Korean War Unit Citations

 
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In recognition of a job well done, the United States government issued Unit Citations during the Korean War. In addition, commanders and leaders sometimes offered words of praise to the men and women who performed their duties beyond normal requirements during the various campaigns of the war. This page of the Korean War Educator is reserved for citations, division memorandums, and statements of appreciation issued to our nation’s Korean War veterans during the war years. Post-war speeches can also be found on this page. In addition, this page will encompass recommendation letters and/or other missives from former platoon commanders and squad leaders. No command reports are on this page. They can be found on another page of this website entitled, "After Action Reports."

The Korean War Unit Citations web page opened in July of 2001 with Marine-related text supplied by Ted and Shirley Heckelman of Bellingham, WA. To post the text of similar material which you would like to share here with the general public, please send it to:

The Korean War Educator
c/o Lynnita Brown
111 E. Houghton Street
Tuscola, IL 61953

or E-mail it to:
lynnita@koreanwar-educator.org.

Veterans from all branches of the military are encouraged to submit citation text for this page.


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The President of the United States takes pleasure
in presenting
The Presidential Unit Citation
To the First Provisional Marine Brigade
for services as set forth in the following

Citation:

For extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 7 August to 7 September 1950. Functioning as a mobile, self-contained, air-ground reserve unit, the First Provisional Marine Brigade rendered invaluable service during the fierce struggle to maintain the foothold established by friendly forces in the Pusan area during the early stages of the Korean conflict. Quickly, moving into action as numerically superior enemy forces neared the Naktong river on the central front and penetrated to within thirty-five miles of Pusan in the southern sector, threatening the integrity of the entire defensive perimeter, this hard-hitting, indomitable team counterattacked serious enemy penetrations at three different points in rapid succession. Undeterred by roadblocks, heavy hostile automatic-weapons and highly effective artillery fire, extremely difficult terrain and intense heat, the Brigade met the invaders with relentless determination, and on each crucial occasion, hurled them back in disorderly retreat. By combining sheer resolution and esprit de corps with sound infantry tactics and splendid close air support, the Brigade was largely instrumental in restoring the line of defense, in inflicting thousands of casualties upon the enemy and in seizing large amounts of ammunition, equipment and other supplies. The brilliant record achieved by the unit during the critical early days of the Korean conflict attests to the individual valor and competence of the officers and men and reflects the highest credit upon the First Provisional Marine Brigade and the United States Naval Service.

- Harry S. Truman, President of the United States

[Submitted to the Korean War Educator by Ted & Shirley Heckelman, Bellingham, WA]


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Tribute to 1st Marine Division Korean War Veterans
by Commandant of the Marine Corps at 1st MarDiv Assn. Banquet,
29 July, 1995, Mayflower Hotel, Washington, D.C.

"In 1950, when the nation called, the reaction of the 1st Marine Division was to march to the sound of the guns. The nation called and you saluted….In fact, you didn’t even blink an eye. You marched with an unmatched determination to do whatever it took. And that mindset was critical—because it was the belief of many people that the task before you simply could not be done… They considered it impossible to throw together a combat force in the span of two weeks and rapidly embark them on ships to deploy half-way around the world. Experts said that no force could rush into a theater teetering on the brink of collapse, engage a numerically superior enemy and stop his advance. Authorities on military operations advised that it was suicide to conduct an amphibious assault—an assault targeted at an area with the second greatest tide change in the world. And nay-sayers declared it was hopeless to attempt any operation where reservists, just called to active duty, comprised over half the strength of some units. They said it couldn’t be done, that it was impossible.

What they didn’t realize was that Marines DO the impossible.

The 1st Marine Division did it with units fielded by sweeping every spare body and weapon from stations around the world. You did it through the fierce house-to-house fighting in Seoul. You did it in the most brutal conditions—across the roughest terrain and in the harshest weather on earth. You did it despite the efforts of three Chinese armies to surround and destroy you.

Your courage—displayed from Pusan, to Inchon, to Chosin—was much more than just bravery in the face of the enemy and the elements. It was also bravery in the face of the "impossible." The tremendous odds against you, the extreme hardships you endured, and the enormity of your missions would have stopped anyone else…anyone less resilient…anyone less versatile…anyone less courageous than United States Marines…To those who said it was impossible, you showed that for Marines, all things are possible.

The lesson we have learned from you is never to listen to those who say it cannot be done—for you proved them wrong time and time again. You have left a legacy of flexibility, of tenacity, and of courage—a legacy that will endure forever…In addition, you left a more tangible legacy…YOU secured a Marine Corps for the future.

Your magnificent performance against formidable odds served as the catalyst for congress to acknowledge that ‘THIS NATION WANTS A MARINE CORPS; THIS NATION NEEDS A MARINE CORPS and THIS NATION WILL HAVE A MARINE CORPS, ONE THAT IS SET IN LAW." Like the faces carved in the stone of your monument, your accomplishments compelled our national leaders to carve into stone our role as a force-in-readiness…A role which charges us to be most-ready when the nation is least ready…to be always at a high state of combat readiness…in position to hold a full scale aggression at bay—no matter the clime, no matter the place, no matter the foe. At a time when defense experts and others conspired to "merge us out of existence," you not only forestalled aggression on the Korean peninsula, you prevented our demise at home…you guaranteed us a future. Your most enduring legacy IS the MARINE CORPS itself.

Today, this nation remains ever thankful for the Corps preserved by your service in Korea. Recall the faces of the American students in Grenada, their gratitude and relief echoes in their simple statements, "Thank God for the Marines." Sentiments echoed around the world, as this same Corps of Marines fed starving Somali children, gave a homeland back to the people of Kuwait, helped restore democracy to the people of Haiti and who performed a daring, dawn rescue of an Air Force Captain by the name of Scott O’Grady. America’s Corps of Marines carries the legacy of the Marines of Korea, ready to answer any call—no matter what the mission, no matter the odds, no matter what others may say, although your contributions began on the razorback hills of Korea, they have been felt around the globe, by all mankind, wherever Marines have answered the call.

The Korean War Memorial we dedicated is a visible acknowledgment of your selfless contributions. Sprung from your sacrifices, the future of our Corps will be launched from your legacies; the Corps you have deeded us will remain prepared to meet the challenges of the future. Whenever the nation calls to Send in the Marines—we will respond and we will succeed—because our course has been set by you—through your extraordinary performance and selfless devotion to duty in the mountains and on the shores, in the dust and in the snows of a far off country named Korea.

Semper Fidelis,
General C.C. Krulak
Commandant Marine Corps

[Submitted to The Korean War Educator by Ted & Shirley Heckelman, Bellingham, WA.]


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The President of the United States takes pleasure
in presenting
The Presidential Unit Citation
To the First Marine Division
for service as set forth in the following

Citation:

For extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Chosin reservoir and Koto-Ri of Korea from 27 November to 11 December 1950.

When the full fury of the enemy counterattack struck both the Eighth Army and the Tenth Corps on 27 and 28 November 1950, the First Marine Division, operating as the Left Flank Division of the Tenth Corps, launched a daring assault westward from Yudam-Ni in an effort to cut the road and rail communications of hostile forces attacking the eighth army and at the same time, continued its mission of protecting a vital main supply route consisting of a tortuous mountain road running southward to Chinhung-Ni, approximately 35 miles distant.

Ordered to withdraw to Hamhung in company with attached army and other friendly units in the face of tremendous pressure in the Chosin reservoir area the division began an epic battle against the bulk of the enemy third route army and, while small intermediate garrisons at Hagaru-Ri and Koto-Ri held firmly against repeated and determined attacks by hostile forces, gallantly fought its way successively to Hagaru-Ri, Koto-Ri, Chinhung-Ni and Hamhung over twisting, mountainous and icy roads in sub-zero temperatures.

Battling desperately night and day in the face of almost insurmountable odds throughout a period of two weeks of intense and sustained combat, the First Marine Division emerged from its ordeal as a fighting unit with its wounded, with its guns and equipment and with its prisoners, decisively defeating seven enemy divisions, together with elements of three others, and inflicting major losses which seriously impaired the military effectiveness of the hostile forces for a considerable period of time.

The valiant fighting spirit, relentless perseverance and heroic fortitude of the officers and men of the First Marine Division, in battle against a vastly outnumbering enemy, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Harry S. Truman
President of the United States

[Submitted to The Korean War Educator by Ted & Shirley Heckelman, Bellingham, WA.]


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Headquarters, 1st Marine Division FMF
c/o FPO, San Francisco, CA
19 December 1950
DIVISION MEMORANDUM
NUMBER…..238-50

Operations in the Chosin Reservoir Area

  1. Early in November the First Marine Division launched a drive from Hamhung toward the Chosin Reservoir. The 7th Marines, in the lead, advanced north steadily and by aggressive and determined fighting finally decimated the 124th CCF Division in the vicinity of Chinhung-ni. The advance continued to a point west of Yudam-ni, when, on November 29th, due to the deteriorating situation on the 8th Army front and the appearance of several fresh Chinese divisions in the Chosin Reservoir area, orders were received to withdraw toward Hamhung. This withdrawal, which was concluded when the last elements of the division closed the Hamhung area on December 11th, will become an epic in the annals of the Marine Corps. Seldom, if ever, have Marines been forced to battle against comparable odds. The enemy in overwhelming force was on all sides, necessitating determined attacks to the front to clear the way, resolute rear guard actions to keep the enemy from closing in, and flank protection to guard the trains and the wounds in the center of the column. Step by step the division fought its way for a distance of thirty-five miles, always against unremitting pressure from the enemy. First the 5th and 7th Marines, with attached units, fought their way out of Yudam-ni, over a 4,000 foot mountain pass and into Hagaru-ri. The losses were heavy but the column was strengthened by the garrison at Hagaru-ri, the 3rd Battalion, 1st Marines, the 41st Royal Marine Commandos, and Headquarters and Service units. Then the column fought its way from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri. Again losses were heavy but the column was strengthened by the addition of the headquarters of the 1st Marines, the 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, and attached units then in garrison at Koto-ri. For the final drive from Koto-ri to the relative security of Chinhung-ni at the southern end of the tortuous mountain road below Koto-ri the entire division participated. While the bulk of the division fought down the mountain, the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines fought up the mountain to a juncture, thus permitting the trains to descend the mountain with reasonable safety. Much of the road over which this withdrawal was conducted was tortuous, narrow and snow-and-ice-coated. Temperatures ranged from -8 degrees F to 20 degrees F imposing extreme hardship on men and causing considerable difficulty with motor vehicles. There were road blocks, blown bridges, and cratered roads. Yet in spite of determined enemy resistance, hazardous roads and bitter weather the division emerged from its ordeal a fighting division and inflicted heavy casualties on the six enemy divisions encountered. All wounded were evacuated, there were no stragglers, and useable equipment was not destroyed except by enemy action.
     

  2. The performance of officers and men in this operation was magnificent. Rarely have all hands in a division participated so intimately in the combat phases of an operation. Every Marine can be justly proud of his participation. In Korea, Tokyo and Washington there is full appreciation of the remarkable feat of the division. With the knowledge of the determination, professional competence, heroism, devotion to duty, and self-sacrifice displayed by officers and men of this division, my feeling is one of humble pride. No division commander has ever been privileged to command a finer body of men.

Oliver P. Smith
Major General, USMC
Commanding General, 1st Marine Division

[Submitted to The Korean War Educator by Ted & Shirley Heckelman of Bellingham, WA. This Memorandum was distributed in 1950 to all members of the 1st Marine Division and to the 41st Royal Marine Commandos. It is believed the distribution to 1st Division Marines took place via family members, as a copy of this Memorandum was in the belongings of Ted Heckelman’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Heckelman. Ted did not see it until after his mother’s home was closed out after 1986.]


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Distinguished Unit Citation
General Orders 18
10 March 1955

Citation:

Company K, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division (Third Award) is cited for extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Surang-Ni, Korea during the period 10 June to 11 June 1953. Defending a critical sector of the battlefront, the company was subjected to repeated attacks by numerically superior Chinese Communist Forces. Enemy assaults ranging from company size to a reinforced regiment were directed against the company’s position in repeated waves in a desperate attempt to take the critical outpost (Harry). By massing his strength in depth, the enemy was at times successful in penetrating friendly positions but was consistently pushed back by members of this company following rigorous hand to hand combat. On the night of 10 June, a reinforced regiment, employing small arms fire, automatic weapons and grenades, and supported by 20,000 rounds of artillery fire and mortar fire, launched the initial assault of a series of new attacks on the position. Although having sustained over 200 casualties in their initial attempt to overtake the outpost, the enemy was determined to seize the key terrain at all costs and charged repeatedly throughout the night of 10 June and the following morning. During the height of the battle the trenches at times were overrun, but met with the inspired close-in fighting of the beleaguered but courageous members of Company K, the enemy was ultimately repelled from the position. The extraordinary heroism of the members of Company K, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in fulfilling their assigned mission reflects great credit on themselves and upholds the highest traditions of the military service.

Citation:

Company B, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division (Third Award) is cited for extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Surang-Ni, Korea during the period 11 June to 12 June 1953. During the night of 11 June, while occupying a vitally important outpost (Harry), the members of this unit successfully repelled several determined attempts by the Chinese Communist Forces to overtake their position. The enemy, moving up through its own artillery and mortar fire in an attempt to seize the key terrain occupied by Company B, assaulted the outpost repeatedly with forces up to regimental strength. With reinforced firepower, the enemy at times was successful in penetrating friendly lines but was subsequently expelled by the members of the defending unit in bitter hand to hand combat, thereby re-establishing the outpost line. On two separate occasions the assaults by the hostile forces were beaten off by close-in fighting and aggressive counter attack, causing the enemy forces to turn back with heavy casualties. By early morning of 12 June, the enemy had been forced to withdraw from the entire position and cease action. The extraordinary heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed of the members of Company B, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in fulfilling their assigned mission reflects great credit on themselves and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service of the United States.

Citation:

Company P Greek Expeditionary Forces Battalion (Second Award) is cited for extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in action against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Surang-Ni, Korea during the period 17 June to 18 June 1953. Assigned the defense of a vital outpost position (Harry), the company encountered a major enemy assault on the evening of June 17. After an intense concentration of enemy mortar and artillery fire, the hostile forces, which had taken up an attack position on the northeast and northwest side of the outpost, moved rapidly through their own and friendly artillery fire to gain a foothold on the northern slope of the position. Refusing to withdraw, Company P closed in and met the attackers in a furious hand to hand struggle in which many of the enemy were driven off. The aggressors regrouped, quickly attacked a second time, and again gained the friendly trenches. Immediately, the Greek Forces launched a series of counterattacks, simultaneously dispatching a diversionary force to the east of the outpost which successfully channeled the enemy thrusts. After 2 hours of close in fighting, the aggressors were again routed and the friendly positions restored. The outstanding conduct and exemplary courage exhibited by members of Company P, Greek Expeditionary Forces Battalion, reflects great credit on themselves and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and the Kingdom of Greece.


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Headquarters Eighth United States Army
Award of the Distinguished Unit Citation
General Orders 923
11 October 1953

Citation:

Company A, 5th Infantry Regiment, 5th RCT and the First Section, Machine Gun Platoon, 5th Infantry Regiment 5th RCT and Forward Observer Team, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, 5th RCT, distinguished themselves by extraordinary heroism in the performance of exceptionally difficult tasks in the vicinity of Songnae-Dong, Korea. On the morning of 12 June 1953, those units relieved other United Nations forces defending a vital outpost and successfully withstood five separate attacks by overwhelming enemy forces during the next twenty four hours. After earlier mass attacks had been halted by combined defensive fires, the hostile element attacked under a tremendous artillery and mortar barrage during the evening and gained a foothold on the right flank of the position. Refusing to withdraw, the United Nations units closed in hand-to-hand combat and destroyed the enemy force. After an artillery barrage, waves of enemy troops assaulted both the left and right flanks of the outpost but were again annihilated. In a final effort another onslaught of hostile forces charged against both the front and the flanks of the United Nations forces and again succeeded in entering the trenches. The courageous defenders launched a series of counterattacks, routed the enemy and restored the position. The complete devotion to duty and outstanding courage exhibited by Company A and attached units in hand-to-hand combat were instrumental in the successful defense of the key position. The magnificent fighting spirit of these organizations reflects great credit on themselves and the military service.


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Headquarters, Capitol Division
Republic of Korea Army
18 August 1952

SUBJECT: Commendation
TO: United States 987th AFA Battalion

Since 23 March 1952, when the Capitol Division first arrived and deployed along the present Kumhwa front-line, your Battalion performed the supporting mission for this Division and also command control of the 10th, 53rd and 98th ROK Field Artillery Battalions and completely smashed the repeated desperate hostile efforts to breach the expert Infantry-Artillery coordination.

When the subordinate 26th Regiment attacked Hill 370 during the 3 days from the 8th of June and the 1st Regiment made an attack on Hill 690, your battalion exhibited the exquisiteness of the Infantry-Artillery coordination, so that the attacking unit occupied and maintained the objective only within a few hours.

Moreover, on the severe operation of Capitol Hill (CT 905493) in the Kumhwa area, the critical position of the Central front during 4 days, a great number of enemy made an attack with their peculiar tactics of the "Human Sea" accompanied by intensive artillery shelling. However, your Battalion inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy and smashed the enemies efforts with tactical and timely close artillery fire so that this Division was successful on this operation.

I hereby congratulate you upon the splendid achievements performed by your Battalion and I sincerely express my appreciation and present this commendation.

/s/ Lee Yong Moon
/t/ LEE YONG MOON
Brig. General
Commanding

[NOTE: This is an exact reproduction of the original letter of commendation typed by: John W. Quick, 90 Duncan Rd., Apt. #106-B, Spring Lake, NC 28390 who was a forward observer for "B" Btry., 987th AFA BN during this period of time.]


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65th Infantry Regiment - 3RD Infantry Division
3rd Division Command Report for June 1953 for 65th Infantry Regiment.
Presidential Unit Citation for Action on June 10th reads as follows:

Citation:

Company F, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Division, is cited for outstanding performances of duty and extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Kumwha, Korea (hill 412 across from Outpost Harry), on 10 June 1953. This unit, a member of a combined attacking team, was assigned the mission of assaulting a heavily fortified enemy hill for the purpose of diverting the concentration of communist strength at a nearby strategic point. As the company moved into a forward position it encountered heavy enemy fire from the crest of the hill. While two friendly tanks departed for a point to the left of the objective, a 10-man assault team approached the crest under the support of tank, artillery, and small arms fire. The assault platoon twice placed machine guns on the eastern slope of the hill to cover the advance but these were quickly destroyed by enemy fire. As the assault group engaged the hostile defenders in close combat, the platoon leader was wounded. His men moved back 10 yards, regrouped, and again charged the cave position, killing and critically wounding its occupants with hand grenades. As the assault platoon moved along the southern slope of the ridge in an effort to pinpoint the enemy fire, they were met by intense resistance from a well-entrenched enemy on the reverse slope. Sending word for two support squads to move up, the Company Commander led his unit in a repeated attempt to rush the crest of the hill. Again encountering concentrated enemy fire, the group managed to deploy to the right and left of the eastern end of the ridge to prevent an enemy envelopment. While the platoon made ready a further attempt to capture the reverse slope position, strengthened by the support squads, a squad-leader of the first platoon moved to the forward side of the hill and discovered the location of the enemy emplacements. With this information, the assault elements again moved forward, crossed the ridge, and routed the enemy with hand grenades and small arms fire. The hard-fought positions immediately were occupied and reorganized in time to stem enemy efforts to regain them. The heroism and courage exhibited by members of this unit reflect great credit on themselves, their organization, and the military service of the United States. (General Orders 620, Headquarters Eighth United States Army, 16 September 1954.)


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The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting
The Presidential Unit Citation to the
First Marine Division, Reinforced
For service as set forth in the following

Citation:

For extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the periods 21 to 26 April, 16 May to 30 June, and 11 to 25 September 1951. Spearheading the first counteroffensive in the spring of 1951, the FIRST Marine Division, Reinforced, engaged the enemy in the mountainous center of Korea in a brilliant series of actions unparalleled in the history of the Marine Corps, destroying and routing hostile forces with an unrelenting drive of seventy miles north from Wonju. During the period 21 to 26 April, the full force of the enemy counter-offensive was met by the Division, north of the Hwachon Reservoir. Although major units flanking the Marine Division were destroyed or driven back by the force of this attack, the Division held firm against the attackers, repelling the onslaught from three directions and preventing the encirclement of the key center of the lines. Following a rapid regrouping of friendly forces in close contact with the enemy, the First Marine Division, Reinforced, was committed into the flanks of the massive enemy penetration and, from 16 May to 30 June, was locked in a violent and crucial battle which resulted in the enemy being driven back to the north with disastrous losses to his forces in the number of killed, wounded and captured. Carrying out a series of devastating assaults, the Division succeeded in reducing the enemy's main fortified complex dominating the 38th parallel. In the final significant offensive of the action in Korea, from 11 to 25 September 1951, the First Marine Division, Reinforced, completed the destruction of the enemy forces in Eastern Korea by advancing the front against a final desperate enemy defense in the 'Punch Bowl' area in heavy action which completed the liberation of South Korea in this locality. With the enemy's major defenses reduced, his forces on the central front decimated, and the advantage of terrain and the tactical initiative passing to friendly forces, he never again recovered sufficiently to resume the offensive in Korea. The outstanding courage, resourcefulness and aggressive fighting spirit of the officers and men of the First Marine Division, Reinforced, reflect the highest credit upon themselves and the United States Naval Service.

For the President,
Charles S. Thomas
Secretary of the Navy

[Submitted to The Korean War Educator by former Navy Corpsman Glenn B. Schroeder, Greeley, Colorado.]


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Headquarters
Eighth United States Army
APO 301
General Orders 28 February 1953
Number 243
Award of the Meritorious Unit Commendation

Citation:

By direction of the Secretary of the Army, under the provisions of AR 220-315, the Meritorious Unit Commendation is awarded to the following unit of the United States Army for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding service during the period indicated:

The 1st Loudspeaker and Leaflet Company is cited for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding service in support of combat operations in Korea during the period 1 August 1952 to 1 February 1953. The personnel of the 1st Loudspeaker and Leaflet Company, the only unit of this kind in the combat zone, performed their duties with determination and aggressiveness. Equipped with bulky public address systems best adapted to vehicular use, the loudspeaker teams hand carried their equipment to isolated peaks on the front in order to render close psychological warfare support to infantry line units. The unit conducted a constant attack by leaflets on the fighting efficiency of the opposing forces. On many occasions the unit operated its presses twenty-four hours daily for extended periods of time in order to satisfy tactical requirements for leaflets. The 1st Loudspeaker and Leaflet Company displayed such outstanding devotion to duty in the performance of unusually difficult tasks as to set it apart from and above other units. The devotion to duty, esprit de corps, and loyalty exhibited by the members of this company throughout this period reflect great credit on themselves and the military service of the United States.

KAG-PD 200.6

BY COMMAND OF LIEUTENANT GENERAL TAYLOR:
OFFICIAL: PAUL D. ADAMS
Major General, General Staff
/s/B.T. Schantz, Chief of Staff
B.T. Schantz
Colonel, AGG
Adjutant General

[Submitted to The Korean War Educator by Korean War veteran Paul Wolfgeher of Independence, Missouri. Wolfgeher is a veteran of the 1st Loudspeaker and Leaflet Company.]


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Distinguished Unit Citation
Companies I and L, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, and
Heavy Machine Gun Platoon, Company M, 35th Infantry Regiment, and
75-mm Recoilless Rifle Platoon, Company M, 35th Infantry Regiment

Excerpt from General Orders No. 35
Department of the Army
Washington 25, D.C., 8 April 1952

Distinguished Unit Citation – Citation of units
Distinguished Unit Citation – As authorized by Executive Order 9396 (sec I, WD Bul. 22, 1943), superseding Executive Order 9075 (sec. III, WD Bul. 11, 1942), citation of the following units in the general orders indicated is confirmed in accordance with AR 360-15 in the name of the President of the United States as public evidence of deserved honor and distinction.  The citation reads as follows:

Citation:

Companies I and L, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, and the following attached units: Heavy Machine Gun Platoon, Company M, 35th Infantry Regiment; 75-mm Recoilless Rifle Platoon, Company M, 35th Infantry Regiment, are cited for outstanding performance of duty and extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Tangwon-ni, Korea, during the period 6 to 8 September 1951.  On the afternoon of 6 September, Companies I and L and attached units joined in the defense of Hills 682 and 717.  As the friendly forces consolidated their defensive positions, they were subjected to a heavy mortar and artillery barrage.  The barrage could not be returned because of a communications failure between the forward observation team and the supporting friendly artillery.  At 0015 hours on 7 September, the tempo of the hostile fire increased, with approximately 1,000 shells landing on the friendly emplacements during a 35-minute period.  With the artillery barrage lifted, an enemy force estimated at two reinforced enemy regiments and supported by mortar and automatic-weapons fire, launched a fanatical attack against the perimeters of Companies I and L.  Throughout a 6-hour period, the fiercely determined enemy troops hurled themselves again and again at the friendly positions, but were repeatedly repulsed by the valiant units defending the two hills.  As the hostile forces were working their way behind the friendly defenses, both companies discovered that their supply of ammunition was almost exhausted and, realizing that it would be suicidal to remain in their present positions because supplies and ammunition could not be brought to them through the encircling enemy, Companies I and L and attached units consolidated forces in an attempt to fight their way back to the friendly lines.  Constantly under attack, the friendly forces gathered all of their wounded and began to battle savagely in order to break out of the enemy entrapment.  Despite the numerically superior hostile troops, who continuously harassed the friendly forces from all sides, Companies I and L and attached units expending their remaining ammunition with deadly accuracy, successfully fought their way back to the friendly lines.  In the entire engagement, an estimated 600 enemy troops were killed or wounded.  Companies I and L and attached units displayed such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in carrying out their assignment under difficult and hazardous conditions as to set them apart and above other units participating in the campaign.  The extraordinary heroism and steadfast devotion to duty displayed by the members of Companies I and L, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, reflect great credit on themselves and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.  (General Orders 968, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, Korea, 6 December 1951.) 

Distinguished Unit Emblem
The Distinguished Unit Emblem is awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against the armed enemy occurring on or after 7 December 1941.  The Unit must display such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in accomplishing its mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions as to set it apart and above other units participating in the same campaign.  The degree of heroism required is the same as that which would warrant award of a Distinguished-Service Cross to an individual.  Extended periods of combat duty or participating in a large number of operational missions, either ground or air, is not sufficient.  Only on rare occasions will a unit larger than a battalion or air group qualify for award of this decoration.  It is a blue ribbon set in a gold colored metal frame of laurel leaves; it is worn immediately above the pocket of the right breast to the wearer’s right of all other emblems.


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[KWE Note: The following citation was supplied to the Korean War Educator by Herbert R. Pearce, M.D., Jacksonville, FL.]

The President of the United States takes pleasure
in presenting
The Presidential Unit Citation
to the First Marine Division, Reinforced
for services as set forth in the following

Citation:

For extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 15 September to 11 October 1950.  In the face of a determined enemy and against almost insurmountable obstacles, including disadvantageous tidal and beach conditions on the western coast of Korea, the First Marine Division, Reinforced, rapidly and successfully effected the amphibious seizure of Inchon in an operation without parallel in the history of amphibious warfare.  Fully aware that the precarious situation of friendly ground forces fighting desperately against the continued heavy pressure of a numerically superior hostile force necessitated the planning and execution of this extremely hazardous operation within a period of less than thirty days, and cognizant of the military importance of its assigned target, the Division moved quickly into action and, on 15 September, by executing three well-coordinated attacks over highly treacherous beach approaches defended by resolute enemy troops, captured the island of Wolmi-do, the city of Inch'on and Kimp'o Airfield, and rendered invaluable assistance in the capture of Seoul.  As a result of its aggressive attack, the Division drove the hostile forces in hasty retreat over thirty miles in the ensuing ten days, completely severed vital hostile communication and supply lines and greatly relieved enemy pressure on other friendly ground units, thereby permitting these units to break out from their Pusan beachhead and contributing materially to the total destruction of hostile ground forces in southern Korea.  The havoc and destruction wrought on an enemy flushed with previous victories and the vast accomplishments in turning the tide of battle from a weakening defensive to a vigorous offensive action reflect the highest credit upon the officers and men of the First Marine Division, Reinforced, and the United States Naval Service.

The following reinforcing units of the First Marine Division participated in operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 15 September to 11 October 1950:

Fleet Marine Force Units and Detachments:

Radio Relay Platoon, 1st signal Operations company; Battery C, 1st 4.5 Inch Rocket Battalion; 1st Amphibian Truck Company; 1st Amphibian Tractor Battalion (less Company "D"); 1st Combat Service Group, Service Command; 1st Fumigation and Bath Platoon; 1st Aerial Delivery Platoon; 7th Motor Transport Battalion, Service Command; 1st Armored Amphibian Battalion; Detachment Marine Tactical Air Control Squadron Two; Team #1, First Provisional Historical Platoon; Marine Observation Squadron Six; Marine Aircraft Group Thirty-Three, Reinforced, including Headquarters Squadron Thirty-Three, Marine Service Squadron, Thirty-Three, Marine Ground Control Intercept Squadron One, Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Twelve, Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Fourteen, Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve, Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three, Marine Night Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen, and Marine Night Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Forty-Two.

United States Navy Units:

Naval Beach Group One

United States Army Units:

Detachment 205th Signal Repair Company; Detachment 4th Signal Battalion; 163rd Military Intelligence Service Detachment; Company "A" Reinforced, 56th Amphibian Tractor Battalion; 96th Field Artillery Battalion; 441st Counter-Intelligence Corps Detachment; 2nd Engineer Special Brigade; 73rd Engineer (c) Battalion; 50th Engineer Port Construction Company; 65th Ordnance Ammunition Company; 32nd Regimental Combat Team; Special Operations Company; 3rd Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team; and the 50th Antiaircraft Artillery Air Warning Battalion.


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Republic of Korea (Seoul)
Presidential Unit Citation

The President of the Republic of Korea takes profound pleasure in citing for outstanding and superior performance of duty during the period 15 September to 24 December 1950

Headquarters and Headquarters Company X Corps
Headquarters and Headquarters Battery X Corps Artillery
Headquarters and Headquarters Battery 5th Field Artillery Group
50th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion (Self-propelled)
92d Armored Field Artillery Battalion
96th Field Artillery Battalion
8221st Army Unit, Field Artillery Topo and Met Detachment
2nd Engineer special Brigade
44th Engineer Construction Battalion
58th Engineer Treadway Bridge Company
73d Engineer Combat Battalion
79th Engineer Construction Battalion
185th Engineer Combat Battalion
53d Engineer Boat and Shore Regiment
4th Signal Battalion
56th Amphibious Truck and Tractor Battalion

for the Award of
The Presidential Unit Citation

Citation:

The X Corps and attached units are cited for extra-ordinary heroism in combat against an armed enemy of the United Nations during the period 15 to 30 September 1950 for the planning and execution of the amphibious landing at Inchon, Korea, the crossing of the Han River and the Capture of the capital city of Seoul and effecting the break through enemy lines to link up with Eighth Army forces south of Suwon, and during the period 18 October to 24 December 1950 for the heroic evacuation of X Corps troops and civilian refugees from the Hungnam beachhead.

An amphibious assault at Inchon, Korea, was magnificently effected by X Corps on 15 September, only 30 days after the plan was initiated.  The success achieved demonstrated a complete mastery of the technique of amphibious warfare and clockwork coordination between the units and service of X Corps.  This successful amphibious assault struck by X Corps into the heart of the enemy-occupied Korea liberated its national capital of Seoul enabling the restoration of the city and the reestablishment of the Korean National Assembly in the old capital city.

The arrival of X Corps in northeast Korea brought about the free voting of the citizens of Wonsan to select the civil government for this large port city for the first time in many years.  This democratic freedom was the first of many to be experienced by citizens throughout Hangyong-Namdo and Hamgyong-Pukto Provinces during the operations by X Corps.  On 8 December 1950, the Commanding General, X Corps was ordered by the Commander-in-Chief, United Nations Command, to consolidate his troops in northeast zone Korea into a perimeter defense and to evacuate all United Nations Forces as soon as an orderly evacuation could be effected.  The evacuation order presented problems to X Corps Command which had never before faced an American Army.  The X Corps evacuation plan called for the movement of all equipment and supplies including some 17,500 vehicles, 350,000 measurement tons of bulk cargo, in addition to approximately 105,000 troops and the maximum number of North Korean civilian refugees.

Although it was known that the time available for the execution plan would depend largely on tactical consideration and how hard the enemy pressed his attack against the perimeter, the estimated time needed to clear the ports from the date that loading began at Hungnam was approximately 10 days.  The stupendous task of extricating the 1st Marine Division and elements of the 7th Division from the Chosin Reservoir area, the marshalling of transportation and supplies of all types, together with the most difficult task of traffic control of units and masses of refugees during these operations, were solved by heroic efforts on the part of all elements of X Corps troops.

By 1400 hours, 24 December, all United Nations Forces and 98,000 North Korean civilian refugees who had proven themselves loyal to the Republic of Korea were completely evacuated from the perimeter.  Many of the key Government officials were brought out by military aircraft while others were evacuated by water transportation.

The outstanding accomplishments of X Corps in the fight against the forces of aggression in Korea rendered a great service to the Republic of Korea and has won the undying gratitude of the Government and people of that Republic.

This citation carries with it the right to wear
the Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation
ribbon by each individual of units listed herein
which served in Korea in the stated periods.

s/Syngman Rhee

[Submitted to the KWE by Charles Smith of the Texas Lone Star Chapter, KWVA.]


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1st Bn The Gloucestershire Regiment, and to its supporting unit 'C' Troop,
of 170th Independent Mortar Battery, Royal Artillery
 (Both units were part of 29th British Independent Infantry Brigade.)

Heroism of the Gloucesters
Highest U.S. Award

In Korea, May 8 - The few survivors of the 1st Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment, and the 170th Independent Mortar Battery, paraded today to receive from Lieutenant-General Van Fleet, the Eighth Army commander, the blue ribbon of the Presidential Unit Citation for heroism in action, the highest American decoration awarded to units.

In the words of the official citation, the Gloucesters and mortar personnel were honoured for their epic stand when the 29th Brigade took the main shock of the Communist offensive from April 22 to 25. Between 40 and 50 men of the battalion got back, leaving 600 killed and missing on the field. If the King approves, every man serving with these units will be able to wear the ribbon, and a blue streamer will be added to the units battle honours.

Behind a dais facing the three-sided parade were the Union Jack, the brigade colours, the flags of Belgium and Luxembourg, and the colours of the Belgian battalion which is part of the 29th Brigade. American Military Police held the Stars and Stripes and the standard of Lieutenant-General Van Fleet. A guard of honour was mounted by the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers. Pipers of the Royal Ulster Rifles played as Brigadier Brodie, the brigade commander, reported to the army commander.

The General's Tribute

General Van Fleet said: “I have come to be in good company, and to pay tribute to the wonderful British Commonwealth forces. I wanted to get better acquainted with and pay tribute and give honour to your gallant stand. I know I am in great company. I am proud and honoured to be here.” The General said they had stopped the communist advance and he felt deeply the losses they had suffered. They had acted in keeping with the finest traditions of the British forces.

Lieutenant-Colonel Digby Grist, the Gloucesters’ new commanding officer, received the award for the battalion, and Major T. Fisher-Hoch received it on behalf of the 170th Independent Mortar Battery.

The 29th Brigade commander also received a message from Lieutenant-General Milburn, commander of the I Corps, in which he said: “I want to commend you and your officers and men for gallantry in action while defending the Imjin River line during the last days of April against the assault of greatly superior forces. Subject to exceedingly heavy pressure, you did not falter, and met his attacks with fighting will and courage beyond his belief as is attested by the hundreds of enemy dead in close proximity to your actions.” The Communists would remember the 29th Brigade as a formidable opponent. “We are all proud of you. American GIs right across the Korean front are giving unstinted praise to the 29th and 27th Brigades.”

The French battalion is the only other non-American unit in Korea to have been awarded the Presidential citation. - Reuters

©The Times, 9th May, 1951

The Indomitable Gloucesters

Eighth Army Headquarters, Korea, May 11 - Lieutenant-General Van Fleet, the Eighth Army commander, having called for reports on the part played by the officers and men of The Gloucestershire Regiment and the 170th Independent Mortar Battery in the recent Communist offensive, and having reviewed all the information, today issued the following special communiqué.

The 1st Battalion and C Troop (of the Independent Mortar Battery) were defending a very critical sector of the battlefield during a determined attack by the enemy. The defending units were overwhelmingly outnumbered. The 623rd Chinese Communist Army drove the full force of its savage assault at the positions held by the 1st Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment, and attached unit. The route of supply ran south-east from the battalion between two hills. The hills dominated the surrounding terrain north-west to the Imjin river. Enemy pressure was built up on the battalion front during the day, April 23.

On April 24 the weight of the attack had driven the right flank of the battalion back. The pressure grew heavier and heavier, and the battalion and attached unit were forced into a perimeter defense on Hill 235. During the night heavy enemy forces had by-passed the staunch defenders and closed all avenues of escape.

The courageous soldiers of the battalion and attached unit were holding the critical route selected by the enemy for one column of the general offensive designed to encircle and destroy the I Corps. These gallant soldiers would not retreat. As they were compressed tighter and tighter in their perimeter defense they called for close in air strikes to assist in holding firm. Completely surrounded by tremendous numbers, these indomitable resolute and tenacious soldiers fought back with unsurpassed fortitude and courage.

As ammunition ran low and the advancing hordes moved closer and closer, these splendid soldiers fought back viciously to prevent the enemy from overrunning the position and moving rapidly to the south. The heroic stand provided the critically needed time to regroup other I Corps units and block the southern advance of the enemy. Time and again efforts were made to reach the battalion, but the enemy strength blocked each effort. Without thought of defeat or surrender, this heroic force demonstrated superb battlefield courage and discipline. Every yard of ground they surrendered was covered with enemy dead, until the last gallant soldier of the fighting battalion was overpowered by the final surge of the enemy masses.

The 1st Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment, and Troop C, 170th Independent Mortar Battery, displayed such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in accomplishing their mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions as to set them apart and above other units participating in the same battle. Their sustained brilliance in battle, their resoluteness and extraordinary heroism are in keeping with the finest traditions of the renowned military forces of the British Commonwealth, and reflect unsurpassed credit on these courageous soldiers and their homeland.

©Reuters The Times, 12th May, 1951


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Naval Unit Citation

The Secretary of the Navy takes pleasure in commending the First Marine Division, Reinforced for service as set forth in the following

Citation:

For exceptionally meritorious service during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 11 August 1952 to 5 May 1953 and from 7 to 27 July 1953.  During these periods the First Marine Division, Reinforced, maintained the integrity of over thirty-five miles of defense line in the Panmunjom Truce Area against the constant aggressions of the enemy.  During the time the Division was in the lines, it was under fire and attack by a resolute, well-equipped and fanatical hostile force.  The Division maintained an aggressive defense and constantly kept the enemy off balance by continuously patrolling, probing and raiding enemy positions, accompanied by the full weight of artillery and air support.  Commencing in August 1952, and frequently thereafter, during the months of October 1952, March 1953, and July 1953, the enemy launched a series of large scale attacks to capture certain terrain features critical to the defense of friendly lines.  The outposts and main defensive positions called Bunker Hill, The Hook, reno, Carson, Vegas, Berlin and East Berlin, along with certain smaller outposts, gave title to battles of unsurpassed ferocity in which the full effort of the Marine Division was required to hurl back the attackers at heavy cost to both the Division and the enemy.  That the lines in the Division sector remained firm and unbreached at the cessation of hostilities on 27 July 1953 gave eloquent tribute to the resourcefulness, courage, professional acumen and stamina of the members of the First Marine Division, Reinforced.  Their inspiring and unyielding devotion to the fulfillment of their vital mission reflects the highest credit upon themselves and the United States Naval Service.

---

All personnel attached to and serving with the First Marine Division, Reinforced, during the periods 11 August 1952 to 5 May 1953 and 7 to 27 July 1953, or any part thereof, are hereby authorized to wear the Navy Unit Commendation Ribbon.  This includes all organic units of the Division and the following reinforcing units:

Fleet Marine Force Units and Detachments: 1st 4.5 Rocket Battery; 1st Combat Service Group; 1st Amphibian Tractor Battalion; 7th Motor Transport Battalion; 1st Armored Amphibian Battalion; 1st Amphibian Truck Company; Team #1, 1st Provisional Historical Platoon; 1st Fumigation and Bath Platoon; 1st Air Delivery Platoon; Radio Relay Team, 1st Signal Operations Company; Detachment, 1st Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company; 2nd Platoon, Auto Field Maintenance Company; 1st Provisional Truck Company; Detachment, 1st Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company.

United States Army Units: (For such periods not included in Army Unit Awards) 1st Bn, 32nd Regt, 7th Inf Div; 7th Inf Div; 74th Truck Co; 513th Truck Co; 3rd Plt, 86th Engr Searchlight Truck Co (Amphibious, was attached to 7th MT Bn, FMF); 196th Field Arty Bn; 92nd Army Engr Searchlight Plt; 181st CIC Det USA; 163rd MIS Det USA (Unit redesignated 1 Sep 1952 to MIS Plt); TLO Det USA; UNMACK Civil Affairs Team USA; 61st Engr Co; 149th Field Arty Bn (155 Howitzer); 623rd Field Arty Bn; 17th Field Arty Bn "C" Btry; 204th Field Arty Bn "B" Btry; 84th Engr Construction Bn; 1st Bn, 15th US Inf Regt; 1st Bn, 65th US Inf Regt; 1st Bn, 9th Regt, 2nd US Div (attached to KPR); Recon Co, 7th US Inf Div; 461st Inf Bn; Heavy Mortars, 7th Inf Div; 204th Field Arty Bn "A" Btry; 69th Field Arty Bn; 64th Field Arty Bn; 8th Field Arty Bn; 90th Field Arty Bn; 21st AAA-AW Bn; 89th Tank Bn; 441st CIC Det, USA; Prov Bn, USA (Dets 31st and 32nd RCTS); Co D, 10th Engr (C) Bn, USA; Tank Co, 31st Inf, USA; Engr Co, 31st Inf, USA; 2nd Bn, 31st Inf, USA (less Co E); 185th Engr (C) Bn, USA (less Co A); Co B, 1st Bn, 31st Inf, USA.


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Distinguished Unit Citation
Department of the Army
Washington 25, D.C., 9 August 1951

General Orders No. 72

The following units are cited under AR 260-15 in the name of the President of the United States as public evidence of deserved honor and distinction.  The citations read as follows:

Citation:

The 2nd Infantry Division and the following attached units: Battery C, 937th Field Artillery Battalion, are cited for extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in action against the armed enemy in the vicinity of Hongchon, Korea, during the period 16 to 22 May 1951.  Defending the critical sector of the Eighth Army battle front, the 2d Infantry Division and attached units faced a hostile force of 12 Chinese Communist divisions with an estimated strength of 120,000 troops.  The Third Chinese Communist Army Group drove the full force of its savage assault against the 2d Infantry Division with the specific mission of annihilation of the unit.  The right flank of the unit was complete exposed when enemy pressure broke through adjacent United Nations elements.  Pressure increased and each night enemy forces bypassed the staunch defenders and occupied positions to their rear areas.  Tactical units of the 2d Infantry Division launched fierce counterattacks which destroyed enemy penetrations, successfully extricated themselves, and through readjustment of positions, stopped the onslaught of the Chinese Communist forces.  Executing planned withdrawals and extending their flank eastward over extremely rugged, mountainous terrain, the 2d Infantry Division contained and held all enemy attempts to envelop and destroy the Eighth Army.  The heroic and determined stand by the 2d Infantry Division and attached units provided critically required time for other Eighth Army units to regroup and block attempted enemy envelopment.  Without thought of defeat, this heroic unit demonstrated superb battlefield courage, knowledge, and discipline and displayed such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in accomplishing this extremely difficult and hazardous mission as to set it apart and above other units participating in similar operations.  Its sustained brilliance in battle, resolution, and extraordinary heroism reflect unsurpassed credit on those courageous soldiers who participated and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the United States Army, the United Nations Forces, and their homelands.

By order of the Secretary of the Army:
J. Lawton Collins, Chief of Staff, United States Army


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Naval Gunfire Detachment of Anglico, assigned to X Corps to support the evacuation from Hamhung-Hungnam immediately following the breakout from the Reservoir.

Subject:  Commendation
28 December 1950

To:    Commanding General
         First Marine Division
         Fleet Marine Force, Pacific

  1. Two Regimental Naval Gunfire Liaison Teams and all nine Battalion Shore Fire Parties of the 1st Marine Division ANGLICO Company were attached to units of this Corps during the Hungnam defensive action to include the successful withdrawal accomplished on 24 December 1950.  The teams were initially attached to 3rd Infantry Division, 7th Infantry Division and the I Republic of Korea Corps.  The majority of these teams were attached to 3rd Infantry Division and controlled the final defensive fires which covered the last units to leave Hungnam.
     

  2. There were no other troops available to this Corps to accomplish this vital task.  It is now a matter of record that it was accomplished smoothly and that enemy interference was kept to a minimum largely by well directed naval fire controlled by your front line spotters.
     

  3. The performance of duty of these naval gunfire teams was a credit to your command and to the naval service.  I would like each and every member concerned to know that I appreciate their important part in this highly successful action.

/s/ Edward M. Almond
Major General, United States Army, Commanding

[KWE Note: This commendation was supplied to the Korean War Educator by Ron Thomas, who was a member of the Naval Gunfire Detachment of ANGLICO that received this commendation.


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Distinguished Unit Citation, General Orders No. 35, Companies I & L, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, and the following attached units: Heavy Machine Gun Platoon, Company M, 35th Infantry Regiment; 75-mm Recoilless Rifle Platoon, Company M,
35th Infantry Regiment

Citation:

Companies I & L, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, and the following attached units: Heavy Machine Gun Platoon, Company M, 35th Infantry Regiment; 75-mm Recoilless Rifle Platoon, Company M, 35th Infantry Regiment, are cited for outstanding performance of duty and extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Tangwon-ni, Korea, during the period 6 to 8 September 1951.  On the afternoon of 6 September, Companies I and L and attached units joined in the defense of Hills 682 and 717.  As the friendly forces consolidated their defensive positions, they were subjected to a heavy mortar and artillery barrage.  The barrage could not be returned because of a communications failure between the forward observation team and the supporting friendly artillery.  At 0015 hours on 7 September, the tempo of the hostile fire increased, with approximately 1,000 shells landing on the friendly emplacements during a 35-minute period.  With the artillery barrage lifted, an enemy force estimated at two reinforced enemy regiments and supported by mortar and automatic-weapons fire, launched a fanatical attack against the perimeters of Companies I and L.  Throughout a 6-hour period, the fiercely determined enemy troops hurled themselves again and again at the friendly positions, but were repeatedly repulsed by the valiant units defending the two hills.  As the hostile forces were working their way behind the friendly defenses, both companies discovered that their supply of ammunition was almost exhausted and, realizing that it would be suicidal to remain in their present positions because supplies and ammunition could not be brought to them through the encircling enemy, Companies I and L and attached units consolidated forces in an attempt to fight their way back to the friendly lines.  Constantly under attack, the friendly forces gathered all of their wounded and began to battle savagely in order to break out of the enemy entrapment.  Despite the numerically superior hostile troops, who continuously harassed the friendly forces from all sides, Companies I and L and attached units expending their remaining ammunition with deadly accuracy, successfully fought their way back to the friendly lines.  In the entire engagement, an estimated 600 enemy troops were killed or wounded.  Companies I and L and attached units displayed such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in carrying out their assignment under difficult and hazardous conditions as to set them apart and above other units participating in the campaign.  The extraordinary heroism and steadfast devotion to duty displayed by the members of Companies I and L, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, reflect great credit on themselves and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.  (General Orders 968, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, Korea, 6 December 1951.)  Distinguished Unit Emblem.


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24th Military Police Company, 24th Infantry Division, Meritorious Unit Citation

Citation:

The 24th Military Police Company, 24th Infantry Division, is commended for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding service in Korea for a six-month period from September 1950 to March 1951 in military operations against the armed enemy. Throughout this period, the 24th Military Police Company was confronted with and solved unusual and difficult problems of such magnitude that normal they would have been delegated to a much larger military police organization. During this period, the 24th Military Police Company posted, patrolled, and directed traffic over more than 2,000 miles of roads that were never designed to accommodate the great amount of traffic necessary to the operation of a United States division. The 24th Military Police Company received, processed, and evacuated more than 20,000 prisoners of war. They received and returned to their parent units more than 1,500 military stragglers. They directed away from military supply and traffic routes more than 1,000,000 indigenous refugees after first screening them for guerillas and saboteurs. On many occasions the 24th Military Police Company acted as infantrymen in the defense of command posts and in establishing outpost lines. In directing traffic in the delaying actions early in the Korean conflict, they were often last to leave in successive withdrawals to new lines of defense. Under all existing hazards, the constant endeavor of the 24th Military Police Company was to get the job done. And this they did, despite the many obstacles inherent to the theater of operations. The zeal, determination, and devotion to duty displayed by all ranks of the 24th Military Police Company, 24th Infantry Division, during this period reflect credit on themselves, the Military Police Corps, and the military service of the United States.


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Headquarters & Headquarters Co & Medical Company,
21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division

General Order 77, Department of the United States Army. 5 September 1951.

Citation:

The Distinguished Unit Citation [later re-designated the Presidential Unit Citation] has been conferred in the name of the President as public evidence of deserved honor and distinction: Headquarters and Headquarters Company and Medical Company, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division (second award), distinguished themselves by extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance in action against an armed enemy near Sanghong jong-ni, Korea, on 27 May 1951. When forward elements of the 21st Infantry Regiment raced through enemy forces and made contact with units of a friendly division on their right, a large number of the Chinese Communist Army were effectively sealed off within the trap. Headquarters and Headquarters Company and Medical Company formed a joint perimeter defense far from any supporting rifle units of the regiment. At about 0200 hours, this perimeter was attacked by approximately 300 well-armed enemy troops trying to break through to their own lines. A hastily bolstered defense repulsed their attack with heavy losses. The brunt of the initial phase of the first attack was taken by the Medical Company. Here, such deadly fire was placed on the advancing enemy that they were thrown into confusion momentarily, but soon recovered and resumed the assault, finally being throw back after suffering heavy casualties. Withdrawing to high ground, the enemy placed automatic weapons fire into the perimeter, bringing the entire area under harassing fire. This fire was lifted from time to time as the enemy made repeated attacks every 30 to 50 minutes until daylight. These attacks increased in strength and determination. Men were shifted to meet each new threat as it developed, turning every attack into a bitter defeat for the enemy. During these encounters, rifle butts, bayonets, fists, and, on one occasion, an axe were used to the best possible advantage. At about 0630 hours, more enemy were observed heading down a valley toward the command post area. Every available man was alerted to stop them and this enemy force was engaged and thrown back. At this time, units of a friendly regiment arrived on the scene and scattered engagements continued until 1100 hours. Enemy casualties were 300 dead, approximately 250 wounded, and 450 prisoners taken. This heroic defense against tremendous odds was accomplished by relatively untrained men, unused to close combat, whose duties were mostly administrative. Headquarters and Headquarters Company and Medical Company, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, displayed such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in accomplishing their mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions as to set them apart and above other units participating in this campaign, and by their extraordinarily heroic conduct they brought great credit on themselves and the military service of the United States.


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24th Infantry Division and attached 441st Counter Intelligence Corps Team
2 July to 15 Sept 1950

Department of the Army GO 45 - 22 December 1950
Presidential Unit Citation:

Citation:

The 24th Infantry Division and the attached 441st Counter Intelligence Corps Team is cited for exceptionally outstanding performance of duty and extraordinary heroism in combat against numerically superior enemy forces in Korea during the period 2 July to 15 September 1950.  When the gravity of the military situation in South Korea, and shortage of immediately available transportation necessitated piecemeal commitment of the division despite its one-third shortage in all essential elements, the division faced an enemy force estimated to be a completely equipped corps, delayed this force and limited its advance.  Stubbornly resisting the enemy's drive from Osan, where the advance force of two companies bravely blunted the driving onslaught, the division, though outnumbered, outgunned, and out-armored in the face of continual frontal attacks, intense guerrilla activities and infiltration of exposed flanks, succeeded in delaying the enemy's main effort until United Nations reinforcements arrived in the critical combat zone.  Fighting in the streets of Taejon, where the Division Commander himself led rocket launcher assaults, the enemy was made to pay dearly for every mile gained.  Time and time again fierce fighting took place throughout the delaying action when front line units decimated waves of attacking enemy with rifle, machine-gun and artillery fire, then killed the remnants that reached their position with bayonet and grenades.  On 24 July, when a grave threat to the vital port of Pusan was made by superior enemy forces from the west, the division was called upon to meet this crisis.  With only two days rest, the 24th Infantry Division met this critical menace and foiled the enemy's attacks; battalions and companies tenaciously gave ground, exacting a heavy toll of enemy dead and stopped this advance.  Moving to a sector on the central Naktong River front it resisted and later eliminated a dangerous enemy bridgehead that threatened the entire United Nations beachhead.  This determined and successful attack completely destroyed one enemy division as a fighting force.  The division again distinguished itself in early September when it reinforced a Republic of Korea unit whose lines had been breached in the Kyongju-Pohang sector.  By skillful strong attacks this last serious threat to the final defensive area was eliminated.  Throughout the entire period of this heroic action, officers and men distinguished themselves by conspicuous gallantry and courage.  Service troops fought side-by-side with riflemen, supply and medical personnel performed their missions despite enemy infiltration and flank penetrations.  Engineers fought as infantry and stopped hostile assaults with mines and demolitions.  Artillerymen fought off attackers to keep their guns in action, in fact every man in the division was engaged in battle.  The individual and collective heroism displayed by all ranks of the 24th Infantry Division in its valiant stand against great odds reflect the highest credit upon itself and the Armed Forces of the United States.


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7th Infantry Division - ROK Presidential Unit Citation
for period 8/1945-12/1948 and 17/09/1950-27/03/1951

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 50 - 9 November 1971

Citation:

For extraordinary sacrifice and service rendered to the Republic of Korea during the period August 1945 to December 1948 and from 17 September 1950 to 27 March 1971.  The 7th Infantry Division, United States Army in war and in peace has contributed to safeguarding the Republic of Korea from Communist aggression.  The memory of the 7th Infantry Division is etched into the soil of Korea by the blood and sacrifices of its officers and men: from the Inchon landing to the Yalu; to the bitter battles of Bloody Ridge, Heartbreak Ridge and Pork Chop Hill; 805 days of combat; and the 15,126 casualties suffered during the Korean War.  The 7th Infantry Division has served with distinction and honor in the Republic of Korea.  The 18 years since the truce only reinforces the ties between the 7th Infantry Division and the Republic of Korea by strengthening the anti-communist posture of this nation.  The military competence as well as the comradeship shown to the Korean nation is in keeping with the highest military traditions of the United States Army and will live eternally in the hearts of the Republic of Korea.

 

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