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Non-U.S. Recipients of the Distinguished Service Cross

 
The following list is definitely not a definitive list of foreign recipients of the U.S. Distinguished Service Cross.  To add the names and citations of non-United States recipients of the Distinguished Service Cross, contact Lynnita
 

Table of Contents:

  • Belgian United Nations Forces Recipients
  • British Commonwealth Forces Recipients
  • French Battalion Recipients
  • Philippine Expeditionary Forces Recipients
  • South Korean Recipients
  • Turkish Recipients

Belgian United Nations Forces Recipients

Crahay, Albert

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 54 - 29 May 1953

Lieutenant Colonel Albert Crahay, Artillery, Belgian Army, commanding officer of the Belgian United Nations Forces, 29th Independent Infantry Brigade Group, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations near Tong-ri, Korea, from 22 to 25 April 1951.  Colonel Crahay's command, assigned the mission of holding a sector in the brigade's front and flank, was viciously attacked and surrounded in one of the initial trusts of the enemy's stupendous spring offensive.  Bitter fighting ensued.  Upon receiving orders to withdraw on the night of 23 April, Colonel Crahay, realizing that all planned routes of withdrawal were unfeasible, daringly seized upon a momentary lull in the battle and organized, regrouped, and effected a spectacular lateral withdrawal across the Imjin River.  After an arduous, circuitous march, Colonel Crahay's command rejoined the brigade the following day and was committed to cover the displacement of two battalions along the enemy-infested main supply route.  Colonel Crahay was seriously wounded while directing and coordinating this stubbornly contested action, but his incredible courage under fire and his intrepid actions inspired his officers and men to fight with unwavering persistency, which contributed significantly to stemming the relentless advance of the numerically superior foe.  Colonel Crahay's gallant leadership and exemplary performance of duty reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the cherished traditions of the military service.


British Commonwealth Forces Recipients

James P. Carne

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 3 - 20 January 1954

Lieutenant Colonel James P. Carne, British Army, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in military operations against an armed enemy as Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment, 29th Independent Infantry Brigade Group, British Commonwealth Forces, in Korea, for the period 22 to 25 April 1951.  During the Imjin River engagement, the enemy in numerically superior numbers started assaults against his position on 22 April and continued these fanatical attacks for 3 days and nights.  The situation rapidly became critical as hostile forces were able to surround his battalion because of gaps in the Brigade front.  In the face of devastating enemy mortar, machine-gun, and small-arms fire and by his indomitable spirit, great courage, and tactical skill, Colonel Carne truly inspired his exhausted men to repeatedly rally and repulse the seemingly endless hordes of Chinese Communists.  Continually exposing himself to intense hostile fire, he moved about among his troops, encouraging them to hold firm against overwhelming odds.  When it became apparent that a continued stand might result in complete annihilation, Colonel Carne organized small parties and ordered them to the rear, but elected to remain with the wounded to await whatever the future held.  Colonel Carne's heroic conduct, superb leadership, and steadfast devotion to the troops of his unit reflect the highest credit on himself and the armed forces of the British Commonwealth.

Muir, Kenneth (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 18 - 18 February 1953

Major Kenneth Muir, Infantry, British Army, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations near Songju, Korea, on 23 September 1950.  Major Muir, second in command of the 1st Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, personally led Companies B and C in a dawn assault on the crest of a strategic hill occupied by the enemy.  His fearless personal example, superb leadership, and total disregard for danger under heavy fire from the enemy contributed greatly to the capture of the hill objective.  Later, when the battalion was being driven from the hill by an enemy counterattack, Major Muir rallied his men and personally led them back to attack and recapture the lost position.  Despite heavy casualties suffered by the Argylls, he consolidated his men into a strong line of resistance.  In the afternoon of the same day, the enemy staged a final counterattack in such strength as to overrun the friendly position.  During this final assault by the enemy, Major Muir was seen standing alone on the hill crest singlehandedly firing a 2-inch mortar against the enemy in order to cover the withdrawal of his men.  It was during this gallant and intrepid action that he was mortally wounded.  Major Muir's noble self-sacrifice is conduct worthy of highest praise and reflects untold credit on him and the esteemed traditions of the military service.  (This award supersedes the posthumous award of the Silver Star to Major Muir, for gallantry in action on the same date, published in General Orders 59, General Headquarters, Far East Command, 15 November 1950.)


French Battalion Recipients

Misseri, Louis

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 12 - 22 January 1953

Sergeant Louis Misseri, Army of the Republic of France, a member of the Third Company, French Battalion, attached to the 23d Infantry Regiment, United States Army, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action near Pia-ri, Korea, on 26 September 1951.  As a squad leader in an attack on "Heartbreak Ridge," he led his squad through an intense barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire to the slope on which enemy bunkers were located.  Dividing his squad into two sections, he personally led one section of three men in an assault upon the bunkers.  While his comrades covered his advance, he moved forward alone through a hail of fire, attacked the first bunker, and silenced it. He continued his assault until the way had been cleared for his squad to advance and reorganize.  When the enemy launched a counterattack, Sergeant Misseri, although seriously wounded, drove them back, inflicting 15 casualties with his rifle.  When this position became untenable and he was ordered to withdraw, he sent his men back one by one while he covered their withdrawal.  The last man to leave the hill, except for one other who helped him because of his wounded condition, he would not allow himself to be evacuated until he had made a complete report of his mission.  One of the very few men to reach the top of "Heartbreak Ridge" during this costly attack, Sergeant Misseri's gallantry and extraordinary devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on him and uphold the finest traditions of the Army of the Republic of France.


Philippine Expeditionary Forces Recipients

Artiaga, Jose M. Jr.  (posthumous)

First Lieutenant Artiaga, a platoon leader with the Tank Company, 10th Battalion Combat Team, Philippine Expeditionary Force to Korea, was killed in action during the Battle of Yultong Bridge.

Yap, Conrado D. (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 107 - 14 December 1951

Captain Conrado D. Yap, Coast Artillery Corps, Philippine Army, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy as commanding officer of Tank (special Weapons) Company, 10th Battalion Combat Team, Philippine Expeditionary Forces to Korea, near Yultong, Korea, on 22 and 23 April 1951.  shortly before midnight on 22 April, his company, occupying defensive positions, came under a vicious, hostile attack which seriously penetrated the perimeter.  Exploiting the breach, the enemy launched successive, determined assaults throughout the night.  Constantly exposed to machine-gun, mortar, and artillery fire Captain Yap crawled from fox hole to fox hole, steadying his men and encouraging them to hold firm.  Learning that his 1st Platoon had been overrun, and despite orders from his battalion commander to withdraw his unit, he fearlessly led a daring charge in a determined effort to reach the beleaguered platoon.  Overwhelming enemy strength and heavy fire received from flanks and to the front notwithstanding, they relentlessly pressed the assault, regained the hill, evacuated the casualties, and rescued the isolated unit.  Observing a stricken soldier on the slope of the hill, Captain Yap immediately started toward the man but was mortally wounded by a burst of enemy fire.  Inspired by his heroic conduct, his men continued the fight with such determination and skill that the enemy attack was contained and numerous casualties were inflicted.  Captain Yap's display of courage, devotion to duty, and inspiring leadership reflect the highest credit on himself and the Army of the Republic of the Philippines.


South Korean Recipients

Chung, Il Kwon

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 84 - 3 November 1953

Lieutenant General Chung Il Kwon, Republic of Korea Army, distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous conduct in action against an armed enemy while serving as Commanding General, Second Republic of Korea Infantry Division, on 16 October 1952.  In an assault on "Sniper's Ridge," the division secured its important objective after 8 days of severe fighting.  Despite heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire, General Chung visited front-line units with complete disregard for his safety, supervising the redeployment of troops and establishment of adequate and effective defense measures.  He quickly initiated plans for the rapid evacuation of the wounded from forward aid stations and displayed a keen and sympathetic interest in the welfare of his men and the security of their newly won position.  As the result of establishing well-organized and strong defense positions, the third determined hostile counter-attack supported by heavy mortar and artillery fire against a smaller defensive force commanded by General Chung failed and the enemy was forced to withdraw.  With outstanding professional knowledge, inspirational leadership, and sound tactical judgment, he directed the activities of unit commanders, which enabled them to immediately exploit opportunities afforded by the terrain and tactical situation.  His patience, determination, ingenuity, and sincere concern for the welfare of his troops inspired all personnel and materially contributed to the successful operations against a numerically superior enemy.  General Chung's display of courage and determination and his consummate devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

[KWE Note: Lieutenant General Chung also received two Legion of Merit awards during the Korean War.]

Chung, Nak Koo (posthumously)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 9 June 1953

Second Lieutenant Chung Nak Koo, Republic of Korea Army, a member of the 11th Company, 28th Regiment, 9th Republic of Korea Infantry Division, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 13 October 1952.  His platoon was ordered to retake the outpost ridge line on Hill 395.  The enemy was well-entrenched and capable of directing accurate and devastating artillery, mortar, and automatic-weapons fire.  When the platoon moved out to attack, it was pinned down by intense enemy fire.  Lieutenant Chung continued forward and three men, so inspired by his courage, followed him.  Despite increasing volume of hostile fire, he continued his advance to the machine-gun bunker, hurled hand grenades into the position, and silenced the gun.  During this action, Lieutenant Chung lost his life.  Members of the platoon, so inspired by his courage, immediately assaulted the position, successfully accomplished the mission of the unit, and inflicted heavy losses on the enemy.  The extraordinary heroism and complete selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Chung reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Kim, Chong O

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 37- 29 April 1953

Major General Kim Chong O, 9th Republic of Korea Army Infantry Division, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy at Hill 395 and vicinity, Chorwon, Korea, from 6 to 15 October 1952.  He made ample plans and preparations for an attack on Hill 395 and under his courageous and skillful leadership his division successfully repulsed the onslaughts of two hostile infantry divisions with supporting elements and decisively defeated them.  With disregard for his personal safety, he proceeded over routes subjected to heavy artillery shelling, visiting forward positions, seeking the most advantageous observation posts, and personally commanding and controlling his troops.  Despite exposure to intense enemy fire and while under constant enemy observation, he observed effects of artillery preparations, kept his subordinate commanders and staff informed on the situation, and issued instructions based upon personal observations upon which to determine effective troop dispositions and fire support and was an inspiration to members of his command.  General Kim's exemplary leadership and indomitable courage are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect the highest credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Kim, Man Soul

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 35 - 13 May 1954

Master Sergeant Kim Man Soul, Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, a member of the 2d Platoon, 6th Company, 11th Regiment, 1st Republic of Korea Division, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in Korea on 15 and 16 July 1953.  In command of the 2d Platoon committed to defend strategic "Outpost Betty" near the main line of resistance, his platoon was viciously attacked and came under intense artillery and mortar fire from a battalion-sized enemy force.  Instantly recognizing the overwhelming odds, Sergeant Kim led his men into action, directing artillery fire on enemy positions.  Despite the heavy artillery fire, hostile troops continued to advance and crept to a critical sector in the outpost's defense and engaged in close combat.  Moving among his men shouting encouraging, decisive commands, he poured accurate rifle fire into the enemy, killing several; then, leaving the comparative safety of his position, he showered the enemy with grenades, killing six others and dispersing the remainder.  Later, when the determined, reorganized foe repeatedly attacked throughout the night, coming within close range of entrenched positions, Sergeant Kim, with unwavering courage and at great risk of his life, met each onslaught in hand-to-hand combat, inflicting heavy losses and eventually thwarting the enemy's attempt to overrun the position.  Sergeant Kim's inspirational leadership, sustained devotion to duty, and courageous actions reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Kim, Man Su (posthumously)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - 23 September 1953

Sergeant Kim Man Su, Republic of Korea Army, a member of 9th Company, 29th Regiment, 9th Republic of Korea Army Division, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 12 October 1952.  While participating in a counterattack on strongly held enemy positions, his unit was pinned down by intense hostile artillery and automatic-weapons fire from commanding positions located on Hill 395.  Despite the hail of enemy fire, Sergeant Kim voluntarily moved forward.  Armed with a supply of grenades and his automatic weapon, he charged up the hill to the machine-gun bunker and successfully silenced the weapons.  Although seriously wounded during this action, he immediately hurled his last hand grenade into an enemy position, eliminating additional hostile soldiers.  He continuously shouted words of encouragement to his men, urging them forward to the successful attainment of their assigned mission.  The extraordinary heroism and selfless devotion to duty exhibited by Sergeant Kim reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.


Turkish Recipients

Ergin, SGT Mehmet

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 43 - 24 June 1955

Sergeant Mehmet Ergin, 18012,l Infantry, Turkish Army, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy near Sanggorangp'o, Korea, on 28029 May 1953.  His unit was dispatched to reinforce Outpost Vegas, which was under heavy enemy attack.  Upon arrival he found the strength of friendly forces depleted and the enemy holding a portion of the position.  Organizing his forces, he led them through heavy artillery, mortar and small arms fire in a valiant counterattack which drove the enemy back several hundred meters.  When the enemy launched a counterattack against the newly won positions, he successfully met the attack and stopped the enemy's advance, forcing their withdrawal.  With complete disregard for personal safety he moved from one position to another encouraging his men despite heavy barrages of artillery and mortar fire.  Later, using grenades and any weapon at his disposal, he led his unit forward again in counterattack, which succeeded in driving the enemy from the last friendly position under their control.  His actions made it possible for friendly forces to regain control of a major outpost while inflicting numerous casualties on the enemy forces.  Sergeant Ergin's aggressive courage, determined devotion to duty and inspiring leadership reflect the highest credit on himself and the Turkish Army, and uphold the esteemed traditions of the military service.

Sukan, Sinasi

Department of the Army
General Order No. 43 - 24 June 1955

Captain Sinasi Sukan, 937-7, Turkish Army, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism near Sanggorangp'o, Korea, on 29 May 1953.  He voluntarily accompanied one of his platoons ordered to reinforce Outpost Carson which was under heavy enemy attack.  Upon hearing that both Outposts Carson and Elko had been surrounded he led his troops in a successful counterattack breaking through enemy lines, retaking Outpost Elko.  He then quickly deployed his forces for defense cautioning his men of the necessity of holding the position at all costs.  He obtained a carbine and resupply of grenades and moved forward to an exposed position in a critical sector of the Outpost.  Although exposed to a continuous devastating mortar and artillery barrage he moved constantly around the fighting positions, encouraging the men, directing fire and fighting with grenades and any weapon he could find, killing an estimates seventy-five enemy himself.  After fighting continuously for 16 hours he was wounded burt refused to be evacuated.  Captain Sukan's inspirational leadership, heroic actions and consummate devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the Turkish Army, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Urer, Ruslu (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 17 - 8 March 1954

First Lieutenant Ruslu Urer, Infantry, Turkish Army, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy near Sanggorangp'o, Korea, on 28 and 29 May 1953.  His unit, while defending Outpost Carson, was attacked by determined enemy forces estimated to have been of battalion strength.  Undaunted by heavy barrages of artillery and mortar falling on the position, he moved from one position to another, encouraging his men and directing the fire of his command until he was wounded.  Refusing to be evacuated and with complete disregard for personal safety, Lieutenant Urer led his platoon forward in a valiant counterattack, which drove the hostile forces from the trenches and killed 16 of the 17 enemy encountered.  Although surrounded and subjected to repeated attacks, the small outpost, greatly outnumbered by the enemy, fought back for more than 2 hours until it was finally annihilated by a numerically superior force  Lieutenant Urer continued to fight from his bunker until he was mortally wounded by enemy grenades.  His aggressive courage, determined will to hold at all cost, and devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the Turkish Army, and are in keeping with the esteemed traditions of the military service.

 

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