B-26 day bombing, B-29 strikes, and miscellaneous.  Annex D also includes 24-hour and 5-day weather forecasts.

5. Annexes E, F, and G are the daily historical summaries for the Training Division, the Troops Control Division, and the Psychological Warfare Division, respectively.

6. Annex H consists of a combat situation map overlay.  The command report narrative summary sections frequently feature citations to specific annexes in the enclosures.

Records of the Adjutant General Section, Eighth Army

II.378 General correspondence, 1944-56 [A1, Entry 132] (233 ft.), is arranged chronologically by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The series includes unit awards (in 1952 under decimal 200.6 and in 1953 under decimal 330.13) and burial files (in 1951 under decimal 293).  Additional documentation consists of records such as periodic intelligence reports (in 1950-52 under decimal 319.1); periodic operations reports (in 1950-52 under decimal 319.1); records relating to organizations and tactical units (in 1951 under decimal 322); and operations and reports of troops (in 1951 under decimal 370.2).  There is also a small series of formerly top secret correspondence, 1949-52 [A1, Entry 134] (3 ft.).

II.379 General orders, 1948-56 [A1, Entry 151] (2 ft.), are arranged chronologically and thereunder numerically.  The orders include listings of recipients for awards such as the Bronze Star, Silver Star, and Purple Heart, but do not contain background papers documenting the award justification.  However, such papers may reside in the award case files, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 159] (70 ft.), which are arranged by year and thereunder alphabetically by name of recipient.  A box listing and a rudimentary name listing for this series is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  Award case files for Medal of Honor and other decorations, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 161] (10 in.), are arranged roughly by year and thereunder alphabetically.  Additional unit award case files, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 154] (2 ft.), have been organized as a separate series.

II.380 The accessions cluster "Organizational History Files, 1920-68," (see paragraph II.416) contains an "Awards and Decorations Files" subgroup that includes awards for the 7th Infantry Division, 1951-52 (18 ft.), and for other Korean War combat and support units, such as: the 7th Infantry Regiment, 1950 (1 in.); the 76th Engineer Construction Battalion, 1952 (less than 1 in.); the 51st Signal Battalion, 1952 (less than 1 in.); the 151st Engineer Combat Battalion, 1952 (less than 1 in.); the 38th Infantry Regiment, 1953 (1 in.); the 1169th Engineer Combat Group (less than 1 in.); and the 10th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1953 (1 in.).

II.381 G-2 Periodic Intelligence Reports (PIRs), 1951-53 [A1, Entry 155] (11 ft.), were routed to the AG Section by the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, and maintained as a separate set.  For a description of the PIRs see paragraph II.374).

II.382 Periodic Operations Reports (PORs), 1953 [A1, Entry 168] (3 ft.), were routed to the AG Section by the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3 and maintained as a separate set.  For a description of the PORs see paragraph II.377.2.

II.383 The chronologically arranged and sequentially numbered Weekly Intelligence Summaries, August 2-December 29, 1953 [A1, Entry 156] (5 in.), replaced the periodic intelligence reports, which were discontinued after the July 27, 1953, issue.  Published by the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, this set was routed and maintained by the AG Section.  Each summary issue includes concise reviews of enemy operations and weather, brief statements of enemy capabilities, updates on order of battle information, reports on counter-intelligence activities, reports on bandit activities (see paragraph II.604) in the communications zone, and lists of captured enemy materiel.  Summaries also include situation maps that show general disposition of friendly and enemy forces.  The issues for October 25-December 29 are duplicated in Korean.

II.384 Situation reports (SITREPS), January 1-October 12, 1953 [A1, Entry 157] (10 in.), are arranged chronologically and numbered sequentially.  These reports, prepared and sent as radio messages, include information relating to enemy operations and sightings and used to update information on the enemy order of battle.

Records of the Armor Section, Eighth Army

II.385 The historical and staff section reports, March 1951-December 1952 [A1, Entry 171] (5 in.), are arranged chronologically by date and consist of command reports of the Armor Section, operational logs, and memorandums.

Records of the Artillery Section, Eighth Army

II.386 The command and staff section reports, Dec. 1950-June 1953 [A1, Entry 172] (3 ft.), are arranged chronologically by date and consist of command reports of the Artillery Section, personnel reports, daily journals, and miscellaneous memos.

Records of the Aviation Section, Eighth Army

II.387 The command and staff section reports, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 173] (5 in.), are arranged chronologically by date and consist of command reports, staff section reports, staff office reports, and other documents that describe the mission and activities of the Aviation Section.

Records of the Chaplain Section, Eighth Army

II.388 The historical and staff section reports, 1945-55 [A1, Entry 176] (5 in.) are arranged chronologically by year and consist of historical reports, staff section reports, staff office reports, and other documents describing the policy and activities of the Chaplain Section.

Records of the Chemical Section, Eighth Army

II.389 The general administrative files, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 178] (5 in.), are arranged chronologically by year and consist of memos, reports, correspondence, photographs, and other documents relating to the administration of the Chemical Section.  Subjects include chemical units in Korea; disposition of chemical supplies, flame throwers, and smoke generations; and other administrative subjects.  The historical and staff section reports, 1950-57 [A1, Entry 177] (1 ft.), are arranged chronologically by year and consist of historical reports, staff section reports, command reports, daily journals, and other documents describing the policy and activities of the section.

Records of the Engineer Section, Eighth Army

II.390 The correspondence, 1950-55 [A1, Entry 184] (2 ft.), is arranged chronologically by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  This series consists of correspondence files relating to capture of enemy equipment, the Armed Forces Assistance to Korea program, intelligence reports, and the Korean military academy, as well as administrative subjects of the Engineer Section.  The command reports, 1952-53 [A1, Entry 183] (2 ft.), consist of monthly command reports giving a narrative summary of events, personnel actions, intelligence issues, and daily journals.

Records of the Finance Section, Eighth Army

II.391 The historical and staff section reports, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 186] (1 ft.), contain monthly combat reports, daily journals, and staff section reports from the Finance Section describing policies and actions of the section.

Records of Headquarters, Special Troops, Eighth Army

II.392 The staff section journals, December 1950-June 1953 [A1, Entry 187] (1 ft.), are arranged chronologically by month.  This series contains staff section journals of the Headquarters Special Troops and those of the Headquarters Company, EUSAK, Headquarters 558th Military Police Company, 21st Transportation Car Company, 502nd Reconnaissance Platoon, 503rd Reconnaissance Platoon, Eighth Army Band, 376th Engineer Utility Detachment, and Honor Guard Platoon, 8230th Army Unit.  The organization and planning files, 1953 [A1, Entry 188] (5 in.), are arranged by subject and contain operations plans, memos, general orders, command reports, maps, and other documents relating to the organization of the army, defense plans, awards, and other administrative matters.

Records of the Information Section, Eighth Army

II.393 The Information Section was created in 1957 when the Troop Information and Education Section and Public Information Section were merged to create a single information office in the Eighth Army.  The historical reports, 1950-58 [A1, Entry 189] (1 ft.), are arranged chronologically by month and consist of command reports and history reports of the Troop Information and Education Section and Public Information Section.  The general correspondence, 1953 [A1, Entry 190] (5 in.), is arranged according to the War Department decimal file system and consists of correspondence files of the Public Information Section.

Records of the Inspector General Section, Eighth Army

II.394 Historical reports, 1951-57 [A1, Entry 192] (10 in.), are arranged chronologically by year and consist of staff section reports and other historical reports written during and after the Korean War.  They include 1G investigations into issues such as black market activities, treatment of POWs, and general complaints.

Records of the Judge Advocate Section, Eighth Army

II.395 Historical reports, 1950-58 [A1, Entry 201] (3 ft.), are arranged chronologically by year and thereunder by month.  The reports consist of command reports and staff section reports during the Korean War and include details of changes in personnel, significant actions, numbers of cases heard, reports and statistics for war crimes incidents, and lists of captured personnel.

Records of the Labor Section, Eighth Army

II.396 Historical reports, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 202] (1 ft.), are arranged chronologically by year and thereunder by month.  They consist of staff section reports from the Labor Section, which was responsible for managing the Korean labor force working for the U.S. Army in Korea.  The reports address major issues and changes in personnel.

Records of the Medical Section, Eighth Army

II.397 Essential technical data medical reports, 1947-53 [A1, Entry 204] (5 ft.), consist of significant monthly reports sent to the Surgeon General of the Army from the Office of the Surgeon, Eighth U.S. Army, in Japan and Korea.  The reports include detailed statistics on personnel and patients, significant actions and changes in organization, and reports from medical conferences.  From June 1947 to 1949 this report is often combined with the medical report on the occupation of Japan.  In the beginning months of the Korean War the medical section of the Eighth army divided into two sections: the forward echelon with the Eighth U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), and a rear echelon with the Japan Logistical Command in Japan (see the forward of the EUSAK report for September 1950).  There are separate reports for each group between September and December 1950.  The wartime reports include evacuation statistics and professional updates on surgical techniques.  Other records include historical reports, 1949-53 [A1, Entry 205] (10 in.), which consist of annual and monthly reports from the Eighth Army medical section and subordinate units, and the general correspondence, 1950-60 [A1, Entry 206] (3 ft.), which is arranged chronologically by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  This series consists of decimal files, organization planning files, bulletins, and history files compiled during and after the Korean War.

Records of the Military History Section, Eighth Army

II.398 Administrative files, 1952 [A1, Entry 222] (10 in.), are arranged by subject and consist of policy, planning, and support documentation from the Eighth U.S. Army Military History Section (MHS) during the Korean War.  Issues covered in the records include the format and preparation of command and staff section reports.  The enemy prisoner of war records, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 224] (6 ft.), consist of a large volume of supporting documentation as well as the report completed in 1960 by the Military History Office of the U.S. Army, Pacific, concerning the handling of enemy POWs during the Korean War.  The records also include information concerning the handling of U.N. POWs of the Chinese and North Koreans returned to U.N. control during operations Little Switch and Big Switch.  On August 14, 1952, the Eighth Army was relieved of the responsibility for enemy POW activities (which had been delegated to the 2nd Logistical Command) and the responsibility was given to the Prisoner of War Command, a newly activated separate major command under the Korean Communication Zone (KCOMZ).  The Eighth U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK) war diaries and command reports, 1950-52 [A1, Entry 234] (70 ft.), are arranged chronologically by month and thereunder alphabetically by section.  This series contains daily war diaries and monthly staff section reports from each EUSAK section and includes daily staff journals, enclosure supporting materials, and orders and instructions detailing major events within that section.  The last section each month is the graphic supplement of maps and captioned photographs.  The series was created as the permanent historical record of the activities of army-level staff sections.

II.399 The Military History Section also collected documents to use as source files such as the following:

1. Far East Command correspondence, 1951 [A1, Entry 217] (2 ft.), which is arranged according to the War Department decimal file system and consists of incoming and outgoing messages collected by the Adjutant General's Section of the Far East Command during the Korean War.

2. Commanding General, Eighth U.S. Army correspondence, 1951 [A1, Entry 220] (2 ft.), which is arranged chronologically by month and contains incoming and outgoing messages collected by the Commanding General, Eighth U.S. Army (EUSAK), during the Korean War.  Additional Eighth Army records include the G-3 command report, 1950 [A1, Entry 216] (3 ft.), which is arranged as a single report with enclosures, divided into seven books.  The lengthy enclosures include operations orders, detailed combat readiness reports, and command post exercise reports from the period immediately before the Korean War.

3. Miscellaneous historical reports, 1944-53 [A1, Entry 221] (1 ft.), which are arranged chronologically by year and consist of Eighth army command reports, unit histories, and other historical reports not belonging to other series.  The reports include those from Eighth army facilities in Japan, general officer biographies, and a report of the British Gloucestershire Battalion, dated April 1951.

4. United Nations Civil Assistance Command, Korea: 8201st Army Unit command reports, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 228] (2 ft.), which are arranged chronologically by month and consist of extensive command reports covering technical and economic assistance to Korea in the areas of public health and welfare.

5. U.S. Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea (KMAG): 8282nd Army Unit command reports, January 1952-April 1953 [A1, Entry 230] (5 in.), which are arranged chronologically by month and consist of command reports from the U.S. Army unit responsible for primary training liaison with the military of South Korea.  The reports contain brief section narratives with minimal supporting documentation.

6. First Marine Division historical diaries, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 231] (2 ft.), which are arranged chronologically by month and consist of special action reports, photographic supplements, and monthly historical diaries of the First Provisional Marine Brigade and the First Marine Division while operating with the Eighth U.S. Army in Korea.  Reports include detailed combat narratives, photographs, and some maps of action in the area of the Chosin Reservoir.

7. 2nd Logistical Command command reports, 1950-52 [A1, Entry 232] (10 ft.), which are arranged chronologically by month and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The records include monthly activities and command reports from the Eighth Army command responsible for managing lines of supply in southeast Korea based in the port city of Pusan and the administration of enemy POWs.  The reports consist of a short summary followed by (after November 1950) volumes of more detailed section activity reports.

8. 3rd Logistical Command command reports, 1950-52 [A1, Entry 233] (5 ft.), which are arranged chronologically by date and contain historical reports from staff sections (G-1, G-2, Chaplain, etc.) followed by orders, memos, and significant messages with a listing of these messages at the beginning.

9. I Corps command reports, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 236] (28 ft.), which are arranged chronologically by month and thereunder by section and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The series consists of war diaries and command staff section reports, which include daily staff journals, enclosure materials, and orders and instructions detailing major events within that section.  Some months contain a photographic section.  The reports from 1952 and 1953 are single command reports without staff section report annexes.  I Corps Artillery reports also are included in this series.  Additional records include the I Corps correspondence, 1951 [A1, Entry 218] (5 in.), which is arranged according to the War Department decimal file system and consists of incoming and outgoing messages collected by the Adjutant General's Section of the I Corps during the Korean War and includes a file entitled "Espionage in Korea."

10. IX Corps command reports, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 237] (43 ft.), which are arranged chronologically by month and contain historical reports, section reports, and daily journals.  The first folder for each month is the overall command report.  Subsequent supporting documents are arranged by section and include more detailed reports from Headquarters and Headquarters Artillery Battery, IX Corps Artillery.  Prior to December 1950, the reports were called IX corps War Diaries.  The reports for January-June 1952 are single volume summary narratives only.  Extensive volumes of supporting documents from IX corps staff sections, including POW interrogations and intelligence spot reports, are located in the July 1952 report.  The series also contains the Commanding General's trip logs for August to December 1962.  Additional records include the IX Corps correspondence, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 219] (2 ft.), which is arranged chronologically by month and consists of incoming and outgoing messages collected by IX Corps during the Korean War.  The series includes two after-action interviews conducted by the IX Corps 3rd Historical Detachment for the "Task Force BYORUM" and "Tanks above Kapyong" operations as well as IX Corps operation orders for 1950.

11. X Corps command reports, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 235] (19 ft.), which are arranged chronologically by date and contain command reports from the Headquarters, X Corps in the area of eastern Korea, consisting of a daily summary and supporting annexes from components such as command, personnel, intelligence, logistics, and civil affairs groups.  The bulk of the reports are periodic intelligence reports and periodic operations reports.  For January-April 1951, the command reports consist of a combined summary report for the month, followed by daily annexes.  The summary report for December 1950 is not included and only the daily annexes remain.  For May 1951 and subsequent months, the annexes are arranged by section rather than by day.  Additional records include the X Corps Artillery command reports, 1951-52 [A1, Entry 238] (4 ft.), which are arranged chronologically by month and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  This series consists of volumes of staff section journals, orders, and significant messages from HQ and HQ Battery, X Corps Artillery.

12. 25th Infantry Division logistical records, 1951 [A1, Entry 239] (6 ft.), which are arranged chronologically by day and sequentially numbered.  This series consists of supply reports and G-4 journal files from the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4, 25th Infantry Division.  The daily journal entry reports (numbered 1-249) consist of message traffic logs and ledgers of levels of critical supplies in a number of 25th ID operational locations from January to September 1951.  Additional supply reports include periodic logistical reports (PLRs) for subordinate units.

Records of the Ordnance Section, Eighth Army

II.400 General correspondence, 1945-58 [A1, Entry 240] (5 ft.), is arranged chronologically by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system and consists of general administrative files from the occupation of Japan, the Korean War, and postwar Korea.  The publications, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 241] (4 ft.), are arranged chronologically by issue date and consist of ordnance operations bulletins, technical publications that provide detail information concerning personnel levels, unit movements, and supply levels for ordnance units in Korea.  These reports were issued daily to mid-December 1952, biweekly to April 1953, and monthly to December 1953.  The series also includes ordnance field operations reports which contain information extracted from the operations bulletins for May to December 1953.  The command reports, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 242] (10 in.), consist of monthly command and staff section reports that include historical narratives and limited supporting documentation compiled during and immediately following the Korean War.

Records of the Provost Marshall Section, Eighth Army

II.401 Operational logs, 1952-53 [A1, Entry 244] (10 in.), are arranged chronologically by month and consist of daily ledgers of statistics (including POW statistics), actions, messages, and brief accounts of incidents.  The command and historical reports, 1950-59 [A1, Entry 245] (10 in.), are arranged chronologically by month  and consist of command reports and staff section reports including crime statistics and enemy POW administration information.  The reports also contain miscellaneous administrative and historical files such as quarterly historical reports, conference materials, and information bulletins.

Records of the Quartermaster Section, Eighth Army

II.402 The general correspondence, 1953 [A1, Entry 248] (5 in.), is arranged according to the War Department decimal file system and consists of correspondence and administrative files.  The staff section reports, 1952-53 [A1, Entry 251] (10 in.), consist of monthly reports of action.  Some materials have been withdrawn for security classification.

Records of the Special Services Section, Eighth Army

II.404 The staff section report files, 1950-58 [A1, Entry 252] (10 in.), are arranged chronologically by month and include information concerning entertainment, recreation, and social services.

Records of the Transportation Section, Eighth Army

II.405 The publications, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 253] (5 in.), are arranged by report type and thereunder chronologically by month.  This series consists of logistical reports and highway letters, published and widely distributed by the Transportation Section in Korea.  Reports cover issues such as traffic volume, shipping tonnage, and other statistics.  The staff section reports, 1950-58 [A1, Entry 254] (10 in.), consists of monthly command and reports.

 

RECORDS OF CORPS

II.406 Corps organizations represented combinations of two or more divisions with appropriate nonorganic combat and support units.  In contrast to the European Command (EUCOM), Far East Command corps varied in size, according to the nature of mission assigned, and were more likely to include additional nonorganic units.  Corps headquarters organization essentially duplicated that of the parent army headquarters.  Corps records tend to convey a tactical focus, limited to the corps' immediate objectives and needs.  This contrasts (but also complements) the broader, more strategic view that generally characterizes records of the parent army.  Corps headquarters command reports within the Army-AG command reports in RG 407 typically include G-1 through G-4 journals and reports, corps artillery unit journals and reports, and historical or after-action repots of other specialized staff sections.  Files of nonorganic units attached to corps remain with nonorganic unit records (see paragraph II.418).  Corps headquarters records in RG 338 follow the same general content and arrangement patterns noted for army headquarters records in RG 338 (see paragraphs II.358-II.359).

II.407 Three U.S. Army corps participated in Korean War operations: I, IX, and X Corps.  In comparison with corps records in RG 407, corps headquarters records in RG 338 vary considerably in volume and arrangement.  Corps-level records in RG 338 also tend to vary in the degree to which they supplement RG 407 documentation.  Occasionally it appears that entire sections of corps headquarters records were transferred to the "command reports" now located in the RG 407 Army-AG command reports under file designations 201, 209, and 210.

Records of I Corps

II.408 In RG 338, I Corps Korean War and World War II records are intermixed [UD, Entries 34475-34487A] (166 ft.).  For each section of I Corps (except headquarters), command reports are the principal records.  However, there are also G-3 periodic reports, G-3 operations journals, G-4 journals, AG correspondence files, and Artillery general staff unit history files.

II.409 Additional records are located in the informally titled "Organizational History Files, 1920-68" (see paragraph II.416).  This accession cluster includes a 24-cubic ft. "Records of I Corps, 1950-53" subgroup, which consists of general administrative files, general subject correspondence files, permanent order files, operating procedure files, publications reference set files, and permanent order background files.  Subgroup finding aids consist of series title lists, descriptions, and box content lists.  The box lists identify contents at the file level.  These finding aids are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

Records of IX Corps

II.410 Korean War and post-WWII-era IX Corps records in RG 338 [UD, Entries 34488-34497B] (125 ft.) are also intermixed within files such as general correspondence files (decimal files); operational and staff memorandums; administrative; field, special, general, letter, movement, and special courts martial orders; G-1, G-2, and G-3 periodic reports extracts from service records; and payroll files.

II.411 Additional records are located in the informally titled "Organizational History Files, 1920-68" (see paragraph II.416).  This accession cluster includes a 17-cu.ft. sub-group of "Records of Headquarters, IX Corps, 1950-53," which consists of general administrative files, general subject correspondence files, unit correspondence files, newspaper files, publication reference and record set files, permanent order files, command reporting files, daily journals, organizational history files, operating procedure files, command health reporting files, and publicity office background files.  Subgroup finding aids consist of series title lists, descriptions, and box contents lists.  The box lists identify contents at the file level.  These finding aids are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

Records of X Corps

II.412 Most of the X Corps Korean War records in RG 338 [UD, Entries 34498-34510] (65 ft.) remain security-classified.  Relevant files include the following: G-2 periodic intelligence reports, command reports, and unit history files; G-3 journals, command reports, and unit history files; Adjutant General correspondence, orders, general administrative files, and unit history files; Artillery S-1 command reports, unit history files, and intelligence report files; and Inspector General investigations and complaints.

II.413 Additional records are located in the informally titled "Organizational History Files, 1920-68" (see paragraph II.416).  This accession cluster includes a 22-cu. ft. "Records of Headquarters, X Corps, 1950-54" subgroup, which consists of general administrative files, general subject correspondence files, unit correspondence files, daily journals, line of duty files, reference set files, morning reporting files, and permanent order files.  Subgroup finding aids consist of series title lists, descriptions, and box contents lists.  The box lists identify contents at the file level.  These finding aids are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF DIVISIONS

II.414 Divisions were the smallest units that included the essential arms and services required for independent ground combat operations.  During the Korean War, standard infantry divisions consisted of the following assigned elements: three infantry regiments; divisional artillery; four field artillery battalions; an antiaircraft artillery battalion; a tank battalion; a reconnaissance company; engineer and medical battalions; quartermaster, signal, replacement, military police, and headquarters companies; and an ordnance company (later battalion).  A division's aggregate authorized personnel strength numbered around 20,000 (depending upon the number and size of attached units), but actual strength varied widely.  As the Korean War progressed, divisions were often reinforced by additional units to accomplish specific missions.  For the same reason, they were sometimes temporarily broken up and committed piecemeal.  Although the Army used established cavalry and infantry divisions during the war, task forces were developed from ROK, Marine Corps, and Army units to participate in special operations.

II.415 Virtually all significant divisional records are located among the Army-AG command reports in RG 407 (see paragraph II.459).  In contrast to records of theater, army, and corps headquarters, division records in RG 338 are less varied, normally consisting only of historical reports and administrative and training memorandums.  These records, located in RG 338 among the unit histories, 1940-67 [UD, Entry 37042] (2,451 ft.), are arranged according to unit type (e.g., infantry, airborne, cavalry), and thereunder numerically by unit designation.  The series unit histories, 1940-67 was assembled from records created by various Army units.  Finding aids for these records included index cards, arranged by unit type and date.  Copies of these cards form a set of 50 binders that is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.416 Other unit records in RG 338 are located in the two recent accessions informally referred to as the "Organizational History Files, 1920-68," and "Unclassified and Classified Army Records from St. Louis, 1944-68."  Formal processing plans for these records are pending.  Listings for both of these accessions are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.417 Because divisional records include those of assigned subordinate units, they are generally more extensive than either army or corps headquarters records.  Typically division records include the following: division historical or after-action reports; records of headquarters staff sections G-1 through G-4; unit journals for each infantry regiment (and sometimes for the engineer and field artillery battalions as well); and unit histories for all other subordinate units.  Records created by regiment or battalion headquarters staff sections (usually designated S-1 through S-4, matching functions performed at higher levels by G-1 through G-4) were usually combined into a single unit journal.  Journal entries were often handwritten, frequently in pencil.  The scope and accuracy of information provided in unit journals varies greatly depending on combat and command conditions.  The focus of information is almost always tactical and centered on immediate division objectives and concerns.  For that reason G-2 and G-3 records of parent corps and army headquarters should be consulted to provide an operational context for division actions.  In addition assigned division units (such as component infantry regiments) were frequently detached for participation in specific operations that did not involve the remainder of the division.  Records of such units thus document actions not described elsewhere in the parent division's records.

The following seven divisions, including one cavalry division, participated in Korean War operations:

  • 1st Cavalry Division
  • 2nd Infantry Division
  • 3rd Infantry Division
  • 7th Infantry Division
  • 24th Infantry Division
  • 25th Infantry Division
  • 40th Infantry Division
  • 45th Infantry Division

 

RECORDS OF NONORGANIC UNITS

II.418 Nonorganic units were specialized units designed to carry out single combat or support functions.  Such units were not permanently assigned components of larger units, nor were they capable of independent action.  There were nonorganic units for all combat arms and services, ranging in size from brigades to platoons and detachments.  They were usually assigned to armies and corps and employed in combination with larger units to accomplish specific missions.

II.419 Records of nonorganic units within RG 338 are located primarily among the unit histories, 1940-67 [UD, Entry 37042] (2,451 ft.) (see paragraph II.415), arranged by category of unit and thereunder by unit size and numerical designation.  Records for these units generally consist only of historical reports and some administrative files, all of which are either duplicated by or less significant than records for the same units in the RG 407 Army-AG command reports.  Recent RG 338 accessions that also contain nonorganic unit records are the informally titled "Organizational History Files, 1920-68," and "Unclassified and Classified Army Records from St. Louis, 1944-68" (see paragraph II.416).

II.420 As noted in paragraph II.358, nonorganic unit records in the RG 407 Army-AG command reports form a distinct group.  They are organized sequentially in accordance with a specifically devised unit designator (alphanumeric code) system.  The first two code letters indicate the arm or branch of service (e.g., FA-field artillery, IN-infantry), followed by two letters that denote unit level (e.g., BN-battalion, CO-company).  The code sequence ends with a unit's numerical designation.  Thus, ENRG0532 represents the 532nd Engineer Boat and Shore Regiment.  Under the unit designator code, records tend to be arranged by document type and thereunder chronologically.  The volume of records in RG 407 for each nonorganic unit varies considerably, with larger units (brigades, groups, and regiments) more extensively documented than smaller ones.  For virtually all units, there are after-action or historical reports.  These are often accompanied by copies of general orders and sometimes by unit journals.  For some larger units, documentation includes reports of subordinate companies or detachments.  Nonorganic artillery units are arranged under either "coast artillery" (including all antiaircraft artillery) or "field artillery."  Many units described under "military government" relate directly to the occupation of Japan and Germany.  The variety and number of nonorganic units preclude detailed description.  The names of units that participated in specific campaigns can be found in order of battle data in official histories or among army and corps headquarters records.

 

Record Group 340 - Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force

II.421 The Office of the Secretary of the Air Force was established on September 18, 1947, in compliance with the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Statutes at Large 499).  This occurred simultaneously with the creation of the Department of the Air Force as an integral part of the new unified National Military Establishment.  The Department of the Air Force took over the functions and responsibilities formerly held by the Army Air Force.  The Secretary of the Air Force's responsibilities included tasks such as: preparing the United States for defense against air attack; defining the perimeters of air power and how to use it effectively; setting up the day-to-day administration and regulation of Air Force business operations; establishing and defending budgetary and fiscal requirements; overseeing the promotion, training, and recruitment of personnel; procuring, testing, and maintaining aircraft, equipment, and facilities; housing and assuring the well being of servicemen and their families; providing information about the Air Force and publicizing its policies, programs, and activities; and representing the Air Force in dealings with other agencies of the Federal Government, private citizens, and manufacturers.  The Secretaries of the Air Force during the Korean War were Thomas K. Finletter (April 24, 1950-January 20, 1953) and Harold E. Talbott (February 4, 1953-August 13, 1955).

II.422 Secretary of the Air Force security-classified general correspondence, 1947-54 [A1, Entries 1A-C] (693 ft.), is arranged in the following chronological segments and security classification subdivisions: November 1947-June 1948; July 1948-December 1949; 1950; 1951 (Secret); 1951 (Confidential and Unclassified); 1952 (Secret); 1952 (Confidential and Unclassified); 1953 (Secret); 1953 (Confidential and Unclassified); 1954 (Secret), and 1954 (Confidential and Unclassified).  Series records thus organized are then arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  There is a folder list for the 1951 security-classified files located at the beginning of that chronological segment.  Before filing, Air Force clerks assigned each document a sequential 4- or 5-digit number (placed in the upper right corner of the accompanying cover sheet) based on the chronological order in which it was received.  Consequently each document includes this 4- or 5-digit number in addition to a War Department decimal file number.  The series consists of memorandums, letters, reports, telegrams, orders, press releases, studies, directives, maps, charts, photographs, and printed documents.  These documents deal mainly with policy formation and execution, but they also cover the Air Force's relations with the rest of the Federal Government, business corporations, veterans groups, and the general public.  Correspondents include the White House, members of Congress, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Offices of the Secretaries of Defense, Army, and Navy, the Bureau of the Budget, the State Department, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and other Federal agencies and private companies, groups, associations, and individuals.

II.423 Air Force programs, policies, and activities during the Korean War are documented in the following decimal file topical concentrations: security matters (decimal 000.5); industrial mobilization for war (decimal 000.04); meetings of the Secretary with other high-level Government officials (decimal 020); contacts with colleges and universities regarding Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) expansion and the awarding of defense-related research and development contracts (decimal 000.8); Air Force exposure to the media through newspapers (decimal 000.7) and motion pictures (decimal 062.2); cooperation with other governmental agencies on civil defense and air traffic control (decimal 360); Air Force publications (decimal 461); improved techniques in materiel and supply management (decimal 400.13); and local air shows and expositions (decimal 001).  During the years 1950 to 1954, the Secretary's Office received a significant number of complaint letters concerning waste, fraud, and discrimination (decimal 330.14) and military aid to Korea (decimals 091) Korea and 092.3).

II.424 Top secret organization and program planning records, 1946-June 1953 [A1, Entries 4&5] (18 ft.), are arranged in chronological blocks (1946-50, 1951, 1952, January-June 1953) and thereunder according to an unidentifiable alphanumeric filing system.  The records for the period July-December 1953 are arranged according to the War Department decimal system.  The series consists of letters, memorandums, studies, reports, messages, charts, tables, and maps relating to the organization of the Department of the Air Force and to its various programs.  Some of these pertain to war and mobilization plans in Asia and Korea.

 

RECORDS OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE, MATERIEL

II.425 The Office of the Assistant Secretary, Materiel, was established on September 19, 1951, under the provisions of the Air Force Organization Act of 1951 (Pub L 150).  The functions of the office included formulation, supervision, and review of plans, policies and programs relating to industrial resources, security, and mobilization' procurement, production, storage, maintenance, distribution, and disposal of all materiel, supplies, and equipment; Air Force participation in the Mutual Defense Assistance Program; transportation and communications; contract appeals and negotiations; and finally, cognizance over civil aviation.  The Assistant Secretary Materiel also served as Air Force representative to the Air Coordinating Committee on Production Policy; the Munitions Board; and the Procurement Secretaries Group.

II.426 The security-classified records of Roswell L. Gilpatric, 1951 [A1, Entry 23] (1 ft.), are arranged chronologically by date and consist of letters, memorandums, reports, agendas of meetings, and cablegrams.  Topics of interest include attempts to reduce the use of critical materials in constructing engines and airplanes; investigations by the Johnson Senate Preparedness Committee and the House Armed Services Procurement Subcommittee on the military procurement effort and individual procurement units; impact of new price control regulations and labor unrest on Air Force procurement and production schedules; questions taken up with the Munitions Board concerning weapons, airplanes, and facilities policies; attempts to correct critical materials shortages; field inspection trips to manufacturing plants and offices of the Air Materiel Command; B-47 production and delivery schedules based on a 138 Wing Air Force; and return of civilian aircraft requisitioned for service in the Korean air operations.

 

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF INFORMATION SERVICES

II.427 Records relating to motion pictures, 1947-53 [A1, Entry 36] (2 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by subject and thereunder chronologically.  The series consists of letters, memorandums, drafts of scripts, telegrams, printed advertisements, press releases, legal release forms, production schedules, and contract forms.  The records document activities and topics such as transactions to secure release forms and proper clearances from real life individuals portrayed in movies; conditions for and types of assistance provided by Defense Department and Air Force personnel in the production of films; the review and editing of movie scripts; filming done at various Air Force installations; the provision of equipment, and aircraft other vehicles for filming purposes; and the use of films for recruiting, training, and publicity.  The records also document technical questions about the production techniques and planning budgets.  Film subjects include air support in the Korean War.

 

RECORDS OF THE AIR COORDINATING COMMITTEE LIAISON SECTION

II.428 The Air Coordinating Committee (ACC) was originally established by interdepartmental memorandum in 1945.  Executive Order 9781 of September 19, 1946, reestablished the ACC with membership of State, War, Navy, Post Office, and Commerce Departments, the Civil Aeronautics Board, and the Bureau of the Budget.  The newly organized Department of the Air Force inherited War Department membership in 1947, and the Treasury Department became a member in 1948.  The ACC was charged with examining and coordinating aviation problems and developments affecting more than one department or agency of the Federal Government.  It also participated in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).  The Air Force ACC Liaison Section was established in the Civil Air Branch, Policy Division, Directorate of Plans and Operations, under the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations (DCS/O).  The section maintained a complete set of ACC papers and minutes and a reference file of ICAO documents.

II.429 The general correspondence of the Air Force representative to the Air Coordinating Committee, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 54] (6 ft.), is arranged by subject heading and thereunder chronologically.  The series consists of letters, memorandums, ACC numbered memorandums and papers, reports, studies, charts, tables of organization, scholarly articles, newspaper clippings, press releases, agendas, briefs and minutes of meetings, published annual reports, congressional hearings, acts of Congress, rosters, agreements, treaties, and other published materials documenting the broad spectrum of common interests shared by the Air Force and the ACC.  Correspondents include various interested Air Force offices and also members of the ACC, members of Congress, other agencies of the Government, civilian associations promoting aviation, individual aircraft manufacturers and airline companies, and representatives of the ICAO.  Korean War-era records in this series focus on the airlift of men and materiel to Korea.

 

RECORDS OF THE MUNITIONS BOARD

II.430 The Munitions Board was established within the National Military Establishment by section 213(a) of the National Security Act of 1947 and became operational on September 30, 1947.  On that date it also took over the personnel and records of the Army and Navy Munitions Board which became defunct.  The Munitions Board operated under the direction of the Secretary of Defense, performing numerous duties to support strategic and logistics plans formulated by the Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Board staff provided estimates of personnel and materiel requirements in order to measure the logistic feasibility of JCS-proposed strategic operations.  The Board's work in this area placed it in a logical position to review a broader range of personnel and material requirements issues handled by other Department of Defense agencies.  The Board functioned in the early Cold War years as an important Defense Department planning and coordinating agency for the military aspects of industrial mobilization.  In this role, the Board organized its work around several related tasks.  It attempted to correlate military production and stockpiling requirements for strategic and critical materials with needs of the civilian economy.  This required the Board to clarify military requirements by determining relative priorities of the various segments that constituted the military procurement program.  It also presented opportunities for promoting efficiency, economy, and more effective interservice coordination in the three core areas of logistics planning--production, procurement, and distribution.  The Munitions Board sough ways to standardize materiel specifications, simplify management efforts by assigning specific areas of procurement responsibility to a particular military service, and by recommending elimination or recombination of existing interservice agencies involved with Defense Department logistics administration.

II.431 With the outbreak of the Korean War in June 1950 the Munitions Board devoted more attention to mobilization planning, allocating strategic materials, setting more stringent stockpiling objectives and commodity price controls, reactivating Reserve Industrial Plants, advocating more research and development efforts for guided missiles and other advanced weaponry, establishing reciprocal military purchasing programs with Canada, promoting conservation of raw materials, leasing commercial warehouses to store war materiel, mediating procurement problems arising between the services, planning construction of morale facilities and setting standards for the construction of chapels, and considering anti-discrimination and other defense manpower policies.  The organization of the Munitions Board as formally constituted in August 1948 consisted of the Chairman, the Assistant Secretary of the Army, the Under Secretaries of the Navy and the Air Force, the Deputy Chairman of the Board, and the Director of Staff, supported by a military director from each of the military services, as well as numerous committees.  The Munitions Board was abolished by Reorganization Plan No. 6, which was presented to the Congress by the President on April 30, 1953, and became effective on June 30, 1953.

II.432 The records relating to Munitions Board meetings, 1947-53 [A1, Entry 68] (18 ft.), are arranged chronologically by date of meeting (October 1947-July 1953).  The series consists of agendas and meeting minutes, staff reports, activity reports, memorandums, letters, maps, photographs, charts, and miscellaneous published materials.

 

Record Group 341 Records of Headquarters
U.S. Air Force (Air Staff)

 

II.433 Headquarters, U.S. Air Force (HQUSAF) was established under the Department of the Air Force on July 26, 1947, and redesignated Air Staff by the Air Force Organization Act of 1951 (65 Statutes 327), September 19, 1951.  The Air Staff provides advice and assistance to the Secretary of the Air Force and the Chief of Staff of the Air Force on all aspects of air defense and offense.

RECORDS OF THE DIRECTOR OF PLANS

II.434 The decimal file (formerly top secret decimal correspondence file), 1942-54 [NM-15, Entry 335A] (639 ft.), is divided into two segments--a decimal file and a project decimal file.  The decimal file segment (boxes 1-683) is arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  File 313.5 (12 Dec 52) contains President Eisenhower's request for important Korean documents and a collection of "Pertinent Papers on the Korean Situation, 1951-53" (Vols. I-IV & annexes).

II.435 The project decimal file segment (boxes 684-1055) is arranged alphabetically by country or area and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Pertinent sections of this series include "Asia" and "Korea".  Under decimal 091 Asia Section 1 is a National Security Council report on "The Position of the United States with Respect to Asia." Decimal 381 Asia Section 1 includes an evaluation of the importance of stability in Korea.  Decimal 384.5 Korea contains a copy of the Barcus Report, "An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the United States Air Force in the Korean Campaign;" a "Transcript of USAF Evaluation Group Recorded Interview with General Edwin J. Timberlake, Vice Commander, Fifth Air Force"; and a copy of the Stern Report, "Korean Evaluation Project: Report on Air Operations."  Part of this series has not been reviewed for declassification.

II.436 The [formerly] secret decimal file, 1942-54 [NM-15, Entry 336] (197 ft.), is arranged according to the War Department decimal file system followed by a "Projects" section arranged alphabetically by project and thereunder in accordance with the War Department decimal file system.  Four project boxes that relate specifically to Korea include reports of the United Nations Command operations in Korea from 1950-53 in decimal 370.2 Korea (12 Aug 50), Sections 5-8.

 

RECORDS OF THE DIRECTOR OF INTELLIGENCE

II.437 Chronologically arranged Korean daily reports, August 1950-July 1953 [NM-15, Entry 272] (3 ft.), summarize the air situation.  Each report includes an annex that summaries ground activity, weather conditions, and projected air operations for the next day.

II.438 Joint situation intelligence reports, July 1950-July 1953 [NM-15, Entry 276] (2 ft.), consist of chronologically arranged daily reports that summarize the U.N. ground, navy, and air situations.

II.439 Reconnaissance Branch aerial photo and radar reconnaissance reports on Korea, July 1950-December 1953 [NM-15, Entry 218] (36 ft.), are security classified and arranged chronologically.  The reports relate to Air Force missions, each containing a brief mission summary, including information about Air Force units.  Reports may also contain aerial photographs and maps.

 

Record Group 342 Records of Air Force Commands,
Activities, and Organizations

 

RECORDS OF THE ENGINEERING DIVISION, AIR MATERIEL COMMAND,
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH

II.440 The Engineering Division, established as part of the Air Force Materiel Command (later the Air Materiel Command) on June 7, 1942, was responsible for aeronautical research and development programs and activities pertaining to the design and production of military aircraft.  Its earliest predecessor was the Airplane Engineering Department, Aviation Section, Office of the Chief Signal Officer, U.S. Army, created on October 13, 1917.  On April 3, 1951, the Engineering Division was transferred from the Air Materiel Command to the Air Research and Development Command (ARDC).  The holdings of the Engineering Division in the custody of the National Archives, include records of predecessor agencies dating back to 1921 as well as records postdating the division's transfer to the ARDC.

II.441 The Engineering Division's "RD" numbered research and development project case files, ca. 1921-ca. 1953 [UD, Entries 1001A-AA] (ca. 5014 ft.), contain a large, unarranged section of "5th Air Force Operations analysis Files" (RD #3511-RD #3629) (121 ft.).  There is no overall sectional organization, but the available finding aids do provide brief, general, section file descriptions keyed to "RD" numbers.  Section files include intelligence reports, aircraft data, sortie reports, target damage assessments, and Shoran mission reports.  There is also a large block of "5th Air Force Mission Reports, August 25, 1950-March 18, 1952" (RD #3597-%D #3629) (41 ft.), which includes teletype message mission reports for various Air Force, Navy, and Marine units that flew combat missions during the Korean War.  They are arranged chronologically by date and thereunder by unit designation.  The teletype messages are formatted with 5th Air Force Intelligence Form #1 numerical categories minus the category title.  Consequently, to interpret information in the teletype messages, researchers must know the Form #1 category titles.  Such category title information is available because some teletype messages include mission report information transcribed onto attached copies of 5th Air Force Intelligence Form #1.

 

MISSION REPORTS

II.442 Fifth Air Force combat pilots submitted reports of missions flown in Korea.  Group and squadron level headquarters frequently transmitted these reports as teletype messages to the 5th Air Force.  Message format paralleled 5th Air Force Intelligence Form #1 numerical categories, which included the following paragraph titles: date of mission, mission type and number; unit; number and type of aircraft; takeoff and landing times; targets (with subparagraphs for name, coordinates, and results); observations; enemy aircraft encountered (type, location, time, duration); friendly casualties; weather conditions; brief resume of mission; and name of interrogator.  NARA has custody of a limited number of unit mission reports.  Some can be found in mission reports of U.S. Air Force units during the Korean War era, 1950-52 [UD, Entry 1008] (78 ft.).  The two largest blocks, containing records of the 6147th Tactical Air Control Group and the 3rd Bomb Squadron, both cover the 1950-52 time period.  Reports of the 7th, 8th, and 9th Fighter-Bomber Squadrons cover only 105 and 1951; those of the 18th Fighter-Bomber Wing, only 1942.  Mission reports are generally in teletype message format with Fifth Air Force Intelligence Form #1 transcriptions attached to most of the teletype messages.  The reports in this series are arranged by unit designation and thereunder in general chronological order by report date.

 

RECENT ACCESSIONS

II.443 The National Archives has recently accessioned security-classified Korean War combat operations reports, 1944-52 [UD-UP, Entry 1] (131 ft.), generated by various commands including the Far East Air Force (FEAF) and FEAF Bomb Command (Provisional), 1947-51 (43 cubic ft.), and the Fifth Air Force, 1946-53 (61 cubic ft.).  FEAF and FEAF Bomb Command (Provisional) files consist mostly of general correspondence, messages, weekly intelligence roundups, daily diaries, reports of investigation, regulations, board of officers proceedings, command directives, final mission summaries, and military history files.  Fifth air Force records include general correspondence, messages, investigation files, conference files, daily journals, daily summaries, staff meeting briefs/summaries, operations planning files, operational summaries, operations analysis files, intelligence summaries/reports, inspection reports/files, special reports, incident case files, frag orders, statistical health reports, aircraft status reports/summaries, and other records pertaining to ammunition expenditures and malfunctions, and aircraft lost, damaged, or "aborted" on mission.  A listing is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.444 In addition, approximately 911 cubic ft. of security-classified files were accessioned as Pacific numbered and named Air Forces--including Korean War records, 1942-67 [UP, Entry 2].  Those records that pertain to the Korean War consist of general correspondence of the Fifth Air Force for 1949-53 (61 ft.) and various Far East Air Force files such as general correspondence, 1949-53 (approximately 200 ft.); general orders, 1949-52 (1 ft.); publications, 1946-49 and 1951 (2 ft.); and Judge Advocate legal opinions, 1951-58 (2 ft.).  A listing is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 389 Records of the Office of the Provost
Marshal General, 1941-

 

RECORDS OF THE U.S. ARMY PRISONER OF WAR/CIVILIAN INTERNEE
INFORMATION CENTER (USPWCIIC)

II.445 Over the course of its 8-year history (1967-75) the U.S. Army Prisoner of War/Civilian Internee Information Center (and predecessor agencies) [4] gathered numerous records relating to the treatment of POWs and the protection of civilians in time of war.  The center initially assembled these records to fulfill requirements of the August 12, 1949, Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War and to assist the First Army staff in the planning, development, and administration of programs relating to POWs under U.S. military control.

II.446 The National Archives holds three USPWCHC series: unclassified records, 1942-76 [UD-UP Entry 1] (23 ft); declassified confidential records, 1949-75 [UD-UP, Entry 2] (16 ft.); and declassified secret records, 1950-75 [UD-UP, Entry 6] (1 ft.).  Each of these three series is arranged in accordance with The Army Functional Filing System (TAFFS) and thereunder generally by "war" (e.g., World War II, Korean, or Vietnam), thereunder roughly alphabetically by subject, and thereunder chronologically by date of document.  Series records relating to United Nations Command administration of POW camps focus on topics such as the treatment and handling of Communist POWs; POW labor; forced repatriation; work of the Neutral Nations Repatriation Commission; Communist POW insurgency activities; United Nations Command POW camp requirements, layouts, and operating procedures; and POW education and recreation programs.  Some of the POW insurgency documentation includes reports and studies analyzing the winter-spring 1952 "riots" staged by Communist POWs held on Koje Do.  Box lists for all three series are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 407
Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1917-

 

II.447 The Adjutant General's Office (AGO), one of the oldest Army organizations, provided a variety of administrative and support services to the Army Department throughout the Korean War.  The AG was responsible for the administrative procedures and operations connected with Army personnel statistical and accounting systems.  Army publications, Army postal services, Army recruiting, and the preservation and administration of the permanent records of the AGO and the Army.  The Adjutant General from February 1, 1946 through June 30, 1951, was Maj. Gen. Edward F. Witsell.  He was succeeded by Maj. Gen. William E. Bergin, who served from July 1, 1951, to May 31, 1954.

 

THE ADJUTANT GENERAL (AG) CENTRAL DECIMAL FILE, 1940-62

II.448 The AG central decimal file is an important source of information on the Korean War era.  Before, during, and after the war, the Adjutant General's Office made administrative rulings that affected American soldiers and airmen.  The Adjutant General also represented the Army in dealings with Congress and the public on many military issues.  In the course of addressing these responsibilities, the Adjutant General gathered and compiled statistics, reports, policy documents, general orders, legal briefs and opinions, training and field manuals, and other records that provide a detailed view of factors that shaped Army programs and policies during the Korean War era.

II.449 The AG central decimal file consists of seven unclassified, declassified, and security-classified series.  Each series is divided into chronological segments of varying lengths (usually 1, 2, 3, or 5 years).  Each segment usually consists of one or more sections (typically "decimal files" or "case files," "special project files," and occasionally "bulky package files" and "cross reference sheets").  Documents in each of the decimal files sections are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  special project files, project files, and bulky package files sections are divided into topical categories under which records are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system. In the case of special project files, the topical categories are project names.  Project files topical categories feature subject terms such as "Civil Education," "Geographic" (based on Army administrative jurisdictions), "Aviation Schools," "Flying Fields," "Military Schools," "Military Posts and Reservations," "Cities," "Mountains," "Lakes," "States and Counties," "Foreign" (based on countries), and "Nautical" (based on names of ships).  Subdivision and arrangement of the cross-reference sheets section are described below under the description of the AG central decimal file indexes (see paragraphs II.453-II.454).

 

AG CENTRAL DECIMAL FILE

II.450 Five of the seven AG central decimal file series contain records that relate to the Korean War era.  Three are described below.  Two others, which contain information on POW/MIA issues, are described in paragraphs I.149b and I.149e of RIP 102, Records Relating to American Prisoners of War and Missing-in-Action Personnel from the Korean War and During the Cold War Era.

II.451 The unclassified Army AG central decimal file, 1940-54 [NM-3, Entries 363A-F] (4,183 ft.), includes three segments dated 1949-50, 1951-52, and 1953-54, which are most pertinent to the Korean War era.  The decimals that may contain information of general interest are 095 (names of commercial firms and persons), 200.6 (awards, decorations, and citations), 300.7 (changes and amendments to basic field, training, and technical manuals), 320.3 (tables of organization), 322 (organizations and tactical units), 334 (boards, commissions, councils, and missions), 352.11 (course of instruction), 353 (training), and 400.34 (tables of basic allowances for supplies and equipment).  For information concerning POWs and casualties, see RIP 102, Records Relating to American Prisoners of War and Missing-in-Action Personnel from the Korean War and During the Cold War Era.  The project files that may be of interest are Military Defense Assistance Program (MDAP); Officer's Reserve Corps (ORC); Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC); installations such as arsenals, proving grounds, centers, depots, posts, military schools, bases, cemeteries, and foreign countries.  Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.452 The declassified Army AG top secret central decimal correspondence file, 1946-54 [NM-3, Entries 361A-D] (57 ft.), and the security-classified Army AG classified decimal file, 1948-54 [NM-3, Entry 360B] (94 ft.), include three segments dated 1948-50, 1951-52, and 1953-54, which are the most pertinent to the Korean War.  The same decimals listed in paragraph II.451 may be of general interest.  Even though the security-classified decimal file remains classified, some of the decimal files have been declassified in whole or in part.

II.453 Listed below are the four series of separately maintained cross-reference sheet indexes for all of the series that constitute the AG central decimal file.  Declassified Army AG top secret central decimal file cross-reference sheets for 1953-54 segment documents are with the series.

1. Unclassified microfilmed AGO central files cross indexes, 1940-45 [A1, Entry 5] (46 ft., 1522 reels of 16 mm. microfilm)

2. Unclassified Army AG central decimal files cross-reference sheets, 1946-54 [NM-3, Entries 359A-E] (498 ft.)

3. Declassified Army AG central decimal files cross-reference sheets, 1948-54 [NM-3, Entry 359F] (156 ft.)

Cross-reference index sheets generally provide the following information about specific documents in the decimal files: War Department decimal number for primary and secondary locations (document and document copy); names of sender and recipient; date of document; document subject and synopsis; and date received by the Adjutant General's Office.

II.454 Organization of the cross-reference sheet index series and sections closely parallels that of the AG central decimal file series.  Thus, each cross-reference sheet index series or series section is normally divided into chronological segments and then subdivided into sections (for example, "decimal files" or "project files").  "Decimal files" cross-reference sheets are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  "Project files" cross-reference sheets are broadly divided into various topical categories that correspond with the same AG central decimal file "project file" topical categories of documents to which they refer.  Within these parallel categories, cross-reference sheets are then arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  Cross-reference sheet indexes serve as a useful subject index to records in the AG central decimal file, particularly for researchers who understand that Army "subjects" reflect Army experience, logic, and definitions.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE LEGISLATIVE AND PRECEDENT BRANCH

II.455 The legislative and policy precedent files, 1943-76 [UD, Entry 390D] (52 ft.), contain copies of messages, reports, studies, correspondence, press releases, and other documents that the AGO maintained for the purpose of documenting Army policies and precedents on various administrative and legal issues.  This series, which is arranged sequentially by folder numbers that correspond to various topics, includes Medal of Honor winners (folder 419), combat casualties (folder 102), internment of Korean War unknowns (folder 953), killed in action (folder 1536), proclamation of Korean emergency (folder 1326), atrocities of Korea (folder 189), AWOLs and desertion (folder 4), rotation of troops (folder 446), the Army Organization Act of 1950 (folder 561), and the Army Postal Service (folder 29).

II.456 The most useful finding aid for this series is the subject index to legislative and policy precedent file, 1943-75 [UD, Entry 390B] (8 ft.), which lists records according to alphabetically arranged subject categories (such as Korea, armistice, casualties).  It provides the following information for specific documents: folder number; document number within folder; document topic or subject; document type (letter, report, etc.); date of document; and cross-references to other file locations.  There is also the name index to the policy precedent and biography files, 1943-76 [UD, Entry 390C] (1 ft.).  The biography file, 1943-76 [NM-3, Entry 390E] (7 ft.), is arranged alphabetically.  There is one foot of material concerning General MacArthur.

 

RECORDS OF THE OPERATIONS BRANCH, ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DIVISION

II.457 The stations lists, 1943-53 [NM-3, Entry 377A] (47 ft.), are arranged generally by command designation and thereunder chronologically.  The lists are computer printouts that include the units assigned to a particular command in order of type (e.g., infantry, quartermaster), location (area, town or installation), and APO.  Useful lists for the Korean War era are for the Far East Command (January 1952-December 1953); Japan Logistical Command (September 1950-September 1952); and Eighth Army (August 1949-August 1950), which include coordinates.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.458 Three similarly arranged but separately maintained sub series of Adjutant General Command Reports include historical reports, operations journals, staff studies, and other documents produced by Army commands, staffs, and units.  These records provide information about the activities of Korean War-era combat and support units in the Far East command and Eighth Army.

II.459 Unclassified, though formerly secret, Army-AG command reports, 1949-54 [NM-3, Entry 429A] (2,869 ft.), are arranged by military administrative or geographic area, thereunder by Army unit, then by document type, and finally by date of document.  Folder lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  a searchable electronic version is available in the Modern Military consulting area of the Textual Archives Services Division.

II.460 Unclassified though formerly secret U.S. Army-Far East [command reports, ca. August 1953-December 1954] [NM-3, Entry 429B] (3 ft.) consist of post-Korean War armistice reports and other reports of the U.S. Army Forces, Far East.  Formerly top secret Army-AG command reports, 1949-54 [January 1951-November 1954] [NM-3, Entry 428A] (13 ft.), contain documents generated by General Headquarters, Far East Command/United Nations Command.  Records within these three sub series can be located using the card index to command reports files, 1949-54 [ZZ, Entry 1003] (8 ft.) [5]

II.461 The similarities and inter-relationships of command reports located in RGs 338 and 407 are discussed throughout the RG 338 textual records section (see paragraphs II.358-II.360).

 

Record Group 428
General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1947-

 

II.462 The records of the Navy's Chief of Naval Operations includes a series useful for understanding the early phases of the naval war in Korea.  The interim evaluation reports regarding the Korean War--COMINCH, US Pacific Fleet [UD, Entry 10] (5 ft.) consist of narratives of various commands of the Pacific Fleet and Naval Forces, Far East, containing information as to what happened, when it happened, and the problems and difficulties experienced by those commands.  Topics include intelligence, communications, and close air support.  Each unit's report is arranged chronologically and contains its own conclusions and recommendations.

II.463 Higher level Navy policy is the primary concern of the formerly classified correspondence of Secretary Francis P. Matthews, 1949-50 [UD, Entry 13] (3 ft.), including planning, operations, intelligence, congressional matters, appropriations, personnel, and ships.  Folder lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.464 In addition, there are formerly classified correspondence files of the Chief of Naval Operations/Secretary of the Navy, 1948-51 [UD, Entry 1] (182 ft; for 1950-51, 47 ft.), as well as the Deputy Chiefs of Naval Operations, 1948-51 [UD, Entry 2] (212 ft.).  The offices represented by the latter series include (volumes provided for 1950-51): OP-2, Administration (7 ft.); OP-3, Operations (13 ft.); OP-4, Logistics (23 ft.); OP-5, Air (14 ft.); and OP-20 (16 ft.).  These are arranged first by office, thereunder chronologically by year, thereunder by security classification (confidential and secret), and thereunder according to the Navy Filing Manual.  The records consist of reports, letters, memorandums, publications, charts, tables, maps, and photographs relating to the execution of Naval policy, including the development of new weapons and strategic planning. Box lists are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 550
Records of the United States Army, Pacific

II.465 The Far East Command was terminated in 1957.  Subsequently, many FEC and Army Forces, Far East functions and records transferred to the Pacific Command and USARPAC respectively.  (USARPAC was the Army component of the Pacific Command.)

 

RECORDS OF THE MILITARY HISTORY OFFICE, U.S. ARMY, PACIFIC

II.466 The Military History Office organizational history files, 1946-73 [A1, Entry 1] (149 ft.), consist of monographs, studies, reports, after-action interviews, general orders, unit histories, officer biographies, operations summaries, issuances, and other records pertaining to or produced by various military jurisdictions and units subordinate to the U.S. Army, Pacific command.  Most of these records are arranged generally by type of record and thereunder chronologically.  The unit histories, however, are arranged numerically by unit jurisdiction.  Within this series, there are command reports, after action interviews, general orders, psychological warfare pamphlets, periodic operation reports, and publications that relate to the Korean War.  A box list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.467 The Military History Office also maintained the classified organizational history files, 1950-72 [A1, Entries 2 and 2A] (145 ft.), arranged generally by name of military unit and thereunder usually in alphabetical order by document title.  This series contains security-classified studies, command reports, after-action interviews, general orders, unit histories, officer biographies, operations summaries, and other records pertaining to or produced by various subordinate USARPAC military jurisdictions and units.  Korean War-era records include 21 feet of command reports of the Eighth Army, United States Army Forces, Far East, IX Corps, X Corps, and the Korea Military Advisory Group. A box list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.  Entry 2A is security classified.

 

Record Group 554
Records of the General Headquarters, Far East Command,
the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, and the
United Nations Command, 1945-57

 

II.468 The Far East Command (FEC) was a tripartite command, with staff and personnel sharing overlapping functions for each of the three command components.  Following the North Korean invasion on June 25, 1950, President Harry Truman directed Gen. Douglas MacArthur, Commander in Chief, Far East to send equipment to aid the forces of the Republic of Korea.  On June 27, following a United Nations resolution to repel North Korea's invasion, the United States authorized deployment of American ground forces in Korea.  Shortly thereafter, General MacArthur began to dispatch troops of the Eighth Army.  With the promise of additional forces from other nations, the U.N. Security Council, on July 7, recommended the placement of all U.N. forces under a combined command to be established by the United States.  The next day President Truman appointed General MacArthur as Commander in Chief of United Nations Forces in Korea.  MacArthur formally established the United Nations Command in Tokyo on July 24, 1950.  His new command staff came from the ranks of those who were already operating in a dual capacity with General Headquarters (GHQ), Far East Command and the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (SCAP).

II.469 Other records of the Far East Command and related commands are located in the RG 407 Army-AG command reports, 1949-54 (see paragraph II.459).  When possible, specific file designations for corresponding files in RG 407 are provided.  NARA has achieved less than complete physical and intellectual control over some of the Korean War-era records in RG 554 that were originally assigned to Record Group 338, Records of Army Commands, 1942-.  For that reason, it is occasionally infeasible to provide linear footage measurements for records, files, and series in this section of the paper.

 

RECORDS OF THE FAR EAST COMMAND, 1950-52

Records of the Chief of Staff, Far East Command

II.470 The Chief of Staff was the principal coordinating agent of, and advisor to, the Commander in Chief, Far East Command (CINCFE) and the Commander in Chief, United Nations Command (CINCUNC).  He transmitted decisions of the commander to appropriate staff offices for preparation of the necessary orders.  The Chief of Staff also transmitted orders directly to those who would execute them.  Put succinctly, he performed all specific duties necessary to insure implementation of and compliance with the Commander in Chief's verbal orders, directives, and preferences.

II.471 The Chief of Staff's formerly security-classified subject file, 1945-52 [A1, Entry 2] (3 ft.), includes letters, memorandums, reports, and other records relating to the conduct of military operations in Korea.  Specific documents include a draft emergency war plan for 1952 (with reports of related war-gaming) and a report on the May 12, 1952, seizure of Communist POWs of brig. Gen. Francis T. Dodd, U.N. POW camp commander at Koje Do.  The series is arranged by security classification (secret, top secret) and thereunder by subject.

II.472 Additional records are located in the informally titled "Unclassified and Classified Army Records from St. Louis, 1944-68," that were assigned originally to RG 338 (see paragraph II.416).  The accessions cluster contains a subgroup of security-classified "Far East Command/United Nations Command" records that includes general correspondence, 1949-52 (10 in.), of the Office of the Chief of Staff.  The general correspondence (box 1) consists of the three following groups of documents:

1. Secret correspondence of the Commander in Chief, 1952 (1 in.), contains letter exchanges between the Commander in Chief, FEC and UNC, the Commanding General, Eighth Army, the U.S. Army Chief of Staff, and the Secretary of the Army.

2. Incoming messages, 1950-52 (3 in.), are arranged by correspondent and thereunder chronologically and consists of radio messages to the Commander in Chief, FEC and UNC, from the Commanding General, Eighth Army, the Department of the Army, and from the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

3. Outgoing messages, 1950-52 (3 in.), arranged chronologically, contain copies of outgoing radio messages relating to press members requests for clearances to enter Japan and Korea and recognition of press credentials and to other matters pertaining to the public relations program in the Far East.

 

Records of the Public Information Office, Far East Command

II.473 Public Information Office command report files, 1952 (3 in.), include information relating to FEC public affairs program administration and about the press corps in Korea.  Source documents are included as appendices.  These are located in the informally titled accessions cluster "Unclassified and Classified Army Records from St. Louis, 1944-68" (see paragraph II.416), in the subgroup of security-classified "Far East Command/United Nations Command" records.  A complete set may be found among the Army-AG command reports, 1949-54, in RG 407.

 

Records of the Joint Strategic Plans and Operations Group (JSPOG),
Far East Command

II.474 JSPOG was originally formed as a major component of GHQ FEC in January 1947.  It was composed of Army, Navy, and Air Force divisions, staffed by senior officers of each service, and chaired by the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of GHQ FEC.  JSPOG assisted and advised the Commander in Chief, Far East on matters relating to his exercise of unified command over ground, naval, and air forces assigned tot he FEC, by Joint Chiefs direction.  In July 1950, JSPOG became a concurrent agency of GHQ UNC working with the United Nations Command Planning Group.  Although no unified body of JSPOG records have been identified, its staff section reports are located among those maintained by the FEC Military History Section (see paragraph II.516).  Other JSPOG records are interfiled among series of the FEC Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3 (see paragraphs II.484-II.489).

 

Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1, Far East Command

II.475 G-1 advised CINCFE and CINCUNC on policies relating to personnel and administrative functions.  G-1 records series include general correspondence (general decimal file), 1948-51 [A1, Entry 12] (67 ft.).  Portions of this series are security classified.  G-1 general correspondence for 1951-52 was retired as part of the records of the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (RG 331).  Staff section reports, 1951 [A1, Entry 14] (5 in.) are monthly summaries relating to organization, personnel strengths, replacements, POWs, burials and grave registration, and civil affairs.  Report enclosures (supporting documents) include copies of the G-1 Journal for the reporting period, and U.S. Naval Forces, Far East operations instructions and plans.

 

Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Far East Command

II.476 G-2 was responsible for intelligence collection and dissemination.  Coordination (Executive) Division records consist of general correspondence (decimal files), 1946-52 [A1, Entry 16] (31 ft.), is arranged chronologically by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  The series contains memorandums, radio messages, endorsements, reports, and other records relating generally to intelligence administration and collection (e.g., C350.9).  Other files focus on specific topics such as Communist activities and propaganda (decimal 000.1), war crimes and criminals (decimal 000.5), and staff visits (decimal 680.2).  The records for 1952 are divided according to security classification (restricted, formerly secret).  A large portion of this series remains security classified.

II.477 Theater Intelligence Division general correspondence (decimal files), 1947-51 [A1, Entry 17] (32 ft.), contains copies of Far East Command, G-2, intelligence publications issued between June and December 1951.  These include daily intelligence summaries, intelligence digests, G-2 and Allied Translator and Interpreter Section (ATIS) enemy document bulletings, and ATIS interrogation reports.  Portions of this series are security-classified.

II.478 Division intelligence reports ("ID Documents"), 1946-51 [A1, Entry 18] (12 ft.), are arranged in two chronological periods (1946-49, 1950-51), thereunder alphabetically by country, and thereunder by subject as outlined in the War Department Military Intelligence Division Basic Intelligence Directive of June 1946.  The 1950-51 files contain a section of reports that focus on military forces, politico-socio-economic conditions, and other matters in Korea.

II.479 The Division's Geographic Branch produced detailed military geographical studies covering strategic areas in Asia.  Many of these are included in the branch's security-classified special reports, 1947-51 [A1, Entry 22] (1 ft.), arranged chronologically by date of report publication.  Jointly published by FEC, G-2, and the FEC Engineer Section, the reports relate predominately to Korea but also cover southeastern Siberia, the Kuriles, and Manchuria.  The reports contain information on terrain and climate, airfields, transportation, and communications.  They are based on ATIS interrogation reports, translations of Japanese General Staff studies, Department of the Army publications, and intelligence reports.

II.480 The Geographic Branch also published terrain handbooks, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 23] (5 in.), to provide basic topographical information for the use of officers and NCOs in military operations.  With coverage of Seoul and of North Korea, these publications convey information on surface navigation conditions, topography of coastlines, ports and harbors, vegetation, waterways, air facilities, transportation, signal communications facilities, cities and towns, population, local administration, and public health.  This series is arranged numerically by handbook number.

II.481 FEC G-2 daily intelligence summaries, 1949-50 [A1, Entry 27] (12 ft.), report on China and Manchuria, the Soviet Union, Southeast Asia, the Philippines, and North and South Korea.  Each issue includes a military section covering orders of battle, troop movements, military installations and facilities, and other items of military interest.  A political section discusses political developments, personalities and other matters.  This series was maintained by the Military Intelligence Service (Department of the Army) Intelligence Division.

II.482 Allied Translator and Interpreter Service records include the chronologically arranged Communist POW investigation [interrogation] reports, [Aug.-Dec.] 1950 [A1, Entry 39] (5 in.), prepared at the Pusan Interrogation Center by the 164th Military Intelligence Service Detachment (after September 7, 1950, the 164th Language Detachment).  Each report provides a personal history of the prisoner, an assessment of his reliability, information on personalities (usually the POW's commanding officers), descriptions of the strength, status, and composition of Communist military formations, and information on U.S. POWs.

II.483 The Intelligence Division was formed by merger of the Military Intelligence Service (Department of the Army) Intelligence Division with the Theater Intelligence Division in 1952.  Records of the reconstituted division include the general correspondence (decimal file), 1952 [A1, Entry 41] (2 ft.), which is arranged by former security classification (restricted, confidential, and secret) and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Decimal 370.21 contains reports of operations in Korea.

 

Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, Far East Command

II.484 The Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, was responsible for military operations and training.  G-3 general correspondence (decimal files), 1946-52 [A1, Entry 44] (33 ft.), was maintained by the Administration Division and arranged in accordance with the War Department decimal file system.  The series includes memorandums, letters, endorsements, radio messages, reports, and other records relating to topics such as organization, equipment, and training of units; the preparation and coordination of plans for troop training and deployment; and training sites.  There are also radio messages, intelligence summaries, and other records that pertain to additional topics, such as China, India, Japan, Korea, and the Soviet Union (decimal 091); the CINCFE command report for November 1950-April 1951; and the G-3 command reports for 1950-51.  Portions of this series are security classified.

II.485 Security-classified general records, 1951 [A1, Entry 46] (5 in.), include records relating to Korean War armistice negotiations.  Security-classified memorandums and endorsements (action file), July-Aug 1950 [A1, Entry 47] (5 in.), consist of records relating to administration, air targets, ammunition supply, press passes, assignment of units, and evaluation of intelligence reports.  Staff studies and intelligence estimates, 1948-51 [A1, Entry 48] (5 ft.), arranged generally in order of receipt, include operations planning files relating to the Inchon landing, troop basis reports, and a JSPOG staff study on armistice negotiations in Korea.  Daily journals, 1950-52 [A1, Entry 49] (43 ft.), contain logs of incoming and outgoing correspondence (including memorandums and messages), daily operations reports, and operations reports of tactical units.  Other series records pertain to military operations, administration, and deployment of forces.

II.486 The Planning Division made policy recommendations concerning the development and composition of current and projected FEC and UNC military forces, strategy, U.S. military policies in the Far East, and command relationships.  Division memorandums (action file), 1949-50 [A1, Entry 50] (10 in.), are arranged chronologically by month and consist of memorandums, messages, and working papers relating to defensive measures in Japan and the Ryukyu Islands, staff visits, strategic and operational requirements, and deployment of U.S. and U.N. forces in Korea.  Security-classified endorsements and memorandums (check notes and memos), 1950-51 [A1, Entry 52] (5 in.), are arranged chronologically and include memorandums, staff papers, and other records relating to operations instructions, post-armistice troop and supply levels, and comments on a draft armistice agreement.

II.487 The Troop Control Division set policies and implemented Department of the Army directives governing authorized staffing, equipment, and supply levels for all FEC units.  The Division also maintained "troop basis" records documenting decisions to implement or change authorized staffing, equipment, and supply levels for FEC units.  Security-classified division memorandums (action file), 1950 [A1, Entry 53] (1 ft.), are arranged generally chronologically and consists of memorandums, endorsements, radio messages, and other records relating to TO&Es (see endnote 2), supply and equipment distribution schedules and authorizations ("tables of distribution"), military and civilian personnel ceilings, unit postings (deployments and assignments), and unit reorganizations and redesignations.  Security-classified [letters], endorsements and messages, 1951 [A1, Entry 54] (2 ft.), are arranged by security classification (unclassified and secret) and deal with many of the same topics, plus unit logistical requirements.  The chronologically arranged outgoing radio messages, 1951 [A1, Entry 55] (5 in.), contain information about unit composition, movements, and assignments.  Security-classified endorsements and memorandums (check notes and memos), 1950-51 [A1, Entry 56] (1 ft.), are arranged by security classification and consists of additional records relating to equipment authorizations, troop deployments, unit requirements, and TO&Es.

II.488 The Training Division was responsible for training policies and programs throughout the Far East Command.  The chronologically arranged series of division memorandums (action file), 1950 [A1, Entry 57] (10 in.), includes reports of liaison officers to the Eighth U.S. Army in Korea (EUSAK).  Portions of this series are security classified.  Security-classified endorsements and memorandums (check notes and memos), 1950-51 [A1, Entry 59 (1 ft.), also arranged chronologically, include reports of staff visits to Korea.  Security-classified outgoing radio messages, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 60] (5 in.), include chronologically arranged messages relating to the physical conditioning of replacements.

II.489 The Operations Division supervised and coordinated operations of U.S. and U.N. ground, naval, and air forces throughout the Far East.  Security-classified division memorandums (action file), 1950 [A1, Entry 61] (1 ft.), include chronologically arranged records relating to movement of naval vessels, combat effectiveness of units, search and rescue, operations orders, and military operations in Korea.  Security-classified outgoing radio messages, 1951 [A1, Entry 62] (4 in.), consist of chronologically arranged radio messages and related records pertaining to close air support, interdiction of North Korean communication lines, search and rescue procedures, tank searchlights, and operations plans.  Endorsements and memorandums (check notes and memos), 1950-51 [A1, Entry 64] (10 in.), are arranged chronologically and include memorandums, radio messages, operations instructions, and other records relating to military operations in Korea, air targets, and emergency planning for General Headquarters.

 

Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4, Far East Command

II.490 This general staff section was responsible for devising and executing logistics policies.  Administration Division general correspondence (general decimal files), 1949-52 [A1, Entry 65] (110 ft.), includes records relating to topics such as supply procurement, storage, transportation, and distribution; equipment maintenance; facilities construction, operation, and maintenance; and administration.  The series is arranged chronologically (1949-50, 1951, 1952), thereunder generally according to security classification (unclassified and restricted followed by secret), and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Decimal 400.00 includes records relating to non-military and civilian aid to Korea.

II.491 Letters, memorandums, and endorsements relating to Korea, 1950-52 [A1, Entry 67] (2 ft.) consist of formerly top secret records pertaining to technical advisers, procurement of equipment, supply requirements, the deployment of technical service units, and logistics planning.  The series is arranged sequentially by TS document number.

II.492 Security-classified radio messages, 1947-52 [A1, Entry 69] (2 ft.), contain records relating to base development, military assistance, ammunition levels, deployment of forces, and requisitions.  The series is arranged alphabetically by source ("CX," Department of the Army, Korea, Miscellaneous, and Washington) and thereunder numbered chronologically.

II.493 Security-classified general records, 1947-52 [A1, Entry 70] (5 in.), include documentation relating to logistical support of operations in Korea.

II.494 The Plans and Policy Division's operations planning files, 1950-52 [A1, Entry 73] (5 ft.), contain data on supply requirements of the Eighth Army in Korea, logistics annexes to operations orders, troop lists, and logistics requirements for the Korean Communications Zone (KCOMZ).  Small portions of this series remain security classified.

 

Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-5, Far East command

II.495 Established in February 1952, the G-5 Section's civil affairs functions included responsibility for the United Nations Command program of civil relief and economic aid.  The UNC program focused on preventing disease, hunger, and unrest among the Korean population; supporting the Republic of Korea armed forces, and providing essential economic aid to ensure the Republic of Korea's continued contribution to the main mission of the United Nations command.  In addition, G-5 collected and evaluated information pertaining to the Republic of Korea government's political, financial, economic, and industrial programs.  It also coordinated programs and activities with the United Nations Commission for the Unification and Rehabilitation of Korea (UNCRK), the United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency (UNKRA), and the United States Ambassador to Korea.

II.496 G-5 records are located in the informally titled "Unclassified and Classified Army Records from St. Louis, 1944-68," which were assigned originally to RG 338 (see paragraph II.416).  The accessions cluster contains a subgroup of security-classified "Far East Command" records that includes G-5 general correspondence, 1951-53 (9 ft.), and other records relating to United Nations Command civilian relief, assistance, and economic aid programs in Korea.  The general correspondence appears to consist of several files created or maintained by G-5 and component divisions, including the Analysis and Reports Division and the Supply Programs Division.  Among these files are monthly reports on UNC civil affairs activities in Korea, 1952 (3 in.) (box 34), photographs on Korean aid, 1951-52 (1 ft.) (boxes 30-31), and Korean economic briefs reference files for January-May 1952 (8 in.) (box 27).  Command report files, 1952 (1 ft.), are contained in a subgroup cluster of security-classified "Far East Command/United Nations Command" records.

 

Records of the Adjutant General Section, Far East Command

II.497 Adjutant General general correspondence (general decimal files), 1947-52 [A1, Entry 79] (420 ft.), maintained by the Operations Division, is arranged by security classification (unclassified, confidential, and secret), thereunder by year, and then according to the War Department decimal file system.  The series includes the following types of records: GHQ communiqués regarding operations in Korea (unclassified 1950, 1951, and 1952 decimal 000.7), general orders and supporting papers pertaining to awards (unclassified 1951 and 1952 decimal 200.6); and intelligence summaries and situation reports (secret 1950, 1951, and 1952 decimal 350.09, and secret 1951-1952 decimal 384).  Operations records (plans, orders, and instructions), along with Eighth army operations reports for 1951 and 1952 are filed in secret decimal 370.2.  Radio messages relating to casualties in Korea are filed as unclassified 1950, 1951, and 1952 decimal 704.  There are also teletype conferences (telecons) transcripts filed under 1951 and 1952 unclassified decimal 311.23.  Small portions of this series remain security classified.  Some records formerly security-classified as top secret were retired as records of SCAP and are available in RG 331.

II.498 There are three registers for the AG general correspondence.  Incoming correspondence logs, 1952 [A1, Entry 77] (5 in.), and outgoing [security] (classified) correspondence logs, 1952 [A1, Entry 78] (5 in.), consist of log entries that identify individual documents by date, originator, designation, subject, and the decimal under which it is filed.  The security-classified radio message logs, 1949-52 [A1, Entry 82] (6 ft.), form a separate register of radio messages that were received by GHQ, FEC, UNC, and SCAP, and then filed in the FEC Adjutant General general correspondence.  The logs are arranged in three chronological periods, 1949-50, 1951, and 1952, and thereunder alphabetically by source.  Log entries include filing notations for each message.

II.499 The Adjutant General Operations Division issued all Far East Command orders, circulars, memorandums, and bulletins originating from General Headquarters (later Headquarters).  The division published and maintained these records, described below, as distinct series (e.g., "general orders," "circulars," "daily bulletins").  Each series was arranged and numbered sequentially, beginning with the number "1" at commencement of each new calendar year.  There is one exception that affected all series.  In 1952 series items issued after April 27th recommenced with the number "1" to reflect the redesignation of General Headquarters, Far East command, to Headquarters, Far East Command.

II.500 Far East Command general orders, 1947-52 [A1, Entry 85] (10 in.), applied to all or large parts of the command.  They were issued for several purposes--to announce changes and assumptions of command; to announce appointments of the Chief of Staff, the Deputy Chief of Staff, Assistant Chiefs of the General Staff, and heads of Special Staff sections, to activate, designate, redesignate, inactivate, or disband a unit under the direct control of the Commander in Chief, Far East or the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers; to announce awards and decorations; and to announce the naming of a camp or cantonment.  General orders issued by GHQ bore the imprimatur of either the Far East Command or SCAP.  General orders concerning the Korean War were issued by FEC.  SCAP general orders are maintained as part of the SCAP records.  Further information on SCAP general orders and special orders can be obtained from Textual Archives Services Division (Modern Military) reference staff (see Part I: Introduction).  General Orders for the post-1952 Far East Command are located among the records of the Military History Office, Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, U.S. Army Pacific in Record Group 550 (see paragraph II.466).

II.501 Security-classified special orders, 1947-52 [A1, Entry 85A] (6 ft.), were directives pertaining to individuals.  They were used to promulgate assignments, reassignments, details, transfers, and other changes in the status of military personnel.  SCAP special orders are maintained as part of the SCAP records. Further information on SCAP general orders and special orders can be obtained from Textual Archives Services Division (Modern Military) reference staff (see Part I: Introduction).

II.502 Far East Command letter orders, 1947-52 [A1, Entry 86] (25 ft.), were directives and authorizations pertaining to individuals.  They were issued to promulgate leaves of absence, temporary duty, detached service, and authorizations for travel.  Letter orders issued under Far East Command authority also applied to personnel of SCAP and the United Nations Command.

II.503 Security-classified GHQ, FEC, and SCAP daily bulletins, 1947-52 [A1, Entry 86A] (2 ft.), were published concurrently for GHQ, FEC, and SCAP.  The bulletins, which appeared every day except Sundays and holidays, provided information and guidance to GHQ military and civilian personnel.  They were divided into "official" and "information" sections.  The official section had the force of an order; it included directives of a temporary nature, such as announcements of conferences, holidays, and official activities.  The more general information section contained information from official publications, and news entries detailing the arrival and departure of officers, the arrival of dependents, visits of important guests of the command, social events, movie schedules, and athletic programs.

II.504 Far East Command circulars, 1947-52 [A1, Entry 87] (1 ft.), promulgated permanent and semi-permanent instructions that applied to FEC, SCAP, and UNC.  Circulars dealt with one or more subjects.  The series includes a 1948 SCAP and FEC index to circulars and staff memorandums (see paragraph II.374).

II.505 Security-classified Far East Command and SCAP staff memorandums, 1947-52 [A1, Entry 87A] (9 in.), announced the commander's instructions to his staff.  Directive in nature, each memorandum dealt with one subject.  Although a single series of staff memorandums were published for both SCAP and FEC, each memorandum contained a notation after the staff memorandum number to indicate whether it pertained to one or both divisions of GHQ.

II.506 Security-classified A.P.O. [Army Post Office] station lists, 1951-53 [A1, Entry 88] (1 ft.), consist of various Far East Command station lists arranged chronologically by date of publication.  The lists correlate APO code numbers to units, bases, and mailing areas in Korea.

II.507 Replacement Division general correspondence (general decimal files), 1951-52 [A1, Entry 89] (10 in.), is arranged in accordance with the War Department decimal file system and includes records on topics such as: staff visits (file 008.4); rotation of personnel (200.3); classification and reclassification of enlisted personnel (210.01) and officers (220.01); assignments, change of station, and transfers of enlisted personnel (210.3) and officers (220.3); and training (353).  Division activities reports, 1952 [A1, Entry 91] (1 in.), are arranged by subject and include reports of the Japan Replacement Center at Camp Drake and a report on the replacement system for military operations in Korea.

 

Records of the Chemical Section, Far East Command

II.508 General correspondence (general decimal files), 1949-51 [A1, Entry 100] (2 ft.), consists of Chemical Section monthly activities reports of Eighth Army, corps, and division headquarters in Korea (file 314.7).  The series also contains records relating to chemical corps units (file 322) and to chemical ordnance (file 400).

II.509 Technical intelligence reports, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 101] (1 in.), consist of reports and related memorandums concerning captured chemical warfare equipment, protective gear, chemicals, and substances.  Series records are arranged numerically by project number.

 

Records of the Civil Information and Education (CI&E) Section,
Far East Command

II.510 This special staff section was established under the United Nations Command in April 1951.  It was responsible for information and education programs directed at civilian internees and POWs held by U.N. forces in Korea.  CI&E section programs and activities are partially documented in the section's general correspondence ("decimal file"), 1951 [A1, Entry 104] (10 in.), and general records, 1951-52 [A1, Entry 103] (2 ft.).  Chronologically arranged broadcast reports, 1951 [A1, Entry 108] (10 in.), document the subject matter and emphasis of CI&E Radio Branch broadcasts to internees and POWs held in United Nations Command compounds.  Report enclosures include copies of materials received from the U.S. Information Service and copies of weekly Chinese and Korean language newspapers published by the UNC for distribution in the POW and internee compounds.

II.511 Instructional publications, 1951-52 [A1, Entry 109] (1 ft.), are English-language teaching guides and pamphlets (in Chinese and Korean) that were used as political re-education materials in POW and civilian internee camps.  They are arranged according to type of publication (Chinese Regular Series, Chinese Emergency Series, and Korean Regular Series).  Thereunder, each series is arranged numerically by an instructional unit number.  Weekly reports of the Field Operations Division, 1951 [A1, Entry 105] (5 in.), consist of summaries and activities reports of the division responsible for many of the United Nations Command POW and internee instructional programs.

 

Records of the Medical Section, Far East Command

II. 512 General records, 1950-52 [A1, Entry 130] (10 in.), are arranged by subject and include copies of Joint Chiefs of Staff directives relating to medical evacuation from Japan, to the evacuation of casualties from Korea, and to policies regarding joint hospitalization and evacuation.  Other series records pertain to hospitalization planning.  There are also radio messages with lists of UNC servicemen classified as POWs, operations planning files relating to recovery of American POWs, and reports of staff visits.

II.513 Security-classified annual reports, 1951 [A1, Entry 135] (3 ft.), include Eighth Army reports concerning civil relief in Korea.

II.514 Public Health and Welfare Division records include general correspondence (general decimal files), 1945-53 [A1, Entries 136[ (2 ft.), arranged in accordance with the War Department decimal file system, consisting of records relating to public health activities and programs in the Far East.  Records focus on topics such as UNICEF activities in Korea, with estimates of international contributions to Civilian Relief in Korea (CRIK) (file 400) and narcotics traffic in Japan and Korea (444.1).  File 461 contains various publications pertaining to public health and welfare in Korea.  Most of this series remains security classified.

II.515 The Division subject file, 1945-53 [A1, Entry 137] (7 ft.), contain records documenting United Nations Command civil affairs program involvement in medical relief for Korean refugees, and in various Korean health, sanitation, and narcotics issues.  There is also a copy of the 1951 Far East Command report assessing rumors of bubonic plague in North Korea.  These records are located under "Korea" as subject term.

 

Records of the Military History Section, Far East Command

II.516 Command and staff section reports, 1947-52 [A1, Entry 141] (144 ft.), are arranged by security classification and thereunder chronologically by year.  They were generally submitted monthly.  Some staff sections, particularly those in the general staff, produced combined reports for GHQ, FEC, SCAP, and the United Nations Command.  The series also includes command reports for the Far East Air Force, Naval Forces Far East, and the Joint Strategic Plans and Operations Group.  Most staff section reports contain annexes (supporting papers) that incorporate significant records such as journals, memorandums, radio messages, publications, and routine orders.  The G-2 section reports for 1950 and 1951 contain Allied Translator and Information Service interrogation reports.  A series finding aid is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the Provost Marshal Section, Far East Command

II.517 Records relating to Korea, 1951 [A1, Entry 152] (10 in.), are arranged by type of record and contain information on topics such as tables of allowances; confinement of United Nations military personnel; staff visits to Korea; unit administration, desegregation, and inactivation; POWs; and civil assistance to Korea.  The series includes an Eighth Army Provost Marshal operational log for the period August 25-September 13, 1950.  Security-classified records relating to anti-communist measures, prisoners of war, and troop planning, 1950-51 [A1, Entry 153] (5 in.), are arranged by subject and include minutes of the Committee on Countermeasures Against Communism in the Far East, June 15-November 29, 1951, and reports and memorandums relating to Communist POWs.

 

Records of the Psychological Warfare Section (PSYWAR),
Far East Command

II.518 Established within the Far East Command in June 1951, the PSYWAR Section coordinated psychological and special operations of all major commands in the Far East.  General correspondence ("decimal file"), 1951-52 [A1, Entries 158] (9 ft.), is arranged chronologically by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system.  Decimal 000.77 (1952) contains radio briefs broadcast transcripts compiled by the PSYWAR Radio Branch.  These broadcasts were transmitted over short and medium wave bands widths in Japan and Korea.  Decimal 091.42 (1942) includes memorandums and reports pertaining to United Nations Command and Communist psychological warfare activities, with lists of enemy publications and psychological warfare operations.  Decimal 319.1 (1951 and 1952) contains runs of various PSYWAR Section reports, including radio operations reports, weekly plans reports, weekly planning conference reports, activities reports, command reports, daily collation summaries, and the section's daily journal (August-October 1951).  Some of the reports include samples of United Nations Command propaganda leaflets with English translations.  Decimal 350.09 (1952) includes copies of several PSYWAR Intelligence Division studies and analyses focused on Korean War issues (e.g., "Psychological Vulnerabilities in China," "Profile of the Enemy Soldier," "A Chronology of Communist Bacteriological and Chemical Warfare Charges").  Decimal 391 (1952) contains PSYWAR plans, reports, guidance documents, and policy directives.  Leaflet drop mission requests, schedules, and reports are located in numerous files, including decimal file 415 (1951).  The drop mission records consist of leaflet lists, brief descriptions of intended targets (e.g., front line, rear area, or North Korean civilians) and drop schedules.  In some cases, the records identify targeted Communist tactical units.  All 1951 files remain security classified.

II.519 The chronologically arranged daily collation summaries and reports, 1951-52 [A1, Entry 159] (1 ft.), include tabular summaries of operations, Communist propaganda, intelligence reports, and captured documents.  Portions of this series are security classified.

II.520 Additional records are located in the informally titled "Unclassified and Classified Army Records from St. Louis, 1944-68," which were assigned originally to RG 338 (see paragraph II.416).  The accessions cluster contains a subgroup of security-classified "Far East Command" records.  Unit history files, 1950-51 and 1952 (8 in.) (boxes 4 and 16), includes PSYWAR section weekly reports of psychological warfare operations to the Department of the Army for 1951 (1 in.) (box 4) and the so-called PSYWAR Section journals for 1951-52 (3 in.) (boxes 4 and 16).  The weekly reports contain brief narrative and tabular summaries of psychological warfare operations (including radio broadcasts, leaflet drops, and loudspeaker messages for the year 1951).  Similar information is in the journals.  A loose assemblage of additional PSYWAR Section records in boxes 4 and 16 is referred to as the operations planning files, 1950-51 and 1952 (3 in.) (boxes 4 and 16).  In addition to random copies of leaflet drop mission records described in paragraph II.518, this series includes testing results from a democratic beliefs test to determine the effectiveness of psychological warfare efforts on U.N.-held POWs.

 

Records of the Signal Section, Far East Command

II.521 The Signal Section records are located in the informally titled "Unclassified and Classified Army Records from St. Louis, 1944-68," which were assigned originally to RG 338 (see paragraph II.416).  The accessions cluster contains a subgroup of security-classified "Far East Command" records that includes Signal Section general correspondence, 1952 (5 ft.) (boxes 12-14), and three sections of unit history files, 1950, 1951 and 1952 (3 ft.) (boxes 1-4 and 14-16), created or maintained by the Signal Section and subordinate divisions.  The unit history files include the following records:

1. records pertaining to the establishment of signal networks in Korea and between Korea and GHQ in Tokyo in the chronologically arranged historical reports of the GQ Long Lines Signal Group--Korea for 1950 in boxes 1 and 2

2. comments to OCAFF [Office of the Chief of Army Field Forces] questionnaire dated March 26, 1951, in box 3 consisting of brief reports on the maintenance, condition, employment, and usefulness of various aspects of signal activities in Korea, including radar, radio microwave, power units, sound ranging, meteorological equipment, pigeons, photography, communications intelligence and communications security, air-to-ground communications, and amateur radio

3. documentation of Signal Section and component division efforts to provide signal support in Korea in after action reports for July 6-November 26, 1950 (4 in.) (boxes 1 and 2), continued by daily journals for November 27, 1950-February 28, 1951 (4 in.) (boxes 2 and 3), and then by daily summaries of major activities for March 1, 1951-November 30, 1952 (1 ft.) (boxes 3, 14, and 15)

4. A more general account of Signal Section activities, located in the history of the Signal Section for January-October 1950 (1 in.) (box 2), and the staff section reports for 1951-52 (8 in.) (boxes 2, 15, and 16)

5. Information on signal networks and services in Korea in Plans and Operations Division reports of staff visits for September 1951-June 1952 (1 in.) (box 15)

 

RECORDS OF THE FAR EAST COMMAND (FEC), 1953-54

II.522 For the most part this portion of the Far East Command's records date from the later period of the Korean War and into the postwar era, principally 1953-1954.  The records were originally processed as part of Record Group 349, Records of Joint Commands, and include several series of general records of Headquarters, FEC, records of headquarters staff sections, and records of the Combined Command for Reconnaissance Activities, Korea.  They clearly indicate that the Korean War was but part of the theater-wide interests of the FEC, which also had responsibilities such as providing military assistance to the Republic of China on Taiwan, supporting French military activities in Indochina, administering the civil government in the Ryukyus, and preparing to terminate the military occupation in Japan.

 

Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Joint Staff, Far East Command

II.523 The Secretary of the Joint Staff security-classified administrative file, 1953-54 [NM-4, Entry 58] (4 ft.), is arranged by year and thereunder by type of file or originator (e.g., CINC, correspondence, incoming/outgoing messages).  This series principally consists of communications between the two Far East Command commanders in chief during the period, Gen. Mark Clark and Gen. John E. Hull, with senior military and political officials of the United States, Republic of Korea, and other allied governments, relating to the termination of hostilities and the implementation of the armistice.  There are some exchanges with North Korean officials as well.

II.524 The Secretary of the Joint Staff records also include minutes of [ROK-US] meetings, July 1954 [NM-4, Entry 59] (5 in.).  The series contains a brief of the meetings held July 27-28, 1954, in Washington, DC, to discuss the planned visit of South Korean President Syngman Rhee to the United States, postwar defense relations between the two countries, and U.S. security support to the Republic of Korea.  The meetings involved senior U.S. Defense Department officials, the Korean Ambassador, and Republic of Korea Ministry of Defense representatives.

 

Records of the Office of the Adjutant General, Far East Command

II.525 The general decimal file [central decimal correspondence], 1953-54 [NM-4, Entry 61] (90 ft.), arranged by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system, includes files on a range of FEC organizational, administrative, and planning activities, from the administration of military exchanges (decimal 331.3), to military medical support for American civilians residing in the command (decimal 700), to arming of Japanese civilian security guards at U.S. installations (decimal 474).  Much of this series, however, directly relates to the war in Korea, with important files on such topics as the strafing in March 1953 of a North Korean convoy carrying armistice negotiation delegates by U.N. aircraft (decimal 333.5) (box 56), the wartime role of the non-commissioned officer in unit organization, administration, and discipline (decimal 334) (box 57); the Far East Air Force's "Intelligence Roundup and Operational Summary" (decimal  350.09) (box 62); procedures for the intelligence processing and debriefing of recovered Navy and Marine Corps prisoners-of-war (decimal 350.09) (box 63); weekly situation reports from the principal FEC areas or organizations, e.g., COMZ [Korea' Formosa, Seoul (decimal 350.09) (box 157); and troop utilization and redeployment (decimal 370).  Most of this series remains security classified.

II.526 The general administrative file [top secret central decimal correspondence], 1953-54 [NM-4, Entry 60] (8 ft.), also arranged by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system, includes important FEC policy, planning, and strategy files relating to the Korean War.  Of particular note are those concerning the preparation of the Republic of Korea military and economy for the post-hostilities period (decimal 091) and reports on operational exercises, several of which involved the potential delivery of atomic weapons on targets in North Korea, China, and the Soviet Union (decimal 354.2).

II.527  The mostly security-classified command reports file, 1953-54 [NM-4, Entry 62] (14 ft.), is arranged monthly and thereunder by Far East Command Headquarters staff section (e.g., J-1, J-2) and FEC major sub-commands (e.g., Far East Air Forces [FEAF], Commander of Naval Forces, Far East [COMNAVFE]).  The series provides basic information on organization and operations throughout the command during the period covered.  Monthly reports for each staff section or command normally include narrative summary reports and multiple appendixes such as staff journals, messages, issuances, maps, charts, and statistical tables.  For the first 7 months of 1953, these reports largely relate to operational matters and Armistice negotiations; for the remainder of the period they cover armistice implementation.  The reports provide a good sense of FEC activities in Japan, Formosa, Indochina, and the Philippines, as well as Korea.

II.528 Within the series history of Korean armistice negotiations, 1951-53 [NM-4, Entry 63] (1 ft.), are summaries of negotiating sessions, messages, draft position papers, and maps.  The emergency planning file, 1953-54 [NM-4, Entry 66] (2 ft.), is actually material removed from decimal file 370.2 of the Far East Command central decimal correspondence (see paragraph II.525).  The series thus created consists of correspondence, orders, and other planning documents relating to FEC operational plans, mostly postdating the July 1953 armistice.  Of particular note in the plans is the assumption: "The UNC will upon resumption of hostilities in Korea undertake a coordinated ground, naval, and air offensive employing large numbers of atomic weapons in coordination with units of CINCPAC and COMSAC..." (2 November 1953, Annex A, OpPlan 8-53).

 

Records of Headquarters Staff Sections, Far East Command

II.529 There are series of monthly command reports for the commanding general and selected general staff sections of Headquarters FEC relating to the following functions:

1. J-1 Division (Personnel)[NM-4, Entry 69], 1953-54 (3 ft.)

2. J-4 Division (Supply)[NM-4, Entry 76], 1954 (6 in.)

3. J-5 Division (Civil Affairs)[NM-4, Entry 77], 1953-54 (1 ft.)

4. Public Information Officer (PIO)[NM-4, Entry 68], 1952-54 (2 ft.)

The commanding general monthly reports are filed with the J-1 records.  The J-1 reports themselves deal substantially with activities involving armistice negotiations and--after July 27, 1953--armistice implementation.  Information about personnel policy, POW exchanges, unit redeployment, and individual personnel rotation can be found in these reports.  The J-4 monthly command reports mostly concern U.S. logistics support for Republic of Korea, Republic of China, and Japanese defense forces.  The civil affairs command reports, which include narrative summaries, staff journals, "key" documents and messages, and civil affairs personnel rosters, relate to such subjects as the political situation in South Korea, relief and war damage rebuilding in Korea, aid policy, and the occupation in the Ryukyus.  The Public Information Officer command reports contain a narrative relating to significant PIO and press issues during the reporting period, but also include the PIO daily staff journal and FEC press releases.

II.530 The J-2 Division (Intelligence) decimal [correspondence] file, 1953-54 [NM-4, Entry 71] (4 ft.), arranged according to the War Department decimal file system (decimals 000.5 through 680.2), relates to intelligence requirements, support, and activities throughout the theater, not just Korea.  The series contains large files of various types of intelligence reports (decimal 319.1), minutes and reports of conferences (decimal 337), and material on the collection and dissemination of military information (decimal 350.05).  These files contain a variety of documentation and information concerning political-military activities, potential threats, and intelligence assessments.  Specific files cover interesting topics such as aerial photography requirements and organization in Korea (decimal 062), strategic vulnerability surveys (decimal 350.09), and armistice violations (decimal 387.4).  Decimal 350.5 contains an April 1954 study on "Communist Courses of Action in Korea and Indochina As Result of US Intervention in Indochina."  Decimal 680.2 contains an SOP (standard operating procedure) for atomic target intelligence reporting.

II.531 The J-2 records also include an administrative files, 1953 [NM-4, Entry 71A] (1 ft.), arranged by subject, which consist of studies, plans, and collections of documents on such topics as partisan operations, enemy deserters, analyses of Chinese Nationalist raids on the China mainland, Korean political attitudes, and the potential effect of a U.N. Command withdrawal from Korea.  The J-2 organizational plans, 1953-54 [NM-4, Entry 72] (6 in.), contain copies of the intelligence annexes to Far East Command operational plans.

II.532 The J-3 Division (Operations) decimal [correspondence] file, 1954 [NM-4, Entry 73] (3 ft.), arranged according to the War Department decimal file system (decimals 000 through 686), consists of correspondence, messages, and reports relating to plans for projected or potential Far East Command operations and other activities following the Korean War armistice.  There are specific files on the redeployment of U.N. contingents (decimal 000-UN), the defense of Korea in the wake of the armistice (decimal 091.7-Korea), the program for strengthening the ROK Army (decimal 091.711-Korean Army), the U.S. command structure in the Far East (decimal 323.361), exercises and war games in support of Far East Command operational plans (decimal 354.2), US.-ROK relations and aid (decimal 387.4), and studies on the potential use of atomic weapons in war plans (decimal 371.6-Atomic Weapons).

II.533 The J-3 security-classified general file [correspondence relating to strategic plans and operations of the armed forces in Korea], 1946-53 [NM-4, Entry 74] (4 ft.) is arranged by control number (401-655, with gaps).  The series contains Far East Command operational plans, strategic studies, and other formerly top secret reports, prepared or maintained b y the Joint Strategic Plans and Operations Group (JSPOG) at Headquarters, FEC.  The plans, studies, and reports relate to specific contingencies planned for, prior to the Korean War's outbreak in June 1950, to operations actually conducted during the war, and to a variety of post-armistice contingencies.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.534 The J-3 [records relating to operations and] emergency plans, 1953-54 [NM-4, Entry 75] (5 in.), consist of two items--a report on Operation Racetrack (August 1954), which was a planned air offensive against targets in North Korea, China, and Manchuria; and correspondence, outline plans, and critiques of several Far East Command operational plans.  The records in this series remain security classified.

 

Records of the Combined Command for Reconnaissance Activities,
Korea (8242nd Army Unit) (CCRAK)

II.535 There are two series of 8242d Army Unit organizational records, both of the S-1 Section (Personnel).  The general administrative file, 1952-53 [NM-4, Entry 95A] (5 in.), is a fragment, but includes administrative instructions on such subjects as organizational relations, preparation and distribution of reports, and procedures for boat and aircraft insertions.  The publications file, 1952-53 [NM-4, Entry 95B] (5 in.), consists of memorandums, special orders, and general orders, relating to administrative procedures and personnel actions.  The bulk of the series is special orders concerning temporary duty assignments for CCRAK personnel; most relate to Korean personnel, both military and civilian, assigned to the unit.

II.536 The records of the S-2 Section (Intelligence) consist of intelligence report files, 1952-53 [NM-4, Entry 95C] (17 ft.), arranged in nine numerical/chronological sub series.  The reports, all based on CCRAK infiltration, observation, and reconnaissance efforts, document enemy troop movements, and unit locations and the state of readiness and morale of enemy organizations.  A list of the nine sub series, the chronological span of each, and their basic content is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.537 There are S-3 Section (Plans and Operations) monthly combat report file [command reports], 1952-53 [NM-4, Entry 95D] (1 ft.), which include a narrative of operations and activities, daily unit journal, rosters of personnel, and copies of important operational and administrative documents.  The reports relate to intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance, and personnel recovery operations conducted by CCRAK and its South Korean associates.

 

OTHER RECORDS RELATING TO THE FAR EAST COMMAND

II.538 Additional records are located in the informally titled "Organizational History Files, 1920-68" (see paragraph II.416).  The accessions cluster includes a 26-cu. ft. subgroup of "Records of Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces, Far East, 1948-54," that was originally assigned to RG 338.  This subgroup includes approximately 4 feet of Far East Command general administrative files and newspaper files from the Korean War-era.  Subgroup finding aids consist of series title lists, descriptions, and box contents lists.  The box lists identify contents at the file level. These finding aids are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.539 The informally titled "Unclassified and Classified Army Records from St. Louis, 1944-68" accessions cluster (see paragraph II.416) includes three subgroups that contain Far East Command records from the Korean War era that were originally assigned to RG 338.  The "Army Materiel Command and Far East Command" subgroup contains unclassified Far East Command general correspondence, 1952 (2 in.), standard operating procedures, 1952 (1 in.), and unit history files, 1946-53 (2 in.) (box 1).  Security-classified "Far East Command" subgroup records (1945-52) comprise approximately 34 feet of general correspondence, unit history files, organization planning files, operations planning files, budget files, and command report files generated by various FEC general and special staff offices.  Security-classified "Far East Command, United Nations Command" records (3 ft.) contain similar files.  More specific descriptions for some of the series found in this accession are incorporated in the preceding FEC Chief of Staff, G-5, Adjutant General, Psychological Warfare Section, and Signal Section records descriptions.  A box and series list for all records in the "Unclassified and Classified Army Records from St. Louis, 1944-68" accession is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF HEADQUARTERS, UNITED NATIONS COMMAND

II.540 The United Nations Command (UNC) with General Headquarters in Tokyo was established on July 24, 1950.  In response to a resolution of the United Nations Security Council, the President of the United States designated General Douglas MacArthur as Commander in Chief of the military forces assisting the Republic of South Korea to repel armed attack by North Korea.  Although U.N. forces were mainly American in composition, 21 other members of the United Nations furnished naval, ground combat, service, or medical units.  From the beginning of the war to the signing of the armistice agreement (July 27, 1953) the following three American generals served as Commander in Chief of the United Nations Command (CINCUNC): Douglas MacArthur, Matthew B. Ridgway, and Mark W. Clark.

II.541 Before January 1953 the United Nations Command was organized along the lines of a typical major United States field headquarters, composed of the usual general and special staff sections.  The command also included a Headquarters, UNC (Advance), which was established in July 1951 to assist with negotiations for an armistice with the Communist forces of North Korea and China.  On January 1, 1953, the United Nations Command was reorganized on the pattern of a U.S. joint command.  At the same time, Headquarters, Far East Command (FECOM), which had been organized as a U.S. Army command, was reconstituted a U.S. joint command, with CINCUNC also acting as Commander in Chief, Far East.  This permitted an arrangement whereby FECOM staff personnel (with some exceptions) also served Headquarters, United Nations Command.  During the middle and latter part of 1953, two more organizations were added to the United Nations Command: the UNC Military Armistice Commission (UNCMAC) and the UNC Repatriation Group (UNCREG), both with the usual supporting staff sections, and with their headquarters at Munsan-ni, Korea.  Most of NARA's permanently accessioned records of the United Nations Command were originally accessioned into RG 333 and a few additional UNC textual records series were accessioned into Record Group 338.  Both now have been reallocated to RG 554 and are described below.

 

Records of the Secretary, General Staff, United Nations Command (UNC)

II.542 [Formerly] top secret general administrative files (central subject files), 1951-52 [UD-UP, Entry 146] (approximately 2 in.), are arranged by subject and consist of a position paper on the repatriation of POWs, memos for the record, and various notes.  There are also copies of planning and operations directives for Operation RETORT.  In the early stages of armistice negotiations at Kaesong, UNC staff were concerned about the possibility that talks might break down without warning, triggering sudden resumption of offensive operations.  This in turn would leave UNC negotiators vulnerable to capture by Communist forces occupying Kaesong.  Operation RETORT, devised in July 1951, was a contingency plan for units of the Eighth Army and Fifth Air Force to seize and secure Kaesong and to effect the escape or recapture of UNC negotiators.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the J-1 Personnel Division, United Nations Command

II.543 The chronologically arranged United Nations-Japan administrative agreement working file, 1952-53 [PI 127, Entry 4] (1 ft.), consists of information copies of correspondence, memorandums, minutes of meetings, messages, a draft agreement, and other papers documenting formulation of the agreement concerning the security status of the United Nations forces in Japan.  These copies were furnished by the FECOM Joint Committee Secretariat.

 

Records of the J-3 Section, United Nations Command

II.544 [Formerly security] classified (top secret) emergency planning files, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 155] (1 in.), includes a plan of military conduct to force enemy acceptance of the U.N. armistice terms. A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.545 J-3 operations reports, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 145] (1 ft.), are arranged sequentially by a three-digit number that was assigned on a daily basis.  The reports begin in January 1952 and end in April 1952.  The reports include information on unit activities within the UNC.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the Adjutant General Section, United Nations Command

II.546 The Adjutant General (AG) was directly responsible to the Chief of Staff.  AG functions included publishing CINUNC orders and instructions, authenticating directives, preparing command channel correspondence, maintaining the central files of the headquarters, operating the records management program, providing messenger and distribution services, and processing electronically transmitted messages.

II.547 The general administrative file, 1951-55 [PI 127, Entry 1] (47 ft.), consists of calendar year files generally divided by former security classification status (e.g., unclassified, "classified," "confidential," and "secret") and arranged thereunder in accordance with the War Department decimal file system.  The 1951 and 1952 files consist only of formerly security "classified" decimal files.  Series records consist chiefly of correspondence, messages, reports, and other papers pertaining to the formulation of policies and procedures for headquarters, the administration of officer and civilian personnel, administrative functions relating to the armistice negotiations, civil assistance, and war crimes in Korea.  Also included are UNC G-3 operation reports and meeting minutes of joint Red Cross teams in Panmunjom, Korea.

II.548 The partially security-classified general administrative files, 1950-51 [UD-UP, Entries 1 and 1A] (3 ft.), are arranged according to the War Department decimal file system.  The records consist of correspondence, minutes, and messages.  Subjects include the armistice, and planned composition of the Republic of Korea peacetime army (decimal 091.711, Korea, #1, UN).  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.549 The chronologically arranged [formerly] top secret general administrative files (record set of incoming and outgoing messages, 1951-52 [UD-UP, Entry 156] (1 ft.), consist of incoming radio messages to the United Nations Command from August 1951 through November 1952 and outgoing messages from July 1951 through October 1952.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.550 The chronologically arranged United Nations Command special file, 1951 [PU 127, Entry 2] (1 ft.), consists of daily summaries showing strength of units assigned by countries of the United Nations, battle casualties, and POWs.

II.551 The [formerly security] classified material accountability file (register), 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 157] (1 in.), tracked security-classified documents by control number.  For each document entry, the register lists sending office, correspondence topic, and receiving office.  Each entry also includes the recipient's signature.  The register is divided into two listings, "restricted & confidential" and "secret & top secret."  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.552 Orders, 1951-54 [PI 127, Entry 3] (1 ft.), are arranged by type of issuance, thereunder chronologically, and thereunder numerically.  The records consist of general, special, and letter orders (together with background papers) implementing Headquarters, UNC administrative and logistical functions, announcing appointments, attaching units to UNC, and discontinuing particular organizational elements.

II.553 [Security] classified general orders, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 158] (1 in.), include orders designating General Douglas MacArthur as the Commander in Chief of U.N. military forces assisting the Republic of Korea, establishing the United Nations command, designating major UNC subcommands, establishing the UNC staff sections (and appointing officers to them), and designating allied units attached to Eighth Army and Naval Forces Far East.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the Civil Information and Education Section,
United Nations Command (UNCCI&E)

II.554 United Nations Command General Order No. 49 (November 20, 1952) reassigned the functions of the UNCCI&E to the Army Forces Far East Psychological Warfare Section.  Therefore, box label and finding aid information includes the term "psychological warfare."

II.555 The general administrative file, January-June 1952 [PI 127, Entry 7] (8 in.), is arranged alphabetically by subject and consists of correspondence, reports, memorandums, and other papers relating to plans, policies, and procedures for the orientation and education of Korean War civilian and military internees.

II.556 Memorandums and orders, January-June 1952 [PI 127, Entry 8] (1 in.), are arranged by type of issuance and thereunder numerically.  The records consist of papers relating to the policies, functions, and organization of the Civil Information and Education Section.

II.557 The general correspondence file (decimal file), 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 167] (1 ft.), is arranged sequentially in accordance with the War Department decimal file system.  The records generally relate to the "re-education" of Chinese and South Korean Communist POWs held captive in U.N. camps.  The series consists of teacher training publications, pamphlets, Chinese and Korean language magazines, pro-U.N. propaganda broadcast scripts, screenings and evaluations of re-education transcripts, and prisoner of war administrative information.  The records document major components of the United Nations Command POW re-education program (e.g., criticism of Communism, explanation of U.N. war aims), the utilization of Korean and Chinese language broadcasts in U.N. POW compounds, and the fostering of amicable relations with the Japanese.

 

Records of the Liaison Section, United Nations Command

II.558 This section maintained liaison between the United Nations Command and representatives of other U.N. members that had forces in the theater, transmitted directives from CINCUNC to U.N. representatives, coordinated all requests from liaison officers to UNC, and supervised administration and logistics of all U.N. personnel other than U.S. and British Commonwealth Forces in the Tokyo-Yokohama area.

II.559 The general administrative file, 1950-55 [PI 127, Entry 5] (11 ft.), is divided into two chronological blocks (1950-54 and 1955) and arranged thereunder alphabetically by subject.  The records consist of correspondence, memorandums, messages, reports, and orders pertaining to the billeting of U.N. personnel, the integration of troops, award of decorations, exchange of information on POWs, military security, logistical support for the United Nations, and post-armistice morale plans.

II.560 The country file, 1950-55 [PI 127, Entry 6] (13 ft.), is arranged alphabetically by name of country and thereunder chronologically.  The records consist mainly of correspondence and messages pertaining to the assignment and attachment (or relief from assignment and attachment) of U.N. personnel and units to the UNC.

 

Records of the Advance Headquarters, United Nations Command

Records of the Secretary, General Staff

II.561 The general administrative file, July 1951-July 1953 [PI 127, Entry 9] (11 ft.), consists of incoming and outgoing messages, correspondence, memorandums, reports, studies, and other papers concerning the negotiation of an armistice agreement and the repatriation of U.N. and enemy POWs.  The messages are arranged chronologically in a security-classified section and an unclassified section.  The other security-classified materials are arranged alphabetically by subject.

II.562 Declassified Korean armistice negotiation records, July 1951-July 1953 [PI 127, Entry 10] (9 ft.), are divided into formerly security-classified and unclassified sections.  Records within each section are arranged chronologically.  The series consists mostly of main delegation, sub delegation, and staff officers meeting minutes transcripts, but also includes correspondence, memorandums, reports, proceedings, and other records concerning the armistice negotiations.

II.563 The publications file, July 1951-July 1953 [PI 127, Entry 11] (5 in.), is arranged by kind of issuance and thereunder chronologically.  The records consist of letter orders and staff and unnumbered memorandums pertaining to temporary duty assignments and to the termination of those assignments.  There is also a small number of travel orders.

II.564 The chronologically arranged Korean armistice agreement documents, July 1953 [PI 127, Entry 12] (5 ft.), consist of the United Nations Command's original signed Armistice Agreement (dated July 27, 1953) with separate "Temporary Agreement Supplementary to the Armistice Agreement" and map portfolios, each in three languages (English, Korean, and Chinese).  The three versions of the agreement are signed by the Commander in Chief, United Nations Command and the Commanders of the Korean People's Army and the Chinese People's Volunteers.  These documents include other items, such as: the original message received by the Department of the Army from CINCUNC announcing the signing of an armistice at Panmunjom, Korea; two original maps (one American, one Soviet) denoting the division of Korea by a joint U.S.-U.S.S.R. survey at the 38th parallel and agreed to by an American-Soviet team in April 1947; and related correspondence.

 

Records of the Advance Headquarters, Adjutant General Section, Mail and Records Division, United Nations Command

II.565 [Formerly] confidential general administrative files (decimal file), 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 159] (1 ft.), and [formerly] secret general administrative files (decimal file), 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 160] (4 ft.), are arranged in accordance with the War Department decimal file system.  The two series consist, respectively, of declassified confidential and secret correspondence and messages collected for UNC by the Adjutant General Section.  The confidential series includes records relating to military defense (decimal 091.711), communications (decimals 311.1 and 311.23), organization of the Army and tactical units (decimals 320.2 and 322), prisoner of war and interned persons issues (decimal 383.6 and 383.7), and equipment (various decimal files).  The secret series includes records relating to military defense (decimal 091.711), communications (decimals 311, 311.1, 311.13, and 311.23), organization of the Army and tactical units (decimals 320.2, 320.3, 322 and 322.01), inspections and investigations (decimal 333, 333.1, 333.5), and equipment (various decimals).  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.566 [Formerly] top secret administrative files, 1951-53 [UD-UP, Entry 161] (1 ft.), arranged by folder number, consist of plans, correspondence, meeting notes, memorandums for the record, and armistice plans.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.567 Monthly personnel daily summaries, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 162] (1 ft.) are arranged in chronological order and consist of chart format reports that list troop strength, losses, and gains (by unit or command) for January through September 1952.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.568 United Nations special reports, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 163] (6 in.), are arranged numerically and consist of United Nations Command correspondence, message files, command reports, and memos for January through August 1952.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.569 The historical publications record set, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 164] (3 ft.) is the Adjutant General record set copy of G-3 daily operation reports for calendar year 1952.  The reports, arranged in chronological order (and numbered sequentially 556-921), include information on unit activities within the UNC.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.570 Intelligence report files, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 165] (7 ft.), are arranged by type of file and thereunder chronologically.  The records include intelligence summaries, intelligence digests, and enemy document bulletins for 1952.  Information was gathered for these reports in Japan, Korea, the Philippines, China, and Southeast Asia.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.571 The unarranged organizational planning files, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 166] (4 in.), consist of "Colonel Weber's" original worksheets that were apparently used to establish UNC Planning Group organization and functions.  The series includes a listing of the worksheets.  A folder list is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the United Nations Command Military Armistice Commission

II.572 On July 10, 1951, representatives of the United Nations Command, on the one side, and of the Commanders of the Korean People's Army and the Chinese People's Volunteers, on the other, met for the first in a series of talks to discuss a possible cease-fire and related problems.  Thus began the "Military Armistice Conference" negotiations. Although the initial meetings were held at Kaesong, after October 7, 1951, the delegates convened at Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) between North and South Korea.  The talks ended with the signing of an armistice agreement on July 27, 1953.  Among other matters, the agreement provided for the establishment of a Military Armistice Commission (MAC), composed of an equal number of general or flag rank officer representatives from each side.  The MAC supervised implementation of the armistice agreement, which included an agreement for the release of most POWs and civilians held by both sides.  UNC had already provided for the UNC component of MAC when it established the UNC Military Armistice Commission on June 20, 1953.

Records of the Secretariat

II.573 Minutes of meetings of the Military Armistice Commission, July 28, 1953-February 13, 1981 [A1, Entry 1262] (9 ft. and 8 rolls of 35 mm. microfilm), are arranged by meeting numbers, 1-405, assigned in chronological order.  Each set of minutes contains a list of officers who participated in the meeting, the date, beginning and ending times of each meeting, meeting number, and a transcript of proceedings.  These records are paper copies reproduced from originals that were retained in Korea.  The series includes a 35 mm. negative microfilm copy of minutes covering meetings held between July 28, 1953 and December 30, 1964.

II.574 Minutes of the Secretaries' meetings at Panmunjom, Korea, July 17, 1953-April 11, 1980 [A1, Entry 1263] (6 ft. and 9 rolls of 35 mm. microfilm), consist of meeting transcripts arranged by meeting numbers, 1-452, assigned in chronological order.  The MAC Secretaries of both sides were responsible to the principal Commission members for the conduct of routine administrative business between the sides.  The talks cover such topics as construction in the DMZ, supplementary operating instructions, and DMZ boundary marker erection and repairs.  Each set of meeting minutes contains a list of officials participating in the meeting, date, beginning and ending times of the meeting, meeting number, and a verbatim proceedings transcript.  One quarter of these records are paper copies reproduced from originals still in Korea.  The remainder are original transcripts.  The series includes a 35 mm. negative microfilm copy of minutes covering meetings held between July 27, 1953 and July 13, 1965.

II.575 Minutes of meetings of [the] Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission, August 1, 1953-June 2, 1981 [A1, Entry 1264] (4 ft.), consist of meeting transcripts arranged by meeting numbers, 1-1603, in chronological order.  The Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission (NNSC) was composed of representatives from Sweden, Switzerland, Poland, and Czechoslovakia.  This impartial, but divided, commission investigated violations of the MAC agreements and oversaw POW returns.  Each set of meeting minutes contains a list of officials participating in the meeting, date, beginning and ending times of the meeting, meeting number, and a proceeding transcript.  The meetings usually lasted no more than 5 or 10 minutes, and often little of any substance was discussed.  These records are paper copies reproduced from originals that were retained in Korea.  The series includes a 35 mm. negative microfilm copy of minutes covering meetings held between August 1, 1953 and August 24, 1965.

II.576 Minutes of meetings of Joint Observer Teams, 1953-67 [A1, Entry 1265] (7 ft.), are arranged by team number and thereunder by meeting numbers assigned in chronological order.  The Joint Observers Teams were responsible for investigating violations of the cease-fire agreement.  Each team was composed of six officers of field grade rank (three appointed from each side) along with various working and technical personnel, interpreters, and secretaries.  The teams investigated cases such as DMZ country marker disputes, infiltration attempts, aircraft over flights, and various naval incidents.  Each set of meeting minutes contains a list of officials participating in the meeting, team number, the date, beginning and ending times of the meeting, and a proceedings transcript.  These records are paper copies reproduced from originals that were retained in Korea.

II.577 Korean armistice negotiation records, June 1951-July 1953 [PI 127, Entry 13] (7 ft.), consist mostly of the following records: Military Armistice Conference transcripts and proceedings summaries; staff, liaison, and control officers meeting minutes; protests of alleged armistice violations and replies; and messages exchanged between key participants in the armistice negotiations.  Also included are weekly Military Armistice Conference "summaries of events" and a staff manual on armistice implementation.  The series is arranged by record type and thereunder chronologically.  Parts of these records are available as Microfilm Publication T1152 (35 mm., 11 rolls) (see Appendix D), which is available in the Microfilm Reading Room in College Park, MD.

II.578 Armistice Implementation records, August 1953-December 1957 [PI 127, Entry 14] (7 ft.), consist of the following records, organized roughly as sub series: minutes of meetings of Red Cross, Joint Observer, and Mobile Inspection Teams and of MAC Duty Officers; Neutral Nations Inspection Team reports; requests for and reports of investigations; incident reports; and weekly summaries of MAC meetings.  Within the sub series, records are arranged, generally, in chronological order.

II.579 The personnel arrival and departure report file, July 1953-December 1957 [PI 127, Entry 15] (6 ft.), consists of trilingual, consecutively numbered and chronologically arranged daily reports documenting Korean Peninsula port of entry arrivals and departures of UNC, Korean People's Army, and Chinese People's Volunteers (KPA/CPV) military personnel who were on rotation, temporary duty, or short leave.

II.580 The controlled combat aircraft report file, January 1954-August 1957 [PI 127, Entry 16] (5 ft.), consists of daily reports of incoming and outgoing shipments of controlled combat aircraft, and of combat aircraft destroyed and expended.  The trilingual and numbered reports are arranged by type of action and thereunder chronologically.

II.581 The controlled combat materiel report file, July 1953-December 1957 [PI 127, Entry 17] (9 ft.), consists of trilingual and numbered daily reports documenting the introduction into and removal from Korea of Korean People's Army and Chinese People's Volunteers controlled combat materiel.  There are also reports that note incoming and outgoing shipments of UNC combat materiel and of UNC materiel destroyed and expended.  The series is arranged by type of report and thereunder chronologically by report date.

II.582 General records, 1951-57 [A1, Entry 1267] (9 ft.), are arranged by type of record and thereunder chronologically.  The records consist of daily journals for the administrative divisions, general orders, numbered memorandums, general administrative records, and miscellaneous reports.  There are also transcripts of staff officers' meetings (1952-53), U.N. Commission advisory committee meetings (1953), committee meetings on repatriation of POWs (1953), and Red Cross meetings (1953).  Other records in the series include newspaper clippings, maps, and United Nations Command Repatriation Group member biographies.

II.583 The declassified general subject and message files, July 1953-1957 [A1, Entry 1267A] (21 ft.), are arranged by subject.  Messages are arranged by year and type of message (incoming or outgoing) and thereunder by former security classification (secret, confidential, restricted, and unclassified).  The series was created and maintained by the United Nations Command, Military Armistice Commission.  The records pertain to armistice topics such as POWs, POW exchanges, displayed civilians, graves registration, and Red Cross matters.  A folder list for this series is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

Records of the Logistics and Liaison Division

II.584  This division was a consolidation of the former Logistics Division and the Neutral Nations Liaison Group.  The offices were combined on February 7, 1955.  The general administrative file, June 1953-June 1957 [PI 127, Entry 19] (7 ft.), is arranged by subject and thereunder chronologically.  The records consist of correspondence, reports, messages, memorandums, journals, and other documents pertaining to UNCMAC service, supply, and liaison functions following the armistice.  The series includes data on the repatriation and rehabilitation of prisoners and the exchange of sick and wounded.  Records predating the consolidation are those of the Logistics Division.

 

Records of the United Nations Command Planning Group,
Administrative Office

II.585 [Formerly security] classified unit history files, 1951-53 [UD-UP, Entry 168] (4 ft.), are arranged partially by an alphanumeric system.  The records include information concerning training, logistical support, orientations, the demilitarized zone, POWs, and displaced civilians.  The series also includes UNC Planning Group headquarters staff section reports from December 16, 1951 to June 20, 1953.  Other records in this series document the work of Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission (NNSC) teams.  NNSC was appointed by the Military Armistice Commission (MAC) to investigate violations of MAC agreements and to oversee the exchange and return of POWs.  NNSC was composed of representatives from Sweden, Switzerland, Poland, and Czechoslovakia.

 

Records of the United Nations Command Repatriation Group

II.586 The UNC Repatriation Group (UNCREG) was added to the United Nations Command on September 1, 1953.  The group assisted with implementation of the armistice agreement, represented CINCUNC [PI 127 Entry 21] (1 ft.), are arranged by staff section and thereunder chronologically.  The records consist of journals of the general and special staff sections and of the Headquarters, UNCREG duty officer.  The series also includes some correspondence and other papers pertaining to the trial of POWs and the validation of non-repatriates.

 

Records of the Adjutant General Section

II.587 Daily journals, September 1953-February 1954 [PI 127, Entry 21] (1 ft.), are arranged by staff section and thereunder chronologically.  The records consist of journals of the general and special staff sections and of the Headquarters, UNCREG duty officer.  The series also includes some correspondence and other papers pertaining to the trial and validation of POWs.

II.588 The publications file, September 1953-February 1954 [PI 127, Entry 22] (1 ft.), is arranged by type of issuance and thereunder chronologically.  The records consist of general, letter, and operations orders, memorandums, and daily bulletins pertaining to UNCREG administrative and logistical functions.

 

RECORDS OF HEADQUARTERS, UNITED NATIONS COMMAND/
UNITED STATES FORCES KOREA (UNC/USFK)

Records of the Armistice Affairs Division

II.589 General subject files, 1951-59 [A1, Entry 1267B] (4 ft.), are arranged by year and thereunder by subject.  The series pertains to armistice negotiations, armistice documentation and reporting, displaced civilians, plane crash victims, prisoner of war matters, armistice violations, and other issues.  A folder list for this series is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF HEADQUARTERS, ARMY FORCES, FAR EAST
AND PREDECESSOR COMMANDS

Records of Headquarters, Army Forces, Far East (HQ AFFE)

II.590 Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces, Far East was created on Oct. 1, 1952, from elements of Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East (HQ-USAFFE), and Headquarters, Japan Logistical Command/8000th Army Unit (HQ-JLC/8000AU).  Pursuant to General Order No. 114, Headquarters, Far East Command (HQ-FEC), Sept. 30, 1952, and General Order No. 2, HQ-AFFE, Oct. 1, 1952, the nominal command structure of HQ-USAFFE was redesignated HQ-AFFE, effective Oct. 1, 1952.  This order also discontinued HQ-JLC/8000AU and assigned or attached all missions, functions, and activities of that unit to HQ-AFFE.  On Jan. 1, 1953, HQ-AFFE was reorganized as the major Army command in the Far East.  In assuming control of all Army forces in Korea, Japan, and Okinawa, it joined U.S. Naval Forces, Far East (NAVFE) and Far East Air Forces (FEAF) as one of the three major subordinate commands in the FEC.

 

Records of the Adjutant General Section, Army Forces, Far East

II.591 General correspondence (general decimal files), 1952-57 [A1, Entry 193] (438 ft.), is arranged chronologically by year and thereunder in accordance with the War Department decimal file system.  Series documentation includes records relating to awards (decimal 200.6), 1953 HQ FEC/UNC organization and function charts (decimal 319.26), 1952-54 technical memorandums (portions of which cover the use of infantry weapons and equipment in Korea) (decimal 350.05), 1952-53 operations plans for U.N. and U.S. forces in the Far East (decimal 370.2), and correspondence relating to POWs (decimal 383.6).

II.592 Registers of unclassified general correspondence, 1953-55 [A1, Entry 189] (10 ft.), arranged by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system, provide important information about individual documents within the general correspondence, including the name of sender, date, name of recipient, a contents synopsis, and a document item ("serial") number.

 

Records of the Provost Marshal Section, Army Forces, Far East

II.593 General correspondence (general decimal files), 1955-57 [A1, Entry 215' (3 ft.), arranged chronologically by year and thereunder according to the War Department decimal file system, includes some records relating to processing of POWs held by the United Nations Command.

II.594 The chronologically arranged correspondence of the Prisoner of War Division relating to enemy prisoners of war, 1950-54 [A1, Entry 217] (2 ft.), consists of correspondence relating to the following topics:

1. assignment of internment serial numbers (ISNs) to enemy POWs

2. enemy POW escapes and recapture

3. the health of enemy POWs, including lists of the seriously ill and their ailments, laboratory reports listing causes of death, and memorandums relating to leprosy and the Sorok Island leprosarium

4. POW repatriation efforts, including Operation Little Switch (spring 1953), Operation Big Switch (summer-fall 1953), and Operation Mass Breakout

The bulk of the correspondence consists of incoming transmittal letters that accompanied FEC-AGO standard form No. 19-2 (the basic enemy POW personnel record) and standard forms FEC-AGO 244, UN-AGO No. 13 (the notification of enemy POW death forms used at various times by the Provost Marshal).  The actual forms are not included.  However, the transmittal letters often contain information included on the forms such as names, ISNs, and status of enemy POWs.

II.595 Correspondence of the Prisoner of War Division relating to civilian internees, 1951-54 [A1, Entry 218] (1 in.), is also arranged chronologically.  It consists of letters, memorandums, and lists relating to the assignment of internment serial numbers (ISNs) to civilian internees (CIs), the status and release of CIs, the downgrading of enemy POWs to CI status, and CI repatriation efforts such as Operation Homecoming (summer 1952) and Operation Thanksgiving (late fall 1952) (see paragraph II.597).  Most of the correspondence consists of incoming transmittal letters that had accompanied either rosters of internees or FEC-AGO standard form No. 19-2 (the basic CI record form).  Status forms are not found in this series.  However, some of the form information (including names, ISNs, and status of CIs) can be gleaned from the lists and transmittals.

II.596 Provisions of the Geneva Convention required investigation of all incidents resulting in the death or injury of POW camp internees.  A board of officers appointed by the Commanding General, 2nd Logistics Command, initiated these investigations on behalf of the United Nations Command.  The board of officers inquires were continued by the Commanding General, Prisoner of War Command/8203rd Army Unit.  Two series of numerically arranged case files emerged from the investigations--prisoner of war incident investigation case files, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 224] (6 ft.), and civilian internee incident investigation case files, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 225] (1 ft.).  A typical case file includes correspondence relating to the investigation; the board of officers final report (which includes board members' names, basic case information, and board recommendations), depositions and statements; medical or autopsy reports; scene of incident sketches, diagrams, and photographs; deceased POW or CI photographs; and a case review prepared by Staff Judge Advocate of Headquarters, 2nd Logistical Command or the Prisoner of War Command/8203rd Army Unit.

II.597 Statistical reports relating to enemy prisoners of war, 1950-53 [A1, Entry 222] (1 in.), contain three types of reports relating to the number of North Korean and Chinese POWs and civilian internees held by U.N. forces during the war.  One group of reports, dated February 9, 1953, includes names, ranks, and ISNs of captured North Korean and Chinese officers, female POWs, escapees, protected personnel, and released POWs.  These reports also include dates of capture, release, escape, or recapture.  A second group of reports lists the number of POWs held by the Prisoner of War Command during various months of the war, citing the number of deceased, released, repatriated, or reclassified POWs or CIs.  The final group recapitulates the total number of POWs and civilian internees deceased, escaped, or repatriated in Operations Homecoming, Thanksgiving, Little Switch, and Big Switch. [6]  This series was probably created by the Prisoner of War Command/8203rd Army Unit.

 

Records of the Military History Officer, Army Forces, Far East

II.598 General correspondence (general decimal files), 1952-56 [A1, Entry 229] (10 in.), includes records relating to the preparation of military histories during the Korean War.  Some records relate to the recreation of the order of battle of U.S. military units in the war.

II.599 A draft manuscript: "A Chronology of Historical Detachments in Korea," 1954 [A1, Entry 234] (1 in.), outlines the activation, training, and operations of the eight historical detachments that were deployed to Korea in 1951 and later consolidated into the 8086th Army Unit.  The manuscript contains a variety of supporting documents, including photographs of historical detachment facilities and personnel, letters, memorandums, general orders, personnel lists, and lists of historians who covered various campaigns and actions during the Korean War.

 

Other Records Relating to Army Forces, Far East

II.600 Additional records of AFFE are located in the "Organizational History Files, 1920-68" (see paragraph II.416).  The accessions cluster includes a 26-cu. ft. subgroup of "Records of Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces, Far East, 1948-54," which was originally assigned to RG 338.  This subgroup includes approximately 22 feet of Army Forces, Far East general administrative files, general subject correspondence files, unit correspondence files, security assistance planning files, newspaper files, and permanent order files from the Korean War era.  Subgroup finding aids consist of series title lists, descriptions, and box contents lists.  The box lists identify contents at the file level.  These finding aids are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF THE JAPAN LOGISTICAL COMMAND (JLC)

II.601 The Japan Logistical Command (JLC), a United Nations Command component, was established on August 25, 1950.  It was constituted from elements of the Eighth Army Rear Echelon to function, in part, as a "wartime theater communications zone" for the Far East Command.  In that capacity, JLC provided logistical and administrative support for U.N. forces in Korea.  It also assumed Eighth Army responsibilities for residual occupation duties within Japan.  JLC was discontinued effective October 1, 1952, by Far East Command General Order 114 and redesignated U.S. Army Forces, Far East.

II.602 The RG 407 Army-AG command reports, 1949-54, file designation for the Japan Logistical Command is AYUT [Army Unit]-8000.  Other series file designations that contain JLC documentation are AYUT-8001 (Yokohoma Depot), and AYUT-8002 (Yokohoma Command and Central Command) (see paragraphs II.459).

II.603 RG 554 includes the following JLC records and files:

1. G-2 unclassified and security-classified decimal files, 1950-51 [UD-UP, Entries 15 and 15A] (2 ft.)

2. G-3 decimal files, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 16] (1 in.), and security-classified historical program files, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 17] (3 in.)

3. G-4 security-classified general administrative files, 1951 (10 in.), and formerly security-classified general administrative files, 1952 (1 in.) [UD-UP, Entries 18 and 18A]

4. Adjutant General decimal files, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 19] (11 ft.)

5. Adjutant General security-classified decimal files, 1951-52 [UD-UP, Entry 19A] (76 ft.)

6. Adjutant General decimal files (non-occupation), 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 20] (5 in.)

7. Adjutant General security-classified decimal files (non-occupation), 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 20A] (7 ft.)

8. Adjutant General security-classified decimal files (occupation), 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 21] (10 in.)

9. Adjutant General formerly top secret decimal files, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 22] (6 in.)

10. Adjutant General general administrative files, 1951-52 [UD-UP, Entry 23] (7 ft.)

11. Adjutant General security-classified command reports, 1950 and 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 25] (4 ft.)

12. Adjutant General security-classified message files, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 169] (16 ft.)

13. Fiscal Section security-classified records, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 187] (1 ft.)

14. Historical Section security-classified unit histories and command reports, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 188] (15 ft.)

15. Inspector General classified investigation records, 1950-51 [UD-UP, Entry 189] (3 ft.)

16. Ordnance Section decimal file, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 192] (2 ft.)

17. Ordnance Section security-classified decimal files, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 192A] (3 ft.)

18. Ordnance Section security-classified command reports, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 193] (3 ft.)

19. Ordnance Section administrative orders, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 194]

20. Ordnance Section memorandums, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 195]

21. Ordnance Section daily bulletins, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 196]

22. Ordnance Section office orders, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 197]

23. Quartermaster Section security-classified general administrative files, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 199] (1 ft.)

24. Signal Section security-classified subject files, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 200] (3 in.)

25. Signal Section security-classified historical program files, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 201] (3 in.)

26. Special Services Section security-classified records, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 202] (4 in.)

A finding aid is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.604 The informally titled "Organizational History Files, 1920-68," accessions cluster (see paragraph II.416) includes a 73-cu. ft. subgroup of "Records of the Japan Logistical Command, 1945-52," which were originally assigned to RG 338.  This subgroup consists of general administrative files, general subject correspondence files, operating procedure files, permanent order files, and command health reporting files.  Another subgroup in this accession, "Publications Record Files of Multiple U.S. Army Organizations, 1941-55" (46 cu. ft.), includes JLC-published memorandums, bulletins, directives, and circulars.  Subgroup finding aids consist of series title lists, descriptions, and box contents lists.  The box lists usually identify contents at the file or publication title levels.  Publication title information includes numerical spans and dates (e.g., Numbered Memos 1-151 1952).  These finding aids are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

II.605 In addition, the informally titled "Unclassified and Classified Army Records from St. Louis, 1944-68} accessions cluster (see paragraph II.416) includes approximately 9 inches of security-classified Japan Logistical Command files, which were originally assigned to RG 338.  The records consisting of general orders, 1952; general correspondence, 1952; operations planning files, 1951-52; organization planning files, 1951-52, and unit history files, 1950 and 1952 and are located in the "Various Logistical Commands" subgroup.  A records listing is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

RECORDS OF OTHER COMMANDS

Records of the Korea Military Advisory Group (KMAG)

II.606 Following World War II, U.S. Army forces occupied Korean territory below the 38th parallel for nearly 3 years. With the departure of Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in Korea, the Provisional Military Advisory Group emerged on July 1, 1949, as an official entity called the United States Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea (KMAG).  The group became an integral part of the American Mission in Korea, along with the U.S. embassy in Seoul, the local office of the Economic Cooperation Administration, and a service organization called the Joint Administrative Services.  KMAG was responsible for training South Korean forces, with the goal of developing a more efficient Korean military establishment.  The advisory effort reached down to battalion level.  KMAG also assisted in communications between U.S. commands and the ROK Army, organized and supervised resupply efforts, and instituted emergency measures to replenish existing ROK units and train new ones.  On matters involving military aid to Korea, KMAG closely coordinated its efforts with the U.S. embassy.  On matters involving military command or administration, the advisory group reported directly to the Pentagon.

II.607 Shortly after the Korean War began, KMAG was placed under Eighth Army operational control.  From that time on, the advisory group concentrated on improving the quality of the Republic of Korea Army.  From December 1950 until the commencement of armistice talks on July 10, 1951, KMAG personnel served primarily as field advisors in frontline ROK Army combat units.  When the pace of fighting slackened, KMAG sought to stimulate the growth of existing training facilities and to establish new ones, all the while emphasizing the basic ROK Army needs of leadership and training.  From July through December, KMAG began programs for organizing the ROK Army's replacement training and school system.  During 1952, it engaged in a systematic program to develop and revitalize the ROK Army.  In 1953, KMAG concentrated on expanding the ROK Army by developing and equipping service units, retraining operational units, and assuring an adequate supply of replacements and trained technical personnel.  KMAG continued to advise and assist the ROK Army for the duration of combat activity.  KMAG was designated Army Unit 8202.  In the RG 407 Army-AG command reports, 1949-54, KMAG command reports are located under file designation AYUT-8202.  Also, in the RG 338 unit records, 1942-67 (see paragraph II.415), there are KMPG historical records for 1950 and general orders for 1949-50.

General Records of the Adjutant General Section

II.608 The unarranged general administrative correspondence, 1951-52 [NM-16, Entry 203] (5 in.), consists of memorandums recommending awards of meritorious unit commendations, distinguished unit citations, and presidential unit citations for units that served in Korea.

II.609 In RG 554, KMAG Adjutant General general correspondence (decimal file), 1948-53 [UD-UP, Entry 1091] (25 ft.), is arranged chronologically by year and thereunder generally in accordance with the War Department decimal file system (with random interspersals of subject titled records folders). [7] The series includes the following types of documentation:

1. KMAG G-3 journals, 1951

2. reports of the Office of the Director, ROK National Police, 1951

3. KMAG travel orders and special orders, 1949-51

4. KMAG engineer reports, 1950

5. weekly intelligence summaries from various sources and KMAG periodic intelligence reports, 1951

6. special courts martial, 1949

7. KMAG daily bulletins [numbered staff memorandums], 1950

II.610 Papers relating to construction [programming files], 1953-54 [NM-16, Entry 204] (4 ft.), are arranged alphabetically by detachment and thereunder by project number.  The files consist of memorandums, project completion reports, and correspondence from Armed Forces Assistance to Korea (AFAK) staff and KMAG concerning construction of schools, other public buildings, and churches.

Records of the Adjutant General Section, Administrative Services Division

II.611 The command policy file, 1953-54 [NM-16, Entry 205] (5 in.), is arranged chronologically.  The files pertain to topics such as personnel awards policies, fire prevention programs, and officers boards.  The series also includes weekly activity reports and travel orders.  Other files contain records that explain the continued presence of KMAG forces in South Korea after the armistice.

II.612 Other KMAG records in RG 554 include the following files:

1. Adjutant General formerly confidential general administrative files, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 110] (ca. 2 ft.)

2. G-2 Section formerly confidential intelligence report files, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 107] (ca. 1 in.)

3. Engineer Section formerly confidential general administrative files, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 110A] (ca. 1 in.)

4. Inspector General Section formerly confidential investigation files, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 110B] (ca. 1 in.)

5. KMAG Detachment 1 (Provisional) formerly confidential unit correspondence files, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 110C] (1 in.)

6. KMAG Detachment 1 (Provisional) formerly confidential unit history files, May-December 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 110D] (less than 1 in.)

II.613 In addition, the informally titled "Organizational History Files, 1920-68," accessions cluster (see paragraph II.416) includes a 5-cu. ft. subgroup of "Records of the U.S. Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea (KMAG), 1953," which was originally assigned to RG 338.  This subgroup consists of command reporting files, publication reference set files, publishing background files, and permanent order files.  Another subgroup in this accession, "Publications Record Files of Multiple U.S. Army Organizations, 1941-55" (46 cubic ft.) includes KMAG numbered memorandums and staff memorandums for 1953.  Subgroup finding aids consist of series title lists, descriptions, and box contents lists.  The box lists usually identify contents at the file or publication title levels.  Publication title information generally includes numerical spans and dates (e.g., Numbered Memos 1-151 1952).  These finding aids are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the 2nd Logistical Command

II.614 The 2nd Logistical Command was established when the Pusan Logistical Command was inactivated on September 19, 1950.  With inactivation the latter's assets transferred to the 2nd Logistical Command.  The RG 407 Army-AG command reports, 1949-54, file designation for the Pusan Logistical Command/2nd Logistical Command is LOGC-2.

II.615 RG 554 records of the Pusan Logistical Command/2nd Logistical Command include the following series:

1. Adjutant General security-classified HQ subject files (decimal file), 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 129A] (ca. 8 in.)

2. Adjutant General formerly [security] classified HQ subject files (decimal file), 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 129] (ca. 3 ft.)

3. Adjutant General security-classified general administrative files (decimal file), 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 131A] (ca. 8 in.)

4. Adjutant General unclassified decimal files, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 131] (ca. 1 ft.)

5. Adjutant General unclassified (1950-51) and formerly security-classified (1952) command reports, 1950-52 [UD-UP, Entries 132 and 132A] (ca. 1 ft.)

6. Pusan Logistical Command and 2nd Logistical Command publication files, 1950-51 [UD-UP, Entries 133-134] (ca. 1 ft.)

7. 2nd Logistical Command and Korean Base Section formerly [security] classified publication record sets, 1951-52 [UD-UP, Entry 135] (ca. 3 ft.)

8. 2nd Logistical Command and Korean Base Section security-classified publication record set, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 135A] (ca. 6 in.)

9. 2nd Logistical Command security-classified incoming and outgoing message files, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 136] ( ca. 1 ft.)

10. 2nd Logistical Command and Korean Base Section formerly security-classified organizational planning files, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 136A] (ca. 1 in.)

11. 2nd Logistical Command and Korean Base Section Planning Board records, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 137] (ca. 2 in.)

12. 2nd Logistical Command and Korean Base Section formerly security-classified progress analysis files, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 138] (less than 1 in.)

13. 2nd Logistical Command and Korean Base Section formerly security-classified claims officer report of investigations, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 139] (less than 1 in.)

14. 2nd Logistical Command and Korean Base Section formerly security-classified investigation files, 1951-52 [UD-UP, Entry 140] (ca. 1 ft.)

15. Judge Advocate Section special courts martial files, 1950-51 [UD-UP, Entry 140A] (ca. 5 in.)

16. Signal Communication Center operational files, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 140B] (ca. 7 in.)

17. Pusan Logistical Command operational files, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 140C]

18. Signal Communication Center message log files, 1950 [UD-UP, Entry 140D (ca. 1 ft,)

II.616 The informally titled "Organizational History Files, 1920-68," accession cluster (see paragraph II.416) includes a 17-cu. ft. subgroup of "Records of the 2nd Logistical Command, 1950-53," which was originally assigned to RG 338.  This subgroup consists of general administrative files, accident case files, organization planning files, permanent order background files, and publication reference files.  Another subgroup in this accession, "Publications Record Files of Multiple U.S. Army Organizations, 1941-55" (46 cu. ft.) includes 2nd Logistical Command published memorandums, directives, and information letters.  Subgroup finding aids consist of series title lists, descriptions, and box contents lists.  The box lists usually identify contents at the file or publication title levels.  Publication title information generally includes numerical spans and dates (e.g., Numbered Memos #1-151 1952).  These finding aids are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the 3rd Logistical Command

II.617 On October 15, 1950, the 3rd Logistical Command was attached to the 2nd Logistical Command to operate the port of Inchon and provide close frontline support to the Eighth Army.  Once United Nations Command forces advanced beyond the 38th Parallel in the fall of 1950, many common supplies were shipped to Inchon (rather than Pusan) in order to expedite the flow of items required by frontline units.  In January 1951, the 3rd Logistical Command's forward echelon moved to Pusan, where it supervised the Pusan Assembly Area and the Pusan Staging Area.  The command's prison responsibilities also began in January with the attachment of the U.N. POW Camp No. 1 and involvement in prison construction.  The 3rd Logistical Command was relieved of prison program assignments in September 1951.  It then became responsible for the logistical support of all 2nd Logistical Command organizations (except ordnance) in the two southernmost provinces of Korea.  In November 1952, all 3rd Logistical Command functions passed to the Korean Base Section, which was part of the Korean Communications Zone.

II.618 The RG 407 Army-AG command reports, 1949-54, file designation for the Port of Inchon/3rd Logistical Command is LOGC-3.  Other 3rd Logistical Command records in RG 554 are located among files of the Korean Base Section (see paragraph II.626).

 

Records of the Korean Communication Zone (KCOMZ)

II.619 The Korean Communication Zone (KCOMZ) was created on July 10, 1952.  Its mission was to relieve the Eighth army of all logistical and territorial operations in the rear echelon.  KCOMZ was responsible for logistical support, administration, civil assistance, movement control, and security operations within the communication zone south of the Eighth Army; logistical support of the Republic of Korea (ROK) forces; maintaining relations on political and economic matters with the ROK and operation of its national railroads; and control over POWs and other categories of internees held by the United Nations Command.  KCOMZ consisted of three major commands--the Korean Base Section, the Prisoner of War Command, and the United Nations Civil Assistance Command, Korea.  In the RG 407 Army-AG command reports, 1949-54, KCOMZ command reports are located under the file designation AYUT [Army Unit]-8006.

II.620 RG 554 contains copies of KCOMZ command and staff section reports, along with other records that supplement these reports, housed in the following KCOMZ History Section and Military Section files:

1. command reports, August 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 123] (ca. 1 in.)

2. formerly security-classified command report files, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 123A] (ca. 2 in.)

3. Military Historian files, January-March, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 124] (ca. 2 in.)

4. unit history files, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 125] (ca. 3 ft.)

5. formerly security-classified unit history files, August-December 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 127G] (4 in.)

6. security-classified unit history files, August-December 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 127H] (ca. 7 ft.)

II.621 KCOMZ program and policy correspondence is located in Adjutant General formerly top secret general administrative files, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 115] (ca. 1 in.), and formerly security-classified general administrative files (decimal file), 1953 and January-April, 1 955 [UD-UP, Entry 118] (4 in.), and security-classified publication files, 1953-54 [UD-UP, Entry 118A] (1 ft.), consist of general, administrative, movement, and operation orders, standard operating procedures (SOPs) for various administrative functions, statistical and intelligence summaries, intelligence directives, operation plans, letters of instruction, and station lists.

II.622 Watch reports, prepared and submitted weekly by the KCOMZ Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2 in message format, consist of information relating to bandit activities and suspected cases of espionage and sabotage.  (The Army considered bandit activities as part of enemy capabilities and reported bandit raids as part of enemy operations.)  These and other reports, along with intelligence summaries and estimates, are located in the G-2 formerly security-classified intelligence report files, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 113] (approximately 2 in.), and security-classified intelligence report files, 1953-55 [UD-UP, Entry 113A] (3 ft.).

II.623 The Provost Marshal Section [reference files for] control of prisoners [of war] of [the] Korean War, 1952-53 [UD-UP, Entry 127J] (approximately 3 ft.), consist of two file sets.  The first is arranged generally chronologically; the second, numerically by POW camp number.  This series, assembled by the Prisoner of War Command and forwarded to HQ KCOMZ, consists of copies of directives, orders, messages, letters, and other records pertaining to policy governing administration and day-to-day operation of POW camps.  The chronologically arranged formerly secret [reports of] POW incidents, 1951-July  1952 [UD-UP, Entry 127K] (approximately 7 in.), consist of reports documenting incident investigations at U.N. POW camps.  Typically each report includes affidavits, sketches of the  camp, and a summary report of findings.  Formerly secret POW board proceedings, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 127I] (approximately 1 in.), contains a copy of "Proceedings of [the] Board of Officers Appointed to Investigate the Death and Injuries to Civilian Internees Which Occurred on 18 February 1952 at U.N. POW Camp #1 (Headquarters, MP Group 8137th Army Unit), Koje-Do Korea, APO 59" (ca. March 1952).

II.624 Other KCOMZ records in RG 554 include the following:

1. Chief of Staff unit history files, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 111] (5 in.)

2. Adjutant General award and commendation files, 1954 [UD-UP, Entry 119] (11 ft.)

3. Adjutant General security-classified organization planning files, February-April, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 120A] (1 in.)

4. Adjutant General security-classified operation planning files, March 1953 and April-November 1954 [UD-UP, Entry 121 (3 in.)

5. Engineer Section security-classified periodic operation reports, 1953-54 [UD-UP, Entry 122] (4 in.)

6. Inspector General formerly security-classified investigation files, July-December 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 127B] (9 in.)

8. Judge Advocate reports regarding the treatment of [Communist] POWs, 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 127C] (9 in.), along with 5 in. of unclassified and security-classified historical files and reports of the War Crimes Division, December 1952-1954 [UD-UP, Entries 127D-E]

9. Ordnance Section security-classified publications files, 1954 [UD-UP, Entry 127I] (5 in.), including Ordnance Section operation bulletins

II.625 Additional records are located in the informally titled, "Organizational History Files, 1920-68" (see paragraph II.416).  The accessions cluster includes a 47-cu. ft. subgroup of "Records of the Korea Communications Zone, 1952-55," which were originally assigned to RG 338.  The subgroup includes general administrative files, general subject correspondence files, IG investigative files, permanent order files, publication reference set files, military award files, and organizational history files.

Records of the Korean Base Section

II.626 The Korean Base Section at Pusan, established August 1, 1952, was a subordinate logistical arm of the Korean Communications Zone (KCOMZ).  The section was created from resources of the 2nd Logistical Command, and absorbed all missions of the 3rd Logistical Command effective November 1, 1952.  Thus, it became the sole functional logistical operating U.S. military agency in Korea.  In that capacity, the Korean Base Section provided supply and service support to the Eighth army and KCOMZ, and to the ROK Army and all U.N. forces in Korea.  The section also supervised port operations.  In the RG 407 Army-AG command reports, 1949-54, records concerning the Korean Base Section are filed with the Korean Communication Zone under the file designation AYUT [Army Unit]-8006.

II.627 Korean Base Section records in RG 554 include the following series:

1. formerly [security] classified general administrative files (decimal file), 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 203] (4 ft.)

2. formerly [security] classified organizational planning files, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 204] (4 in.)

3. formerly [security] classified progress analysis files, August-December 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 205] (less than 1 in.)

4. formerly [security] classified command and staff section reports, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 206] (4 in.)

5. formerly [security] classified publication record set, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 207] (2 ft.)

II.628 Additional records are located in the informally titled "Organizational History Files, 1920-68" (see paragraph II.416).  The accessions cluster includes 46 cu. ft. of "Publications Record Files of Multiple U.S. Army Organizations."  This subgroup, which was originally assigned to RG 338, includes some Korean Base Section published memorandums, general court martial bulletins, and various information publications.  The subgroup finding aid includes a box contents list.  The box contents list identifies specific Korean Base Section publications by publication title.  Title information generally also includes numerical spans and dates (e.g., Troop Information & Education Letter 1-21, 1952).  A finding aid is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the Prisoner of War Command

II.629 KCOMZ General Order No. 6 established the Prisoner of War Command on August 1, 1952.  The command was responsible for POW and internee internment, administration, control, and utilization.  The informally titled "Unclassified and Classified Army Records from St. Louis, 1944-68" accessions cluster (see paragraph II.416) includes approximately 25 cu. ft. of security-classified "United Nations Command, POW Command" subgroup general staff, camp, and unit files, all of which were originally assigned to RG 338.  The records consist of command report files, general correspondence, investigation files, unit history files, general, operations plans, intelligence report files, numbered and unnumbered memorandums, policy files, and organization planning files.  There are also files of general, administrative, movement, and operations orders.  A records listing is available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Records of the United Nations Civil Assistance Command, Korea (UNCACK)

II.630 In July 1950 the United Nations Security Council passed a resolution requesting the United Nations Command to exercise responsibility for civilian relief and support in Korea.  UNC Commander Gen. Douglas MacArthur delegated responsibility for civil assistance activities to Eighth Army, while retaining program oversight responsibility in the GHQ UNC Public Health and Welfare Section commanded by Brig. Gen. Crawford F. Sams.  To plan and implement a civil affairs program, Eighth Army Commander Gen. Walton Walker created a special staff section known as the "Civil Assistance Section."  In November 1950, the 8201st Army Unit, U.N. Public Health and Welfare Detachment was initially organized at Seoul in conjunction with the establishment of the UNC Public Health and Welfare Field Organization, Korea.  This latter organization was formed to accomplish direct civilian emergency relief and welfare in Korea.  In December 1950 responsibilities of the Eighth Army Civil Assistance Section and the UNC GHQ Public Health and Welfare Detachment were apparently combined in a newly created United Nations Civil Assistance Command, Korea (8201st Army Unit).  UNCACK became a part of the Korean Communications Zone on August 1, 1952.

II.631 Although it was a military command, UNCACK included technical personnel from 22 U.N. countries trained in engineering, law, education, economics, government, and other fields.  UNCACK instituted large programs of civil relief and brought in food, clothing, and medical aid supplies to reduce disease and improve the welfare of South Korea's populace.  The command assisted in increasing crop production and rehabilitating many industrial plants.  UNCACK also aided in the support of hospitals, medical aid stations, orphanages, refugee camps, and food distribution stations.  On July 1, 1953, UNCACK was redesignated as the Korean Civil Assistance Command, (8201st Army Unit).  In the RG 407 Army-AG command reports, 1949-54, UNCACK command reports are located under the file designation of AYUT[Army Unit]-8201.

II.632 UNCACK records in RG 554 include the following series:

1. Adjutant General formerly confidential general administrative files (decimal file), 1953-54 [UD-UP, Entry 210] (10 in.)

2. Adjutant General formerly secret general administrative files (decimal file), 1953-55 [UD-UP, Entry 210A] (6 in.)

3. Adjutant General formerly secret command reports, November 1950-June 1953 [UD-UP, entry 211] (1 ft.)

4. Adjutant General central files, 1952 [UD-UP, Entry 209] (ca. 1 ft.), consisting of 1952 command reports

5. Historical Program command reports, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 216] (10 in.)

6. Historical Program weekly activity reports, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 127] (5 ft.), including some team reports

7. Historical Program team reports, 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 219] (1 ft.)

8. Historical Program semi-monthly activity reports, January-September 1951 [UD-UP, Entry 218] (4 in.)

9. Investigative files, May-December 1953 [UD-UP, Entry 215]

II.633 Additional records are located in the informally titled "Organizational History Files, 1920-68" (see paragraph II.416).  The accessions cluster includes a 26-cubic foot subgroup of "Records of the United Nations Civil Assistance Command, Korea 1950-53," which were originally assigned to RG 338.  This subgroup consists of general administrative files, general subject correspondence files, permanent order files, publication reference set files, operational procedure files, overseas freight operation files, foreign aid program reporting files, and command reporting files.  Another subgroup in this accession, "Publications Record Files of Multiple U.S. Army Organizations, 1951-55" (46 cubic ft.), include UNCACK numbered, unnumbered, and political memorandums, directives, and bulletins.  Subgroup finding aids consist of series title lists, descriptions, and box contents lists.  The box lists identify contents at the file or publication title levels.  Publication title information generally includes numerical spans and dates (e.g., Numbered Memos 1-151, 1952).  These finding aids are available for use in the Textual Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.


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PART III

TEXTUAL RECORDS OF THE U.S. CONGRESS
RELATING TO THE KOREAN WAR

Contents - Part III:

  • Overview
  • Legislation
  • Investigations
  • Confirmations
  • Treaties
  • Legislative Records Relating to the Korean War
    • Records of the Senate Armed Services Committee
    • Records of the House Armed Services Committee
    • Records of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
    • Records of the House Foreign Affairs Committee

 

PART III

OVERVIEW

III.1 Three Congresses met during the Korean War: the 81st, January 3, 1949-January 2, 1951; the 82nd, January 3, 1951-July 7, 1952; and the 83rd, January 3, 1953-December 2, 1954.  Although President Truman did not seek a declaration of war from Congress, he consulted with senior members of Congress and found support for emergency war-related measures, including supplemental defense appropriations, draft extensions, reserve mobilization, and other Presidential actions.  While the Korean War increased Presidential powers relative to those of Congress, rapidly rising military appropriations, additional authorizations, high visibility investigations, and controversial confirmations nonetheless enlarged the congressional role in national defense.  Congress made no declaration of war.  However, after Chinese Communist troops attacked U.N. forces south of the Yalu River in November 1950, the House and Senate passed separate resolutions declaring "the Chinese Communist authorities an aggressor in Korea."  The separate resolutions were House Resolution 77 and Senate Resolution 35, 81st Congress, 2nd Session.

 

LEGISLATION

III.2 The bill that became the Selective Service Extension Act of 1950 passed the House of Representatives on June 27, 1950, and the Senate one day later. [8]  This act, which provided for a one-year extension of the Selective Service Act of 1948, including Presidential authorization to order induction, laid the basis for manpower policies during the Korean War.  The law also authorized the President, until July 9, 1951, to order into active service (for a maximum of 21 months) members of all the reserve components of the armed forces.  This included the National Guard and all retired regular armed services personnel.

III.3 After the fighting in Korea began, Congress passed other significant manpower and personnel legislation.  The Extension of Enlistment Act of 1950 authorized the President, until July 9, 1951, to extend the enlistments of members of the armed services by a period of 12 months. [9] A bill that became the Armed Forces Strength Act of 1950 passed the House on July 25  and the Senate the next day. [10]  The law suspended statutory limits on manpower levels imposed by the Selective Services Act of 1945 and 1948 and by the Army, Air Force Composition Act of 1950 (which became law on July 10). [11]  The Doctor-Dentist Draft Act of 1950, which passed the Senate on August 29th and the House on August 30th, was formulated because volunteer enlistment numbers were not meeting Korean War requirements. [12]  The act subjected doctors, dentists, and allied specialists under the age of 50 to the selective service law.

III.4 On June 7, 1951, the House approved a bill that the Senate had passed on June 1, extending the draft until July 1, 1955, and establishing a program of universal military training.  The Universal Military Training and Service Act of 1951 provided for transition from the Selective Service System to establishment of a universal service system by creating a National Security Training Corps to be effective at the end of the Korean War. [13] On March 4, 1952, however, the House voted down a bill (HR 5904) to implement universal military training and the new manpower system was never established.  After the demise of the universal military training proposal, both houses passed bills that became the Armed Services Reserve Act of 1952. [14]  Many of the practices for calling up reservists had produced inequities that had prompted public criticism.  The act sought to remedy this situation by establishing seven reserve components of the armed forces and by detailing conditions under which reservists would be recalled to active duty.

III.5 In order to increase the flow of war goods to the Korean front, the House on August 10, 1950, and the Senate on August 21, 1950, passed bills that became the Defense Production Act of 1950. [15] The act authorized the President to impose wave and price controls, to limit consumer credit, to set priorities for allocating scarce materials, and to use up to $2 billion for loans to ensure defense production.

 

INVESTIGATIONS

III.6 With the war's commencement in Korea, the Senate significantly increased its oversight of the Pentagon.  On July 27, 1950, the Senate Armed Services Committee established a Preparedness Subcommittee to exercise "continuous watchfulness" over all phases of the nation's military efforts.  During the 1950s and 1960s, the Preparedness Subcommittee became the Senate's most important mechanism for oversight of the Department of defense.

III.7 Shortly after President Truman relieved Douglas MacArthur of his Asian-based commands on April 11, 1951, the Senate Armed Services Committee and Foreign Relations Committee held joint hearings on the general's dismissal and on U.S. policy in East Asia.  The hearings began on May 3, 1951, and ended on August 17, 1951, when the members voted in closed session to make no formal report on their investigation.

III.8 On April 1, 1953, a subcommittee of the Senate Armed Services Committee began an investigation into charges made by Gen. James A. Van Fleet, former commander of the Eighth U.S. Army in Korea, that "critical" shortages of ammunition hampered U.N. troops in Korea.  The subcommittee issued an interim report on May 23, 1953, charging that the shortage had resulted in "needless loss of American lives," and a final report on August 12, 1953, stating that progress had been made in overcoming ammunition production and delivery problems.

III.9 On October 6, 1953, the Senate Government Operations Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations began an investigation into alleged Communist atrocities in Korea.  On January 9, 1954, the subcommittee filed an interim report asserting that 5,639 American servicemen had been victims of Communist atrocities in Korea.

 

CONFIRMATIONS

III.10 On September 15, 1950, the House and Senate approved special legislation allowing appointment of Gen. George C. Marshall as Secretary of Defense.[16]  The legislation exempted Marshall from National Security Act of 1947 provisions that would have barred him from becoming Secretary of Defense because he had served as an officer in the armed forces during the past 10 years.

 

TREATIES

III.11 After concluding an armistice on July 27, 1953, President Eisenhower submitted the Korean Mutual Defense Treaty to the U.S. Senate.  Reported by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on January 21, 1951,[17] the Senate--by an 81 to 6 roll call vote--adopted a resolution of approval on January 26, 1954.

 

LEGISLATIVE RECORDS RELATING TO THE KOREAN WAR

III.12 The records of the legislative branch of the U.S. Government are housed in the Center for Legislative Archives (see Introduction).   Senate records are designated as Record Group 46, records of the House of Representatives as Record Group 233, and records of the Joint Committees of Congress as Record Group 128.  The published records of Congress (the Congressional Record and printed hearings, reports, and committee prints) may be accessed in Record Group 287, Publications of the U.S. Government.  Published congressional records are also available at government depository libraries.  A website listing of government depository libraries is available on the Internet at http://www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs/locators/findlibs/index.html.

III.13 The principal finding aids for legislative records are the Guide to the Records of the United States House of Representatives at the National Archives, 1789-1989, 100th Congress, 2nd Session, Senate Document No. 100-42 (1989).  Both guides, along with access guidelines and other information about Congressional records, can be found on http://www.archives.gov/records_of_congress/, the website of the Center for Legislative Archives.  The guides are also available in government depository libraries and in most large public and research libraries.

III.14 Most archival records of the House and Senate that relate to the Korean War are organized by committee.  Committee recordkeeping practices vary widely; consequently, Center for Legislative Archives holdings are more complete for some committees than for others.

 

Records of the Senate Armed Services Committee

III.15 Some of the most significant legislation relating to the Korean War came through the two congressional armed services committees.  During this period the Senate Armed Services Committee was a far more effective record keeper than most other House and Senate committees.  The unpublished records of the Senate Armed Services Committee provide significant documentation on Korean War manpower issues.  The committee's bill files, 1949-54 (44 ft.), are full and complete, containing copies of all printed hearings and reports, copies of all forms of the bill, suggested amendments, comparisons of various forms of the bills, correspondence, petitions, memorials, and resolutions of interested organizations.  There is, for example, more than 10 in. of documentation on S.1, The Universal Military Training and Service Act of 1951, and 12 in. of documentation on HR 5426, the Armed Services Reserve Act of 1952.

III.16 In addition to bill files, National Archives holdings of the committee's records from each Congress include communications and reports from executive agencies, petitions and memorials, general correspondence files (sometimes organized by subject), and nomination files.

 

Records of the House Armed Services Committee

III.17 House Armed Services Committee records are generally less voluminous than those of its Senate counterpart.  For the 81st Congress (January 3, 1949-January 2, 1951) there are 10 ft. of bill files, but they offer less information about the Korean War than the Senate records.  There are also 10 in. of committee papers, which include correspondence arranged by subject and minutes of committee and subcommittee meetings.

 

Records of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee

III.18 Senate Foreign Relations Committee files are fairly complete for the 81st Congress, including 7 feet of executive messages, communications and reports. 5 feet of correspondence (2 inches are on Korea, including discussion of economic aid to Korea), and 10 feet of bill files.  The bill files include HR 5330, "A bill to promote world peace...by providing aid to Korea"; S2917, the International Development Act; and S 3103, The Foreign Assistance Act.

III.19 In the 82nd Congress (January 3, 1951-July 7, 1952) there are 3 feet of subject files including 2 inches on the recall of General MacArthur.  The bill files include a file on S 1762, the Mutual Security Act of 1951.

 

Records of the House Foreign Affairs Committee

III.20 Records of the House Foreign Affairs Committee include some small bill files that contain correspondence and unpublished hearings.  More significantly, the committee papers of the 81st-83rd Congresses (1949-54) include 10 feet of correspondence and subject files on topics such as aid to Korea, development of the united Nations, and the Economic Cooperation Administration (ECA) European Recovery.


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PART IV

STILL PICTURE RECORDS
RELATING TO THE KOREAN WAR

Contents - Part IV:

  • Overview
  • Record Group 52 - Records of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery
  • Record Group 59 - General Records of the Department of State
  • Record Group 80 - General Records of the Department of the Navy 1798-1947
  • Record Group 111 - Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer
  • Record Group 127 - Records of the U.S. Marine Corps
  • Record Group 242 - National Archives Collection of Foreign Records Seized
  • Record Group 306 - Records of the United States Information Agency
  • Record Group 319 - Records of the Army Staff
    • Records of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence (G-2)
  • Record Group 342 - Records of United States Air Force Commands, Activities and Operations

 

Part IV

OVERVIEW

IV. 1 Still picture records at the National Archives provide broad visual documentation of the Korean War.  Listed below are major series that focus on the war's operations, weapons, ammunition, aircraft, ships, equipment, combat activities, bases and facilities, engineering projects, diplomacy, and personalities.  The major military still picture series also provide a comprehensive view of the daily life, working environment, and activities of marines, soldiers, airmen, and sailors who served in combat and combat support units.  Most still picture records are available for unrestricted research and copying.  Copyright restrictions may exist, however, for accessioned still picture images that were originally acquired by Federal agencies from private, commercial sources.  Further information on the availability and duplication of National Archives still picture images can be obtained from the Special Media Archives Services Division (Still Pictures) (see Introduction).  NARA Archival Research Catalog (ARC) database descriptions are available for most of the still picture series described in this part.

 

Record Group 52 - Records of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery

IV.2 During the Korean War, Navy doctors, nurses, and corpsmen provided field medical and hospital services for U.S. Navy and Marine Corps personnel stationed in Korea.  Photographs of Naval Medical Battalion activities in the Korean War, October 1952-August 1953 [52-NMB] (5 in.), consist of 148, 4-x 5-in. black-and-white negatives, prints, and color transparencies that capture the day-to-day work and living conditions of naval medical personnel in the war zone.  Individual images depict field hospitals and hospital ships, helicopters evacuating the wounded, surgical operations and medical corpsmen in the field.  Both U.S. and Korean personnel are pictured.  The photographers were Sgt. W.G. Landers and C.L. Chance of the 1st Marine Division.  Series images are arranged in chronological order (day, month, and year) and thereunder numerically by field number (when provided).

IV.3 Photographs depicting battlefield surgical techniques in the Korean War, October 1952-February 1953 [52-KST] (5 in.), consist of 202 black-and-white negatives and prints and color transparencies that graphically portray the pain, trauma, and disfigurement inflicted by weapons of war.  These 4- x 5-in. images focus on head, chest, leg, and arm wounds along with surgical procedures and techniques used to treat them.  Specific items document amputations, brain surgery, infections and wound cleansing, tumors, and the effects of gunshot and shrapnel punctures on human lungs, livers, hearts, and kidneys.  Some photos illustrate surgical procedures and postoperative treatment.  Both American and Korean personnel are pictures.  Occasionally, individuals are named.  For that reason, privacy issues may govern access to specific images in this series.  The photographers were Sgt. W.G. Landers and Cpl. Eugene F. Beals of the 1st Marine Division.  Items are arranged in chronological order (day, month, and year) and thereunder numerically by field number when provided.

 

Record Group 59 - General Records of the Department of State

IV.4 Two series of Department of State still pictures provide images of Korean War diplomatic events and personalities.  The series prints of diplomatic events and facilities, and U.S. and foreign political, economic, and cultural activities, 1950-64 [59-G] (70 ft.), contains approximately 15,950 black-and-white photographs that relate to treaty signings, diplomatic embassies and consulates, events, and meetings.  The photos document conferences, summits, negotiations, and organizational sessions, including United Nations Security Council debate on North Korea's invasion of South Korea in June 1950.  The series also includes images of the Korean War Armistice signing ceremony at Panmunjom on July 27, 1953.  Other Korean War images portray subjects such as U.S. Marines in combat, Turkish artillery forces, wartime devastation in Seoul, and the evacuation of Korean civilians from combat areas.  Series 59-G is arranged alphabetically by subject and thereunder chronologically by the date that the images were entered into the Department of State (DOS) central file, and thereunder by corresponding sequence of DOS "VS" (for "Visual Services") log numbers assigned to each image.

IV.5 Prints of diplomatic personalities and other U.S. and foreign dignitaries, 1950-64 [59-O] (23 ft.), consist of approximately 4,550 black and white photographic prints of American Presidents and Presidential advisors, secretaries of state, ambassadors, Department of State undersecretaries and assistant secretaries, and U.N. representatives.  There are Korean War-era images of President Harry S. Truman, Secretary of State Dean G. Acheson, and Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs Dean Rusk.  The series is arranged alphabetically by surname of featured individual, and thereunder chronologically by the date that images were entered into the DOS central file, and then by corresponding sequence of DOS "VS" log numbers assigned to the images.

IV.6 Researchers gain access to photos within the alphabetically arranged 59-G "subject" or 59-O "personality" categories through container lists that the National Archives created for each series.  More precise index card citations to individual prints relating to a specific Korean War topic or personality are located in the 1950-64 segment of the alphabetically arranged card index to photographs relating to diplomatic events, facilities, and officials, and U.S. and foreign political, economic, and cultural life [59-GX] (30 ft.).  Index cards within this series segment identify the particular container list "subject" or "personality" category under which a specific image is located within series 59-G and 59-O.  Container lists and series 59-X are located in the Still Picture Research Room in College Park, MD.

IV.7 Negatives for many series 59-G and 59-O prints are located in negatives and proof sheets relating to U.S. and foreign diplomatic officials, events, and facilities, 1950-93 [59-N] (219 ft., approximately 214,000 images).  Series 59-N is arranged by format (size and type of image), thereunder chronologically by the date that the images were entered into the DOS central file, and thereunder by corresponding sequence of DOS "VS" log numbers assigned to the images.

 

Record Group 80 - General Records of the Department of the Navy 1798-1947

IV.8 The general photographic file of the Department of the Navy, 1943- 58 [80-G] (ca. 3,027 ft.), consists of approximately 700,000 numerically arranged negatives and matching prints that feature naval ships, shipboard activities, American and foreign naval aircraft, and military and civilian personalities.  Numerous images depict World War II and Korean War naval campaigns, engagements, and activities.  Korean War images focus on ships and aircraft in action, naval air sorties against bridges, railroads, buildings, and roads; coastal bombardment; minesweeping activities in areas such as Wonsan, Hungnam, and Chinnampo harbors during the fall of 1950; Naval participation in the Inchon Invasion (August-September 1950) and the Wonsan landing (fall 1950); and the evacuation of X Corps forces from Hungnam following the Chosin Reservoir breakout in December 1950.  There are also numerous photos of naval logistical facilities located in ports such as Pohang and Pusan.  Other images illustrate day-to-day naval land and shipboard activities and operations during the Korean War.  The series also includes a few images that document signings of formal agreements reached at the Panmunjom armistice negotiation sessions.

IV.9 The alphabetically arranged subject card index to the general photographic file of the Department of the Navy, 1942-58 [80-GG] (719 ft.), provides subject access to photographic items in 80-G.  The two most prominent subject card categories are "Ships, Navy," and "Aircraft."  The heading "Korea" contains approximately 1 ft. of subject cards relating to the Korean War.  Other Korean place name subject cards identify images set in specific Korean geographic locations.  Many of the index cards are in the Navy's "visual aid" (vis-aid) format, which incorporates a reduced image version of the indexed photographic image plus caption.  The two "personality" indexes for post-1947 80-G images are the index to photographs of personalities in the general photographic file of the Department of the Navy, 1947-58 [428-VX] (123 ft.), and the index to portrait photographs of personalities in the general photographic file of the Department of the Navy, 1947-58 [428-WX] (93 ft.).  Index cards in each of these two personality indexes are subdivided into vis-aid and non vis-aid card sections, and arranged thereunder alphabetically by indexed surname and first and middle names or initials.  All three indexes to 80-G are available for research in the Still Picture Research Room in College Park, MD.

 

Record Group 111 - Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer

IV.10 The series of color photographs of Signal Corps activity, 1944-81 [111-C] (ca. 102,300 prints, negatives, slides, and transparencies) (587 ft.), provides images of combat, Army posts, equipment, guns and weapons, aircraft, military units and exercises, special forces, medical facilities and procedures, military ceremonies, American and foreign POWs, foreign landscapes and populations, foreign armies and equipment, and artwork from the U.S. Army Art Collection of the U.S. Army Center of Military History.  Typed captions appear on the backs of prints.  Most negatives, transparencies, and slides also have captions, noted either on envelope jackets or on accompanying slips of paper.  The series is divided into two parts by size (8- x 10-in. and 4- x 5-in.) and arranged thereunder numerically by Signal Corps assigned "C" or "CC" number.  Combat theatre of operations photography within this series derives mostly from the wars in Korea and Vietnam.  Images from the Korean War focus heavily on Army weapons, ordnance, equipment, and combat support operations.  Other items document forces deployed in or moving toward combat areas such as the Naktong River front (August 1950), the Han River (February 1951), and the Chorwon and Kumhwa valleys (the "Iron Triangle" area) (1951-52).  Many images document the day-to-day activities and living conditions of U.S. Army and some U.N. armed forces in the field.  The series also includes a few photographic portraits of individual Korean citizens and scenes of daily commerce and activity among the Korean populace.

IV.11 The major finding aid for this series is the index to U.S. Army Signal Corps color photographs relating to American military activity, ca. 1942-ca. 1983 [111-CX] (105 ft.).  It consists of two chronological sections (1942-54 and 1955-83) of alphabetically arranged subject card indexes.  Within the 1942-54 section, under various subdivisions of "Korea" as subject, there are approximately 200 index cards that provide captions and numerical citations to Korean War images located in 111-C.  Personalities in Signal Corps photographs, l1940-81 [111-PX] (397 ft.), is a card index series that identifies named personalities in the images of several Record Group 111 still picture series, including 111-C.  The index cards in 111-PX are divided into two chronological sections covering, respectively, the years ca. 1940-ca. 1953 and ca. 1940-ca. 1981.  Cards within each section are arranged alphabetically by surname.

IV.12 Several series derivative from 111-C organize images into specific subject categories.  Negatives, slides, transparencies and--in most cases--corresponding contact prints are filed in the primary 111-C series, but additional copies of relevant prints can be found in the derivative series.  One of these series, the color prints subject file, 1944-54 [111-CPF] (15 ft.), consists of approximately 3,500 color prints and some black-and-white prints made from color negatives and transparencies that document and publicize U.S. Army activities during and after World War II and the Korean War.  Images are arranged into two sections.  Section 1 is arranged alphabetically by branch of service (e.g., artillery, engineers) and thereunder alphabetically by subject.  Section 2 is arranged alphabetically by subject and thereunder alphabetically by subject subdivisions.  A subject, folder, and box list is available in the Still Picture Research Room in College Park, MD.  Approximately 2 ft. of 111-CPF Korean War images are filed under the section 2 subject "Korea" and various subdivisions.  The series 111-CPF does not incorporate every Korean War image found in 111-C.  However, it does offer a alternative to the 111-CS index for locating and reviewing many (if not all) Korean War images in the comprehensive series 111-C.

IV.13 Signal Corps photographs of American military activity, ca. 1900-ca. 1981 [111-SC] (2,054 ft. of original negatives), is a large series of over 680,000 black and white photographic negatives and corresponding prints covering events that occurred between 1754 and 1981.  The 1941-54 portion of this series (2nd accession or accretion), covering World War II and the Korean War, is arranged in numerical order by Signal Corps photograph number.  Korean War images in the second accretion focus on the activities, equipment, weapons, supplies, and living conditions of deployed Army combat and support forces.  Frontline photography illustrates tactical operations and positioning of units such as the 1st Cavalry Division, the 2nd, 3rd, 7th, and 25th infantry divisions, and the 187th Regimental Combat Teams.  These images illustrate the Army's advance northward from the Naktong, Han, and Imjin rivers to Hungnam Harbor, Kunu-ri, and the Yalu River; its retreat southward; and the 38th Parallel battles of position waged in places such as the Kumhwa and Chorwon valleys and Heartbreak Ridge.  Other photographs focus on the work of Army support forces, including engineers, medics, nurses, doctors, and signal corpsmen.  There are, for example, images depicting construction (especially of bridges and roads), the work of combat medics and surgeons (including scenes of medical evacuation by helicopter), and communications equipment and facilities.  Other related items include aerial views of Korean combat areas and Army bases, casualty photographs, scenes of soldiers participating in various off-duty activities (especially religious services), photos of awards ceremonies, scenes of foreign forces, and tour images focusing on high ranking military commanders and civilian dignitaries.  Several items depict individual Koreans, groups of Korean refugees, and Communist POWs.

IV.14 The most important finding aid for 111-SC is the three-part index to U.S. Army Signal Corps black and white photographs in series 111-SC, ca. 1900-ca. 1981 [111-SCY] (42 ft.).  Part II of this index contains alphabetically arranged subject index cards that cover photography taken between the years 1941 and 1954.  Under the subject "Korea," there are major subdivisions for geographic areas (e.g., "Korea, Koje-do"; "Korea, Taegu"), and for "subjects" (e.g., "Korea, helicopters": "Korea, sleeping and relaxing").  Under the subject subdivision, there are branches of service subheadings (e.g. "engineers," "transportation," "infantry") that include sections of index cards sub-arranged by unit number (e.g., 153rd Transportation company).  These cards identify images that pertain to specific units.  The personality index for 111-SC is personalities in Signal Corps photographs, 1940-81 [111-PX].

IV.15 U.S. Army Signal Corps photographs of military activity during WWII, Korea, and Vietnam, 1941-81 [111-SCA] (ca. 1,280 ft.), consist of over 600,000 black and white photographic prints derived from 111-SC and housed in 7,717 albums and 9 boxes.  The albums and boxes are grouped under geographic, aerial, subject, branch of service, unit, maneuvers, army posts, and personality file headings and arranged thereunder alphabetically by subtopic (e.g., "Korea," "Havoc of War, Korea," "Armored Forces, Korea") or numerically by unit or Army number (e.g., "7th Infantry Division"), and thereunder numerically by Signal Corps identification number.  These subject albums provide a quick means of locating, identifying, and viewing prints of most (but not all) Korean War photography that appears in 111-SC.  The finding aid for 111-SCA is a six-volume album subject list located in the Still Picture Research Room in College Park, MD.

 

Record Group 127 - Records of the U.S. Marine Corps

IV.16 Photographs of Marine Corps activities in Korea, 1950-58 [127-GK] (ca. 22 ft.), consist of approximately 14,000 images (4- x 5-in. and 3- x 4-in., most black-and-white prints) that document Marine Corps combat and noncombat activities in Korea both during and after the Korean War.  Most of the images cover the period 1950-53 and include photographs of Marine Corps aircraft, pilots, helicopters, combat and battle scenes during various engagements and campaigns, uniforms, buildings, landings, briefings, sentries, engineer activity, weapons, captured North Korean and Chinese troops, personalities and dignitaries visiting the troops, officers and enlisted personnel, and vehicles.  In addition, there are also photographs of various Marine noncombat activities, including parades, training exercises, ceremonies, embarkments, recreation, and entertainment.  Print captions usually include a negative number, date taken, photograph subject information (names of featured Marine Corps units, individuals, and geographic locales), and names of photographers.  The photographs are organized according to Marine Corps-devised numeric groups (or "dividers") corresponding to subject categories.  Some of the larger subject categories are subdivided into more refined subject or chronological subheadings.  There are, for example, images filed under subjects such as "Combat, Korea (by city or year)," "Landing Craft," "Beachhead, Embarking," "Pilots, Crewmen," and "Machine Guns--Light and Heavy."  Combat action photographs document nearly every battle in which the Marine Corps took part.  However, most images emanate from engagements along the Naktong River, at Wolmi-do and Inchon, in Seoul, at various locations near the Chosin Reservoir, and in the "Punch Bowl" area.  The most important finding aid for this series is an alphabetical subject list that correlates subjects with divider and box numbers.  It is located in the Still Picture Research Room in College Park, MD.

IV.17 The United States Marine Corps photographic reference file, ca. 1940-ca. 1958 [127-GR] (14 ft.), consists of 3,000 mostly black and white 8- x 10-in captioned prints arranged by subject within three topical series categories--"general subjects," "World War II," and "Korea."  Under "general subjects" there are groupings of Korean War-era photographs filed under subject headings such as "Medal of Honor, Korea" (Korean War Marine Corps medal of honor recipients), "VMF-214, Korea" (Marine Corps aircraft fighter squadron, also known as the "Black Sheep"), and "Med-evac and Corpsmen."  Under "Korea" there are subject groupings of photographs of Marines in combat from Pusan to Hwachon Reservoir (filed under "Campaigns [by place") as well as views of aircraft, artillery, bunkers, cemeteries, close air supply and support, communications, engineering activities, and captured weapons and equipment.  The same heading includes subject-arranged images of Marines in combat, medical and surgical hospitals, Korean civilians, Marine Corps personalities, North Korean and Communist Chinese POWs, coordinated United Nations Command offensives in the "Punch Bowl" area ("Operation Killer," 1951), Marines participating in recreation activities, religious services conducted in the field, Republic of Korea Marines, and other U.N. soldiers in Korea.  A box and folder list, arranged by the three series topical categories and thereunder alphabetically by subject headings employed in each category, is available in the Still Picture Research Room in College Park, MD.  Many (but not all) of the Korean War photographs in this series duplicate images found in 127-GK.  These 8- x 10-in. images are generally easier to handle and view than the smaller format images found in 127-GK.  However, the photographic caption subject information in 127-GR generally contains less detail than that provided with the 127-GK images.

IV.18 Negatives for most of the photographic prints in series 127-GK and 127-GR are filed in the general photograph file of the U.S. Marine Corps, 1927-81 [127-N] (1,417 ft.).  This series contains over 356,000 images (a mixture of black and white and color negatives, slides, and transparencies).  It is a comprehensive pictorial record of Marine Corps history, with emphasis on combat campaigns, personnel recruitment and training, and personalities from World War II and the Korean War through the Vietnam War.

IV.19 The alphabetically arranged car indexes to photographs of Marine Corps and noted civilian personalities, 1927-81 [127-PX] (374 ft.), is the personality index for series 127-GK, 127-GR, and 127-N.  The index cards include caption references to noteworthy Marine Corps and civilian personalities whose names appear on photograph captions in the various Marine Corps photographic series along with citations to item numbers for negatives in series 127-N.

 

Record Group 242 - National Archives Collection of Foreign Records Seized

IV.20 North Korean propaganda posters, ca. 1950 [242-P], consist of two Korean-language posters produced by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea early in the war to generate public support for North Korean war aims.  Other North Korean informational and propaganda posters are located in the RG 242 textual series captured Korean documents, 1921-54 (see paragraph II.227).

 

Record Group 306 - Records of the United States Information Agency

IV.21 The United States Information Agency (USIA) maintained a photo library in which the centerpiece was a master file consisting of selectively retained photographic prints and negatives that were disseminated abroad through various press and U.S. Government publications.  The National Archives has accessioned significant portions of the master file, including Korean War-era images.  The USIA master file photographs of U.S. and foreign personalities, world events, and American economic, social, and cultural life, 1948-83 [306-PS] (578 ft.), consist of approximately 236,600 prints, slides, and transparencies.  The series is organized into the following six sub series: 306-PS (1948-61), 306-PS-A (1948-73); 306-PS-B (1948-64); 306-PS-C (1948-76), 306-PS-D (1948-72); and 306-PS-E (1973-83).  Most Korean War images in 306-PS are black and white, measuring 4- x 5-in. or smaller.  They are located in all of the 306-PS sub series except 306-PS-E.  There are photographs of Korean War era political leaders, ambassadors, and armistice negotiators such as Syngman Rhee (President of the Republic of Korea), Jacob Malik (USSR ambassador to the United Nations), General Nam IL (Chief of Staff, North Korean People's Army, Vice Premier, People's Democratic Republic of Korea, and chief of the Communist nations Korean War armistice negotiating team at Kaesong and Panmunjom), and Mao Ze-dung (Chairman of the Communist Party of the People's Republic of China).  As with photographic items in the armed services still pictures series, 306-PS Korean War images focus on U.N. forces (along with their weapons and equipment) in combat or support activities, but also include views of Korean citizens and refugees and Communist POWs.

IV.22 Most 306-PS Korean War images supplement those found in the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and State Department still picture series described in this section.  Many 306-PS images derive from U.S. Government sources such as the State Department, the Department of Defense, and individual military service branches.  Numerous others, however, originated with news agencies (Acme, International News, Associated Press, Wide World, Black Star, and The Washington Post) and the United Nations.  Many of the images acquired by the USIA and its predecessors from private, nongovernmental sources such as the news agencies cited above may be subject to copyright restrictions.  Each sub series has a separate card index that consists of alphabetically arranged "subject" and "personality" sections.  Collectively, these six indexes make up the subject indexes to master file photographs of U.s. and foreign personalities, world events, and American economic, social, and cultural life, 1943-83 [306-X] (386 ft.).  Sub series index cards usually contain the following information: photographic item numbers and source identification; captions (including date and place of photograph); and subject categories or personality names along with cross reference citations.  All of this information is useful for locating photographic items because arrangement schemes vary among the six 306-PS sub series.  The indexes, 306-X, are located in the Still Picture Research Room in College Park, MD.  Negatives matching most of the black-and-white items are located in another series, USIA master file black and white negatives of U.S. and foreign personalities, world events, and American economic, social and cultural life, 1948-83 [306-N] (382 ft., ca. 165,000 images).

 

Record Group 319 - Records of the Army Staff

IV.23 Photographic prints relating to the Korean War are among a series of aerial and panoramic photographs of various countries and the United States [319-CE] (11 feet, 12,000 images).  This series was created by the Office of the Chief Signal Officer.  Initially, the photographs were part of the Signal Corps files for the period ca. 1940-1954.  The images were removed and restricted from public use by the Public Information Office or other elements of the Army Staff, presumably for reasons of personal privacy, military security or other related considerations.  Included in the series are aerial and panoramic views of Korea, military and civilian casualties, atrocities, and propaganda activities.  Negatives matching most of these black-and-white items are located in another series, Signal Corps photographs of American military activity, ca. 1900-ca. 1981 [111-SC] (2,054 ft. of original negatives).

 

RECORDS OF THE ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF FOR INTELLIGENCE (G-2)

IV.24 The series of black-and-white negative stills, compiled from motion picture film, relating to economic, military, and political sites and activities in communist countries, ca. 1944-54 [391-NS] (26 ft., ca. 12,480 images), is a product of Cold War-era efforts by U.S. Army intelligence analysts to comb through motion picture footage for documentation of industrial, agricultural, military, and political locales, resources, operations, and personages in the U.S.S.R., the People's Republic of china, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, and other Communist nations.  Drawing on films from many international sources and on footage shot before, during, and after World War II, analysts selected frames deemed significant, then systematically compiled negatives generated from those frames for ongoing reference and research.  Accordingly, about 75 percent of the negatives in the series are accompanied by detailed captions indicating image locale and date.  Many locale descriptions include map coordinates.  This series was maintained by this agency's Document Library Branch in the Collections and Dissemination Division.

IV.25 The series 319-NS is arranged in four groups representing motion picture acquisition source (designated by acronyms, such as "MIDS") and thereunder sequentially by a hyphenated numbering scheme that denotes (in descending order) film number, film reel number, and Document Library Branch assigned negative number (e.g., MIDS-5010-1-4).  The largest group of negatives (MIDS) derive from motion pictures that have been accessioned into the National Archives as part of [seized foreign] motion pictures films from G-2 army military intelligence division, 1918-ca. 1947 [242-MID].  See paragraph V.15 for additional information on this series and about specific series films such as 242-MID-5010, 242-MID-5011, 242-MID-5141, and 242-MID-5153 described below.  MIDS is the only 319-NS acronym group that contains negatives relating to the Korean War.

IV.26 Most 319-NS MIDS negatives focus on North Korean political leaders or other notables, and several physical, military, and cultural manifestations of cooperation between the Soviet Union and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK).  Negative stills from MID 5010 and 5011 (two versions of "Everlasting Good Will," ca. 1946-50), for example, include a few images of Premier Kim Il Sung and other unidentified North Korean officials attending a sports festival in Pyongyang (ca. 1948) commemorating North Korean officials attending a sports festival in Pyongyang (ca. 1948) commemorating establishment of the DPRK.  MID 5011-3-41 is a close-up of Kim Il Sung with author Du Pong Kim.  Several MID 5011 negatives provide individual or group close-up shots depicting Soviet Army and Air Force officers and enlisted personnel in North Korea on parade, posed in YAK fighter aircraft, Receiving medals or gifts from North Korean officials (such as North Korean actress Kyung Al You), attending concerts, and in various scenes of cordial exchange with Korean citizens, ca. 1945-ca. 1950.

IV.27 Other MID 5011 negatives offer examples of Soviet technical assistance programs in post-World War II North Korea.  There are several negatives (ca. 1950) depicting Russians training North Korean technicians to operate and maintain Soviet supplied communications equipment.  MID 5011 negatives also document an industrial infrastructure that had developed in North Korea during the Japanese occupation and continued under Soviet Union auspices after World War II.  There are, for example, negatives of the Chong Chin Dam; a hydroelectric plant; steel, metallurgical and textile factories; bridges; and public buildings.  Negatives from MID 5141 ("South-North Meeting") also emphasize the theme of technical development with scenes of the Sui Ho Dam, turbine outlets, and transformer on the Yalu River.

IV.28 MID 5153 ("Arctic Star," ca. 1949) negatives offer a view of daily life in the Kuck Sung Kolkhoz (Arctic Star Collective Farm) in the Uzbekistan Soviet Socialist Republic, emphasizing themes of equality and cooperation among Koreans and Uzbeks in the Soviet Union, and the superiority of Communist agricultural technology and production.  arctic Star was an agricultural venture composed of Koreans who had left their native country during the Japanese occupation.  There are scenes of poultry, sheep graving, field irrigation, and cotton harvesting; the cooperative gate entrance, school, reading room, repair shop, power house, and other buildings; and cooperative meetings, dances, ceremonies, and feasts.  Other images depict Korean cooperative members conducting business with Uzbek officials and Korean students attending classes with non-Koreans at Tashkent University.  Two other negatives contrast the scene of a South Korean farmer operating his horse-drawn plow with another portraying a mechanized North Korean crop harvest.

 

Record Group 342 - Records of the United States Air Force Commands,
Activities and Operations

IV.29 The most important still picture series documenting Air Force activities during the Korean War is black and white and color photographs of U.S. Air Force and predecessor agencies, activities, facilities and personnel--World War II and Korean War, ca. 1940-ca. 1980 [342-FH] (252 ft.).  This series consists of 149,552 black-and-white and color photographic prints and 448 slides documenting the activities of the U.S. Air Force and its predecessors during World War II and the Korean War, as well as U.S. military aviation history.  The records are grouped into six broad subject categories (World War II, Pre-1940 Domestic, Pre-1954 Domestic, Non-Domestic, Korean War, and Addenda) and arranged thereunder by more specific subject categories.  Photographs in the Korean War section document U.S. Air Force, United Nations, and North Korean combat actions and cease-fire negotiations.  Most of these photographs were taken in Korea, but many others originated in Japan.  Within the Korean War section print images are arranged by specific subject categories such as aircraft, crews, fields and installations, maintenance, transportation, operations, bombing, strafing, and combat; prisons and prisoners; captured materiel; medical care; and recreation.  Print and slide captions usually provide photographic source identification and negative numbers; image dates; name, rank or title; hometown locations, or other particulars pertaining to featured personalities; specific names of weapons, aircraft, ordnance, equipment, or other featured subjects; and cross reference citations to other 342-FH series subject categories.  Caption information rarely identifies Air Force bases in Korea, Japan, or Okinawa by name or location, nor does it cite unit names and numbers below the wing or group level.

IV.30 Numerous "Korean War" section combat operation photographs illustrate the full range of propeller-driven and jet-powered fighters, bombers, fighter/bombers, reconnaissance and spotter planes, cargo transports, and helicopters used in Korea.  Several images focus on the work, uniforms, equipment, and activities of pilots, bombardiers, navigators, crew chiefs, gunners, and ground crew specialists.  Other images focus on mission briefings and debriefings, capturing the emotional effects of combat on pilots and air crews.  There are also photographs of U.N. military personnel boarding Air Force cargo transports en route to, or returning from, Japan on rest and recuperation leave.  Several images detail weapons and equipment, ranging from .50 caliber machine gun belts and airborne rockets to ground- or aircraft-installed radar equipment.

IV.31 The most useful finding aids for browsing to identify and locate 342-FH prints are the Smithsonian Institution-produced "National Air and Space Museum Archival Videodiscs": U.S. Air Force pre-1954 still photograph collection, 1985-95 [342-VID] (2 items), an accompanying Smithsonian-produced list of video disc (viddisc) item numbers arranged in accordance with 342-FH "Korean War" section subjects, and a NARA-produced box list that correlates viddisc/342-FH item numbers with series box numbers.  All of these finding aids are available in the Still Picture Research Room in College Park, MD.  Side A of 342-VID Disc 4 includes images of most 342-FH "Korean War" photographic prints arranged in accordance with that section's specific subject categories and thereunder by viddisc item number clusters.  The Smithsonian Institution, with Air Force cooperation, produced the 342-VID discs as a compendium and historic Air Force photographs finding aid when 342-FH was on loan to the National Air and Space Museum.

IV.32 The following two RG 342 captioned index card series located in the Still Picture Research Room provide detailed information about individual 342-FH prints that relate to specific Korean War subjects and personalities: subject index to black and white and color negatives, slides, and transparencies of U.S. Air Force activities, facilities, and personnel, ca. 1942-80 [342-X] (174 ft.), and personality index to black and white and color negatives, slides and transparences of U.S. Air Force activities, facilities, and personnel, ca. 1942-ca. 1980 [342-Z] (67 ft.).

IV.33 The Smithsonian-compiled "USAF Collection Database," also located in the Still Picture Research Room, correlates 342-FH print item numbers to corresponding negatives and transparencies in black and white photographs of U.S. Air Force and predecessor's activities, facilities, and personnel, domestic and foreign, 1930-75 [342-AF] (493 ft., ca. 180,000 negatives, ca. 5,000 slides, 2,000 transparencies, and 9,000 prints) and color photographs of U.S. Air Force activities, facilities, and personnel, domestic and foreign, ca. 1940-ca. 1980 [342-C] (134 ft., ca. 24,000 slides, ca. 27,000 negatives, and ca. 27,000 transparencies).

IV.34 A series of prints and negatives relating to the U.S. Air Force occupation of Japan, 1945-62 [342-J] (17 ft., approximately 4,000 images), includes some images that document the Korean War activities of Air Force combat and support units and personnel stationed in Japan, Okinawa, and (to a lesser extent) Korea.  The prints are arranged alphabetically by photo album subject title.  Negatives are arranged sequentially by assigned negative number.  Shelved with the series is a card index (342-JX) (5 ft.) divided into five broad headings (Japan, Korea, Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, Personnel) and arranged thereunder alphabetically by subject or surname.  Each card provides the print's negative identification number, full caption, and the subject heading under which it is filed.

IV.35 The Special Media Archives Services Division (Still Pictures) maintains an unpublished guide to representative National Archives still picture records relating to U.S. involvement in the Korean Peninsula, 1945-54.  This 9-part guide, divided by topic, consists of approximately 1 foot of still picture series descriptions, electrostatic copy samples of captioned and numbered photographs, and other records or information pertaining to various aspects of American involvement in Korea after World War II.  Duplication of some photocopied images in the guide may be restricted, due to copyright considerations.  A copy is available for consultation in the general subject files of the Still Picture Research Room in College Park, MD.


Back to Page Contents

PART V

MOTION PICTURES AND SOUND AND VIDEO RECORDS
RELATING TO THE KOREAN WAR

Contents - Part V:

  • Overview

  • Record Group 59 - General Records of the Department of State

  • Record Group 111 - Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer

  • Record Group 127 - Records of the United States Marine Corps

  • Record Group 242 - National Archives Collection of Foreign Records Seized

  • Record Group 263 - Records of the Central Intelligence Agency

  • Record Group 306 - Records of the U.S. Information Agency

  • Record Group 330 - Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense

  • Record Group 335 - Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Navy

  • Record Group 342 - Records of U.S. Air Force Commands, Activities, and Organizations

  • Record Group 428 - General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1947-

  • National Archives Collection of Donated Materials

 

PART V

OVERVIEW

V.1 Listed and described below, in record group order, are the motion picture, sound, and video series that contain footage relating to military, political, and social aspects of the Korean War.  Each description incorporates series titles with a detailed focus on specific media items, or on groups of items, along with comments pertaining to finding aids.  Researchers should note that available finding aids for these records focus on individual items and not series titles.  Consequently, researchers usually gain access to these records through item title or subject searches of NARA--or agency-produced catalogues or production lists or through the NARA Archival Research Catalog (ARC).  Series titles are provided only to suggest broadly the type, format, chronological span, and occasionally the subject content of media records grouped under a series designator (e.g., 111-LC, 127-USMC, 342-USAF).

V.2 Card index information for many of the following motion picture series (111-ADC, 111-LC, 342-USAF, and 428-NPC) has been entered, in whole or in part, in the ARC database, thus enabling searches by field or field combinations, such as film title, item number, and descriptive item or keyword.  NARA updates the ARC database on a weekly basis.  For current information on the status of these and other motion picture series described in ARC, contact the Special Media Archives Services Division (Motion Picture, Sound, and Video).

V.3 Access to these records is generally open, but there are important copyright restrictions that govern use and reproduction of donated materials such as newsreels and broadcast sound recordings produced by private corporations.  Additional information about National archives motion picture, sound, and video records can be obtained from the Special Media Archives Services Division (Motion Picture, Sound, and Video) (see Introduction).

 

Record Group 59 - General Records of the Department of State

V.4 Motion picture documentation of the activities of the Department of State, U.S. foreign policy, and U.S. foreign relations, 1911-68 (254 items), is a relatively small series of mostly black-and-white and edited films and newsreels created by the Department of State or obtained from other Government agencies and private sources.  Most items in this series related to the Korean War were produced during the first year of combat.  Several films capture thoughts and official statements of Government policy-makers.  Item 59.167, for example, is a 30-min. black-and-white motion picture interview of Secretary of State Dean Acheson conducted by CBS correspondents Charles Collingwood and Edward R. Murrow, and Griffing Bancroft for the September 10, 1950, edition of "Diplomatic Pouch," a series of televised interviews with Department of State policymakers on various aspects of American foreign policy.  Approximately 10 minutes of the program focuses on Acheson's views concerning the Korean War and its causes, American war aims, the possibility of a war with U.S.S.R. or China over Korea, the role of U.N. leadership, and broader aspects of American foreign and military policy in Asia.  Pathe News newsreels in this series feature several addresses and speeches delivered by President Harry S. Truman in 1950 and 1951 to the United States Congress, the United Nations, and the American public (items 59.155, 59.156, 59.157, and 59.158) relating to the Korean situation.

V.5 Both Truman and Acheson sought to justify American participation in the Korean War by stressing the image of American forces joining with other nations under U.N. leadership to repel Communist aggression on the people and on nascent democratic institutions of South Korea.  Conveying this view to foreign audiences partly depended on producing films such as the United States Information Agency's "In Defense of Peace," 1951 (Item 99.162), "Battle Report," 1951 (Item 59.172), and "One Year in Korea," 1951 (Item 59.180).  Scenes in these narrated films feature North Korean forces attacking South Korea, fleeing Korean refugees, and U.S., Canadian, Turkish, Dutch, and Australian forces departing for or arriving in South Korea.  Other footage highlights successful U.N. combat actions such as U.S. Marines landing at Inchon, U.S. Army 7th Cavalry Regiment soldiers crossing the 38th parallel, X Corps' evacuation of U.S. Marines from Hungnam, and U.N. forces under Lt. Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway recapturing Seoul.  There are also scenes of numerous North Korean prisoners of war.  "In Defense of Peace" includes images of South Koreans going to the polls in 1948 as the U.S. withdraws its occupation forces.  "One Year in Korea" shows U.N. agencies distributing food and clothing to Korean civilians, massacred Korean civilians found north of the 38th parallel by the 7th Cavalry, and U.N. forces retreating through the snow as Chinese troops enter the war.

V.6 Pathe News and other newsreels include similar scenes and thematic emphasis (see above and paragraphs V.28-V.31).  This suggests that the Truman Administration enjoyed some early success in conveying major points of its war policy through the media to the millions of Americans who attended movies or watched television.

 

Record Group 111 - Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer

V.7 There are four series of index cards for the 111-ADC series, including master numerical cards [for series 111-ADC] (13 ft.); subject cards for [series] 18-CS and 111-ADC (80 ft.); source files for 111-ADC (11 ft.); and combined subject cards [for series] 111-ADC and 111-LC (363 ft.).  The master numerical cards are arranged by 111-ADC item number, while the subject cards are arranged alphabetically by subjects such as "Korean War, 1950-53-[subject subdivision]."  Information on each card includes a film title or supplied title, film date, film shooting location, film source information, film type (silent, sound), film physical information (e.g., footage, color or black-and-white), and detailed film scene descriptions (e.g., film setting, subjects, actions).  Researchers who use the subject cards should understand that they also refer to motion picture films that have not been accessioned by the National Archives.

V.8 Motion picture films, 1940-53 [111-ADC] (10,641 items) contains several silent, unedited black-and-white motion picture films created by the Army Pictorial Center that provide information about the Korean War.  For example, series items 111-ADC 9032, 9034, 9082, and 9103 include film footage of the "Cease Fire Talks."  The films were shot near Kaesong in July and August 1951.  Item 111-ADC 9051 includes film footage of a "Visit to I Corps Area" shot near Uijongbu, Korea, in July 1951.  Item 111-ADC 9202 consists of film footage of battles and ally support in "38th Infantry ROK stops counterattack (23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Division moving up)," shot north of Yanggu, Korea, in August 1951.  Item 111-ADC 9208 pertains to film footage of the "9th Infantry Tank Co., 2nd Division" as well as other units in September 1951 in Korea.  And item 111-ADC 9210, "NK Bunkers, Hill 673," includes film footage of damage to the hill after an air strike in order for Marines to take the hill and the aftermath of the battle.  This footage was shot in September 1951.

V.9 There are four series of index cards for the 111-LC series, including master numerical cards (4 ft.); combined subject cards [for series] 111-ADC and 111-LC series 111-LC (16 ft.); and color subjects [cards for series 111-LC] (23 ft.).  The numerical cards are arranged by 111-LC item number, while the subject cards are arranged alphabetically by subjects, such as "Korean War."  Information on each card provides a film title or supplied title, film date, film shooting location, film source information, film type (silent, sound), film physical information (footage, color or black-and-white), and detailed film scene descriptions (film setting, subjects, actions).  Some motion picture films identified in the 111-LC subject and numerical cards have not been accessioned by the National Archives.

V.10 Motion picture films from the Army Library Copy Collection, 1953-80 [111-LC) (3,000 items), include several sound and silent, unedited black-and-white motion picture films created by the Army Pictorial Center that pertain to the Korean War.  For example, item 111-LC 28530 includes information concerning the "Panmunjom Peace Talks..." filmed in November and December 1951.  The 8209th and the 8225th MASH (Mobile Army Surgical Hospital) units, the 629th Medical Clearing Company, and 1st Marine Medical Battalion are highlighted in items 111-LC 28760 through 28762, titled, "Air Evacuation Story...," filmed in Inje, Korea, during December 1951.  Items 111-LC 28855 and 28856 describe "5th Air Force Plane GSAP [Gun Sight Aiming Point] Footage," from November 1951.  The 101st Signal Construction Battalion is featured in items 111-LC 28879 and 28880 while in Chunchon, Korea, on February 14, 1952.

V.11 Motion picture films from the "combat bulletin" program series, 1944-51 [111-CB] (114 items), include several sound, black-and-white motion picture films relating to the Korean War during 1950 and 1951.  For example, item 111-CB 101, "Battle for Time...," depicts amphibious landings by the 1st Cavalry Division and 1st Marine Brigade as well as combat scenes involving the 25th and 24th Infantry Divisions.  Item 111-CB 103, "UN Offensive," includes Air Force footage.  In Item 111-CB 105, "UN Forces Escape Trap," film footage shows the 7th Infantry Division dig in at the Yalu River and the 1st Marine Division on the Hagaru road headed for Hungnam where they are evacuated.  Additional evacuation footage is shown in item 111-CB 106, "UN Forces Consolidate Below 38th Parallel."  Troop movements of the 1st Cavalry Division and the 24th, 25th and 7th Infantry Divisions are documented on item 111-CB 108, "Combat Activities in Korea."  Operation Tomahawk is highlighted in item 111-CB 109, "UN Forces Cross 38th Parallel."  Item 111-CB 112, "Korean Cease-fire Talks," features the delegations at Kaesong, Korea.

 

Record Group 127 - Records of the United States Marine Corps

V.12 Unedited combat camera films, ca. 1940-ca. 1980 [127-USMC or 127-G] (2,913 items), which is divided into 16 mm. and 35 mm. film format segments, contains extensive footage that documents Marine Corps military activities during the Korean War.  Combat action footage in 16 mm. film includes scenes of various locations such as Chunchon, Hungnam, Hwachon, and Inchon (127-USMC, 1535, 1556, 1571, 1573, 1599, 1601, 1604-1608, 1620, 1622, 1624, 1637, 1640, 1648, 1652, 1721-1727).  Several 35 mm. motion picture films in this series provide additional coverage of combat action (127-USMC 692, 887, 889, 892-893, 947-964, 966, 1002-1007, 1035-1036, 1091, 1105, 1107-1110, 1116-1118, 1120, 1122, 1128, 1216, 2067).

V.13 The combined subject cards (28 ft.) refer to specific 127 USMC master catalog cards (22 ft.) that provide content descriptions of each film in the 127-USMC series.  All of the items listed above were located under the subject heading "Geographical Locations--Korea" instead of under "Crisis--Korean War."  The master catalog cards were filmed and are also available on the master numerical fiche (6 ft.).  Numbers below 3001 in the 35 mm. segment of the master catalog cards are only available on microfiche.

V.14 Broader subject access to 127-USMC film footage of the Korean War is also possible.  For example, the Marine Corps Picture Authority Film Book lists general subject items.  These terms are used in the 127- USMC subject catalog cards to index master catalogue card film descriptions that relate to the Korean War.  One final note about the 127-USMC indexes: because the 127-USMC film series is divided into 16 mm. and 35 mm. format segments, subject and master catalogue cards for that series are also divided into 16 mm. and 35 mm. sections.  The Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch has compiled an informational handout that explains the contents and format of 127-USMC catalog cards, the authority film book, and their functional interrelationships.

 

Record Group 242 - National Archives collection of Foreign Records Seized

V.15 Motion picture films from G-2 Army Military Intelligence Division, 1918-ca. 1947 [242-MID] (2,576 items), includes six motion pictures depicting North Korean pro-Soviet and ant-American attitudes in the 1940s and 1950s:

1. 242-MID 5000, "North Korea" and "From North Korea" includes scenes of North Korea and how Communism and the Soviet Union have helped North Korean society progress (1950)

2. 242-MID 5010 and 5011, "Everlasting Good Will" includes scenes depicting the good will existing between the Soviet Union and North Korea (1945-48)

3. 242-MID 5141, "South-North Meeting" includes scenes of political meetings between North and South Korean officials and speeches by North Koreans concerned about how Americans are treating their southern brothers

4. 242-MID 5153, "Arctic Star" focuses on a Korean group called the Kuck Sung Kolkhoz in the Uzbek region of Russia

5. 242-MID 5401, "Russian Newsreel #23" shows participants in mass meetings in the Soviet Union and China signing a peace pledge.  Speakers blame U.S. intervention in Korea for destroying the peace in the area (July 1950).

All 242-MID motion picture master catalog cards have been entered into the ARC database.

 

Record Group 263 - Records of the Central Intelligence Agency

V.16 Motion picture films from Asia, 1952 [263] (3 items), contain films alleging the use of bacteriological or germ warfare by the United States during the Korean War that were produced by the Peking Film Studio (with English language narration) and by the National Film Studio of North Korea (with English language subtitles).  Item 263.1 is "Documentary Evidence of the International Scientific Commission for the Investigation of U.S. Bacteriological Warfare," and item 263.2 is "U.S. Germ Warfare in Korea."

 

Record Group 306 - Records of the U.S. Information Agency

V.17 The Federal Government comprehended the role of media as a tool during the Korea War and later in the Cold War.  Exploitation of radio, motion picture, photographic, and journalistic resources began earlier but achieved coherent direction in 1953 with the establishment of the United States Information Agency (USIA).  Since then, the USIA has supported American foreign policymakers through programs of information gathering, analysis, and dissemination.  During the Korean War, the USIA utilized various media to promote U.S. interests and foster a favorable American image abroad, while simultaneously trying to counter the effects of Communist propaganda on foreign populations.

V.18 This effort is well documented in three series of NARA-held USIA motion picture films, 1942-99 (16,376 items) and Voice of America (VOA) audio recordings, 1942-99, and production library audio recordings, 1945-93 [306-EN] (16,907 items).  Individual items in the three series offer coverage of the Korean War including production of war materiel in the U.S., Congressional reaction to the Korean situation, and reports from Korea.  The USIA emphasis on "selling" America abroad is also well documented by several items that feature U.S. accomplishments.  Two motion picture films in the first series that relate to the Korean War are 306.9, "America in Transition," which demonstrates the ability of the U.S. to change from a peacetime to a wartime society, and 306.134, "Production and the Free World," which describes the importance of individual production to NATO forces serving in Korea.

V.19 A sample of VOA sound recordings include the following:

1. 306.14, "Syngman Rhee, Broadcast to the World: Expression of Gratitude to Nations Supporting Korea Against Communist Aggression" (July 14, 1950)

2. 306.22, "Warren B. Austin Speech to the United Nations on Communist Aggression in Korea" (January 1, 1951)

3. 306.35, "Fox in Korea: Interview of Hospital Personnel at the 38th Parallel in Korea..." (March 4, 1953)

4. 306-EN C-3695 and C-3703B, "Congressional Reaction to the Korean Situation..." (June 27, 1950)

5. 306-EN C-4062A, C-4062B, and C-4165, speeches from President Harry S. Truman on the situation in Korea (September 19 and 26, 1950)

6. 306-EN E-3989, E-4159, E-4795, E-4888, E-5269, E-5305, E-6025, E-60626, E-6383, E-6548, E-6706, E-6707, E-6789, E-7231, E-7232, E-7329, E-7481, E-7482, including "Report[s] on Korea" from November 1952 through May 1953

7. 306-EN E-6217, E-6314, E-6316, E-6317, E-6338, E-6345B, E-6382, E-6568, E-6569, E-6571, E-6671, E-6697, E-6698, [reports from' "Sonny Fox in Korea" during February 1953

V.20 The ARC database includes index card information for all VOA sound recordings and for over 75 percent of NARA-held USIA motion picture and video holdings.  In addition, Special Media Archives Services Division (Motion Picture, Sound, and Video) staff have compiled lists of various USIA film program series and maintain collections of USIA-produced film catalogues.  These finding aids provide a useful supplement to ARC.

V.21 Until 1990 there were Federal statutory prohibitions on the showing of USIA media productions in the United States.  Public Law 101-246 (104 Stat. 49), issued February 16, 1990, provides for the domestic release and distribution of USIA motion pictures, films, videotapes, and other materials 12 years after initial dissemination overseas or, if not disseminated, 12 years from the preparation of the material.

 

Record Group 330 - Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense

V.22 Armed Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS) audio recordings, 1945-65 [330- AFRTS] (1,303items), include sound recordings of radio dramatizations of the events leading to the awarding of the Congressional Medal of Honor to 10 servicemen during the Korean War (items 330-AFRTS 1954 through 1963).

 

Record Group 335 - Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Navy

V.23 During World War II, and again from 1953 to 1974, the Army Command Information Unit produced "The Army Hour" as a public service radio program series.  It was distributed by various radio networks and the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.  The National Archives holds sound recordings of several broadcasts of "The Army Hour," including those that were heard on stations of the Mutual Broadcasting System, in a series titled Army Hour--Mutual Network audio recordings, 1953-54 [22-AHM] (110 items).  In 1953, "The Army Hour" featured the following programs pertaining to the Korean War:

1. 335-AHM 3 (September 1, 1953)--combat medic describes how he avoided capture during the Korean War

2. 335-AHM 5 (September 11, 1953)--Pvt. Courtney L. Stanley describes the action that led to his being awarded the Silver Star

3. 335-AHM 10 (October 15, 1953)--helicopter pilot describes his upside-down flight

4. 335-AHM 14 (November 13, 1953)--WAC M.Sgt. Carolyn James tells how she served in Korea as secretary to Gen. James Van Fleet

Program summaries for "The Army Hour" have been entered into ARC.  As a result, individual programs descriptions can be searched by date, subject, and name of program guest or participant.  The Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch also holds program scripts and textual summaries for several of "The Army Hour" broadcasts.

 

Record Group 342 - Records of U.S. Air Force Commands, Activities, and Organizations

V.24 Motion picture films and video recordings, 1946-84 [342-USAF] (4,968 items), include silent, edited and unedited black-and-white motion pictures of Air Force activities during the Korean War:

1. 342-USAF 18442 depicts various scenes of "Air Force Activities in Japan and Korea in June 1950"

2. 342-USAF 18581 and 18607 show "Miscellaneous Korean War Scenes in 1950"

3. 342-USAF 18698, "F-80's and B-26's Raid North Korea," contains scenes of Taegu airstrip and missions flown over Korean cities in December 1950

4. 342-USAF 18723 and 18831, "Korean War Scenes during 1951"

5. 342-USAF 19363, "Front Line Air Force Chaplains: Outtakes"

6. 342-USAF 18823 and 196281, "Gun Camera Footage on Korean War"

7. 342-USAF 20874 shows the reaction of infantry units in Korea to the signing of the truce on July 27-29, 1953

8. 342-USAF 43193, depicts a summary of events surrounding and including the Korean War (1945-55) in "The Korea Story."

Although complete indexes are not yet available for all of the films in this series, there are substantial runs of 342-USAF subject catalog (225 ft.) and master catalog cards (16 ft.) in the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch research room.  The latter have been entered into the ARC database.

 

Record Group 428 - General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1947-

V.25 Motion pictures films, ca. 1943-80 [428-NPC] (13,339 items), include unedited motion picture film items that document Korean War activities:

1. 428-NPC 1,38-39, and 53--various Navy ships are shown conducting "Minesweeping Operations [in] Chinnampo Harbor, Korea"

2. 428-NPC 6--"Loading Activities"

3. 428-NPC 21--"Shore Bombardment of North Korean Coastline on October 13, 1950"

4. 428-NPC 75 and 152--"Gun camera [in] Korea" footage during 1950

5. 428-NPC 107, 110-111, and 199--"Project Crippled Chicks" conducted in April 1953

6. 428-NPC 124 and 135--"Evacuation of Inchon, Korea," in January 1951

7. 428-NPC 165 and 188-189--"Activity at Hungnam Harbor, Korea," during December 1950

8. 428-NPC 167-168, 170-171--"Evacuation Activities at Hungnam," on December 24, 1950

9. 428-NPC 169, 172, and 182--"Fleet Activities at Pusan, Korea," in 1950-51

10. 428-NPC 195 and 197--"Marine Action [in] Koto-Ri and Hagaru-Ri Area," in 1950

11. 428-NPC 285 and 447--"Armistice Conferences in Korea," in 1951

12. 428-npc 610--"Truce Talks," on May 3, 1953

V.26 The basic finding aids for 428-NPC are subject catalog cards (99 ft.) and master catalog cards (16 ft.) that provide information on a particular film item's size and format, along with detailed film scene descriptions.  Many of these catalog cards list the identity of specific individuals who appear in particular motion picture footage.  Because 428-NPC catalog card information has been entered into the ARC database, researchers can use that database to locate film footage that pertains to a specific individual.  ARC will also accommodate broad subject category searches of catalog card descriptions under such terms as "Korea," "planes," "Pusan," and "ships."

 

NATIONAL ARCHIVES COLLECTION OF DONATED MATERIALS

V.27 These records consist of gifts of personal papers, historical manuscripts, and special media materials donated to the National Archives. Although these materials are not official records of the U.S. Government, the National Archives Act of June 18, 1934, authorized their acceptance as gifts if they related to and illustrated historical activities of the United States.  The materials allocated to this record group have been donated by a wide range of business and cultural organizations and by many individuals.  The four collections of donated motion picture film described below are primarily commercial newsreels and documentary footage.

V.28 Paramount News motion picture newsreel films, October1941-March 1957 [PARA-PN] (ca. 1,809 items) include much sound, black-and-white footage concerning the Korean War.  The following are examples:

1. PARA-PN 9.89 depicts American officials meeting at the outbreak of the Korean War (July 15, 1950)

2. PARA-PN 10.15 focuses on tanks and motorized infantry of the 1st Cavalry Division crossing the 38th parallel and South Korean troops advancing on Wonsan (October 28, 1950)

3. PARA-PN 10.95 portrays U.N. correspondent barred by North Korean troops from attending truce talks in Kaesong (August 4, 1951)

4. PARA-PN 11.17 shows heavy counter attacks launched by North Koreans against UN positions on Heartbreak Ridge (November 3, 1951)

5. PARA-PN 11.88 highlights Russian delegates charging the U.S. with using germ warfare in Korea and the U.S. delegation denying the accusations (June 18, 1952)

6.  PARA-PN 11.96 depicts Marines and South Korean troops storming a hill using tanks, flamethrowers, and artillery (July 16, 1952)

7. PARA-PN 12.99 shows General Harrison and North Korean General Nam IL signing Korean truce agreement (July 27, 1953)

V.29 March of Time Documentary/Newsreel Films relating to U.S. history, government, politics, culture, and international affairs, 1935-53 [MT-MT] (269 items) includes several edited sound, black-and-white films created by Time, Inc., concerning the Korean War.  The following are examples:

1. MT-MT 16.6, "The Gathering Storm," compares preparations for the Korean War with those of World War II activities (1950).

2. MT-MT 17.01, "Strategy for Victory," includes a montage of retreating U.N. troops in Korea (February 1, 1951).

3. MT-MT 402.24, "War in Korea," focuses on the U.S. involvement in the war (January 31, 1952).

4. MT-MT 424.68 depicts the end of the war in "Korea: the Long Road to Peace" (1953).

V.30 Many newsreel items are listed and described in the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch main card catalog (subjects) under such terms as "Korean War, 1950-1953--[subject]."  Most catalog card newsreel descriptions are in the ARC database and can be searched under numerous topical terms, including "Marine Corps" in combination with historical subjects such as "Korean War," "Korean Conflict," or "Korea" and with the series designator (PN or MT).  Most of the motion picture newsreel series are also indexed by their own subject and main entry catalog cards.  The Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch can provide researchers with more detailed information and finding aids on National Archives holdings of newsreel film series.

V.31 The Universal Newsreel [collection], ca. July 1929-ca. December 1967 [200 UN] (ca. 2,000 items), including outtakes, was donated to the National Archives and Records Administration in its entirety.  Individual reels, such as the following examples, contain coverage of the Korean War:

1. Vol. 23, No. 364, "Korea Invaded" (June 26, 1950)

2. Vol. 23, No. 405, "The War in Korea" (November 17, 1950)

3. Vol. 24, No. 451, "Latest War Films from Korea" (February 26, 1951)

4. Vol. 24, No. 490, "Allies Brace for New Red Assault in Korea" (September 10, 1951)

5. Vol. 25, No. 571, "US and Reds Clash in UN over Germ-Warfare Charges" (June 19, 1942)

6. Vol. 25, No. 596, "Fighter-Bombers Blast North Korea Targets" (September 15, 1952)

7. Vol. 26, No. 461, "Korea Truce Hopes Rise" (April 30, 1953)

8. Vol. 26, No. 486, "Truce in Korea" (July 27, 1953)

The collection includes an extensive donor-created card catalog that is available on microfilm.  A brochure describing the Universal Newsreel collection can be obtained from the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch.

V.32 The Longines Wittnauer Watch Company produced the "Longines Chronoscope."  This collection of sound, black-and-white films are known as the motion picture films of television interviews with significant newsmakers of the early 1950s, ca. 1951-55 [LW-LW] (482 items).  The interviews include Adm. William H.P. Brandy (June 11, 1951); Ambassador Tingfu F. Tsiag from Nationalist China (July 2, 1951); Secretary of the Army Frank C. Pace, Jr. (July 18, 1952); Assistant Secretary of State Dean Rusk (November 30, 1951); Dr. You Chan Yang, South Korean Ambassador to United States (August 6, 1952).

V. 33 The Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch has also acquired extensive collections of radio news and special program broadcasts.  The audio recordings of ABC [American Broadcasting Company] Radio News programs including news commentaries, special events, public affairs, actuality news, and some sports and entertainment, 1943-71 [ABC-ABC] (25,000 items) include several broadcasts concerning the Korean War such as item 28278, "Three Years of Korea" and Item 28307, "Korean War Program--United Nations Review."  There is a subject index for the ABC Radio News (13 ft.) in the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Research Room.

V.34 Audio recordings of radio broadcasts of speeches, interviews, combat reports, special events, public affairs, and entertainment for U.S. troops, 1932-ca. 1952 [G-G] (3,200 items) were created by David Goldin and distributed by the Mutual Broadcasting System.  Recordings concerning the Korean War include the following examples:

1. G-G 565--"One Nation Indivisible" contains Gen. Omar Bradley's comments on the Korean War (October 12, 1950)

2. G-G 1900--"The Korean Situation" is a rebroadcast of "The United Nations Today" that summarized the start of the conflict (June 25, 1950)

3. G-G 1901--"A War in Korea--What does it Mean?" includes news bulletins from the front (June 25, 1950)

4. G-G 1986--"Hear It Now" describes the latest Korean War news (March 9, 1951)

V.35 New York University created edited audio recordings of "America's Town Meeting of the Air" radio programs, 1935-54 [NYU-ATMA] (7,001 items) include a few programs concerning the Korean War.  Examples include the following programs:

1. NYU-ATMA 607--"Has the Korean War been a Failure?" (February 24, 1952)

2. NYU-ATMA 661--"What is the Answer in Korea?" (November 25, 1952)

3. NYU-ATMA 664--"What are the Answers from Korea?" (December 1952)

There is a subject index (7 ft.) to the town meeting programs available in the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Research Room.

V.36 Most catalog card newsreel descriptions are in the ARC database and can be searched under numerous topical terms in combination with historical subjects such as "Korean War" or "Korea" and with the series designator (ABC, G, or ATMA).

 


Back to Page Contents

PART VI

CARTOGRAPHIC AND ARCHITECTURAL RECORDS
RELATING TO THE KOREAN WAR

Contents - Part VI:

  • Overview
  • Record Group 19 - Records of the Bureau of Ships
  • Record Group 72 - Records of the Bureau of Aeronautics
  • Record Group 77 - Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers
  • Record Group  156 - Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance
  • Record Group 263 - Records of the Central Intelligence Agency
  • Record Group 319 - Records of the Army Staff
  • Record Group 338 - Records of Army Operational, Tactical, and Support Organizations (World War II and Thereafter)
  • Record Group 373 - Records of the Defense Intelligence Agency
  • Record Group 389 - Records of the Office of the Provost Marshal General
  • Record Group 550 - Records of the United States Army, Pacific

 

PART VI

OVERVIEW

VI.1 Listed and described below, in record group order, are specific media type series that contain items relating to military aspects of the Korean War.  Each description incorporates series titles with a detailed focus on specific media type such as maps and charts, aerial photographs, architectural drawings, or engineering plans.  There are several NARA--or agency-produced guides and some series have been entered into the Archival Research Catalog (ARC).  Series titles are provided only to suggest broadly the type, format, chronological span, and occasionally the subject content of media records grouped under a series designator.  For current information on the status of these and other cartographic and architectural series described in ARC, contact the Special Media Archives Services Division (Cartographic and Architectural Branch) (see Introduction).

 

Record Group 19 - Records of the Bureau of Ships

VI.2 Engineering plans, ca. 1930-50 (54,000 items), are of Navy ships of all classifications, most of which were constructed before 1945.  Of these, about 4,000 relate to ships that were used during WWII and brought out of retirement for use in the Korean War.  The plans may include inboard and outboard profiles; hull plans; section plans; sheer, half breadth, and body plans; and plans of decks, bridges, holds, magazines, and details of U.S. naval vessels.  Other plans of machinery and mechanical and electrical details of U.S. naval vessels are available on microfilm up to the 1950s.  Plans of most U.S. naval ships constructed after 1945 still remain in the custody of the Department of the Navy.  Primary access to these ship plans is by either the name of the ship or its hull number.

 

Record Group 72 - Records of the Bureau of Aeronautics

VI.3 The U.S. Navy Aircraft plans files, 1942-62 (1,500,000 items), include engineering drawings accumulated by the Naval Air Material Center (NAMC) and its subordinate offices.  Included are plans of naval airplanes, airships, aircraft engines, and related equipment.  Many plans not maintained in paper form, can be found on microfilm.  Among the aircraft used during the Korean War, are the Vought F4U Corsair, McDonnell F2H Banshee, Grumman F9F Panther, Douglas AD Skyraider, and Sikorsky HRS helicopter.

 

Record Group 77 - Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers

VI.4 Army Map Service (AMS) maps, 1942-72 (70,000 items), cover virtually all countries and land areas of the world at various scales.  These topographic and related maps were published for use by all Army commands during WWII, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.  In addition to topography, the maps generally show settlements, highways, railroads, streams, lakes, vegetation, and other features.  They also usually include the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) grid that is often used in military reports.  They do not show the locations or movements of military units or temporary military place names such as "Pork Chop Hill."  These maps are arranged in scale-based series.  AMS Series 1.751 (1:50,000) is especially useful for Korea, but smaller and larger scale maps are available.  There are thousands of map sheets covering Korea, and each map series generally has a graphic index that shows the coverage of the individual map sheets.

 

Record Group 156 - Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance

VI.5 Tank and Automotive Center/Command research & development drawings, 1942-62 (720 items), consist of plans of tracked and some wheeled military vehicles and related equipment.  Included are plans of half-tracks, tanks, gun motor carriages, cargo and personnel carriers, and recovery vehicles, some of which were undoubtedly used in Korea.  These drawings were transferred from the textual records series titled, records of the Tank and Automotive Center/Command, 1942-64 [A1, Entry 1362[ (see paragraph II.209).

 

Record Group 263 - Records of the Central Intelligence Agency

VI.6 Map Service Center published numbered maps, 1947-92 [263-MSCPUB] (679 items), consist of maps of most countries and world regions such as Korea and Asia.  Included are base and briefing base maps; maps depicting terrain, sociological, transportation, political, and economic features; maps showing administrative, military, and treaty boundaries; maps of urban areas; and maps indicating ethnic distributions or narcotics trade routes.  The maps originally were produced for the official use of the U.S. Government.  There are published indexes to the published numbered maps.  A partial listing of those published numbered maps in NARA holdings is available for use in the Cartographic and Architectural Research Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

 

Record Group 319 - Records of the Army Staff

VI.7 The ID file "bulky items," n.d. (1,500 items), is arranged numerically and consists of oversized photographs and maps transferred from the textual record series numerical series of intelligence documents ("ID File"), n.d. [NM-3, Entry 85C].  Documents pertaining to the Korean War are as follows:

1. ID 1132836, 17 aerial photographs of Chinese airfields from the "CINCPACFLEET Mosaic Supplement to Photographic Interpretation Report No. 36," dated October 30, 1952, and including airfields at Wu-Sung, Ta-Ch'ang, Hang-Chow, and Nanking

2. ID 1258711, maps of POW camps, prisons, and crossings in Korea, Eastern Europe, and the USSR, dated October 1953.  They consist of 6 maps showing the locations of POW camps in Korea and China as well as diagrams of Camp Nos. 1 and 4

3. ID 1271066, ten maps showing enemy (North Korean and Chinese) troop strength estimates and locations, dated 1951

 

Record Group 338 - Records of Army Operational, Tactical, and Support Organizations
(World War II and Thereafter)

VI.8 Maps of the Eighth U.S. Army in Korea (EUSAK), 1951-57 (7 items), include two published route maps of North and South Korea, 1951-52, and a 1954 map of U.N. airfields in Korea, which were transferred from the Eighth Army textual records.

VI.9 Maps and plans of the 24th Engineer Construction Group, 1952-53 (56 items), consist of building plans and reservation maps for the Yongsan Military Reservation in Korea, which was transferred from the unit history files of the 24th Engineer Construction Group.

 

Record Group 373 - Records of the Defense Intelligence Agency

VI.10 Aerial photography of the Defense Intelligence Agency [DIA], 1935-65 (9,768,000 items), consists of vertical and oblique sequential photographic negatives in roll format.  The image scales vary from large (1:10,000) to small (1:60,000).  Both urban and rural areas of the U.S. are represented with emphasis on photography of coastal and navigable inland waterways, military installations, and airfields throughout the country.  The coverage for areas outside the United States is focused on the World War II period and in areas in which U.S. troops were active.  This series appears to contain thousands of aerial photographs of Korea, but these images have not been listed or filed separately.  These photographs are accessed by flight-line graphic indexes that are arranged numerically by degree of latitude and longitude.  The indexes consist of transparent acetate overlays used with 1:250,000-scale base maps.  Each overlay provides precise locations of individual film exposures.  Legends indicate mission dates and project codes used to locate the specific film exposures.  Legends also contain some or all of the following information regarding the indexed aerial photographic imagery: camera focal length, flight altitude, scale of imagery, number of film exposures, date and time of photography, country covered, image quality, percentage of snow or cloud cover, and original security classification.  Other finding aids for this series are available for use in the Cartographic and Architectural Research Room in College Park, MD.

VI.11 Requests for aerial photography of Korea, like other areas of the world, must be accompanied by a map clearly showing the location and size of the subject area(s).  At this writing, the flight-line indexes and almost all of the aerial film are housed in offsite cold storage to halt their physical deterioration.  This delays access to these records.

 

Record Group 389 - Records of the Office of the Provost Marshal General

VI.12 Maps of the 22d U.S. Prisoner of War/Civilian Internee Information Center, Fort Meade, MD, ca. 1951-73 (6 items), include map overlays relating to the X Corps and an organizational chart relating to the prisoner of war system during the Korean War that were transferred from textual records.

 

Record Group 550 - Records of the United States Army, Pacific

VI.13 Maps of the U.S. Army, Pacific (USARPAC), 1950-54 (5 items), include an annotated map of Seoul relating to the evacuation of refugees and civilians and a manuscript map in two sheets of Wonju and vicinity prepared by the 3rd Historical Team.

 


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ENDNOTES

PART II

1. (II.30) In Article IV, Item 60, military negotiators recommended to the governments of both sides in the war that, "within three months" of the armistice agreement's effective implementation, a political conference "of a high level of both sides be held by representatives appointed respectively to settle through negotiation the questions of the withdrawal of all foreign forces from Korea, the peaceful settlement of the Korean question, etc."  By early 1954 conference arrangements had mired in disagreements between the two sides over the status of invited nations, the conduct and supervision of elections, and other issues.  The idea of such a political conference revived in February 1954, when American, British, French, and Soviet foreign ministers--meeting in Berlin to discuss post World War II occupation issues pertaining to Germany and Austria--agreed to assemble in Geneva to address problems of Korean unification in addition to those concerning peace and rehabilitation in Indochina.  The 1954 Geneva Conference, Korean Phase, consisting of 15 plenary sessions extending from April 26th to June 15th, settled few of the Korean War's unresolved political issues.

2. II.56) Army "table or organization and equipment" (TO&E) directives prescribe the number and types of units making up a command (e.g., the Far East Command) or unit (e.g., the 1st Cavalry Division).  TO&E directives further define the number and types of authorized personnel and equipment items for each prescribed command or unit (i.e., a TO&E unit).  The Army sets basic levels of supply (e.g., food, clothing, and shelter items) for TO&E and other units through "table of allowances" directives.

3. (II.341) The primary decimal number (positioned in the upper left corner of the cross-reference sheet) indicates where the original document was or would have been filed.  If a document was filed or referred elsewhere, this is generally noted on the cross-reference sheet.  But not always.  Consequently, the presence of a cross-reference sheet does not always guarantee a known location of an original document.

4. (II.445) The records of the U.S. Army Prisoner of War/Civilian Internee Information Center (USPWCHC) were originally accessioned into RG 338 and have been reallocated to RG 389, Records of the Office of the Provost Marshal General, 1941-.

5. (II.460) Index boxes are currently labeled "Index to the Series Titled: Army-AG Command Reports, 1949-54."

6. (II.597) Homecoming and Thanksgiving (1952) were United Nations Command-initiated civilian internee repatriation operations intended in part to force resolution of unresolved issues of POW repatriation before the armistice negotiators at Panmunjom.  Little Switch (spring 1953) and Big Switch (summer-fall 1953) were the Military Armistice Commission's approved repatriation operations of, respectively, wounded or disabled, and able-bodied United Nations Command POWs held by Communist forces.

7. (II.609) Many of these subject folders consist of "KMAG AG File" records.  A few contain copies of records once maintained by other KMAG offices.

 

PART III

8. (III.2) The bill, HR 6826, became Public Law 599, 81st Congress, 2nd Session, signed by President Truman on June 30, 1950.  See U.S. Statutes at Large 64 (1950-51), 318-19.

9. (III.3) S 3937 passed the Senate on July 21, 1950 and the House on July 25, 1950.  It became Public Law 624, 81st Congress, 2nd Session, signed by the President on July 27, 1950.  See U.S. Statutes at Large 64 (1950-51): 379.

10.(III.3) HR 9178 became Public Law 655, 81st Congress, 2nd Session, signed by the President on August 2, 1950.  See U.S. Statutes at Large 64 (1950-51): 408.

11. (III.3) HR 1437 became Public Law 604, 81st Congress, 2nd Session, signed by the President on July 10, 1950.  See U.S. Statutes at Large 64 (1950-51): 321-25.

12. (III.3) S 4029 became Public Law 779, 81s Congress, 2nd Session, signed by the President on September 9, 1950.  See U.S. Statutes at Large 64 (1950-51): 826-28.

13. (III.4) S 1 became Public Law 51, 82nd Congress, 1st Session, signed by the President on June 19, 1951.  See U.S. Statutes at Large 65 (1951): 75-89.

14. (III.4) HR 5426 became Public Law 476, 82nd Congress, 2nd Session, signed by the President on July 9, 1952. See U.S. Statutes at Large 66 (1952): 481-509.

15. (III.5) HR 9176 became Public Law 774, 81st Congress, 2nd Session, signed by the President on September 8, 1950.  See U.S. Statutes at Large 64 (1950-51): 798-822.

16. (III.10) HR 9646 became Public Law 788, 81st Congress, 2nd Session, signed by the President on September 18, 1950.  See U.S. Statutes at Large 64 (1950-51): 853-54.

17. (III.11) Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, Mutual Defense Treaty with Korea, 83rd Congress, 2nd Session, 1954, Senate Executive Report 1.


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APPENDIXES

Appendix A: Combat Chronology, 1950-53

This chronology was reprinted with permission from Combat: America at War in the 20th Century, and was compiled and produced by the VFW magazine staff.

Abbreviations used below:

KIA=Killed in Action; MIA=Missing in Action; NK=North Korea/North Korean; WIA=Wounded in Action; POW=Prisoner of War; DOW=Died of Wounds; ID=Infantry Division

Actions shown in bold are of particular importance.

1950

Date Action
Jun 25 North Korea invades South Korea with 135,000 men, initiating the Korean War.
Jun 27 A U.S. 5th Air Force pilot shoots down the first enemy plane of the war over Seoul, capital of South Korea.
Jun 28-29 First U.S. KIA.  4 U.S. planes are shot down: 8 airmen KIA.
Jun 29 First U.S. Ground Force Arrives in Korea: Detachment X (35 men of the 507th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion).  It shoots down 1 YAK with M-55 machine guns at Suwan Airfield.  Detachment X sustains 5 WIA--first U.S. ground casualties of the Korean War.
Jun 29 U.S. Naval Forces Far East's light cruiser USS Juneau fires the first salvo of the initial shore bombardment of the war on Korea's eastern coast.
Jun 29 5th Air Force's 3rd Bombardment Group sends 18 B-26 Invader light bombers against Heijo Airfield near the North Korean capital of Pyongyang; 25 enemy aircraft are destroyed on the ground; one YAK fighter is shot down.
Jun 30 U.S. troop carrier is shot down over Korea, killing 23 men: 18 soldiers and 5 airmen.
Jul 1 First U.S. infantry unit arrives in Korea: 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division (ID).  Along with A Battery, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion (FABN), it comprises Task Force Smith.
Jul 2 War's Only U.S. Sea Battle.  Off Chumunjin, on Korea's east coast, the Juneau helps destroy three of four attacking North Korean torpedo boats.
Jul 3 First U.N. carrier-based air strike of the war occurs when planes from the USS Valley Forge strike airfields in the Pyongyang Chinnampo area of North Korea (NK).
Jul 4-Aug 3 Delay of North Korean Invasion.  3 U.S. divisions (24th ID, 25th ID, 1st Cavalry) participate.  U.S. casualties: 1,991 KIA; 2,588 WIA.
Jul 5 Battle of Osan.  First U.S. ground action of the war: Task Force Smith (406 infantrymen and 134 artillerymen) engages and delays advancing North Korean People's Army (NKPA) units.  U.S. casualties: 42 KIA; 85 WIA.
Jul 10-12 Chochiwon.  24th Division regiments delay advancing NKPA.  U.S. casualties: 405 KIA.
Jul 13-16 Battle at the Kum River.  19th & 34th Infantry Regiments (24th ID) delay the advancing NKPA at the Kum River line.  19th Regiment and other units suffer 490 KIA among the 3,401 men deployed.
Jul 13 B-29s of the 326th Bombardment Squadron, 92nd Bombardment Group, conduct the first strike against NK (Wonsan) from Japan.
Jul 19-20 Battle of Taejon.  24th ID (3,933 GIs) defends the town against the NKPA.  U.S. casualties: 638 KIA; 228 WIA.
Jul 20 24th Infantry Regiment (25th ID) launches a counterattack at Yechon.
Jul 27 Hadong Ambush.  29th Infantry Regiment is committed to combat near Chinju, and its 3rd Battalion (757 men) is mauled: 306 KIA and 100 captured.
Aug 1 Battle of the Notch.  29th (attached) and 19th Infantry Regiments (24th ID) engage NKPA.  U.S. casualties: 90 KIA.
Aug 4-Sep 16 Defense of Pusan/Naktong Perimeter.  84,478 U.S. troops participate: 1st Cavalry Division, 2nd ID, 24th ID, 25th ID, 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT) and 1st Provisional Marine Brigade (PMB).  U.S. casualties: 3,603 KIA; 12,058 WIA.
Aug 4 First ever aero medical evacuation of U.S. casualties is performed by Marine VMO-6 helicopters.
Aug 8-18 First Battle of the Naktong Bulge (Pusan Perimeter).  The 24th ID, reinforced by 1st PMB and elements of the 2nd and 25th IDs, contains and repels the NKPA 4th Division's penetration of the Naktong Perimeter.
Aug 15-20 Battle of the Bowling Alley.  Fought west of Taegu on the Naktong Perimeter.  U.S. 23rd (2nd ID) and 27th Infantry Regiments (25th ID) maul the NKPA, contributing to the defense of Taegu.
Aug 17 Hill 303 near Waegwon.  26 men of the 5th Cavalry Regiment are found bound and executed by the NKPA.
Aug 31-Sep 19 Second Battle of the Naktong Bulge.  U.S. 1st Cavalry Division, 1st PMB, 2nd ID, 24th ID and 25th ID engage enemy in fierce fighting.
Sep Taejon.  42 U.S. soldiers are found executed by the NKPA.
Sep 15 Inchon Landing (Operation Chromite).  X Corps (70,000 men)--7th ID and 1st Marine Division--begin landing on Korea's west coast.  Marines secure their objective, sustaining 20 KIA and 187 WIA.
Sep 16-27 Naktong Perimeter Breakout.  Eighth U.S. Army (EUSA) breaks out of the Naktong Perimeter.  4 U.S. divisions (1st Cavalry, 2nd ID, 24th ID and 25th ID) participate.  U.S. casualties: 834 KIA; 3,544 WIA.
Sep 17 Kimpo Airfield is captured by the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines.
Sep 20-22 1st Marine Division (absorbed the 1st PMB on September 13) crosses the Han River.  1st Marines capture Yongdungpo.
Sep 20-27 Liberation of Seoul.  Seoul falls September 27 after a week of fighting.  1st Marine Division and 7th ID: 382 KIA and 2,373 WIA.
Sep 26 USS Brush hits a mine off Tanchon: 9 KIA; 10 WIA.
Sep 29 Minesweeper Magpie is destroyed by a mine off Chuksan, NK: 21 KIA.  Next day, the USS Mansfield hits a mine: 5 MIA; 27 WIA.
Oct 9 Invasion of North Korea.  I Corps, led by the 1st Cavalry Division, crosses the 38th Parallel north of Kaesong and attacks northward toward Pyongyang.  86 GIs are found massacred. 
Oct 12 Minesweepers Pirate and Pledge are sunk by mines in Wonsan Harbor.  Pirate loses 6 KIA; 43 WIA.
Oct 19 Pyongyang falls to the U.S. 1st Cavalry Division and the 1st ROK (Republic of Korea) Division.
Oct 20 War's First Airborne Operation.  187th Airborne RCT (187th Airborne Infantry and 674th FABN) makes a parachute assault--by 2,860 paratroopers--on Sukchon and Sunchon north of Pyongyang.  U.S. casualties: 56 injured in jump accidents.  75 GIs are found executed at Sunchon.  Battle of Yongyu: U.S. 48 KIA; 80 WIA.
Oct 23 Kunsang NK: 128 GIs are found executed.
Oct 25 Chinese Communist Forces (CCF) launch their first phase offensive of the Korean War.
Nov 1 Northernmost U.S. Action of the War.  21st Infantry Regiment (24th ID) reaches the 8th Army's "high-water mark" when it captures the village of Chonggodo, 18 air miles from Sinuiju and the Yalu River which separates North Korea from China.
Nov 1-2 Battle of Unsan.  First U.S. battle with the CCF.  8th & 5th Cavalry Regiments, 1st Cavalry Division suffer heavy casualties: 454 KIA.
Nov 8 First All-Jet Combat in History.  An F-80 Shooting Star of the 51st Fighter Interceptor Wing shoots down MiG-15 fighter near Sinuiju in a 30-second dogfight.
Nov 8 Korean Service Medal authorized.
Nov 21 17th Infantry Regiment (7th ID) reaches the Yalu River near its source at Hyesanjin on the Manchurian border.
Nov 25-Dec 15 CCF Counteroffensive in NK.  7 U.S. divisions participate (1st Cavalry, 1st Marine, 2nd ID, 3rd ID, 7th ID, 24th ID, and 25th ID).  U.S. casualties: 562 KIA; 3,122 WIA.  This changes the entire course of the war.
Nov 27-Dec 1 7th ID's Task Force MacLean/Faith (elements of 31st & 32d Infantry Regiments) is annihilated east of the Chosin Reservoir, during the CCF counter offensive.  Only 385 soldiers of its 3,200-man force survive.
Nov 27-Dec 9 Battle of the Chosin Reservoir.  The encircled 1st Marine Division fights its way southward from the Chosin Reservoir to the Hungnam Perimeter.
Nov 28 Task Force Kingston, elements of the 7th ID's 32nd Infantry Regiment reaches the Yalu River at Sin-galpa-jin.
Nov 29-Dec 1 Battle of Kunu-ri.  The CCF virtually destroys the U.S. 2nd ID: 1,194 men are lost.
Dec 3-7 Task Force 90 (Amphibious Force Far East) evacuates Wonsan.
Dec 10 Wonsan-Hungnam Campaign.  Ends this date.  Includes Chosin Reservoir.  Total U.S. casualties: 1,641 KIA, 3,508 WIA.
Dec 12 Battle of Koto-ri.  U.S. 143 KIA in one battalion of the 31st Infantry.
Dec 15 8th Army establishes Imjin River defense line north of Seoul.
Dec 24 Hungnam operation is complete--105,000 U.S. and ROK personnel are evacuated by sea.

1951

Date Action
January "Great Pohang Guerrilla Hunt."  1st Marine Division routes guerrilla forces in the Masan-Pohang-Sondong-Andong area.  Operations continue around Masan into February.  Last major engagement is fought at Uisong.  The North Korean 10th Division is reduced in strength by 60%.
Jan 1-15 Third Phase CCF Offensive: 500,000 Communists push U.N. forces 50 miles south of the 38th Parallel and recapture Seoul.
Jan 25-Feb 20 Operation Thunderbolt.  Counteroffensive against the CCF.  6 U.S. Army divisions participate: (1st Cavalry, 2nd ID, 3rd ID, 7th ID, 24th ID, and 25th ID): 667 KIA; 3,570 WIA.
Feb 1 Battle of the Twin Tunnels.  23rd Infantry Regiment (2nd ID), French Battalion and 347th FABN confront several CCF regiments, killing at least 1,300 Chinese.  U.S. casualties: 18 KIA; 110 WIA.
Feb 5-24 Operation Roundup.  U.S. X Corps advance on the central front.
Feb 5-9 Battle of Hill 440.  A task force of the 25th ID decimates CCF.
Feb 11-13 Battle of Hoengsong.  2nd Division and attached units are ambushed: 773 KIA.  Thousands more are wounded.
Feb 12-21 CCF Counterattack, Wonju/Chipyong Area.  Three U.S. divisions (1st Cavalry, 2nd ID, 7th ID) participate.  U.S. casualties: 651 KIA; 1,296 WIA.
Feb 13-15 Battle of Chipyong-ni.  CCF (18,000 troops) offensive contained by 23rd Infantry Regiment (2nd ID), French Battalion, 1st Ranger Company, 37th FABN, and B Battery of the 82nd Anti Aircraft Artillery Battalion.  U.S. casualties: 113 KIA; 299 WIA.
Feb 16, 1951-Jul 27, 1953 Siege of Wonsan.  Task Force 95 (U.N. Blockade and Escort Force) blockades Wonsan Harbor.  An unprecedented 861-day naval operation, it is the longest effective siege of a port in U.S. Navy history.
Feb 21-Mar 7 Operation Killer.  To drive the CCF north of the Han River.  5 U.S. divisions participate (1st Cavalry, 1st Marine, 2nd ID, 7th ID, 24th ID).  U.S. casualties: 144 KIA; 921 WIA.
Mar 7-Apr 4 Operation Ripper.  Drives the Communists back to the 38th Parallel and retakes Seoul.  7 U.S. divisions participate (1st Cavalry, 1st Marine, 2nd ID, 3rd ID, 7th ID, 24th ID, 25th ID)  U.S. casualties: 566 KIA; 3,220 WIA.
Mar 23 War's Last Jump (Operation Tomahawk).  187th Airborne RCT (2nd and 4th Ranger companies attached)--3,447 men--makes an air assault on Munsan-ni, 20 miles northwest of Seoul.  Casualties: 84 jump injuries; 1 KIA; 18 WIA.
Apr 5-15 Operation Rugged.  To secure phase Line Kansas, or 38th Parallel.  Enemy is entrenched in the Chorwon-Kumhwa-Pyongyang area--"Iron Triangle."  6 U.S. Army divisions (1st Cavalry, 2nd ID, 3rd ID, 7th ID, 24th ID, 25th ID) participate.  U.S. casualties: 156 KIA; 901 WIA.
Apr 11-22 Operation Dauntless.  To secure phase Line Utah.  3 U.S. Army divisions (3rd ID, 24th ID, 25th ID) participate: 95 KIA; 1,056 WIA.
Apr 12 War's first major aerial duel--9 MiGs are shot down.  Also, 40 MiGs attack a B-29 formation--3 are shot down.
Apr 22 Rotation plan initiated: Personnel will return to the U.S. individually after a specified number of months in Korea.
Apr 22-29 CCF First Spring Offensive.  Largest single battle of the Korean War.  CCF launch their Spring Offensive with 250,000 men in 27 divisions.  Five U.S. Army divisions (2nd ID, 3rd ID, 7th ID, 24th ID, 25th ID) and 1st Marine Division participate.  U.S.: 314 KIA; 1,600 WIA.
May 9 U.S. Far East Air Force (FEAF) launches a 300-plane strike on Sinuiju on the Yalu River.  Largest raid of the war to date.
May 17-20 Battle of the Soyang River.  "May massacre" along No Name Line.  2nd ID stems the enemy tide, inflicting severe casualties on the Chinese.  U.S. casualties: 406 KIA.
May 17-22 CCF Second Spring Offensive.  4 U.S. divisions (1st Marine, 2nd ID, 3rd ID, and 25th ID) participate: 333 KIA; 888 WIA.
May 18 TF 77 suffers its heaviest single-day casualties: 4 pilots KIA.
May 20 4th Fighter Interceptor Group is jumped by 50 enemy jets over Sinuiju, resulting in America's first jet ace of the war.
May 20-Sep 20 Operation Strangle.  Massive all-out air interdiction campaign is carried out by FEAF, supported by TF 77 and the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing (MAW).
May 20-Jun 8 Operation Detonate.  A major 8th Army offensive to retake Line Kansas.  7 U.S. divisions participate (1st Cavalry, 1st Marines, 2nd ID, 3rd ID, 7th ID, 24th ID, 25th ID): 530 KIA; 3,195 WIA.
Jun 3-12 Operation Piledriver.  To secure Line Kansas and form a new defensive line (Wyoming).  4 U.S. Army divisions (1st Cavalry, 3rd ID, 7th ID, 25th ID) participate: 231 KIA; 1,787 WIA.
June 10-16 Battle for the Punchbowl.  1st Marine division encounters heavy NKPA resistance  Marines: 67 KIA; 1,044 WIA.
Jun 12 Destroyer Walke is hit by a mine off Hungnam, NK: 26 KIA and 35 WIA.  This is the largest single Navy combat loss of the war.
July (late) Battle of Taeusan (Hill 1179).  38th Infantry Regiment (2nd ID) captures the hill on the western edge of the Punchbowl.
Aug 18-Sep 5 Battle of Bloody Ridge  (Hills 983, 940, 773).  U.S. 2nd ID sustains 341 KIA; 2,032 WIA.  Counted enemy dead total 1,389.  15th FABN set a record by firing 14,425 rounds in 24 hrs.
Sep 13-Oct 15 Battle of Heartbreak Ridge (Hills 931, 894, 851).  2nd ID seizes Ridge: 616 KIA; 3,064 WIA.  The 23rd Infantry Regiment takes heaviest casualties.
Sep 15-19 Assault on Hill 749.  U.S. Marines sustain 91 KIA; 714 WIA.
Sep 21 Operation Summit.  A company of 228 Marines is lifted by 12 Sikorsky S-55s in the first helicopter deployment of a combat unit.
Oct 3-9 Operation Commando.  To secure Line Jamestown.  3 U.S. Army divisions (1st Cavalry, 3rd ID, 25th ID) participate: 405 KIA: 2,238 WIA.
Oct 13-22 Operation Nomad and Polar.  To secure Line later designated Missouri.  U.S. casualties: 265 KIA; 1,487 WIA.
Oct 23 Biggest Air Battle of War.  "Black Tuesday" over Namsi.  By week's end, 3 B-29s are shot down & 4 crash land: 55 KIA/MIA.
Nov 12 Offensive Operations Cease.  8th Army begins "active defense."
Nov 30 In a rare pitched air battle, 31 F-86s take on 50 MiGs escorting 28 enemy bombers: 12 enemy planes are shot down.

1952

Date Action
Apr 17 Presidential Executive Order 10345 extends enlistments involuntarily for 9 months.
Apr 21 Cruiser St. Paul, while engaged in a gunfire support mission off Kojo, NK, loses 30 men killed in a powder fire.
May 25 Raid on Agok.  Nine tanks of the 245thTank Battalion, 45th ID, retaliate for three raids on the division's sector.
May 28 A patrol of the 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th ID, is hit by two Chinese companies.
May 31 Enemy fires 102,000 rounds on 8th Army positions in May.
Jun 6-14 Operation Counter.  45th ID launches a two-phased series of attacks to establish 11 patrol bases in the Old Baldy area. 2nd and 3rd Battalions, 180th Infantry Regiment fight fiercely for Outpost Eerie on Hill 191, which is counterattacked by Chinese battalions.
Jun 10 Raid over Kwaksan: 3 U.S. bombers shot down.
Jun 16-29 Chinese launch a series of attacks against Outpost 9 (Snook), Outpost 10 (Pork Chop) and Outpost 11 (Old Baldy), all defended by the 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th ID.
June 23 Hydroelectric Plants Strike.  FEAF and 290 carrier planes bomb 9 hydroelectric power plants in North Korea.
Jul 3 7th Marines, elements of the 45th ID and units of the 7th ID engage CCF units along various sectors of the front.
Jul 11 Pyongyang Raid.  91 U.N. aircraft hit 40 targets.
Jul 17-Aug 4 Battle for Old Baldy (Hill 266).  23rd Infantry Regiment (2nd ID) sustains 39 KIA, 234 WIA and 84 MIA by July 21.
Aug 12-16 & Sep 5-15 Battle of Bunker Hill (Hill 122).  First major Marine ground action in western Korea is fought by the 1st Marines: 48 KIA; 313 WIA.
Aug 29 War's Largest Air Raid.  FEAF and carrier planes bomb Pyongyang in a 1,403-plane assault--the largest single-day raid of the war.
Aug 30 Ocean tug Sarsi is sunk by a mine off Hungnam: 4 KIA and 4 WIA.  Last U.S. naval vessel lost in the war.
Sep An all-time single-day high of 45,000 rounds fall on the 8th Army's front during September.
Sep 1 Largest All-Navy Raid.  144 planes from three carrier destroy the oil refinery at Aoji, NK.
Sep 6-8 Outpost Bruce (Hill 148).  During a 51-hour siege, U.S. Marines sustain 19 KIA and 38 WIA.
Sep 17-24 Outpost Kelly.  65th Infantry Regiment (3rd ID) is besieged by CCF.  The regiment sustains 350 casualties.
Sep 18-21 Battle for Hill 266 continues with the 38th Infantry Regiment (2nd ID).
Sep 22 245th Tank Battalion, 45th ID launches an attack on the Chinese.
Sep 30 During the month, units of the 5th Air Force shoot down 64 MiG-15s at a cost of 7 Sabrejets.
Oct 9-Jul 1953 "Cherokee" Strikes.  7th Fleet bombing campaign against battle-front enemy supply facilities.
Oct 6-13 CCF Attack on Western & Central Fronts.  U.S. units sustain 51 KIA; 348 WIA.
Oct 14-25 Operation Showdown/Battle of Hill 598 (Sniper Ridge/Triangle Hill).  7th ID battles the Chinese near Kumhwa, the right leg of the Iron Triangle, and suffers 2,000 casualties: 393 KIA.
Oct 21 USS Lewis is hit by a shore battery off Wonsan: 7 KIA.
Oct 26-28 Battle of the Hook.  A ferocious and key combat of the "outpost war."  7th Marines: 70 KIA; 386 WIA; 12 MIA; 27 POW.
Nov 3 Hill 851.  Heartbreak Ridge area, held by the 2nd Battalion, 160th Infantry Regiment (40th ID) withstands an NKPA attack.  U.S. casualties: 19 KIA, 54 WIA.
Dec 25 T-Bone Hill.  38th Infantry Regiment (2nd ID) repels CCF during intense battle.
Dec 25 Hill 812.  Held by Company K, 3rd Battalion, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th ID, is hit hard by the NKPA.

1953

Date Action
Jan 270,000 Chinese and North Korean troops man enemy lines.
Jan 25 Operation Smack.  Assault on Spud Hill by elements of the 31st Infantry Regiment.
Feb 3 Hill 101/Ungok.  5th Marines conduct a raid.  U.S. casualties: 15 KIA; 55 WIA.
Mar 9 A 34-man patrol of the 7th ID loses 20 KIA, 2 MIA and 12 WIA in CCF ambush.  A 34-man patrol of the 2nd ID loses 12 KIA and 5 MIA in another ambush.
Mar 13 Aircraft of TF 77 devastate Chonglin, NK.
Mar 17 Hill 355 (Little Gibraltar).  CCF assault the 9th Infantry Regiment (2nd ID).
Mar 20 Heaviest naval bombardment of the war on Communist lines at Kosong.
Mar 23-24 Old Baldy.  Held by 31st Infantry Regiment (7th ID) and relieved by 32nd Regiment during Chinese assault.  U.S. casualties: 91 KIA.
Mar 26-30 Outposts at the Nevada cities (Vegas-Reno-Carson).  CCF attack the 5th Marines.  CCF regiment is destroyed.  Marine casualties: 156 KIA; 801 WIA.
Apr 16-18 Battle of Pork Chop Hill.  17th and 31st Infantry Regiments (7th ID) hit hard by CCF: 112 KIA.  Chinese repulsed, largely by artillery.
Apr 20-26 Operation Little Switch exchanges 149 sick/WIA U.S. POWs including 149 Americans.
May 13 Raid on Toksan Dam.  A dramatic strike by the 58th Fighter Bomber Wing destroys a major irrigation system.
May 28-30 CCF launches a regimental-strength attack against I Corps sector  Savage sighting ensues in Nevada Cities and Hook area outposts.  Marine tanks and artillery fight in support of the defending 25th ID line units.  Company B, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment takes Outpost Elko.
Jun 10-18 Siege of Outpost Harry.  U.S. 3rd ID's 15th Regiment and 5th RCT withstand an assault by the CCF 74th Division.  Chinese suffer 4,200 casualties.  U.S. casualties: 186 KIA, 824 WIA during CCF attack on ROKs.
Jun 15 U.S.S. Princeton launches 184 sorties, establishing the single-day Korean War record for offensive sorties flown from a carrier.
Jun 15 Navy and Marine Corps aircraft fly 910 sorties--the highest combined number for a single day.
Jun 24 U.S. 40th and 45th IDs and 5th RCT are redeployed along the front lines to bolster the ROKs during a renewed CCF offensive.
Jun 30 Marine Air Group 12 flies a record-breaking 217 combat sorties.
Jun 30 During June, Sabrejets down 77 enemy aircraft.
Jun 30 The war's peak monthly artillery rounds of 2,710,248 are fired during June.
Jul 6-10 Battle of Pork Chop Hill.  7th ID is ordered to evacuate its defensive positions after five days of fighting: 232 KIA.
Jul 7-8 Outposts Berlin-East Berlin.  (7th Marines right sector) are attacked during the relief of the 25th ID.  Marine casualties: 21 KIA; 126 WIA.
Jul 10-15 U.S. unit to go farthest north of the 38th Parallel: At Kumsong.  A Battery of the 300th Armored Artillery Battalion supports ROK 6th Division.
Jul 13-20 Battle of Kumsong River Salient.  Last Communist offensive.  CCF launches a six-division attack partly directed at the U.S. IX Corps (3rd, 40th, 45th IDs).  187th RCT is attached to 2nd ID during the fighting.  U.S. casualties: 242 KIA; 718 WIA.
Jul 14 U.S. 555th FABN is overrun.
Jul 19-20 Outposts Berlin-East Berlin--held by only 81 Marines--are overrun, but reinforced: 6 KIA, 44 MIA, 12 POW and 86 WIA.
Jul 24-26 Heavy enemy (3,000 men) attack is launched in the Berlin Complex ("Boulder City") area held by the 7th and 1st Marines.  U.S. casualties: 43 KIA; 316 WIA.  Last Marine ground actions of the war are fought on Hills 111 and 119.  Central Sector: 3rd ID units assaulted on Sniper Ridge.
Jul 25 TF77 planes fly 538 offensive plus 62 defensive sorties--a record number for a single day.
Jul 26-27 Chorwan Valley.  3rd Battalion, 31st Regiment, 7th Division at Outposts Westview and Dale fight off battalion-size Chinese attacks.
Jul 27 Last Air Kill of the War.  An enemy transport is downed near the Manchurian border.
Jul 27 Last U.S. KIAs.  Sgt. Harold R. Cross, Jr., of 3rd Platoon, K Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th RCT, is KIA in a mortar blast 80 minutes prior to the 10 p.m. cease-fire.  Pfc. Harold smith of B Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, is KIA by a land mine near Outpost Berlin 16 minutes before the cease-fire.  Air Force Capt. Jack Rhoads of the 67th TRG died when his plane was hit by enemy ground fire that afternoon.
Jul 27 Korean War Ends.  Korean armistice is signed.  Total U.S. casualties: 33,741 hostile deaths; 103,284 WIA; 7,140 POWs.  Static warfare (1951-53) alone claims 1,586 (39.6 percent) Marine infantry lives and 11,244 (43.9 percent) WIA, and of Marines/Army combined--12,300 KIA (36.5 percent) and 50,900 (49 percent) WIA.  Non-hostile U.S. deaths: 2,827.
Jul 28 Last U.S. Casualties.  Five GIs of Companies B and C, 23rd Infantry Regiment (2nd ID) are killed in an accidental explosion near Ansan, NK.
Jul 31 Peak U.S. Ground Troop Strength: 302,483.  Total of 1,587,040 U.S. personnel serve in Korea during the war.  Some 198,380 or 12.5 percent actually fight in combat.
Sep 6 Operation Big Switch.  Last of 3,597 U.S. POWs are released.

 

Appendix B: Commanders of U.N. Forces in Korea

Source: Ministry of National Defense, Republic of Korea.  The History of the United Nations Forces in the Korean War.  Seoul, 1977.

Commanders in Chief, United Nations Command

  • General of the Army Douglas MacArthur: July 24, 1950-Apr. 11, 1951

  • Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway: Apr. 11, 1951-May 12, 1952

  • Gen. Mark W. Clark: May 12, 1951-Oct. 7, 1953

Senior Armistice Delegates, United Nations Command

  • Vice Adm. C. Turner Joy, USN: July 10, 1951-May 22, 1952

  • Lt Gen. William K. Harrison, Jr., USA: Feb. 6, 1952-July 27, 1953

The Australian Force
(28th British Commonwealth Brigade)

  • Brig. G. Taylor: Apr-Oct. 1951

  • Brig. J.F.M. MacDonald: Oct. 1951-June 1952

  • Brig. T.J. Daly: June 1952-March 1953

  • Brig. J.G.N. Wilton: March-July 1953

The Belgian-Luxembourg Force
(The BELUX Battalion)

  • Lt. Col. B.E.M. Crahay: Sept. 28, 1950-Nov. 21, 1951

  • Lt. Col. B.E.M. Cools: Nov. 21, 1951-Feb. 23, 1952

  • Lt. Col. B.E.M. Vivario: Feb. 23, 1952-Feb. 13, 1953

  • Lt. Col. R. Gathy: Feb. 12, 1953-July 12, 1953

  • Lt. Col. Bodart: July 12, 1953-Dec. 19, 1953

The Canadian Force
(25th Canadian Infantry Brigade)

  • Brig. J.M. Rockingham: Aug. 9, 1950-Apr. 27, 1952

  • Brig. M.P. Bogart: Apr. 28, 1952-Apr. 20, 1953

  • Brig. J.V. Allard: Apr. 21, 1953-June 14, 1954

The Ethiopian Force

  • Col. Kebbede Guebre: n.d.

The French Force

  • Lt. Col. Monclar: Nov. 29, 1950-Dec. 5, 1952

The Greek Force
(Greek Force HQ Command in Korea)

  • Col. Ioannis Dascalopoulos: Nov. 1950-Aug. 12, 1951

The Netherlands Force
(The Netherlands Battalion)

  • Lt. Col. M.P.A. den Ouden: Sept. 9, 1950-Feb. 12, 1951

  • Lt. Col. W.D.H. Eekhout: Feb. 13, 1951-Nov. 7, 1951

  • Lt. Col. G.H. Christian: Nov. 7, 1951-Aug. 20, 1952

  • Lt. Col. C.M. Schilperoord: Aug. 20, 1952-Aug. 3, 1953

United States Forces

Commanders-In-Chief, Far East

  • General of the Army Douglas MacArthur: Jan. 1, 1947-Apr. 11, 1951

  • Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway: Apr. 11, 1951-May 12, 1952

  • Gen. Mark W. Clark: May 12, 1952-Oct. 7, 1953

Eighth U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK)

  • Lt. Gen. Walton H. Walker: July 13-Dec. 23, 1950

  • Maj. Gen. Frank W. Milburn (acting): Dec. 23-26, 1950

  • Lt. Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway: Dec. 26, 1950-Apr. 14, 1951

  • Gen. James A. Van Fleet: Apr. 15, 1951-Feb. 10, 1953

  • Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor: Feb. 11, 1953-Mar. 31, 1955

I Corps

  • Maj. Gen. John B. Coulter: Aug. 2-Sept. 10, 1950

  • Maj. Gen. Frank W. Milburn: Sept. 11-Dec. 23, 1950

  • Maj. Gen. William B. Kean (acting): Dec. 23-26, 1950

  • Lt. Gen. Frank W. Milburn: Dec. 26, 1950-July 18, 1951

  • Lt. Gen. John W. O'Daniel: July 19, 1951-June 28, 1952

  • Lt. Gen. Paul W. Kendall: June 29, 1952-Apr. 10, 1953

  • Lt. Gen. Bruce C. Clarke: Apr. 11, 1953-Oct. 13, 1953

IX Corps

  • Maj. Gen. Frank W. Milburn: Aug. 10-Sept. 11, 1950

  • Maj. Gen. John B. Coulter: Sept. 12, 1950-Jan. 31, 1951

  • Maj. Gen. Bryan E. Moore: Jan. 31-Feb. 24, 1951

  • Maj. Gen. Oliver P. Smith, USMC (acting): Feb. 25-Mar. 4, 1951

  • Lt. Gen. William M. Hoge: Mar. 5-Dec. 23, 1951

  • Maj. Gen. Willard G. Wyman: Dec. 24, 1951-July 30, 1952

  • Maj. Gen. Joseph P. Cleland (acting): July 31-Aug. 8, 1952

  • Let. Gen. Reuben E. Jenkins: Aug. 9, 1952-Aug. 9, 1953

X Corps

  • Lt. Gen. Edward M. Almond: Aug. 26, 1950-July 15, 1951

  • Maj. Gen. Clovis E. Byers: June 15-Dec. 5, 1951

  • Lt. Gen. Williston B. Palmer: Dec. 5, 1951-July 9, 1952

  • Maj. Gen. Ira P. Swift (acting): July 13-Aug. 11, 1952

  • Lt. Gen. Williston B. Palmer: July 13-Aug. 11, 1952

  • Maj. Gen. David L. Ruffner (acting): Aug. 12-14, 1952

  • Lt. Gen. Isaac D. White: Aug. 15, 1952-Mar. 31, 1953

  • Maj. Gen. Joseph P. Cleland (acting): Apr. 1-7, 1953

  • Lt. Gen. Isaac D. White: Apr. 8-Aug. 15, 1953

  • Lt. Gen. Reuben E. Jenkins: Aug. 16-Oct. 12, 1953

Appendix C: Major U.S. Combat Casualties in Korea

The units listed below account for 96 percent of the Americans killed by hostile action in Korea.  Wounded in action include only those actually hospitalized.

Unit Killed in
Action
Wounded
in Action
2nd Infantry Division 7,094 16,575
1st Marine Division 4,004 25,864
7th Infantry Division 3,905 10,858
1st Cavalry Division 3,811 12,086
24th Infantry Division 3,735 7,395
25th Infantry Division 3,048 10,186
3rd Infantry Division 2,160 7,939
Far East Air Force/5th Air Force 1,200 368
5th Regimental Combat Team 867 3,188
45th Infantry Division 834 3,170
Naval Forces Far East/7th Fleet 458 1,576
187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team 442 1,656
40th Infantry Division 376 1,457
1st Marine Aircraft Wing 258 174

The 29th Infantry Regiment was attached to the 24th ID and later assigned to the 27th and 35th Infantry Regiments of the 25th Infantry Division.  It lost 306 men KIA on July 27, 1950 alone.  Those figures are included above.

In addition to the units listed, 1,432 Army personnel assigned to outfits independent of the divisions and regimental combat teams were also KIA.

Original Source: Battle Casualties of the Army, September 30, 1954 (Office Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1, Dept. of the Army), and other sources.

Reprinted with permission from the June/July 2000 issue of the VFW magazine.

Appendix D: Microfilm Records Cited

CONTRACT MICROFILM PUBLICATIONS

This section lists NARA holdings of contractor-produced microfilm publications cited in this reference information paper. Citations include the following elements in this order: NARA-assigned microfilm publication number, series title, file number, file dates, file title (if applicable), roll numbers for the file, cross-reference to text, the title of the microfilm publication, and the name of contractor/publisher.  Specific roll numbers pertaining to particular records or files are cited in the narrative description of this paper.

Two private companies, Scholarly Resources (SR) and University Publications of America (UPA), have produced some microfilm publications as part of their own sales programs, but have donated copies to NARA, designated as library microfilm and identified by "LM" numbers.  Researchers can purchase microfilm rolls of LM publications from these private companies.

These companies have also produced some microfilm publications under a regulated contract program and requiring that they donate a copy to NARA.  such publications are identified by "C" numbers.  NARA can convert them to NARA publications ("M" prefix) after 7 years.  Until that time, researchers may purchase copies from these private companies.  All the C publications listed here are also available for sale from the National archives Trust Fund (see below).

All the contractor publications listed are 35 mm. film.

Addresses and phone numbers of these contractors are listed below.

There are roll lists available for most "LM" and "C" publications in the Textual Records Research Room and in the Microfilm Reading Room in College Park, MD, or upon request.

LM-81[SR] Department of State decimal file, 1910-63, File 795 (1950-54): KOREA--Political/National Defense Affairs.  Rolls 1-30.  Microfilm includes decimal files 795.00, 795.5, and 795.56 (see paragraphs II.23-II.26).  In Records Relating to the Internal Affairs of Korea, 1950-1954.  Scholarly Resources.

LM-151[UPA] Department of State decimal file, 1910-63, File 611.93 (1950-54): CHINA--U.S. Relations With.  Rolls 3-6.  (See paragraphs II.23-II.26).  In Confidential U.S. State Department Central Files, China, Foreign Affairs, 1950-1954.  University Publications of America.

LM-152[UPA] Department of State decimal file, 1910-62, File 793 (1950-54): CHINA--Political/National Defense Affairs.  Rolls 1-28.  (See paragraphs II.23-II.26).  Microfilm includes decimal files 793.00 and 793.5.  In Confidential U.S. State Department Central Files, China, Internal Affairs, 1950-1954.  University Publications of America.

C-42[UPA] "Black Book" on cease-fire, December 12, 1950-December 25, 1952 (Lot File 55D128) Rolls 1-7.  (See paragraphs II.27-II.29).  In Department of State Special Files Relating to Korea, 1950-1957.  University Publications of America.

C-44[UPA] Records of the Director of the Office of Northeast Asian Affairs (U. Alexis Johnson), 1945-53 (Lot File 54D278, 58D529, and 56D257).  Rolls 1-4 (see paragraph II.32-II.33).  In Department of State Special Files Relating to Northeast Asia, 1943-1956.  University Publications of America.

C-44[UPA] Records of the Office of Northeast Asian Affairs relating to foreign policy decisions, 1950-56 (Lot File 58D184, 58D208, and 59D476) Rolls 5-6.  (See paragraphs II.32-II.33.)  In Department of State Special Files Relating to Northeast Asia, 1943-1956.  University Publications of America.

C-0012[SR] Subject file of the Office of Chinese Affairs, 1944-50 (Lot File 56D151) Rolls 15-16. (See paragraph II.34.)  In Records of the Office of Chinese Affairs, 1948-1955.  Scholarly Resources.

C-0012[SR] Numeric file of the Office of Chinese Affairs, 1949-55 (Lot File 57D663) Rolls 21-22.  (See paragraph II.35.)  In Records of the Office of Chinese Affairs, 1948-1955.  Scholarly Resources.

University Publications of America
4520 East-West Highway
Bethesda, MD 20814-3389
1-800-692-6300

Scholarly Resources
104 Greenhill Avenue
Wilmington, DE 19805-1897
1-800-772-8937

NARA MICROFILM PUBLICATIONS

NARA has its own microfilm publications program for records of high research interest in order to make the records available for researchers, while preserving the originals from deterioration and damage.  Most M publications reproduce an entire series of records.  These publications have a descriptive pamphlet and introductory information filmed on the first roll.  T and P publications do not always reproduce a complete series of records and usually have no introductory materials or descriptive pamphlets  T publications may have been accessioned as microfilm from another Federal agency.  P publications have been filmed for preservation purposes.  M, T, and P publications are available in the Microfilm Reading Room at College Park, MD, and are often available for sale as well.

The following information is provided for each NARA publication: publications number, publication (or title of section) title, film size, if not 16 mm., cross reference to text, publication title if not shown earlier, and number of rills in the entire publication.

M1101 Cross Reference Sheets to the Correspondence of the Office of the Secretary of the Army, 1947-64 (35 mm.) [see paragraph II.343].  485 rolls.

M1950 Shipping Advice Lists (SA 2005-SA 2013 and SA 10181) for Records Seized by U.S. Military Forces during the Korean War, 1950-1954 (35 mm.) [see paragraph II.230]. 1 roll.

T826 Korean Armistice Agreement of June 8, 1953 and the Temporary Supplementary to the Armistice Agreement of July 27, 1953 (35 mm.) [see paragraph II.222].  In German and Japanese Surrender Documents of World War II and the Korean Armistice Agreements.  1 roll.

T1152 United Nations Command Korean Armistice Negotiations, 1951-1953.  (35 mm.) [See paragraph II.577].  11 rolls.

P2264 Press Releases and Other Records Relating to Korean War Casualties, 1950-53.  (34 mm.) [see paragraph II.336].  20 rolls.

Most NARA microfilm publications are listed and described in the National Archives Microfilm Resources for Research: A Comprehensive Catalog (Washington, DC, 2000).  The catalog also provides ordering information and terms of sale.  Copies of the catalog can be purchased from the National Archives and Records Administration, Customer Service Center (NWCC2), P.O. Box 100793, Atlanta, GA 30384-0793 (telephone 1-866-272-6272 or 301-837-2000; fax 301-837-0483).

More information on NARA microfilm publications and up-to-date ordering instructions can be accessed through the NARA website at www.archives.gov.  A system for online ordering is under development.

Other microfilmed records are cited at paragraphs II.573-II.575.


Back to Page Contents

INDEX

A

ABC Radio News programs V.33
Aberdeen Proving Ground II.181, II.195, II.196, II.210
Acheson, Dean G. II.22, IV.5, V.4, V.5
Acme IV.22
Adak, AK II.18 4
Adams, Howard G. II.283
Adjutant General sections II.365

  • Army Forces, Far East II.591-II.592
  • Eighth Army II.378-II.384
  • Far East Command II.497-II.507, II.525-II.528
  • Japan Logistical Command II.603.4-II.603.12
  • Korea Military Assistance Group II.608-II.613
  • Korea Communications Zone II.621, II.624.2-II.624.4
  • Logistical commands II.615.1-II.615.5
  • United Nations Civil Assistance Command, Korea II.632.1-II.532.4
  • United Nations Command II.546-II.553, II.565-II.571, II.587-II.588

Adjutant General's Office, 1917-, Records of the (RG 407) II.358, II.364, II.365, II.406, II.407, II.415, II.419, II.420, II.447-II.461, II.469, II.473, II.602, II.607, II.614, II.618, II.619, II.626, II.631
Aerial Photography II.530
Aeronautics, Records of the Bureau of (RG 72) II.42-II.44, VI.3
Air Coordinating Committee II.425, II.428-II.429
Air Force, Fifth II.441, II.442, II.443, II.444, II.542
Air Force, rockets for II.161
Air Force, Records of the Office of the Secretary of the (RG 340) II.421-II.432
Air Force units II.439

  • operations reports II.442
  • situation reports II.326

Air Materiel Command II.184, II.426, II.440-II.441
Air operations II.377.4, II.437, II.485, V.23.3, V.24, V.31.6

  • Air Force II.377.4, II.441, II.442-II.444
  • Army II.377.4, II.387
  • Marine Corps II.377.4, II.441
  • Navy II.145, II.147, II.377.4, II.441, II.462, II.464
  • planning for II.534
  • restrictions on II.322

Air reconnaissance operations II.377.4, II.439, II.530
Air Research and Development Command II.440-II.441
Air shows and expositions II.423
Air Staff II.433-II.439
Air support operations II.92, II.318, II.377.4, II.427, II.489
Air traffic control II.423
Aircraft

  • B-26 II.377.4
  • B-29 II.377.4
  • B-47 II.426
  • Air Force II.442, IV.29
  • Army IV.10
  • civilian II.426
  • construction of II.426
  • enemy II.442
  • engineering drawings for VI.3
  • lost or damaged II.443, II.580
  • Marine Corps IV.16, IV.17
  • Navy II.42-II.44, IV.8, IV.9, VI.3
  • shipments of controlled combat aircraft II.580
     

Airfields II.479, II.480, VI.7.1, VI.8, VI.10
Airlift of men and materiel to Korea II.429
Akin, Maj. Gen. Spencer B. II.76
Alexander, Archibald II.350
Allied Translator and Interpreter Section II.224, II.229, II.231-II.233, II.273.3-II.273.6, II.477, II.479, II.482, II.516
"Allies Brace for New Red Assault in Korea" (newsreel) V.31.4
Almond, Lt. Gen. Edward M. II.316
Alternate Joint Communications Center II.85
Ambulances II.206
"America in Transition" (film) V.18
American Battle Monuments Commission II.58
American Broadcasting Company V.33
"America's Town Meeting of the Air" (radio series) V.35
Ammunition

  • congressional investigations of shortages II.151, II.154, II.161, II.296, II.351
  • development of II.187, II.189, II.193, II.194
  • distribution of II.164
  • procurement of II.161, II.153, II.295, II.351
  • production II.154, II.152, II.164, II.165, II.169, II.170, II.173, II.174
  • shortages II.153, II.165, II.168, II.175.4, II.296, II.342, II.351, III.8
  • standards II.183
  • supplies II.50, II.152, II.156, II.202, II.256, II.485, II.492
  • usage II.377.2, II.443

Ammunition Coordination Committee II.174
Ammunition Task Force II.165
Amphibious Forces, Pacific II.251
Amphibious operations II.147, II.148, V.11
Amphibious vehicles II.205
Animals II.60
Anti-Communist measures II.517
Anti-guerrilla operations II.338.3
Archival Research Catalog (ARC) I.9, I.13, V.1-V.2, V.20, V.23, V.24, V.30, V.36
"Arctic Star" (movie) IV.28, V.15.4
Arlington National Cemetery II.52, II.65, II.67
Armed Forces Assistance to Korea program, II.390, II.610
Armed Forces Medical Policy Council II.140
Armed Forces Policy Council II.342
Armed Forces Preaching Mission II.235
Armed Forces Radio and Television Service V.22, V.23
Armed Forces Reserve Act of 1952 III.4, III.15
Armed Forces Special Weapons Project II.184
Armed Forces Strength Act of 1950 III.3
Armistice agreement

  • copies of II.222, II.564
  • implementation of II.29, II.30, II.32, II.33, II.331, II.450, II.486, II.523, II.527, II.529, II.532, II.572, II.577, II.578, II.586
  • photographs related to IV.4, IV.8, IV.29
  • planning for contingencies after II.533
  • violations of II.288, II.530, II.575, II.576, II.577, II.585, II.589

Armistice negotiations

  • American policy toward II.32, II.220, II.221, II.288, II.314.5, II.314.9, II.322, II.349, II.485, II.486, II.527, II.528, II.529, II.589
  • and the Communists II.221, V.28.3
  • films of V.10, V.25.11, V.25.12
  • POW releases during II.312
  • press policies during II.312
  • South Korean hostility toward II.30, II.48.4, II.221
  • strafing of North Korean delegates to II.525
  • and the United Nations Command II.37, II.221, II.542, II.544, II.547, II.548, II.561, II.562, II.577, II.589

Armor operations II.385
Armstrong, Maj. Gen. George E. II.129, II.133
Army, Department of the, documents in State Department files II.28, II.29
Army, Records of the Office of the Secretary of the (RG 335) II.339-II.357, V.23
Army Amateur Radio System II.88
Army Ammunition Program II.165
Army Anti-aircraft Networks II.89
"Army Chaplain in Combat, The" (film) II.235
Army Chemical Center II.213, II.215
Army Chemical Corps II.212-II.215
Army Chief of Staff II.253-II.257
Army Command and Administrative Network II.89
Army Command Information Unit V.23
Army Communications Service Division (Signal Corps) II.88-II.90
Army Equipment Policy Panel II.202
Army Field Forces Board II.181
Army Forces, Far East II.465, II.467, II.590-II.601
"Army Hour, The" (radio series) V.23
Army Installations Board II.167
Army Map Service VI.4
Army Materiel Command II.539
Army Medical Service II.129-II.143
Army Military Intelligence Division V.15
Army Operational, Tactical, and Support Organizations (World War II and Thereafter), Records of the (RG 338) II.358-II.420, II.607, IV.8-VI.9
Army Pictorial Center V.8, V.10
Army Pictorial Service II.77, II.91-II.94
Army Policy Council II.357
Army Postal Service II.455, II.506
Army Research and Development Board II.342
Army Reserve II.303
Army Staff, Records of the (RG 319) II.252-II.318, II.361, IV.23-IV.28, VI.7
Army Units

  • 8000th II.590
  • 8046th II.158
  • 8086th II.599
  • 8201st II.399.4, II.630, II.631
  • 8202nd II.607
  • 8203rd II.596, II.597
  • 8230th II.392
  • 8238th II.224, II.232
  • 8242nd II.535-II.537
  • 8282nd II.399.5
  • organization of, for combat II.318
  • situation reports, II.326
     

Artillery II.197-II.199, II.204-II.206
Artillery operations II.386, II.399.9, II.399.10, II.399.11, II.408, II.412
Associated Press IV.22
Atomic weapons, potential use of in Korea II.186, II.256, II.251, II.287, II.294, II.526, II.528, II.530, II.532
Atrocities II.455, III.9, IV.23, V.5
Audio recordings V.18-V.19, V.22, V.23
Austin, Warren B. V.19
Australian forces V.5
Aviation history IV.29
Aviation schools II.449

B

Back, Maj. Gen. George I. II.76
Bacteriological warfare, accusations of United States use of II.41, II.250, II.262.3, II.274, II.518, V.16, V.28.5, V.31.5
Baker Electronic and communication Mission to Korea II.108
Bancroft, Griffing V.4
Bandit activities II.383, II.622
Barcus Report II.435
"Basis for Planning Supply Requirements and Service Support for Military Operations in Korea" II.56
"Battle Circus" (film) II.335
"Battle Report" (film) V.5
Beals, Cpl. Eugene E. IV.3
Beauchamp, Charles II.64.3
Bennett, Maj. Gen. Ivan L. II.234
Bergin, Maj. Gen. William E. II.447
Bern, Switzerland, U.S. Embassy II.48.5
Biographies II.399.3, II.456, II.466, II.467, II.582
Biological Warfare II.212-II.215
"Black Books" II.28, II.29, II.33
Black market activities II.394
Black Star IV.22
Bliss, Maj. Gen. Raymond W. II.129
Blueprints

  • captured enemy II.227
  • ordnance II.181, II.197, II.198
  • ordnance facilities II.167

Board of National Estimates II.241
Bomb Group, 17th II.442
Bomb Squadron, 3rd II.442
Bombing operations II.196, II.377.4
Bombs II.188, II.194, II.207
Bowles, Edward II.254
Boxer II.5
Bradley, Gen. Omar N. II.219, II.322, V.34.1
Brandy, Adm. William H.P. V.32
Briggs, Ellis O. II.32
British Commonwealth Division, 1st II.368.1
British Commonwealth nation, troops in Korea II.218
British Gloucestershire Battalion II.399.3
Brooke Army Medical Center II.143
Bubonic plague, rumors of II.515
Budgets

  • Army II.297
  • cuts in after World War II II.202
  • Eighth Army II.297
  • Far East Command II.539
  • logistics II.292, II.296
  • ordnance II.159, II.163, II.165, II.167, II.176, II.202
  • and postwar reconstruction of Korea II.322
  • Signal Corps II.84, II.87, II.103

Bullene, Maj. Gen. Egbert F. lII.212
Burials II.52, II.61, II.65, II.67, II.69-II.72, II.378, II.455, II.475

C

Camp McCoy, WI II.184
Canada II.284, II.431
Canadian forces V.5
Captured documents II.224-II.233, II.262.1, II.273.3, II.273.4, II.477, II.519, II.570
Captured enemy materiel II.383, II.390, II.509, IV.17, IV.29
Casualties II.367, II.323

  • allied II.370, II.377.2, II.442
  • American II.336, II.455
  • Army II.50, II.58
  • Eighth Army II.368, II.370, II.377.1
  • enemy II.377.2
  • evacuation of II.397, II.512
  • Far East Command II.497
  • killed in action II.50, II.58, II.68, II.455
  • Marine Corps II.149
  • medical reports on II.139
  • Navy II.9-II.12, II.13, II.20
  • next of kin II.9, II.10, II.70, II.336
  • press releases regarding II.336
  • ROK Army II.370
  • United Nations Command II.550

Cates, Gen. Clifton B. II.144
Cavalry Division, 1st II.368.1, II.417, IV.13, V.11, V.28.2
Cavalry Regiment, 7th V.5
Cease-fire agreement II.572, V.8, V.11

  • American attempts to negotiate a II.28
  • violations of II.576

Cemeteries II.50, II.52, II.58, II.65, II.69-II.72, II.451
Censorship II.267
Center for Legislative Archives III.12, III.13, III.14
Central Intelligence Agency, Records of the (RG 263) II.237-II.243, V.16, VI.6
Chance, C.L. IV.2
Changjin Reservoir II.227.7
Chaplains II.234-II.236, II.388, V.24.5
Chaplains, Records of the Office of the Chief of (RG247) II.234-II.236
Chemical Corps Materiel Command II.213
Chemical Corps Technical Committee II.213, II.214
Chemical units II.389, II.508
Chemical Warfare Service, Records of the (RG 175) II.212-II.215
Chiang Kai-Shek II.34
Chief Chemical Officer, Office of the II.212, II.213
Chief Signal Officer, Records of the Office of the (RG 111( II.76-II.128, IV.10-IV.15, IV.23, V.7-V.11
China, People's Republic of

  • American relations with II.26.2, II.27
  • captured documents II.231
  • declared the aggressor in Korea by the U.S. Congress III.1
  • entry into the war II.37
  • and implementation of the armistice II.33
  • interventions by II.289
  • military/defense matters in II.26.4, II.481
  • photographs of IV.24
  • political matters in II.26.3, II.375, II.481
  • potential intervention by II.34, II.261, II.262.1, II.268, II.323
  • U.S. policy toward II.218, II.219, II.246

China, Republic of, offers of troops II.34
Chinese Affairs, Office of (State Department) II.34-II.35
Chinese People's Volunteer Army forces in Korea II.225, II.581
Chinnampo Harbor, Korea IV.8, V.25.1
Chiri-San, Korea II.227.9
Chosin Reservoir campaign II.55, II.145, II.399.6, IV.8, IV.16
Chunchon, Korea V.10, V.12
Civil affairs activities II.399.11, II.475, II.490, II.495-II.496, II.529.3
Civil affairs functions of the Army overseas II.343
Civil aviation II.423, II.425, II.428, II.429
Civil defense II.423
Civilian internees II.445, II.446, II.510-II.511, II.555, II.564, II.595, II.596, II.597, II.619, II.623, II.629
Civilian relief efforts, U.S. II.298, II.299, II.304, II.308, II.322, II.324, II.513, II.517
Civilian Relief to Korea II.59
Civilians, evacuation of from combat areas IV.4
Claims, from ROK civilians II.305, II.307, II.615.13
Clark, Rear Adm. David H. II.1
Clark, Gen. Mark II.32, II.165, II.523, II.540
Clothing II.55, II.57, II.60, II.64.1, II.64.2, II.64.3
Cold weather

  • equipment performance in II.184
  • injuries II.135, II.141
  • instruction II.64.3

Coles Signal Laboratory II.126
Collingwood, Charles V.4
Collins, Gen. J. Lawton II.252
Combat effectiveness of U.S. units II.489
Combat operations II.314.6, II.314.7, II.315, IV.4, IV.8, IV.10, IV.13, IV.15-IV.18, IV.29, IV.30, V.5, V.28.4
Combat readiness reports II.399.2
Combat support operations, Army II.314.3, II.315
Combined Command for Reconnaissance Activities, Korea II.535-II.537
Combs, Rear Adm. Thomas S. II.42
Command post exercise reports II.399.2
Commander, Amphibious Forces, Pacific II.251
Commander, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific II.251
Commander, Naval Forces Far East II.251
Commander in Chief, Far East Command II.291, II.326, II.470, II.472.1, II.473.3, II.484
Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet II.251, II.462
Commander in Chief, United Nations Command II.470, II.472.1, II.472.2
Commanding General, Eighth Army II.472.2, II.472.3
Commanding General, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific II.251
Committee for the Coordination of Non-Military Assistance to Korea II.59
Committee on Countermeasures Against Communism in the Far East II.517
Committee on Production Policy II.425
Communication security II.521.2
Communications facilities II.479, II.480
Communications zone planning II.317
Communism in the United States II.239, II.280
Communist bloc

  • charges against United Nations forces II.41, II.250, II.262.3, II.274, II.518, V.16, V.28.5, V.31.5
  • military capabilities II.17, II.18
  • political aims II.17

Communist Chinese forces in Korea II.375
"Communist Courses of Action in Korea and Indochina as Result of U.S. Intervention in Indochina" II.530
Communist indoctrination, resistance to II.18
Communist Party activities II.225, II.227, II.476
Communist political organizations II.280
"Communist Reaction in Korea to American Possession of the A-Bomb" II.287
Congressional Medal of Honor II.379, II.455, IV.17, V.22
Congressional Record III.12
"Consequences of US Troop Withdrawal From Korea in Spring, 1949" II.240
Contracts

  • Air Force II.425, II.427
  • audits of II.95, II.1561
  • Office of the Chief of Ordnance II.159, II.160, II.151, II.167, II.179, II.181, II.186, II.195
  • Quartermaster II.61
  • Signal Corps II.84, II.91, II.95, II.96, II.99, II.100, II.101, II.102, II.114, II.115

Controlled combat materiel reports II.580, II.581
Corps

  • I II.399.9, II.408-II.409, V.8
  • IX II.399.10, II.410-II.411, II.467
  • X II.55, II.399.11, II.412-II.413, II.467, IV.8, V.5, VI.12

Cosmos Industries II.97
Coulter, Gen. John B. II.367
Counter-intelligence activities II.383
Counter Intelligence Corps II.273.7, II.275-II.279, II.280
Counter Intelligence Corps Detachments II.279

  • 2nd II.275
  • 7th II.275
  • 181st II.275, II.278
  • 191st II.2 75
  • 201st II.275
  • 308th II.275, II.375
  • 441st II.275
  • 442nd II.275, II.278

Courts martial II.410, lII.609.6, II.615.15, II.628
Cowart, William A. II.283
Crime statistics II.401
Critical materials shortages II.426, II.430, II.431
Cutler, Robert S. II.244
Czechoslovakia II.575, II.585

D

Data processing technology II.64.3
Deaths II.61, II.66, II.68, II.236
Declassification, requests for I.3
Defense, Records of the Office of the Secretary of (RG 330) II.319-II.337, II.352, V.22
Defense Intelligence Agency, Records of the (RG 373) VI.10-VI.11
Defense Production Act of 1950 III.5
Demilitarized Zone, post-armistice activities in II.574, II.576, III.585
Demobilization planning II.302
Dental units II.20, II.126
Desegregation II.309, II.517
Desertion II.455
Detroit Arsenal II.181
Diamond Ordnance Fuze Laboratory II.211
Diplomatic aspects of the war II.25.10
"Diplomatic Pouch" (film) V.4
Dispensary and Field Medical Service, Board on (Martin Board) II.140
Displaced person II.583, II.585, II.589
Doctor-Dentist Draft Act of 1950 III.3
Dodd, Brig. Gen. Francis T. II.471
Douglas, Rufus E. II.283
Du Pong Kim IV.26
DuBose, Vice Adm. Laurance T. II.4
Dulles, John Foster II.22, II.30, II.33, II.324
Dunn, John R. II.283
Dutch forces V.5

E

Economic Cooperation Administration II.59
Eden, Anthony II.30
Edgewood, MD, Proving Ground II.213
Eighth Army II.53, II.64.2

  • allied units attached to II.553
  • award files II.360
  • Band II.392
  • budget estimates II.297
  • command reports II.467
  • communications II.89, II.90
  • general orders II.379, II.392
  • KATUSA troops II.368
  • Korean laborers with II.396
  • logistics II.494, II.619-II.625
  • medical reports II.139
  • ordnance operations II.158
  • and reconstruction of Korea II.322
  • records of the II.363-II.405
  • recreation and entertainment activities II.404
  • strength II.368, II.371
  • troop movements II.377.3
  • unit deployment II.377.3
  • United Nations units attached to II.368

Eisenhower, Dwight D. II.244, II.434, III.11
Eisenhower Presidential Administration, policy papers II.246
Electronic warfare II.112, II.128
Elvair Corporation II.154
Emergency war plan for 1952 II.471
Enemy forces

  • deserters II.531
  • morale II.536
  • operations II.374, II.383, II.384
  • probable courses of action of II.373
  • troop movements II.536

Engineer Combat Battalions

  • 10th II.380
  • 151st II.380

Engineer Combat Group, 1169th II.380
Engineer Construction Battalion, 76th II.380
Engineer Construction Group, 24th VI.9
Engineer operations II.390
Engineer Utility Detachment, 376th II.392
Engineering plans

  • for aircraft VI.3
  • for ships VI.2

Engineers, Records of the Office of the Chief of (RG 77) VI.4
Equipment and supplies

  • communications II.77, II.83, II.88-II.90, II.109-II.111, II.112, II.114, II.115, II.116, II.119, II.120
  • distribution of II.60
  • electronics II.79, II.83, II.112, II.114, II.119, II.120
  • medical II.142
  • ordnance II.152
  • performance of II.49, II.55, II.64.3
  • procurement of II.49, II.63, II.73
  • requirements II.202, II.59`
  • for Republic of Korea Army units II.607
  • United Nations Command II.565
  • World War II II.150

Espe, Rear Adm. Carl F. II.15
Espionage II.280, II.282
"Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the United States Air Force in the Korean Campaign, An" II.435
Evans Signal Laboratory II.126
"Everlasting Good Will" (film) IV.26,V.15.2
Explosives II.183, II.191, II.192, II.193
Extension of Enlistment Act of 1950 III.3

F

Far East Air Force II.465, II.468-II.539

  • Bomb Command (Provisional) II.443
  • combat operations reports II.443, II.444, II.516
  • command reports II.460
  • general orders II.499, II.500
  • intelligence operations II.273, II.523
  • medical reports II.139
  • military installations II.457
  • Military Intelligence Division II.224, II.231-II.233
  • Military Intelligence Section II.273.1, II.273.3, II.273.7
  • press releases II.311
  • Psychological Warfare Branch II.262.1
  • tour of by the Under Secretary of the Army II.350

Far East Command, General Headquarters, the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, and the United Nations Command, 1945-57, Records of the (RG 554) II.468-II.632
Far East (Four-Power) Meeting in Berlin, January 1954 II.328
Far Eastern Affairs, Bureau of (State Department) II.22, II.27-II.35
Fechteler, Adm. William M. II.14, II.322
Feldman, Maj. Gen. Herman II.51, II.55, II.64.2
Fighter-Bomber Groups

  • 18th II.442
  • 49th II.442

Fighter-Bomber Squadrons

  • 7th II.442
  • 8th II.442
  • 9th II.442

Fighter-Bomber Wing, 18th II.442
"Fighter-Bombers Blast North Korea Targets" (newsreel) V.31.6
Finletter, Thomas K. II.421
Fire control equipment II.199, II.204
Fitzsimmons General Hospital II.143
Flame throwers II.389
Flares II.188, II.207
Fleet, 7th II.251
Fleet Marine Force, Pacific II.251
Food

  • for American forces in Korea II.57, II.60, II.64.1, II.64.2, II.64.3, II.74-II.75
  • for Thai forces II.64.2

Food Services Division (Quartermaster General) II.49, II.64.2, II.64.3, II.74-II.75
Ford, Maj. Gen. Elbert L. II.151
Foreign aid II.97, II.343
Foreign Broadcast Information Service II.237, II.238
Foreign nationals

  • medals and awards given to II.8, II.254
  • military training for II.265
  • requests to visit U.S. research facilities II.99
  • training for II.104

Foreign policy, films and sound recordings regarding V.4, V.5, V.6
Foreign Service Posts of the Department of State, Records of the (RG 84) II.47-II.48
Formosa

  • logistics support for II.529
  • raids on the China mainland II.531
  • U.S. policy toward II.218, II.527
  • See also China, Republic of; Taipei, Taiwan

Fort Knox, KY II.141
Fort Monmouth, NJ II.122, II.123, II.127
Fortuna, Andrew II.283
Fox, Sonny V.19.3, V.19.7
Funerals II.236
Fuzes II.189-II.190, II.194-II.196, II.207, II.211

G

"Gathering Storm, The" (film) V.29.1
Geneva Conference of 1954 II.29, II.33, II.48.4, II.48.5, II.48.6
George Roper Company II.162
Gilpatric, Roswell L. II.426
Goldhamer, H. II.287
Goldin, David V.34
Goodiel, Col. Carlton II.122
Graves registration service units II.50, II.55, II.58, II.64.1, II.64.2, II.64.3, II.475, II.583
Great Britain

  • fuzes developed by II.190, II.194
  • and negotiations with Communist forces II.31

Grenades II.188, II.192, II.207
Griggs, Lewie W. II.283
Guerrilla activities II.367
Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States I.10
Guide to the Records of the United States House of Representatives at the National Archives, 1789-1989 III.13
Guide to the Records of the United States Senate at the National Archives, 1789-1989 III.13

H

Hamhung, Korea II.227.5, II.227.6
Harrison, General V.28.7
"Has the Korean War Been a Failure?" (radio broadcast) V.35.1
Hastings, Brig. Gen. Kester L. II.55, II.64.2, II.64.3
Headquarters, U.S. Air Force (Air Staff), Records of (RG 341) II.433-II.439
"Hear It Now" (radio broadcast) V.34.4
Heartbreak Ridge V.28.4
Helena II.5
Helicopters II.318
Hill 598 Triangle II.140
Historical detachments II.599
Historical studies

  • I Corps II.408, II.409
  • IX Corps II.411
  • X Corps II.412, II.413
  • Air Force II.443
  • Army Forces, Far East II.598-II.599
  • Central Intelligence Agency II.242
  • Counter Intelligence Corps II.275-II.279
  • Eighth Army II.398-II.399, II.458
  • Far East Command II.399.1, II.458, II.516
  • Japan Logistical Command II.603.14
  • Joint Chiefs of Staff II.221
  • Korean Communications Zone II.620.3, II.624.1, II.625
  • logistical commands II.616
  • military assistance groups II.338, II.612.6, II.613
  • Office of the chief of Ordnance II.154-II.157
  • Quartermaster II.64-II.65
  • Signal Corps II.78
  • State Department II.36-II.39
  • Surgeon General's Office II.130-II.139
  • unit histories II.399.3, II.408, II.412, II.415, II.416, II.417, II.419, II.420, II.458, II.466, II.467, II.520, II.521, II.536, II.603.14, II.605, II.612.2, II.620.4-II.620.6, II.624.l, II.629
  • United Nations Civil Assistance Command, Korea II.632.5-II.632.8, II.633
  • United Nations Command II.516
  • U.S. Army, Pacific II.466-II.467

Holland, Brig. Gen. Frank C. II.55
Horkan, Maj. Gen. George A. II.51, II.64.2
Hospitals

  • Army II.132, II.136, II.141, II.143, IV.10
  • Navy IV.2

Howitzers II.178, II.198, II.197, II.208
Hubbell and Miller II.97, II.100
Hull, Gen. John E. II.523
Hume, Maj. Gen. Edgar II.133
Hungnam, Korea II.55, II.144, IV.8, V.5, V.11, V.12, V.25.7, V.25.8
Hydroelectric plans, U.S. attacks on II.34, II.322
Hydrographic data II.228

I

"In Defense of Peace" (film) V.5
Inchon, Korea II.148, II.227.5, II.485, II.617, II.618, IV.8, IV.16, V.5, V.12, V.25.6
India II.32, II.48.2
Indochina II.530
Industrial mobilization program II.73, II.151, II.154, II.156, II.167, II.168, II.169-II.172, II.175, II.176, II.177, II.180, II.195, II.344, II.352, II.355, II.356, II.425
Industrial security II.353, II.356, II.425
Infantry Divisions

  • 2nd II.368.4, II.417, IV.13, V.8
  • 3rd II.368.5, II.417, IV.13
  • 7th II.55, II.368.6, II.380, II.417, IV.13, V.11
  • 24th II.368.7, II.417, V.11
  • 25th II.368.8, II.399.12, II.417, IV.13, V.11
  • 40th II.368.9, II.417
  • 45th II.368.10, II.417
  • composition of II.414

Infantry Regimental Combat Teams

  • 24th II.489
  • 187th IV.13

Infantry Regiments II.417

  • 7th II.380
  • 23rd V.8
  • 38th II.380

Infantry Tank Company, 9th V.8
Inje, Korea V.10
Inspectors general

  • X Corps II.412
  • Eighth Army II.394
  • Japan Logistical Command II.603.15
  • Ordnance Department II.160
  • Signal Corps II.95

Integration of U.S. troops II.309, II.517
intelligence, Assistant Chief of Staff for (Army) II.232, II.260-II.283
International Civil Aviation Organization II.428, II.429
International Committee of the Red Cross II.547, II.578 , II.582, II.583
International Communist Volunteer Army II.375
International News IV.22
Interservice Agencies, Records of (RG 334) II.338

J

James, M/Sgt. Carolyn V.23.4
Japan

  • American relations with II.27
  • and the conduct of the war II.48.1, II.48.2, II.48.3
  • defensive measures in II.486
  • logistics support for II.529
  • occupation of IV.34
  • relations with the ROK II.33
  • security status of United Nations forces in II.543
  • United Nations command fostering of friendly relations between Japan and Korea II.557
  • U.S. policy toward II.218

Japan Logistical Command II.55, II.90, II.139, II.457, II.590, II.601-II.605
Japan Replacement Center II.507
Johns Hopkins University II.186, II.196
Johnson, Rear Adm. Felix L. II.15
Johnson, Louis II.324
Johnson, U. Alexis  II.22, II.3`
Joint Board for Decorations and Medals II.332
Joint Chiefs of Staff II.321, II.472.3

Joint Committees of Congress, Records of (RG 128) III.12
Joint doctrine II.318, II.321
Joint Observer Teams II.576, II.578
Joint Strategic Plans and Operations Group, Far East Command II.474, II.516, II.533
Judge Advocates II.444, II.615.15
Juneau II.5

K

Kaeson, Korea II.227.6, II.542
Kim Il Sung IV.26
Kimpo, North Korea II.227.2, II.227.3, II.227.5, II.227.6
Korea

  • international political conference on II.48.2, II.48.4
  • U.S. occupation of II.276

Korea, Peoples Republic of

  • American relations with II.225.6, II.27
  • captured documents II.227-II.230, II.231-II.233, II.273.3, II.273.4
  • espionage by II.280
  • guerilla activities II.367
  • and implementation of the armistice II.33
  • lines of communication II.256
  • military capabilities II.240, II.268, II.269
  • naval forces II.243
  • officials II.282
  • photographs of IV.24
  • political leaders IV.26
  • political matters II.25.3, II.25.7, II.243, II.478, II.480, II.481
  • political meetings with South Korea V.15.3
  • public health II.480
  • rumors of bubonic plague in II.515
  • Soviet aid to IV.26, IV.27, IV,.28, V.15.1, V.15.2

Korea, Republic of

  • American relations with II.25.2, II.25.8, II.25.10, II.246, II.298, II.524, II.532
  • and armistice negotiations II.30-II.31
  • civil affairs assistance to II.343, II.399.11, II.475, II.490, II.495-II.496, II.547
  • civil information in II.304
  • defense of after the armistice II.532
  • diplomatic negotiations with II.22, II.29
  • economic aid to II.31, II.33, II.59, II.298, II.303, II.308, II.342, II.399.4, II.490, II.495, II.496, III.18, III.20
  • education in II.304
  • labor supply II.303, II.305, II.307
  • logistics support for II.529
  • military academy II.390
  • military assistance to II.330, II.337, II.342, II.423, II.492, II.495
  • National Police II.609.2
  • natural resources II.306
  • political matters II.25.3, II.25.9, II.30, II.33, II.478, II.481, II.495, II.529, II.531
  • railroads II.619
  • rebuilding of II.303, II.322, II.324, II.529, II.610, II.631
  • relations with Japan II.33
  • relief assistance to II.399.4, II.491
  • UNICEF activities in II.514
  • United Nations Command civil assistance activities in II.53, II.495, II.496, V.5
  • See Also Republic of Korea Army.

"Korea Invaded" (newsreel) V.31.1
"Korea Project" (State Department Division of Historical Policy Research) II.39
"Korea Story, The" (film) V.24.8
"Korea: The Long Road to Peace" (film) V.29.4
"Korea Truce Hopes Rise" (newsreel) V.31.7
Korean Base Section II.158, 11.615.7, II.615.8, II.615.10-II.615.14, II.617, II.618, II.626-II.628
Korean Civil Assistance Command II.631
Korean Communications Zone II.139, II.158, II.494, II.619-II.628, II.630
"Korean Evaluation Project: Report on Air Operations" lI.435
Korean Labor Party II.280
Korean Mutual Defense Treaty III.11, III.19
Korean Mutual Defense Treaty of 1954 II.29, II.32, II.33
"Korean Situation, The" (radio broadcast) V.34.2
"Korean War Program--United Nations Review" (radio broadcast) V.33
Koreans working for the U.S. Army in Korea II.368, II.396
Koyong, Korea II.227.6
Kyung Al You IV.26

L

Labor disputes II.101, II.152, II.426
Labor supply in South Korea II.303, II.306, II.307
Landers, Sgt. W.G. IV.2, IV.3
Language Detachment, 164th II.482
Larkin, General II.296
"Latest War Films from Korea" (newsreel) V.31.3
Lawton, General II.78
Lay, James S. Jr. II.244
Legion of Merit awards II.8
Leprosy II.594.3
Lines of communication II.399.7, II.489
Logistical Commands

  • 2nd II.53, II.399.7, II.614-II.616, II.617, II.626
  • 3rd II.399.8, II.617-II.618, II.626

Logistical operations II.326, II.299.11, II.399.12, II.490-II.494, II.529.2

  • Navy II.464
  • planning for II.490, II.491

Logistical requirements II.487, II.494
Logistics issues II.55, II.56, II.64.3, II.317, II.324, II.342, II.343, II.344, II.350, II.405, II.430
Logistics support II.292-II.296

  • Eighth Army II.619-II.625, II.626
  • for the Japanese defense forces II.529
  • for non-U.S. forces in the United Nations Command II.558, II.559
  • for the Republic of China II.529
  • for the Republic of Korea II.529, II.619-II.625
  • for the United Nations Command II.558, II.559, II.584, II.601, II.626

"Longines Chronoscope" (films) V.32
Longines Wittnauer Watch Company V.32
Lovett, Robert II.324
Loyalty case II.342

M

MacArthur, Gen. Douglas II.31, II.37, II.321, II.334, II.456, II.468, II.540, II.553, II.630, III.7, III.19
Malik, Jacob IV.31
Manchuria, hot pursuit into II.34
Manpower issues III.15
Manuals

  • captured Russian II.226.2
  • chemical warfare II.213
  • Navy II.147
  • Ordnance Bureau II.153, II.161
  • photography II.91
  • Quartermaster II.61
  • Signal Corps II.77, II.88, II.91, II.107, II.124

Mao Ze-dung IV.31
Map Service Center VI.6
Maps II.432

  • Air Force II.422, II.439
  • armistice II.564, II.582
  • captured enemy II.227
  • intelligence II.373
  • of Korea II.243, II.338.4, II.398, II.527, II.528, VI.4, VI.6, VI.7.2, VI.8, VI.9
  • Navy II.464
  • POW camps VI.7.2, VI.12
  • situation II.374, II.377.6, II.383, II.392, II.399.6

March of Time films V.29
Marine Air Wing, 1st II.251
Marine Aircraft Group 33.II.147
Marine Brigade, First Provisional II.399.6, V.11
Marine Corps Picture Authority Film Book V.14
Marine Division, 1st II.148, II.218, II.368.2, II.399.6, IV.2, IV.3, V.5, V.8, V.11, V.12, V.28.6
Marine Medical Battalion, 1st V.10
Marshall, Gen. George C. II.324, III.10
Marshall, S.L.A. II.186
Martin Board II.140
"MASH" (film) II.335
Matthews, Francis P. II.462
McAuliffe, Maj. Gen. Anthony C. II.212
Mead Carney and Company II.174
Medals and decorations

  • Army II.360, II.591, V.23.2
  • Congressional Medal of Honor II.379, II.455, IV.17, V.22
  • decorations authorized by U.S. Armed Services II.331-II.332, II.451, II.455
  • Eighth Army II.360, II.378, II.379, II.380, II.392
  • Far East command II.497, II.500
  • given to Americans by foreign governments II.265
  • given to foreign nationals II.8, II.265
  • given to Korean nationals II.8
  • Korea Military Assistance Group II.608, II.611
  • Korean Communications Zone II.624.2, II.625
  • Legions of Merit II.8
  • Marine Corps IV.17
  • Navy II.7-II.8
  • Presidential Unit Citations II.7, II.608
  • Silver Star V.23.2
  • unit commendations II.7, II.378, II.379, II.608
  • United Nations Command II.559

Medical Clearing Company, 629th V.10
Medical Corps (Navy) II.19, II.31
Medical Department Field Research Agency, Fort Knox, KY II.141
Medical education for national defense II.135
Medical equipment and supplies II.60
Medical evacuations II.397, II.512, IV.2, IV.13, IV.17, V.10
Medical personnel

  • Army II.397
  • Korean IV.2, IV.3
  • Navy II.21, IV.2, IV.3
  • U.S. V.19.3, V.23.1

Medical statistics II.131, II.297, II.443
Medical support for American civilians in the Far East command area II.525
Medical units II.132, II.136, II.137-II.139, IV.2
Medicine and Surgery, Records of the Bureau of (RG 52) II.19-II.31, IV.2-IV.3
Memorial Division (Quartermaster General) II.50, II.64.1, II.65, II.66-11.72
Meteorological records II.228
Military aid II.299, II.342, II.351
Military Armistice Commission II.288
Military Armistice Conference II.572, II.577
    See Also Armistice negotiations
Military Assistance Program II.94
Military attaches

  • American II.265, II.266
  • foreign II.265
  • Military bases II.492
  • Military capabilities
  • Communist bloc II.17, II.18, II.241
  • enemy II.383, II.478
  • North Korean II.240, II.268, II.269, II.320
  • South Korea II.262.2, II.320
  • Soviet II.268

Military construction II.167, II.180, II.431
Military Defense Assistance Program II.451
Military History, Office of the Chief of II.314-II.315
Military installations II.457, II.500, II.506, II.525
Military intelligence

  • X Corps II.412
  • Air Force II.437-II.439, II.443
  • from Allied countries II.270
  • Army II.254, II.256, II.260-II.283
  • British II.270
  • Captured chemical warfare equipment II.509
  • captured documents II.224-iI.233, II.477
  • Central Intelligence Agency II.240-II.241, II.269
  • Eighth Army II.373-II.376, II.378, II.381, II.383, II.390, II.399.9, II.399.10, II.399.11
  • Far East Command II.476-II.483, II.484, II.485, II.497, II.530, II.531, II.536, II.537
  • Far East Land Forces II.273.2
  • Korea Military Assistance Group II.609.5, II.612.2
  • Korean Communications Zone II.621, II.622
  • Korean Communications Zone II.621, II.622
  • Marine Corps II.144, II.146, II.148
  • Navy II.16, II.270, II.462
  • Office of the Chief of Ordnance II.157, II.185
  • strategic vulnerability surveys II.530
  • United Nations Command II.570

Military Intelligence Service II.270, II.481, II.482, II.483
Military Intelligence Service Detachment, 154th II.482
Military Intelligence Service Group, 500th II.224, II.230, II.232
Military operations reports

  • I Corps II.408
  • Eighth Army II.377, II.378, II.382, II.399.11, II.497
  • Far East Command II.497, II.537
  • United Nations command II.436, II.569
  • U.S. Army, Pacific II.466, II.569

Military personnel

  • American II.369, II.370
  • Army II.257-II.259, II.314.8
  • available to the United Nations Command II.291
  • Chinese People's Volunteers II.579
  • confinement of II.517
  • DOD policies II.431
  • Eighth army II.395
  • Far East Command II.484-II.489, II.501, II.502, II.503, II.507, II.529.1, II.535, II.537
  • foreign II.265, II.267
  • in Japan II.543
  • KATUSA II.535
  • Korean People's Army II.579
  • legislation relating to III.2, III.3, III.4, III.15
  • medical IV.2-IV.3
  • minority group members II.342
  • Navy IV.2-IV.3
  • recruitment of minorities II.342
  • replacements II.475, II.488, II.507
  • Republic of Korea Army II.369
  • rotation II.455, II.507, II.529, II.579
  • training of - See Training.
  • troop basis files II.290
  • United Nations Command II.369, II.501, II.543, II. 547, II.563, II.579

Military Police Company, 558th II.392
Military schools II.449, II.451
Military strategy and planning II.220, II.246, II.284-II.291, II.485, II.486, II.488, II.526, II.533, II.539
Minorities II.342
Missiles

  • development of II.78, II.112
  • production of II.354

Missing-in-action

  • American II.68, II.283, II.450
  • Navy II.9-II.12

Missouri II.5
Mobile Army Surgical Hospital Units

  • 8209th V.10
  • 8225th V.10
  • 8666th II.335

Mobile Inspection Teams II.578
Mobile medical units, Navy II.20
Mobilization

  • Air Force II.424
  • Navy II.30

Mobilization planning II.61, II.77, II.103, II.112, II.140, II.154, II.167, II.180, II.317, II.323, II.342, II.353, II.424, II.431
Montague, Ludwell Lee II.242
Morale, U.S. Army II.318
Moscow, U.S.S.R. II.16
Motion pictures II.77, II.91, II.92, II.93, II.94, II.423, II.427, V.1-V.18, V.20-V.21, V.24, V.25, V.27-V.32

  • Air Force II.427
  • of combat operations V.5, V.8, V.11, V.12
  • about Communist countries IV.24
  • enemy II.92
  • service support for Hollywood-produced films II.335
  • still pictures from IV.24, IV.25

Mount McKinley II.5
Munitions Board II.167, II.352-II.356, II.425, II.426, II.430-II.432
Murphy, Raymond E. II.239
Murrow, Edward R. V.4
Muster rolls, Navy II.6
Mutual Broadcasting System V.23, V.34
Mutual Defense Assistance Program II.59, II.425
Mutual Defense Assistance Program, Korea II.322, II.329

N

Nam Il IV.21, V.28.7
NARA Archival Research Catalog database I.9, I.12, V.1-V.2, V.20, V.23, V.24, V.30, V.36, VI.1
Narcotics traffic II.514, II.515, V!.6
"National Air and Space Museum Archival Videodiscs" IV.31
National Archives Collection of Donated Materials V.27-V.36
National Archives Collection of Foreign Records Seized (RG 242) II.224-II.233, IV.20, V.15
National Film Studio of North Korea V.16
National Guard II.299
National Intelligence Estimates II.241
National Intelligence Surveys II.144, II.243
National military cemeteries II.50, II.52, II.65, II.67, II.69-II.71
National Security Council II.345-II.348, II.435
National Security Council, Records of the (RG 273) II.244-II.248
National Tube Company II.171
Naval Air Material Center VI.3
Naval attaches' reports II.16
Naval Forces Far East II.251, II.462
Naval gunfire II.377.2
Naval hospitals II.19, II.21
Naval Intelligence, Office of II.14, II.15-II.18
Naval Operating Forces, Records of (RG 313) II.251
Naval operations II.251, V.25.1-V.25.10
Naval Operations, Chief of II.4, II.320, II.322
Naval Operations, Records of the Office of the Chief of (RG 38) II.14-II.18
Naval Ordnance Test Station Annex, Pasadena, CA ((.184
Naval Personnel, Records of the Bureau of (RG 24) II.4-II.13
Naval shore establishments II.6
Naval units, situation reports II.326
Navy, 1798-1947, General Records of the Department of the (RG 80) IV.8-IV.9
Navy, 1947-, General Records of the Department of the (RG 428) II.462-II.464, V.25-V.26
Navy flag files II.251
Neutral Nations Liaison Group II.584
Neutral Nations Repatriation Commission II.288, II.575, II.578, II.585
New York University V.35
Newspaper clippings II.25, II.239, II.334, II.538, II.582, II.600
Newsreels V.27-V.31, V.36
Niblo, Gen. Urban II.157
North Carolina II.5
North Korean People's Army II.225, II.280

  • controlled combat materiel reports II.581
  • order of battle II.268
  • plans for the demobilization of II.302

Northeast Asian Affairs, Office of (State Department) II.27, II.31, II.32-II.33
Nuclear weapons, potential use of in tactical operations II.186

O

Oerlikon (Swiss Company) II.161
Officer's Reserve Corps II.451
Ohly, John H. II.320
Okchon, Korea II.227.6
Okinawa IV.34
Onchon, Korea II.227.6
"One Nation Indivisible" (radio broadcast) V.34.1
"One Year in Korea" (film) V.5
Onjin, Korea II.227.8
Operation Big Switch II.313, II.398, II.594.4, II.597
Operation Homecoming II.595, II.597
Operation Killer IV.17
Operation Little Switch II.147, II.398, II.594.4, II.597
Operation LOGEX II.123
Operation Mass Breakout II.594.4
Operation Racetrack II.534
Operation RETORT II.542
Operation Thanksgiving II.595, II.597
Operation Tomahawk V.11
Order of battle

  • enemy II.374, II.383, II.384, II.481
  • U.S. II.598

Ordnance

  • chemical II.508
  • Japan Logistical Command II.603.16-II.603.22
  • on Navy aircraft II.43
  • production II.154, II.152, II.164, II.154, II.167, II.169-II.172, II.174, II.176, II.178, II.353
  • Soviet II.185

Ordnance, Records of the Bureau of (RG 74) II.45-II.46
Ordnance, Records of the Office of the Chief of (RG 156) II.50-II.211, VI.5
Ordnance Groups

  • 60th II.158
  • 314th II.158

Ordnance Technical Committee II.182, II.183
Ordnance units II.158, II.400
Orphans II.304
Overseas bases, requirements for II.342

P

Pace, Frank, Jr. II.339, V.32
Pacific Fleet II.144, II.146, II.251, II.462
Paramount News V.28
Parker, Maj. Gen. Roy H. II.234
Pate, Arlie H. II.283
Patents II.97, II.101, II.152, II.152, II.195, II.213
Pathe News newsreels V.4, V.6
Peace proposals II.288
Peking Film Studio V.16
Personnel Policy Board II.331
Petroleum II.53, II.57, II.61
Philippine Islands II.481, II.527, II.570
Photographs

  • activities and sites in communist countries IV.24, IV.26, V1.7.1, VI.7.2, VI.7.3
  • aerial IV.13, IV.23, VI.7.1, VI.10, VI.11
  • aerial reconnaissance II.439
  • Air Force activities II.422, IV.29-IV.36
  • aircraft IV.8, IV.9, IV.10, IV.16, IV.17, IV.29, IV.30
  • American civilian leaders IV.5, IV.7, IV.13, IV.16, IV.21, IV.22
  • armistice negotiations and signing IV.4, IV.8, IV.29
  • captured enemy II.225, II.227, IV.25
  • captured enemy documents IV.20, IV.29
  • casualties IV.13, IV.23
  • cemeteries IV.17
  • chemical units II.389
  • civilian internees II.596
  • combat operations IV.4, IV.8, IV.10, IV.13, IV.15, IV.16, IV.17, IV.18, IV.29, IV.30
  • Counter Intelligence Corps detachments II.279
  • daily situation maps II.224
  • diplomatic events IV.4, IV.6, IV.7
  • diplomatic personalities IV.5, IV.7
  • Eighth Army II.398, II.399.9
  • First Marine Division II.399.6
  • foreign dignitaries II.265, IV.5, IV.7, IV.13, IV.21, IV.22, IV.24, IV.26
  • historical detachments II.599
  • industrial facilities IV.24, IV.26-IV.28
  • for intelligence analysis IV.24, IV.25-IV.28, VI.10, V1.11
  • Korean civilians IV.10, IV.13, IV.17, IV.21
  • Korean military personnel IV.17
  • medal and award recipients IV.17, IV.26
  • medical care IV.2, IV.3, IV.29
  • military ceremonies IV.10, IV.13, IV.15, IV.26
  • military commanders IV.13, IV.26
  • Munitions Board II.432
  • Naval Medical Battalion IV.2
  • Navy II.464, IV.8-IV.9
  • Office of the chief of Ordnance II.15
  • ordnance II.181, II.187, II.188, II.192, II.193, II.197, II.201, II.203
  • ordnance facilities II.167
  • personalities IV.4, IV.6, IV.7, IV.8, IV.9, IV.11, IV.14, IV.15, IV.16, IV.17, IV.18, IV.19, IV.21, IV.22, IV.29
  • prisoners of war II.596, IV.10, IV.13, IV.16, IV.17, IV.21, IV.29, V.5
  • refugees IV.13, IV.21
  • relating to civil relief efforts in Korea II.496
  • ships IV.8, IV.16
  • Signal Corps II.91, II.94, IV.10-IV.15
  • Surgeon General's Office II.132, II.133, II.136, II.138
  • surgical procedures IV.2, IV.3
  • tour of the Far East Command by the Under Secretary of the Army II.350
  • United Nations armed forces IV.10, IV.17, IV.21, IV.30
  • U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command II.282
  • U.S. military aviation history IV.29
  • U.S.S.R. IV.24
  • weapons IV.10, IV.16, IV.17, IV.29, IV.30

Pigeon Service II.108, II.521.2
Pine Bluff Arsenal II.213
Poland II.575, II.585
Policy development II.314.1, II.320, II.321, II.322, II.323, II.324, II.328, II.330, II.342, II.345-348, II.357, II.422, II.435, II.448, II.455, II.462, II.486, II.526
Port authorities II.626
Port Hudson National Cemetery II.52
Post-war planning II.256
Precipitation II.101, II.110, II.121
Presidential Unit Citations II.7, II.608
Press credentials II.472.3, II.485
Press releases II.311, II.336, II.422, II.427, II.429, II.455, II.529
Price controls II.426, II.431
Pride, Rear Adm. Alfred M. II.42
Princeton II.5
Prisoners of war II.475, II.517

  • Allied attempts to reeducate II.510, II.511, II.520, II.555, II.557
  • Americans II.274, II.283, II.450, II.482, II.512, II.589, II.591
  • Americans who refused repatriation II.274, II.283
  • camps II.446, II.510, II.565, II.617, II.623, VI.7.2
  • Communist insurgency activity among II.446, II.471
  • deaths of II.594.3, II.596, II.623
  • debriefings of II.525
  • education and recreation programs for II.446, II.510, II.511, II.520, II.555, II.557
  • and Eighth Army II.367, II.368, II.398
  • enemy II.398, II.399.7, II.401, II.445, II.517, II.593-II.597, II.619, II.629, V.5
  • forced repatriation of II.446
  • held on Koje Do II.446, II.471, II.623
  • interrogation of II.18, II.147, II.273.5, II.273.6, II.273.12, II.399.10, II.477, II.479, II.482
  • Marine Corps II.525
  • medical services for II.140, II.594.3
  • Navy II.10-11.12, II.20, II.525
  • North Korean indoctrination of II.274, II.280
  • numbers II.370, II.597
  • Operation Big Switch II.313, II.398, II.594, II.597
  • Operation Little Switch II.147, II.398, II.594, II.597
  • photographs of IV.10, IV.13, IV.16, IV.17, IV.21, IV.29, V.5
  • policy issues II.37, II.220, II.254
  • rehabilitation of II.584
  • releases of II.312, II.398, II.529
  • repatriation of II.18, II.29, II.32, II.221, II.254, II.274, II.288, II.322, II.542, II.561, II.574, II.582, II.583, II.584, II.585, II.586-II.588, II.594.4, II.595
  • rosters of II.18, II.313, II.395, II.595
  • treatment of II.18, II.274, II.313, II.394, II.398, II.445, II.446, II.596, II.624.8
  • United Nations Command administration of camps for II.446, II.510, II.565, II.593, II.629
  • United Nations Command personnel II.274, II.398, II.512, II.550, II.559, II.561, II.565, II.585, II.586, II.589
  • U.S. policies regarding II.324, II.398
  • use of for propaganda purposes II.302
  • used as labor II.446
  • validation of II.587

Proctor and Gamble II.174
Procurement

  • Air Force II.425, II.430
  • of aircraft II.42, II.44
  • of ammunition II.154, II.161, II.163, II.165
  • Army II.49, II.73, II.343, II.344, II.349
  • chemical warfare supplies II.213
  • communications equipment II.77, II.102
  • Navy II.42, II.44, II.45-II.46
  • of ordnance II.45-II.46, II.159, II.161, II.162, II.167, II.168, II.175, II.177, II.178, II.180, II.182, II.197
  • policies II.352, II.353, II.354, II.355
  • of rockets II.162
  • Signal Corps II.77, II.102, II.114-II.117

Procurement Secretaries Group II.425
"Production and the Free World" (film) V.18
Project CIRRUS II.101, II.110, II.121
Propaganda II.267, II.274

  • American II.26.1, II.262.1, II.518, II.520, IV.23, V.17, V.18-V.19
  • Anti-American II.26.1, V.15
  • Communists II.26.1, II.186, II.2225, II.227, II.243, II.250, II.476, II.518, II.519, V.15
  • North Korean II.262.1, IV.20
  • United Nations Command II.186, II.518, II.557
  • use of prisoners of war for II.302

Provost marshal sections II.593-II.597
Psychological warfare II.25, II.186, II.262.1, II.267, II.287, II.300-II.302, II.377.5, II.466, II.518-II.520, II.554-II.557
Public opinion

  • American II.324
  • German II.250
  • Soviet II.251
  • World II.249-II.250, II.261

Public relations

  • Air Force II.427
  • Department of Defense II.333-II.336
  • Eighth Army II.393
  • Far East Command II.472.3, II.473, II.529.4

Publications of the U.S. Government (RG 287) III.12
Pugh, Rear Adm. Herbert L. II.19
"Punch Bowl" campaign IV.16, IV.17
Pusan, Korea II.399.7, II.617, II.626, IV.8, V.25.9
Pusan Interrogation Center II.482
Pusan Logistical Command II.614-II.615
Pyongyang, North Korea II.225, II.226, II.227, II.230

Q

Quartermaster Food and container Institute II.75
Quartermaster General, Records of the Office of the (RG 92) II.49-II.75
Quartermaster Technical Committee II.61

R

Race relations II.343, II.423, II.431, II.517
Radar reconnaissance reports II.439
Radford, Adm. Arthur W. II.219
Radio broadcasts V.22, V.23, V.33-V.35
Radiological warfare II.213, II.214
Rand studies II.287
Ranger units II.285
Reconnaissance operations II.439
Reconnaissance Platoons

  • 502nd II.392
  • 503rd II.392

Red Cross II.547, II.578. II.582, II.583
Refugees II.55, II.318, II.583, II.585, II.589, II.631, IV.13, IV.21, V.5, VI.13
Republic of Korea Army

  • clothing for II.64.2
  • interrogation reports II.273.12
  • logistical support II.607, II.626
  • personnel II.369
  • planning for post-war II.548
  • plans for demobilization of II.302
  • replacements II.606, II.607
  • strength II.324, II.337, II.338.3
  • strengthening of after the armistice II.532
  • tables of allowances II.56
  • tables of organization and equipment II.56
  • training for II.399.5, II.606, II.607
  • U.S. support of II.338.1, II.338.2, II.338.4, II.338.5

Republic of Korea Army units

  • 38th Infantry V.8
  • 3519th II.273.12

Research and development

  • of aircraft II.42, II.423, II.440, II.441
  • chemical warfare II.213, II.214
  • communications equipment II.79, II.88, II.119, II.120, II.124, II.125
  • electronics II.119, II.120, II.124, II.125
  • food II.75
  • guided missiles II.431
  • medical II.138, II.143
  • ordnance II.46, II.181-II.207, II.209.5, II.210, VI.5
  • Quartermaster equipment and supplies II.49, II.55, II.57, II.60, II.63
  • weapons II.431, II.464
  • weapons systems II.342, II.344

Reserve Industrial Plants II.431
Reserve Officers Training Corps II.303, II.451

  • Air Force II.423
  • personnel II.258
  • Signal Corps summer camp II.127

Rhee, Syngman II.22, II.30, II.32, II.33, II.282, II.321, II.324, II.524, IV.21, V.19.1
Ridgewood Ordnance Plant II.154
Ridgway, Gen. Matthew B. II.31, II.252, II.367, II.540, V.5
Road surveys II.367
Robertson, Walter S. II.22, II.32
Rock Island Arsenal II.208
Rockets

  • procurement of II.161
  • research and development II.194, II.200-II.201, II.204
  • testing of II.184

Rockford Ordnance Plant II.162
Rocky Mountain Arsenal II.213
Roper, Vice Adm. John W. II.4
Rossford Ordnance Plant II.154
Rusk, Dean II.22, II.28, IV.5, V.32
Ryukyu Islands II.306, II.486, II.529, IV.34

S

Sabotage II.622
St. Paul II.5
Sams, Brig. Gen. Crawford F. II.630
Satellites, development of II.78
Schoeffel, Rear Adm. Malcolm F. II.45
"SCR-Radio Catalog" II.79
Search and rescue operations II.489, II.537
Selective Service Extension Act of 1950 III.2
Seoul, South Korea II.16, II.48.4, IV.16, V.5, VI.13

  • devastation of IV.4
  • documents captured at II.227.3-II.227.8

Shepherd, Gen. Lemuel C. II.144
Sherman, Adm. Forrest P. II.14
Shipbuilding II.1, II.2
Ships IV.8, IV.9, V.25.1, V.25.2

  • aircraft carriers II.5, II.43
  • battleships II.5
  • damage control II.3
  • deck logs II.5
  • engineering plans VI.2
  • hospital IV.2
  • movements of II.489
  • naval personnel on II.5, II.6

Ships, Records of the Bureau of (RG 19) II.1-II.3, VI.2
Signal activities II.521, II.603.24-II.603.25, IV.10-IV.15
Signal Battalion, 51st II.380
Signal Construction Battalion, 101st V.10
Signal Corps Intelligence Agency Board II.98
Signal Corps Procurement Agency Ii.100
Signal Corps Technical Committee II.83
Sinri, Korea II.227.6
Situation maps II.223, II.273.13, II.289
Situation reports II.262.2, II.289, II.291, II.320, II.326

  • Air Force II.437
  • Eighth Army II.376, II.384
  • Far East Command II.497, II.525
  • Joint II.438

Small arms II.202-II.203, II.208
Smith, Walter Bedell II.242
Smithsonian Institution IV.31, IV.33
Smoke generators II.389
Sorok Island leprosarium II.594.3
Soucek, Rear Adm. Apollo II.42
South Africa, Union of, troops in Korea II.218
"South-North Meeting" (film) V.15.3
Springfield Armory II.208
Stanley, Pvt. Courtney L. V.23.2
State, General Records of the Department of (RG 59) II.22-II.41, II.47, IV.4-IV.7, V.4-V.6
State-Defense Conference on the Korean Armistice Negotiations II.322
State Department documents relating to the international Communist movement II.239
Stern Report II.435
Stevens, Robert T. II.339
Stout, Rear Adm. Richard F. II.15
Strategic materials

  • security of II.342
  • stockpiling of II.355

Strategic planning II.464, II.474
"Strategy for Victory" (film) V.29.2
Strength

  • Eighth Army II.368, II.371
  • enemy II.373, II.377.2, II.482, VI.7.3
  • Far East Command II.475
  • Marine corps II.149
  • United Nations Command II.567

Subakkol II.227.9
Suiho Dam II.34
Sullivan, Larance V. II.283
Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (SCAP) (see Far East Command)
Surgeon General (Army), Records of the Office of the (RG 112) II.129-II.143
Surgical procedures IV.2, IV.3
Surgical techniques II.397
Suwon, Korea II.227.5
Sweden II.575, II.585
Swing, Lt. Gen. Joseph M. II.316
Switzerland II.48.5-II.575, II.585

T

Tables of allowance II.56, II.116, II.213, II.451, II.517
Tables of distribution II.487
Tables of organization and equipment II.56, II.128, II.202, II.213, II.298, II.338.2, II.372, II.429, II.451, II.484, II.487
Tactical Air Control Group, 6147th II.442
Taejon, Korea II.227.6, II.227.9
Taipei, Taiwan II.16
Talbott, Harold E. II.421
Tanggok (Pusan), Korea II.58
Tank and Automotive Center/Command VI.5
Tanks II.164, II.178, II.179, II.183, II.205, II.209, II.210, II.296, II.489, V.28.2, V.28.6, VI.5
"Tanks above Kapyong" operation II.399.10
Tasca, Henry J. II.298, II.307
Task Force BYORUM II.399.10
Task Force Frost II.184
Task Force Williwaw II.184
Technical Service Unit, 9193rd II.211
Technical service units deployed to Korea II.491
Termination of hostilities II.48.2, II.48.3, II.523
Terrain II.479, II.480, VI.4, VI.6
Thailand, forces under the United Nations Command II.64.2
"Three Years of Korea" (radio broadcast) V.33
Timberlake, Gen. Edwin J. II.435
Time, Inc. V.29
Tingfu F. Tsiag V.32
Tokyo, Japan II.16, II.48.2, II.48.3
Topdong, Korea II.227.3
Training

  • Air Force II.427
  • Army II.299, II.343, II.415
  • chemical warfare II.213
  • communications II.88
  • Eighth Army II.377.5, II.488
  • exercises II.532
  • Far East Command II.488, II.507
  • films used in II.77, II.91, II.92, II.93, II.94, II.427
  • for foreign nationals II.104, II.265
  • manuals II.448, II.451
  • Marine Corps II.145, IV.18
  • medical II.135, II.136, II.143
  • naval II.251
  • officers II.123
  • ordnance II.180
  • for replacements II.488
  • ROK Army II.324, II.338.2, II.338.4, II.399.5, II.606, II.607
  • Signal Corps II.103-II.104, II.108, II.112, II.114, II.122, II.123, II.124, II.127
  • unit II.484
  • United Nations command II.585

Transportation Car Company, 21st II.392
Transportation facilities II.479, II.480
Troop basis files II.290, II.485, II.487
Troop deployment II.344, II.484, II.485, II.486, II.487, II.492, II.525, II.529
Troop lists II.299, II.494
Troop rotation II.455, II.529
"Truce in Korea" (newsreel) V.31.8
Trucks II.178, II.206, II.210
Truman, Harry S. II.31, II.37, II.202, II.242, II.324, II.468, III.1, III.7, IV.5, V.4, V.5, V.19.5
Truman Administration, policy papers II.246
Turkish forces IV.4, V.5
Twin Cities Arsenal II.169

U

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.)

  • activities in Korea II.280
  • aid to North Korea IV.26, IV.27, IV.28, V.15.1, V.15.2
  • alleged violations of borders by U.S. aircraft II.322
  • captured documents II.226, II.229, II.230, II.231
  • espionage programs II.280
  • intelligence reports regarding II.241, II.481
  • life in II.225
  • occupation zone in Korea II.268
  • ordnance II.185, II.207
  • photographs of IV.24
  • policy on the war II.37, II.318, II.320, II.321, II.323, II.328
  • political matters in II.481
  • potential intervention by II.34, II.268, II.320
  • trade with Korea II.225
  • U.S. relations with II.246

United Nations

  • civil affairs activities in Korea II.273.11, II.495-II.496
  • consideration of Korean War issues II.35, II.39
  • documents II.218
  • flag II.218

United Nations Affairs, Office of II.40-II.41
United Nations Civil Assistance Command, Korea II.399.4, II.619, II.630-II.633
United Nations Command

  • and armistice negotiations II.37, II.288
  • cemeteries II.50, II.58
  • civil assistance activities in Korea II.53
  • civilian relief activities II.273.14, II.514, II.515
  • command reports II.460
  • economic aid activities II.273.14
  • and the Joint Chiefs of Staff II.220
  • Military Armistice Commission II.541, II.515
  • military policy II.31
  • orders II.546, II.552, II.553, II.582
  • organization II.565
  • Planning Group II.571, II.585
  • post-armistice morale plans II559
  • Prisoner of War Command II.629
  • Public Health and Welfare Field Organization, Korea II.630
  • records of II.540-II.589
  • redeployment of forces II.532
  • Repatriation Group II.541, II.582, II.586-II.588
  • servicemen killed in action II.50, II.58
  • strength of units assigned by members II.550, II.567
  • troops provided by other member nations II.558, II.559, II.560

United Nations Commission for the Unification and Rehabilitation of Korea II.33, II.495
United Nations forces

  • attached to Eighth Army II.368
  • equipment for II.565
  • logistics support for II.324
  • military assistance offers from U.N. countries II.256, II.322
  • personnel II.369, II.558-II.560, II.563, II.567
  • problems in the use of II.78
  • supplies for II.64.2
  • Thai II.64.2
  • troop availability from member countries II.291, II.322, II.552, II.558, II.559, II.560

United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency II.495
United Nations Security Council IV.4

  • American activities on the II.25.1
  • resolutions II.630

"United Nations Today, The" (radio broadcast) V.34.2
U.S. Air Force Commands, Activities, and Organizations, Records of (RG 342) II.440-II.444, IV.29-IV.35, V.24
United States Ambassador to Korea II.495
"U.S. and Reds Clash in UN over Germ-Warfare Charges" (newsreel) V.31.5
United States Army, Pacific, Records of the (RG 550) II.465-II.467, VI.13
U.S. Army Art Collection IV.10
U.S. Army Center of Military History IV.10
U.S. Army Chief of Staff General Council II.140
U.S. Army Commands during the Korean War, records of II.358-II.362
U.S. Army Forces, Far East II.56, II.273.9, II.344, II.460
U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command II.280-II.283
U.S. Army Medical Department II.131, II.136
U.S. Army Prisoner of War/Civilian Internee Information Center II.445-II.446
U.S. Army Signal Service (Signal Corps) II.76-II.128
U.S. Army War College II.316-II.318
United States Congress

  • reaction to the Korean situation V.18, V.19.4
  • support for the war II.324, II.334

United States Congresses

  • 81st III.1, III.17, III.18
  • 82nd III.1, III.19
  • 83rd III.1

United States Forces, Korea II.589
United States Foreign Service II.27
"U.S. Germ Warfare in Korea" (film) V.16
U.S. House of Representatives

  • Armed Services Committee III.17
  • bills passed by III.1, III.2, III.3, III.4, III.5
  • Foreign Affairs Committee III.20
  • Investigations Subcommittee on Expenditures in Executive Departments II.100

U.S. House of Representatives, Records of the (RG 233) III.12
United States Information Agency V.5
U.S. Information Agency, Records of the (RG 306) II.249-II.250, IV.21-IV.22, V.17-V.21
U.S. Information Service II.510
U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, Records of the (RG 218) II.249-II.250, IV.21-IV.22, V.17-V.21
U.S. Information Service II.510
U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, Records of the (RG 218) II.216-II.223
U.S. Marine Corps, Records of the (RG 127) II.144-II.149, V.12-V.15
U.S. Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea (KMAG) II.273.10, II.314.4, II.315, II.330, II.338.1, II.338.4, II.338.5, II.399.5, II.467, II.606-II.613
U.S. Naval Forces, Far East Command II.475, II.516, II.553
U.S. Navy

  • casualties II.9-II.12, II.13
  • Hydrographic Department II.228

U.S. Prisoner of War/Civilian Internee Information Center, 22d VI.12
U.S. Senate

  • bills passed by III.1, III.2, III.3, III.4, III.5
  • Committees on Korean Operations II.223
  • Foreign Relations Committee III.7, III.11, III.18-III.19
  • Government Operations Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations III.9
  • treaty approvals III.11

U.S. Senate, Records of the (RG 46) III.12
U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee III.7, III.8, III.15, III.16

  • Preparedness Investigating Subcommittee (Senate Subcommittee on Ammunition Shortages) II.151, II.154, II.161, II.163, II.165, II.166, II.168, II.296, II.351, II.426, III.6

Universal Military Training and Service Act of 1951 III.4, III.15
Universal Newsreels V.31
Unknown soldiers buried at Arlington National Cemetery II.65, II.67
Uzbekistan Soviet Socialist Republic IV.28, V.15.4

V

Valley Forge II.5
Van Fleet, Gen. James A. II.337, III.8, V.23.4
Vereris, James G. II.283
Veterans Administration, Records of the (RG 15) II.72
Veterans Administration National Cemetery Commission II.69
Veterinaries II.137
Veterinary equipment and supplies II.60
Voice of America V.18-V.19

W

Wake Conference II.323
Walker, Gen. Walton II.630
Wallin, Rear Adm. Homer N. II.1
Walter Reed Army Medical Center II.143
War crimes II.259, II.280, II.343, II.395, II.476, II.547, II.624.8
War Department Signal Center II.88
"War in Korea" (film) V.29.3
"War in Korea, The" (newsreel) V.31.2
"War in Korea--What Does It Mean, A" (radio broadcast) V.34.3
Warner, Michael II.242
Washington Post, The IV.22
Watertown Arsenal Laboratory II.181
Weapons deployment II.344
Weapons System Evaluation Group II.254
Weather conditions II.228, II.267, II.289, II.373, II.377.4, II.383, II.437, II.442
Weber, Colonel II.571
West Virginia Ordnance Works II.171
"What Are the Answers from Korea" (radio broadcast) V.35.5
"What is the Answer in Korea?" (radio broadcast) V.35.2
White Sands Proving Ground II.78, II.126
Wickliffe, Col. Nell II.133
Wide World IV.22
Wilson, Aaron P. II.283
Wilson, Charles E. II.324, II.337
Wilson, PFC Richard II.133
Winnacker, R.A. II.324
Witsell, Maj. Gen. Edward F. II.447
Wonju, Korea VI.13
Wonsan, Korea II.227.5, II.227.6, II.227.9, IV.8, V.28
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH II.184, II.440-II.441

X

Y

Yalu River dams IV.27
Yalu River hydroelectric facilities, bombing of II.34, II.322
Yang, You Chan V.32
Yokosuka Naval Base, Japan II.228
Yongsan Military Reservation, Korea VI.9
Yonpo Air Field II.227.3, II.227.4, II.227.5, II.227.6
Yuma, AZ, Test Station II.184

Z

Zarafonetis, Chris J.D. II.135

 
 

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