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Soldier's Medal for Heroism Not Involving Combat
(June 27, 1950 - January 31, 1955)

The Soldier's Medal was established in 1926.  It denotes acts of heroism in a non-combat situation.  It is awarded for heroic actions on behalf of fellow soldiers or civilians. To add Korean War-related citations for this award contact Lynnita.  To view DMZ Soldier's Medal Awards, click here.

Recipients & Citations


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A

Allen, 2Lt. Vincent H. Jr.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 43 - June 24, 1955

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery) Vincent H. Allen, Jr., United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters 548th Field Artillery Battalion, at Lake Ozark, Missouri, on 28 May 1954. Lieutenant Allen, along with his wife and ten other passengers was aboard a boat after there had been heavy storms in the area on the date of the accident. The boat was about 10 minutes out from the dock when a storm struck with great fury causing the boat to capsize in some two or three hundred feet of water. Fully aware of the treacherous tide and the danger that the twisting boat might lurch against him, Lieutenant Allen dived under the capsized boat and broke open a compartment securing life jackets. It was necessary for him to dive under the capsized boat three or four times. He would return to the surface, distribute the life jackets to those survivors still on top of the water and once again dive under the capsized boat for additional life jackets. He further assisted in aiding some of the passengers to a position on top of the capsized boat. After rendering all possible assistance at the immediate scene he advised the survivors that he was swimming ashore to get help. Shortly thereafter the storm subsided and Lieutenant Allen and his wife were picked up a few yards from shore by a rescue boat returning to the dock after picking up other survivors at the scene of the accident. Lieutenant Allen's prompt, brave, and thoughtful action was undoubtedly a major factor in saving the lives of survivors reflecting great credit on himself and the military service.

B

Barefoot, MSgt. Julius E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 287 - December 29, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Julius E. Barefoot (ASN: RA-34306232), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery C, 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, at Pakchon, Korea, on 14 November 1950. When a fire broke out near an ammunition truck he unhesitatingly rushed to the scene to fight the blaze. With utter disregard for safety, he mounted the truck, as it became enveloped in flames and removed the ammunition. In spite of the danger of explosion he continued to brave the flames until all ammunition had been removed. The heroism displayed by Sergeant Barefoot reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Barnett, Sgt. Elmer C. (US Army)

Barron, Sfc. Robert W.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 35 - May 13, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Robert W. Barron, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company A, Army Language School, Presidio of Monterey, California, during a fire at the Presidio of Monterey on 11 March 1954. An extremely intense fire had trapped a small child on the second floor of the burning building. Repeated efforts by firemen and volunteers to rescue the child had failed because of the intensity of the heat and the denseness of smoke. Although warned that the floor of the building was weak and in danger of collapsing, Sergeant Barron, without hesitation and disregard for his personal safety, crawled up a ladder, entering the building through a second floor window, and by groping his way through the darkness and burning smoke-filled room, located the child and carried him to safety from the building. Sergeant Barron's prompt and courageous action reflect credit on himself and the military service.

Barrows, Cpl. Avelino R. (Battery A, 15th AAA Aw Bn)

Barsosky, MSgt. Mike ( 2nd award)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 5 - January 15, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Mike Barsosky (ASN: 6715037), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 20th Military Police Company, Fort Gulick, Canal Zone, on 2 November 1951. A fishing companion fell into swift, turbulent waters and was swept rapidly downstream into the boiling waters and whirlpools below Gatun Spillway. Recognizing that his companion was in dire distress and helpless to extricate himself from his grave danger, Sergeant Barsosky, unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his personal safety, jumped into the surging waters, fully clothed, in a heroic but unsuccessful attempt to swim to the side of the drowning man and save his life. Sergeant Barsosky's prompt and courageous action during the attempted rescue reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Bartlett, Sgt. John U.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - July 9, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant [then Corporal] John U. Bartlett (ASN: RA-13238488), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the Arctic Test Branch, the Army Arctic Center, near Big Delta Air Force Base, Alaska, on 4 February 1954. While riding on the rear of an M-48 tank which was being tested on a cross-country artic course, Sergeant Bartlett heard a muffled explosion inside the tank. The vehicle was brought to a sudden stop by the driver, who leaped from the turret into the snow to extinguish his burning clothing. Smoke and flames were billowing from the turret hatch and the entire floor and hull of the tank was engulfed with fire, with flames leaping around the small-arms and high-explosive test type ammunition supplies. Without hesitation or regard for his personal safety, Sergeant Bartlett climbed into the burning vehicle, secured a fire extinguisher, and calmly proceeded to extinguish the fire despite the intensity of the heat and smoke. His decisive action undoubtedly prevented extensive damage or complete loss of Government property and possible injury to his comrades. Sergeant Bartlett's alertness and prompt, courageous action in the face of grave danger reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Bartling, Pfc. Leroy C.

 Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army
General Orders No. 791 - December 23, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Leroy C. Bartling (ASN: US-55173421), United States Army, for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy of the United States as a member of an ordnance recovery company, in Seoul, Korea. In the early morning hours of 21 November 1952, Private Bartling learned that a fire had broken out in a building occupied by members of his company. At the risk of his own life, he climbed a ladder to the second floor and entered the burning building. When a soldier was discovered overcome by smoke in one of the sleeping rooms, Private Bartling assisted two comrades in an attempt to lower the unconscious man to the ground from a window. Finding that this was impossible, he helped to drag the asphyxiated soldier to a second window which opened onto an adjoining rooftop. Climbing through the opening, he grasped the unconscious soldier as he was passed to him and helped lower him to safety. The heroism displayed by Private Bartling on this occasion was instrumental in saving the life of a fellow soldier and reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Bebeau, Cpl. Gordon P.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 26 - April 2, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Gordon P. Bebeau, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 612th Quartermaster Aerial Supply Company, 981st Engineer Construction Battalion, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 2 September 1953. Corporal Bebeau saw a boat loaded with soldiers overturn on Smith Lake. Immediately upon arriving at the scene, with total disregard for his personal safety and realizing the danger, he unhesitatingly entered the water in an attempt to rescue his fellow soldiers. He pulled one man out of the water and placed him in a rescue boat. Then, with great presence of mind, he continued in the rescue work until all bodies were recovered. Corporal Bebeau's alertness and prompt heroic actions reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Benson, Pvt. David G.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 21 - March 15, 1955

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private David G. Benson, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company B, 519th Military Police Battalion, at Chunchon, Korea, on 8 November 1954. While on duty as a military policemen at Traffic Control Point Number 1, Private Benson heard an explosion in the defile north of Binyon Bridge. He then observed that a Korean bus had plunged off the side of the road into a 30-foot wash and was burning fiercely. Leaving his station in charge of a Korean military policeman, he rushed to the scene of the accident and, disregarding the danger to his own life, entered the flaming vehicle to assist in the rescue of passengers trapped in the bus. Despite intense heat and the fact that many people were jammed under seats, he managed to extricate nine injured and burning people from the blazing wreckage. Private Benson's prompt and courageous action prevented serious injury and possible death to victims of the accident and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Benson, Cpl. Erdman D.

Department of the Army
General Orders o. 84 - November 3, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal [then Private First Class] Erdman D. Benson, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery B, 506th AAA Gun Battalion, of a 90-mm gun revetment, he heard a loud explosion and observed flames coming from the revetment. One round of 90-mm ammunition, which was stored with 21 other rounds, was accidentally exploded. He immediately seized a fire extinguish and without regard for his personal safety, ran into the gun revetment and attempted to extinguish the flaming ammunition boxes. The prompt and courageous action of Corporal Benson in the face of grave danger reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Billett, MSgt. Leonard M.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 245 - 28 May 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Leonard M. Billett, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, on 16 December 1950. On this date a C-54 which was returning from Korea with 16,800 pounds of demolition bombs aboard, crashed at the end of the runway and nosed up in a steep ravine. When Sergeant Billett and a companion arrived at the scene of the crash, they observed that the number four engine was still running and that gasoline was pouring from a ruptured fuel tank near the exhaust of the engine. Realizing the imminent danger of an explosion and fire and ignoring the hazards involved, Sergeant Billett removed an inspection plate from the engine and helped his companion enter the hole to shut off the fuel supply to the engine. Through his prompt and courageous action Sergeant Billett prevented a possible explosion of the bomb load which would have resulted in great property damage and loss of life. Sergeant Billett's heroic performance in an extremely perilous situation was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Blais, Sfc. Ronald V.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 61 - August 18, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Ronald V. Blais, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 77th Special Forces Group (Airborne), at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 30 March 1954. While en route to the First-Sergeant's call, he observed a c-119 aircraft crash into a mess hall building in the area of 77th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Sergeant Blais immediately ran to the scene of the crash and, with complete disregard for his personal safety, entered the flaming wreckage and successfully rescued a severely injured soldier who was pinned between the plane and the building. After this action, Sergeant Blais repeatedly entered the burning wreckage to assist in removing other injured personnel, and to fight the fire until it was under control. The prompt and courageous action of Sergeant Blais undoubtedly saved the lives of injured personnel and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Bokulich, Pvt. George A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 37 - April 29, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private George A. Bokulich, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy near Beaver, Pennsylvania, on 29 November 1952. While driving his automobile on Pennsylvania Highway 68, at night, he observed another passenger car directly ahead of him skid on the icy road, climb an embankment, and plunge into the deep waters of the Ohio River. Stopping his car and shouting instructions and words of encouragement to the two occupants of the vehicle, he unhesitatingly dived into the dark, icy water without regard for his personal safety and succeeded in removing one of the passengers, who could not swim, to a place of safety on shore. He again plunged into the water and successfully rescued the second occupant of the vehicle, who was unable to reach safety. Private Bokulich's alert and heroic actions undoubtedly saved two persons from drowning and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Bracht, Pfc. Albert O. (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72  September 23, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pride in presenting the Soldier's Medal (Posthumously) to Private First Class Albert O. Bracht, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 811th Signal Company, Fort Richardson, Alaska, at Spenard, Alaska, on 25 June 1953. Private Bracht heard a call for help from a neighbor's house. Upon arriving at the scene, he found his neighbor had been overcome by gas and had fallen into a well. With utter disregard for his personal safety and realizing the danger, he unhesitatingly entered the gas filled well in an attempt to rescue his neighbor. While descending into the well, he was also overcome by the carbon monoxide gases and made the supreme sacrifice by giving his life in a futile attempt to save the life of another man. The prompt, courageous, and determined action taken by Private Bracht in the face of grave danger reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Branson, Maj. Charles E.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 63 - September 8,  1955

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Major (Ordnance Corps) Charles E. Branson, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as Commanding Officer, Badger Ordinance Works, Baraboo, Wisconsin, at Badger Ordinance Works, on 27 June 1950. Upon notification that a 16-year-old boy had been bitten by rattlesnakes, Major Branson acted promptly and bravely, at risk of his own life to save the boy. Running through dangerously snake infested area, Major Branson found the boy, applied a tourniquet, and carried the boy over the very rugged terrain to a safe place. Having previously alerted the doctor, Major Branson drove the boy to a hospital and later was instrumental in finding the rare type blood required for transfusions. Major Branson's alert and courageous action was materially responsible for saving the boy's life and thereby reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Breeding, A3c  Herman

General Orders: Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 235 (May 17, 1952)

"The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Airman Third Class Herman Breeding, Jr., United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving actual conflict with an enemy while on serving with a crash rescue crew, 6161st Air Installations Squadron, Yokota Air Base, on the night of 18 November 1951. Airman Breeding and his crew rushed to the scene of a B-29 type aircraft which had crashed while taking off on an operational mission with a full complement of bombs. In spite of his awareness of the danger of an explosion of high octane fuel and bombs, Airman Breeding attempted to enter the burning aircraft to remove crew members whom he believed trapped in the wreckage. Through his act of heroism and selfless courage in the performance of service far beyond the normal call of duty, Airman Breeding reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force."

Brennan, Capt. John P. [for heroic action same incident as Herman Breeding]

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 369 - July 21,1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Captain John P. Brennan, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life as Aircraft Commander of a B-29 of the 344th Bombardment Squadron, 98th Bombardment Wing (M), FIFTH Air Force, on 18 November 1951. While taking off for a combat mission, the aircraft, with a maximum load of 500 pound demolition bombs and gasoline, lost power, and after a unsuccessful attempt was made to stop, crashed at the end of the runway and burst into flame. Captain Brennan had left the burning aircraft when he noticed two crew members, apparently in a state of shock, standing at the aircraft amidst burning gasoline and exploding machine gun shells. Although Captain Brennan knew the fuses of the bombs were of a delicate nature and would explode at any moment, he immediately rushed back and guided the crew members to safety. Shortly thereafter, the first of a series of four explosions occurred, and Captain Brennan was struck in the ankles. When he observed another crew member near the aircraft, Captain Brennan, once again disregarding his own well being, made an immediate rescue. The exceptional courage displayed by captain Brennan was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Brooks, Lt. Col. William P. Jr.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - June 9, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Lieutenant Colonel (Field Artillery) William P. Brooks, Jr., United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while assigned to the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, Department of the Army, Washington, D,C., at Alexandria, Virginia, on 5 May 1953. Seeing a young girl in danger of drowning in a flood-swept stream, Colonel Brooks, with total disregard for his personal safety, jumped into the stream and held her up until they were helped from the water by the police. Since the girl was unable to swim in the swift current, Colonel Brook's prompt and courageous action, at the risk of his own life, saved her life and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Brown, Pfc. Robert M.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 288 - December 30, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Robert M. Brown (ASN: RA-13248541), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery A, 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, at Chonan, Korea, on 2 October 1950. His battalion was halted in a motor convoy when a prime mover carrying ammunition caught fire and in a few moments was blazing out of control. Completely unmindful of the grave danger from the flames and exploding ammunition Private Brown unhesitatingly rushed to the scene and aided in uncoupling the artillery piece from the prime mover thereby permitting the vehicle to be maneuvered and driven off the road. His heroic actions prevented further destruction of other vehicles in the convoy and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Bruton, Pfc. C.J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 111 - April 2, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class C J Bruton (ASN: US-56095956), United States Army, for heroism as a member of the 24th Military Police Company, 24th Infantry Division, in Korea on 8 January 1952. Serving as Military Policeman, he was directing divisional traffic when a shout from a nearby mountain pass attracted his attention. Approximately half way up the pass he noticed a truck loaded with oil and gasoline blazing uncontrollably on the right of way and blocking traffic. Realizing the vital importance of preventing congestion, he worked his way to the truck. Just as he reached the vehicle, a bystander fired several rounds of ammunition into its gas tank to release mounting pressure which might have caused an explosion. Although the force of the flames was greatly increased, Private Bruton, with complete disregard for his own safety, boarded the burning truck and drove it down to a nearby stream, dumped the load of partially filled drums and thereby cleared the supply route and removed the potential danger to personnel in the immediate area. Private Bruton's heroism, daring initiative and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Military Police Corps.

Bryant, Sfc. James R.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - September 23, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class James R. Bryant, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Service Company, 505th Airborne Infantry Regiment, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 28 May 1953. While participating in a parachute jump and in the act of descending, a fellow paratrooper with a partially inflated parachute came in contact with Sergeant Bryant's parachute. In an attempt to slip away, the other jumper's parachute collapsed and he started to fall to earth. With complete disregard for his personal safety, and the utmost presence of mind, Sergeant Bryant grabbed the canopy of the other jumper's parachute, thus preventing his rapid descent toward the ground, and held it until a distance of approximately 50 feet from the earth. The other jumper was able to release his reserve parachute and land without incident. This caused the parachute of Sergeant Bryant to collapse and he suffered severe back injury upon contact with the ground. Sergeant Bryant's prompt and courageous action was responsible for preventing serious injury or possible death to his comrade and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Bryn, Pfc. Stanley W.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 92 - December 07, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Stanley W. Bryn, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery B, 506th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 8 July 1952, While performing his duties in the mess hall, he heard a loud explosion and observed flames coming from a nearby 90-mm gun revetment, One round of 90-mm ammunition, which was stored with twenty-one other rounds, was accidentally exploded. Private Bryn immediately left the mess hall with a bucket of water and attempted to extinguish the burning ammunition boxes. After making two additional trips to the fire barrel for water, he remained in the revetment until the blaze was extinguished. The prompt and courageous action taken by Private Bryn in the face of grave danger reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Burrows, Cpl. Avelino R.

CITATION NOT YET FOUND

Corporal Avelino R. Barrows, United States Army, was awarded the Soldier's Medal for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while serving with Battery B, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (AW) Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, in Korea.

Bushby, TSgt. John L.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 369 - July 21, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Technical Sergeant John L. Bushby, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life as a Flight Engineer of a B-29 type aircraft, 344th Bombardment Squadron, 98th Bombardment Wing, (M), Fifth Air Force, on 18 November 1951. On that date, Sergeant Bushby took off on a combat mission over North Korea in an aircraft loaded with 500 pound bombs and a maximum load of gasoline. When the aircraft lost power, and an unsuccessful effort to stop was made, it crashed near the end of the runway and burst into flames. Sergeant Bushby had escaped when he noticed the navigator and pilot were still in the airplane. Although Sergeant Bushby knew the fusing of the bomb load was of a very delicate nature and would detonate at any moment, he completed disregarded personal safety and rushed back amidst the burning wreckage and exploding ammunition and helped the navigator and pilot to safety. Immediately thereafter, the first of several explosions occurred, completely demolishing the aircraft. The exceptional courage and fortitude displayed by Sergeant Bushby was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Butcher, Pfc. Johnnie A.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - June 09, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Johnnie A. Butcher, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery C, 718th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, in the vicinity of Fort Funston, California, on 26 February 1953. A deep se fishing boat, Muskie of San Francisco ran aground on a sand bar approximately 150 yards off shore with four civilian men aboard. Two men gained shore, injuring themselves in the process, and approached the area of Battery C for aid for the other two men. Upon a request for volunteers by the battery commander to attempt a rescue, Private Butcher unhesitatingly volunteered and immediately went on foot to the scene of the accident approximately 1 mile away. By this time, high winds and heavy breakers were breaking up the boat. The two remaining men with the boat, because of injuries, cold, dangerous undertow, and heavy seas, were clinging to the wreckage. Private Butcher, with complete disregard for his safety, waded into the sea toward the boat and aided in the recovery of one of the injured civilians who was washed overboard by a huge breaker. He then again entered the water and aided in bringing the second injured man to shore. The heroism displayed by Private Butcher reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 49 (June 9, 1953)

C

Cardenas, Pvt. Joe G.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 107 - December 14, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private Joe G. Cardenas, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company I, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, near Grafenwohr, Germany, on 14 August, 1951. During a unit exercise under assumed combat conditions, he observed a tank moving at a rapid speed toward one of his comrades in arms who was unaware of the tank's approach. Private Cardenas, without regard for his life, rushed out in front of the onrushing tank to attract the attention of its commander. He then attempted to drag his fellow soldier from the path of the tank. By his quick thinking, gallantry and determination, he succeeded in halting the tank in sufficient time to prevent critical injury to his comrade. The prompt and courageous action taken by Private Cardenas saved the life of his fellow soldier and reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Carroll, Pvt. Lewis A.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 84 - November 3, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private Lewis A. Carroll, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery C, 279th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion, Alabama National Guard, at Savannah Beach, near Savannah, Georgia, on 12 July 1953. Observing a young girl in distress while she was swimming in the rough water, he unhesitatingly went to her aid to attempt her rescue. There was a strong wind and the water was extremely rough with a strong undertow. He succeeded in keeping the victim above water until a comrade reached the scene and assisted in completing the rescue. Private Carroll became exhausted during his difficult experience and another comrade succeeded in bringing him safely to shore, where he required extensive artificial respiration to restore his breathing. Private Carroll's alert and courageous actions reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Casey, 1Lt. Herbert D. Jr.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 18 - February 18, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to First Lieutenant (Armor) Herbert D. Casey, Jr., United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy a member of Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 14th Armored Cavalry, distinguished himself near Hershfeld, Germany, on 7 April 1952. As the battalion was moving into a field position in convoy, and ammunition truck loaded with high explosives, including 90-mm. tank ammunition, caught fire. The driver, unable to extinguish the blaze, abandoned the vehicle and attempted to warn other trucks of the danger. Lieutenant Casey, the convoy commander, arrived at the scene from the head of the column, quickly analyzed the situation, and, ignoring his personal safety and the flying fragments of exploding ammunition, assisted successfully in removing all vehicles to a safe distance from the danger are. His prompt and unhesitating action prevented injury to comrades in the vicinity and saved valuable equipment and cargoes. Lieutenant Casey's disregard for his safety, devotion to duty and courage reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.

Caswell, Cpl. Burton C. Jr. (Battery B, 15th AAA AW Bn., 7ID)

CITATION NOT YET FOUND

Corporal Burton C. Caswell, United States Army, was awarded the Soldier's Medal for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while serving with Battery B, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (AW) Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, in Korea.

Caudle, A3c Forrist D.

CITATIONS NOT FOUND

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 225 - May 9, 1952

Airman Third Class Forrist D. Caudle, United States Air Force, was awarded the Soldier's Medal for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving actual conflict with an enemy.

Christensen, Pfc. Donald E.

Headquarters, Eighth US Army
General Order #603 - October 06, 1952

The Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with the enemy is awarded to Private First Class Donald E. Christensen, US 56112054, Transportation Corps, United States Army. Private Christensen, a member of Company B, 712th Transportation Railway Operating Battalion, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement in the vicinity of Changyang-ni, Korea. Early on the morning of 6 August 1952, a box car filled with drums of gasoline became derailed and burst into flames, threatening a second derailed car nest to it. Realizing that a conflagration would result if the second car, which also carried petroleum products, were to catch fire, Private Christensen, with three comrades, moved to the scene of the blaze in an effort to rerail the car and move it to a position of safety. Disregarding the danger resulting from the shower of burning gasoline, Private Christensen remained in the area and assisted in replacing the car on the rails and in moving it from danger. The heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Private Christensen on this occasion were instrumental in saving vast quantities of valuable government property and reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Montana.

Clayton, MSgt. William M.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 64 - June 30, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant William M. Clayton, United States Army, for heroism while a member of the 8353d Army Unit, (Arctic Test Branch), near Big Delta, Alaska, on 19 June 1951. During a paradrop of heavy equipment from a cargo aircraft, the extraction system failed to function over the drop zone, delaying the release and presenting the possibility of loss of the valuable equipment by a drop in an inaccessible area several miles from the designated point. Realizing the danger involved to personnel in the cargo compartment should the heavy load break loose, Sergeant Clayton voluntarily crawled over the load, exposed his head and shoulders into the slipstream, retrieved the pilot chute, and made the system ready for a subsequent successful drop. Sergeant Clayton's mental alertness, fortitude, and courageous action in the face of extreme danger reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.

Cleaver, Sgt . Richard N.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 17 - March 8, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant Richard N. Cleaver (ASN: RA-12370425), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company D 511th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 11th Airborne Division, at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, on 21 August 1953. While participating in a parachute drop, Sergeant Cleaver, in the act of descending, glanced upward and observed a fellow parachutist falling through his suspension lines with a collapsed parachute. With great presence of mind and no thought of his personal safety, Sergeant Cleaver grabbed the top of the collapsed parachute and wrapped the suspension lines around his feet. The two men thus rode to the ground supported by the parachute of Sergeant Cleaver. The paratrooper with the collapsed parachute did not pull his emergency cord because of the proximity of himself to his rescuer. By his courageous and heroic action in this emergency and at the risk of his life, Sergeant Cleaver prevented serious injury or possibly death to his fellow soldier. Sergeant Cleaver's courageous action reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Cole,  TSgt. Dean M.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 469 - October 4, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Technical Sergeant Dean M. Cole, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, on 21 May 1951 while serving as Noncommissioned Officer-in-Charge of the Armament Section, 98th Bombardment Wing (M), (ADVON). At 1735 hours, he and the Wing Armament Officer were called to a parked B-29 aircraft which was loaded with forty 500 pound bombs fuzzed with highly sensitive variable time delay fuzzes. During the fuzzing operation, an aircrew member has inadvertently broken a fuse, spinning the generator propeller. Realizing the danger to personnel and invaluable equipment, Sergeant Cole and the officer immediately cleared the area and entered the bomb bay. Fully aware of the possibility of immediate death, they voluntarily risked their lives to promptly defuze the bomb. The exceptional courage and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Cole were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Connelly, Col. John K.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 89 - October 03, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Colonel (Chaplain) John K. Connelly, United States Army, for heroism while a member of the 5th Infantry Division at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, on 14 July 1952. Upon learning that an apparently deranged soldier had climbed to a small platform on the side of a water tower over 100 feet from the ground and was intent upon leaping to his death, Chaplain Connelly voluntarily climbed a narrow ladder to a position beside the soldier. While realizing that the mental condition of the soldier was such that he might offer resistance and that the slightest struggle on the narrow platform would result in both falling to their death, Chaplain Connelly spent almost one hour dissuading the soldier from his suicidal intent and persuading him to descend. During the descent on the narrow, vertical ladder, he preceded the soldier by only three rungs in order to block, by the use of his body, any last-minute jump. Chaplain Connelly's utter disregard for safety and his outstanding courage reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.

Cook, Capt. Robert W.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 16 - March 20, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Captain (Infantry) Robert W. Cook, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 112th Infantry Regiment, at Camp Atterbury, Indiana. On 23 October 1950, a civilian lineman working on a power line suffered severe shock and burns from contact with a live wire. Captain Cook, seeing the man suspended by his safety belt and in great pain secured a ladder and a fire extinguisher, climbed the pole and, at great risk to himself from possible electric shock or fall from the ladder, succeeded in partially extinguishing the flames. The initiative and courage displayed by Captain Cook reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Cooke, TSgt. Rex L.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 271 - June 4, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Technical Sergeant Rex L. Cooke, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life as a Lineman, 618th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron, during Typhoon Ruth, on 14 October 1951 and 15 October 1951. During the height of the typhoon, under extremely adverse conditions, Sergeant Cooke, with complete disregard for personal safety, ascended power poles and cut free the branch power lines leading to various buildings as they became demolished by the typhoon. By his courageous actions, Sergeant Cooke reduced the possibility of a greater danger of exposed electrical wires and the threat of fire. Further, Sergeant Cooke's heroic actions enabled the emergency crew to continue work without fear of hazardous conditions. Through his immediate action in an emergency situation, and his selfless courage in risking his life to protect others, Sergeant Cooke reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Cunningham, WO JG Milton E.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 61 - August 18, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Warrant Officer (Junior Grade) Milton E. Cunningham, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters, 724th Field Artillery Battalion, 273d Infantry Regiment, 68th Infantry Division, at Fort Dix, New Jersey, on 17 June 1954. While conducting the firing of hand grenades from M-1 rifles equipped with adapters, Mr. Cunningham observed a soldier move forward of within his firing bay, the movement causing the soldier's rifle to strike the embankment. The armed grenade dislodged itself from the adapter and fell back into the bay beside the soldier. Mr. Cunningham quickly analyzed the situation, ran into the bay, scooped up the live grenade, and hurled it over the embankment into the impact area. His prompt and unhesitating action saved the life of soldiers in the immediate. Mr. Cunningham's disregard for own personal safety, his devotion to duty, and his courage reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.

Curran, Maj. (Chaplain) Edward A.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 3 - January 20, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Major (Chaplain) Edward A. Curran, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy at Camp Drake, Honshu, Japan, on 8 September 1953. Called to the scene of an attempted suicide, Chaplain Curran discovered that an enlisted man had taken position atop a 70-foot smokestack, stating his intention of jumping to his death. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his safety Chaplain Curran climbed to the peak of the smokestack to a position directly under that of the enlisted man. Clinging to a steel upright for support as the soldier tried to dislodge him, Chaplain Curran spent 50 minutes in a successful effort to persuade him to descend the ladder to safety. The heroic service rendered by Chaplain Curran reflects credit on himself and the military service.

Cuta, 2Lt. Weston W.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 421 - October 04, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Second Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers) Weston W. Cuta (ASN: 0-1919167), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company A, 13th Engineer Combat Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, near Karagoo, Korea. On 26 August 1952, Lieutenant Cuta was moving along a Main Supply Route when he approached a point where traffic was held up due to an ammunition trailer which had caught fire. Lieutenant Cuta immediately moved his truck to a position from which his truck winch could be used, and, accompanied by another man, carried a cable up to the burning ammunition trailer. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Cuta approached the exploding ammunition, attached the cable to the trailer and returned to his own truck. As tension increased on the cable in pulling the burning trailer, the cable came loose. Lieutenant Cuta again exposed himself to the exploding ammunition as he moved up to the trailer and re-attached the cable. This time the cable held and the burning trailer was successfully pulled from the road, eliminating the danger to personnel and making traffic on the Main Supply Route again possible. The heroism displayed by Lieutenant Cuta reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

D

Dailey,  TSgt. Rollind W.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 528 - November 13, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Technical Sergeant Rollind W. Dailey, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, at Far East Air Material Command, Area "B", Fuchu, Japan, on 28 September 1951. He voluntarily risked his life while supervising and fighting a fire started by an explosion in a 120-mm. gun park containing live ammunition, equipped with proximity and mechanical fuses. Upon arriving at the gun park all personnel were ordered out of the area because of additional exploding shells. Disregarding personal safety, Sergeant Dailey advanced with a hose-stream into the hazardous area extinguishing the fire as he progressed. He removed the top from the smoldering ammunition rack containing the fused 120-mm. shells and applied additional water, completely extinguishing the fire. The heroism shown by Sergeant Dailey reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Davis, Sfc. Everard A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 36 - 6 June 1969

Sergeant First Class Everard A. Davis, (then Corporal), United States Army, who distinguished hiself by heroism at Kimpo Air Base, Korea, while a member of Company A, 811th Engineer Aviation Battalion, on 16 October 1950.  While engaged in construction work at the end of the main runway Sergeant Davis saw a jet aircraft crash near where he was working.  Accompanied b y an officer and two other men he ran to the plane which had landed upside down and saw that the canopy was embedded in the ground and that the pilot could not escape.  Fully aware that the plane might catch fire and explode, Sergeant Davis, with complete disregard for his own safety, successfully helped to clear the earth away and removed the pilot.  By his courageous action at the risk of his life,     Sergeant Davis brought great credit upon himself and the military service.

Davis, SSgt. Howard L.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 525 - November 10, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Staff Sergeant Howard L. Davis, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, on 14 October 1951 by voluntarily risking his life in removing injured air crew personnel from a crashed B-29 aircraft of the 98th Bombardment Wing (M) (ADVON). Sergeant Davis was one of the first to arrive on the scene. Without regard for his own safety, Sergeant Davis entered the fuselage of the burning aircraft to assist in the removal of the injured crew members. After removal of those crew members who could readily be found, Sergeant Davis directed hoisting operations of a large section of the demolished aircraft, and disregarding the danger from falling debris reentered the aircraft to aid in the removal of the last two air crew members. Sergeant Davis though fully aware of the danger from burning high octane gasoline, lubricating oil and oxygen, voluntarily risked his life in attempting to save these men. The high degree of heroism displayed by Sergeant Davis was in the highest tradition of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

DeBoir, Sgt. Frank

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 3 - January 20, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant [then Corporal] Frank DeBoer, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of 77th Special Forces Group (Airborne), near Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 23 March 1953. While on an operational training parachute jump in the Pisgah National forest, he observed a comrade had water-landed in a river with full equipment and inflated parachute and was experiencing considerable difficulty because of the weight of his equipment and the force of the water. Sergeant DeBoer, landing in a tree on the bank of the stream, removed his equipment and parachute and plunged into the icy water, and although a poor swimmer, went to the aid of his comrade. He successfully rescued the soldier and brought him safely to shore. Sergeant DeBoer's prompt and courageous action undoubtedly saved the life of his comrade and reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Derby, Pvt.  Eugene P.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 26 - April 2, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private Eugene P. Derby, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company A, 981st Engineer Construction Battalion, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 2 September 1953. Private Derby was aboard an assault boat with other members of the company when the boat overturned, causing panic among all the passengers. With total disregard for his personal safety and realizing the danger, he swam to the aid of one of the passengers and placed him on the overturned boat, where he was picked up later by a rescue boat. He then aided in the rescue work until all bodies were recovered. Private Derby's great presence of mind and indomitable courage reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Dingeman, Capt. Robert Edward

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 558 - November 3, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Captain (Field Artillery) Robert Edward Dingeman (ASN: 0-27380), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while serving with Battery B, 8th Field Artillery Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. On 21 September 1951, Captain Dingeman's battery was supporting a task force advance in the vicinity of Mongsa, Korea. When a fire suddenly started in a pile of ammunition, he ordered all his men from the area and, disregarding the hot projectiles, grasped a poncho and smothered the blaze. Although the fire had caught on to the covering camouflage net, endangering other ammunition, he refused to leave the area and grasped the flaming cloth with his bare hands, pulling it from the area, to prevent further loss of artillery rounds. Before allowing his men to resume action, he personally carried all the smoking projectiles to a nearby hole where they were buried. Captain Dingeman's calm courage and steadfast devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself, his unit and the Armed Forces.

Donahue, WO Edward L.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - July 9, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Warrant Officer Edward L. Donahue, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while a member of the Medical Detachment, 6941 Army Service Unit, Camp San Luis Obispo, California, on 1 November 1952. While he and friends were gathering abalones among the rocks jutting out from the beach into the ocean, a high wave came in unexpectedly, forcing them to seek a position of relative safety on top of the rocks to avoid being carried out to sea. He observed that one companion had been swept off the high rocks by the large swell and carried approximately 150 feet out into the treacherous waters. Realizing that his companion was unable to swim and in grave danger of drowning, without regard for his personal safety, Mr. Donahue unhesitatingly entered the turbulent surf and fought his was against great odds to effect the rescue of his distressed friend. Although his progress was greatly impeded by his heavy shoes and clothing, after determined effort he reached the victim and finally succeeded in bringing her to a place of safety on the beach. Mr. Donahue's quick thinking and his prompt and courageous action reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Donner, 1Lt. Donald L.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 43 - June 24, 1955

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), [then Second Lieutenant] Donald L. Donner, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 538th Field Artillery Battalion, Fort Carson, Colorado, on 11 August 1954. Lieutenant Donner extinguished a fire in an M-48 tank at a fueling point near the battalion motor shop where a fire had started while a tank was being refueled. All efforts to put out the blaze had failed and all personnel, including the crew of the tank, had retreated to a safer distance, fearing an explosion. At this time Lieutenant Donner arrived with a CO2 fire extinguisher, and, in the face of previous unsuccessful efforts to extinguish the blaze, and the possibility of an explosion, Lieutenant Donner, with total disregard for his life and personal safety, approached the fire and quickly put it out. This act saved the Government thousands of dollars in loss of equipment and averted possible injury to personnel in the vicinity, reflecting credit on himself and the military service.

Drain, Col. Jesse Cyrus Jr.

CITATION NOT YET FOUND

Colonel (Infantry) Jesse Cyrus Drain, Jr., United States Army, was awarded the Soldier's Medal for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while serving as Commanding Officer, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in Korea, in 1953.

Drake, 2Lt. Raymond A.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 551 - November 26, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Second Lieutenant Raymond A. Drake, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, on the morning of 19 October 1951 at Oshima Island, Japan. On that date, Lieutenant Drake witnessed a Japanese being washed overboard from a low pier jutting into the ocean. Without regard for personal safety, Lieutenant Drake jumped fully clad into the chilly water and grasped hold of the drowning man. Although the current swept him further out into the ocean, Lieutenant Drake held on to the man until a rowboat was dispatched to rescue both of them. Lieutenant Drake's courage, and quick-thinking prevented the death of a Japanese national, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Drew, MSgt. Douglas

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 73 - August 9, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Douglas Drew, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company H, Airborne Battalion, 1st Student Brigade, on 16 April 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia. While taking part in a demonstration before the Joint Civilian Orientation Conference No. 8, he voluntarily exposed himself to grave danger in securing the extraction system for the dropping of a 105-mm howitzer and -ton truck by parachute from an aircraft in flight. Realizing fully the risk involved and the great danger to all personnel of the aircraft, Sergeant Drew moved behind the loaded equipment, removed the reserve parachute, and lay prone on the floor of the ship with head and shoulders outside the plane in the slipstream to recover and reposition the equipment, thus removing a very serious threat to the stability and safety of the aircraft. Had the heavy load broken free while he was behind it, he would have been killed instantly. When the system failed to function the second time, Sergeant Drew repeated the procedure. Sergeant Drew's prompt and heroic action in the face of extreme danger during this emergency reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Dukes, Pvt. Nathaniel

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 89 - October 3, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private Nathaniel Dukes, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 505th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 10 July 1952. While participating in a parachute drop, under assumed combat conditions, he noticed a falling fellow soldier whose parachute had collapsed. With complete disregard for his safety and no thought of danger involved, he grasped the suspension lines of the collapsed parachute as his falling comrade passed and clung to it tenaciously. The reserve parachute worn by the falling parachutist also failed to open. The two men then rode to earth supported by the parachute worn by Private Dukes. Through quick thinking and fast action on the part of Private Dukes, his falling comrade was saved from almost certain death. The heroism of Private Dukes reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

E

Edelman , 1Lt. Sherwin D.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 469 - October 4, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to First Lieutenant Sherwin D. Edelman, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, on 21 May 1951 while serving as Armament Officer of the 98th Bombardment Wing (M), (ADVON). At 1735 hours, he and the Noncommissioned Officer-in-Charge of the Armament Section were called to a parked B-29 aircraft. The aircraft was loaded with forty 500 pound bombs fuzzed with highly sensitive variable time delay fuzzes. During the fuzzing operation, an aircrew member had inadvertently broken a fuze, spinning the generator propeller. Realizing the imminent danger Lieutenant Edelman and his assistant immediately cleared the area of all other personnel. Fully aware of the possibility of immediate death, they voluntarily risked their lives by promptly entering the bomb bay where they defuzed the defective bomb. The exceptional courage and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Edelman were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Elliot,  TSgt. William F.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 41 - 22 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Technical Sergeant William F. Elliot, United States Air Force, for heroism involving risk of life while attached to the 93d Bombardment Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group, (Medium), FIFTH Air Force. On 15 November 1950, Sergeant Elliott was on the scene of an aircraft accident on the runway at Kadena Air Base. When Sergeant Elliott arrived at the accident spot, he found the flight engineer of the bomber in a semi-conscious state, approximately 15 feet from the burning aircraft and unable to move. The excessive heat, detonation of incendiary-type ammunition and 50 caliber ammunition greatly endangered the life of the injured man. Sergeant Elliott immediately went to his aid and assisted in removing him to a safe area, where medical aid was administered. Sergeant Elliott's courage, quick-thinking and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Elwell, Pvt. Lawrence H. (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 4 - 7 February 1951

Private Lawrence H., RA17249294, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company I, 14th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by heroism, on 17 January 1950, at Camp Carson, Colorado.  He was a member of the fire fighting detail that was attempting to check the forest and field fire that threatened the camp.  In the face of high flames fanned by hurricane winds and with complete disregard for his safety, he fought the fire until he was engulfed in flames and fatally burned.  Private Elwell's determination and devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.

Erickson, A2c Clayton W.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 234 - May 17, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Airman Second Class Clayton W. Erickson, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life on the evening of 18 November 1951 at Yokota Air Base, Japan. As a member of a crash rescue team, 6161st Installations Squadron, Airman Erickson, while off duty, voluntarily joined a crew proceeding to the location of a B-29 type aircraft which had crashed on take-off carrying a full load of bombs. Arriving at the scene, Airman Erickson, although aware of the imminent possibility of explosion, rushed into the danger area and attempted to remove the unconscious body of a fire truck driver from the cab, where he had been pinned by a previous explosion. Airman Erickson's voluntary response to the emergency reflected heroism and devotion to duty of an extraordinary degree. By his willingness to endanger his life to save another, Airman Erickson brought great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Estes, Cpl. Robert A.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 61 - August 18, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Robert A. Estes, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters, 724th Special Forces Group, Airborne, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 30 March 1954. A C-119 aircraft crashed into a mess hall in the area of 77th Special Forces Group, Airborne, trapping the plane crew and mess personnel in the wreckage. Corporal Estes, who was working in an area nearby, heard the crash and immediately ran to the scene of the accident. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Corporal Estes entered the burning aircraft and rescued the injured pilot. Again, with no thought of his personal safety, he reentered the wreckage and assisted in the rescue of the copilot. Hearing a scream from the left side of the aircraft, Corporal Estes immediately crawled under the wreckage in an attempt to rescue the injured person: however he was driven back by the intense smoke and flames. Corporal Estes then manned a fire hose, and again entered the aircraft in an effort to prevent the flames from reaching the fuel tank which contained approximately one thousand gallons of gasoline. The heroism displayed by Corporal Estes in the face of grave danger reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

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Facetti, Capt. R.P. (RAO1373617) 4/15/51 Korea

Farris, Cpl.  Roy

  Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea
General Orders No. 79 1 - December 23, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Roy Farris (ASN: US-56146041), United States Army, for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy of the United States as a member of a signal construction company, in the vicinity of Chunchon, Korea. On the afternoon of 14 November 1952, Corporal Farris saw an amphibious vehicle carrying several of his comrades sink in a deep, wide river. Observing some of the passengers floundering helplessly in the fast-moving current, he plunged without hesitation into the icy water and swam quickly to one of the drowning men. Seizing him, he managed to drag him to safety. Then, despite the fact that he was all but exhausted by his efforts, he re-entered the water and, with the aid of a rope, rescued a second soldier. The heroic efforts of Corporal Farris undoubtedly saved the lives of two of his comrades and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Fiene, Sgt. Keith E.

General Orders No. 358 - 7 October 1952

The Soldier's Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy is awarded to Sergeant Keith E. Fiene, US55172739, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic actions and outstanding courage near Kumgong-ni, Korea, on 30 August 1952. On that date, while leading a group of men on a training march, Sergeant Fiene unknowingly entered an unmarked mine field. A mine exploded, injuring three men. Sergeant Fiene immediately reorganized some of the men into a rescue party and led them down the hill. After removing the first casualty, Sergeant Fiene, with complete disregard for personal safety, returned to the mined area to further supervise the removal of the other two injured men. By this time a rescue party had arrived. As they were preparing to evacuate another casualty, still another mine was detonated. Sergeant Fiene, although painfully injured by the blast, continued his mission of aid and evacuation for the wounded. Sergeant Fiene’s heroic devotion to duty, willingness to endanger himself to protect his men, and valiant spirit reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Omaha, Nebraska.

Fogarty, Sfc. Lewis C.

Department of the Army
General Orders No.   35 - May 13, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Lewis C. Fogarty, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 811th Signal Company (Service), Fort Richardson, Alaska, in saving the life of a child at McChord Air Force Base, Seattle, Washington, on 6 September 1953. Immediately after the crash landing of a Northwest Airlines Constellation, on which he was a passenger, he was evacuating the aircraft which had burst into flame upon impact. Hearing the cries of a hysterical woman about the loss of her child, Sergeant Fogarty, with complete disregard for his personal safety, returned to the interior of the airplane to search for the child. He successfully located the infant in the forward section and carried the child to safety through the expanding conflagration thereby suffering severe burns about his hands, arms and face. He continued to care for the child without regard to his injuries until relieved by medical personnel. Sergeant Fogarty's prompt and courageous action reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Furches, Maj. Douthit L.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 35 - May 13, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Major (Chemical Corps) Douthit L. Furches, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the Reserve Officers Training Corps Instructor Group, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, near Clemmons, North Carolina, on 2 July 1953. While fishing in the Yadkin River at the Idols Power Dam, he observed a boy who was swimming in the river nearby caught in the swift current and being helplessly swept toward the power dam intake. Without regard for his personal safety, Major Furches unhesitatingly plunged into the water beyond marked safety limits and quickly proceeded to effect the rescue. He succeeded in reaching the swimmer in the main channel at a point approximately 25 yards from the intake proper. He grasped hold of the boy, lifting him from beneath the surface of the muddy, swift water and returned him safely to shore. Major Furches' prompt and courageous action undoubtedly saved the life of the distressed swimmer and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

G

Garza, Sfc. Guillermo B.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 85 - 25 September 1951

Sergeant First Class Guillermo B. Garza (then corporal), Armor, United States Army, a member of Company C, 44th Tank Battalion, 82d Airborne Division, distinguished himself by heroism on 30 September 1950 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.  Hearing a loud crash and an explosion, Sergeant Garza saw that a medium tank had been accidentally driven over a gasoline pump in the tank park, igniting the escaping gasoline which had then enveloped the vehicle in flames.  The driver became frightened and jumped from the tank.  Whereupon Sergeant Garza ran toward the blazing vehicle and pump, jumped aboard the unmanned, moving tank, gained the driver's hatch, and took control as it crushed and ignited a second pump and headed toward a line of trucks in an adjacent motor pool.  He then drove the burning tank out of and away from the fire to a place of safety.  The prompt, courageous and determined action taken by Sergeant Garza in the face of grave danger reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Gattis, MSgt. Everett A.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 48 - January 27, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Everett A. Gattis, United States Air Force, for heroism involving risk of life as a Line Chief, 30th Bombardment Squadron, on 27 September 1952. On that date, Sergeant Gattis rescued a crash crew fireman from burning gasoline surrounding a crashed and burning aircraft. During an emergency landing, a B-29 went out of control, immediately bursting into flames. Three crash crew firemen were trapped by burning gasoline as they were attempting to extinguish the burning aircraft. Sergeant Gattis, immediately realizing the seriousness of the fireman's plight, and without regard for his personal safety, plunged into the flames, successfully carrying one of the firemen to an area of safety where he extinguished the fireman's blazing clothing with wet grass. Sergeant Gattis' presence of mind and heroic action undoubtedly saved the fireman from critical injury and possible death. Through his high personal courage and exemplary devotion to duty, Sergeant Gattis reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Goldsmith, Pfc. Ernest

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 37 - April 29, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Ernest Goldsmith, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery B, 26th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, (Self Propelled), 24th Infantry Division, in Japan on 21 July 1952. He was a member of a detail filling sandbags in the hot sun at Fukanuma Beach and the men were authorized to swim. The water became extremely rough and dangerous and exceedingly dangers with strong under-currents and the swimmers were directed to return to shore. He courageously assisted one of his comrades safely to shore when he heard calls for help coming from another comrade who was in distress. With complete disregard for his safety, Private Goldsmith returned to the dangerous water in an attempt to rescue the second man. In the ensuing attempt, he became so exhausted from battling the surf and struggling with his comrade that he was forced to return for help. While nearing the shore, he became too weak to swim, but the waves forced him close in where he could be assisted to safety. Private Goldsmith's prompt and courageous actions in the face of grave danger reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Gomes, Capt. Anthony A.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 41 - 22 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Captain Anthony A. Gomes, United States Air Force, for heroism involving the voluntary risk of his life while attached to the 93d Bombardment Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group, (Medium), FIFTH Air Force. On 15 November 1950, Captain Gomes witnessed an aircraft accident on the runway at Kadena Air Base. When he arrived at the scene, he found the flight engineer of the bomber, semi-conscious, approximately 15 feet from the burning aircraft, unable to move. he injured man was in great danger from the excessive heat, the detonation of incendiary-type bombs and 50 caliber ammunition. Disregarding his own safety, Captain Gomes quickly assisted in the rescue of the endangered crew member. He was removed to a safe area where medical aid was administered. Captain Gomes' courage, quick-thinking and devotion to duty contributed to the saving of a life and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Goyt, Lt. Col. Gordon F.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 234 - May 17, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Lieutenant Colonel Gordon F. Goyt, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life, as Operations Officer, 98th Bombardment Wing (M), on 18 November 1951. Lieutenant Colonel Goyt was notified that a B-29, was unable to take-off, and was in serious trouble at the end of the runway. He found the wrecked aircraft to be on fire, with fused and timed bombs scattered around it. After the first explosion Lieutenant Colonel Goyt, seeing an injured man lying close to the aircraft, rushed into the danger area, and successfully brought him to safety. In his attempt to effect further rescues, Lieutenant Colonel Goyt completely disregarded the extreme danger from burning gasoline and detonation of high explosives scattered in the burning wreckage. The courage and heroism displayed by Lieutenant Colonel Goyt were in the highest tradition of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Graham, Sgt. Cecil R.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - July 9, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pride in presenting the Soldier's Medal (Posthumously) to Sergeant Cecil R. Graham (ASN: RA-25946103), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company E. Infantry School Detachment, during a weapons demonstration at the infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia, on 4 March 1954. He was performing duty as a 4-man grenade demonstration team. During the demonstration, an M26 hand grenade accidentally became armed. Sergeant Graham endeavored to pick up the armed grenade and throw it into a safe area, but was unsuccessful. Realizing that he did not have time to make another attempt, Sergeant Graham without hesitation and with complete disregard for his own safety, threw himself forward and covered the grenade with his body. The resulting explosion killed him instantly and wounded another man slightly. Sergeant Graham's prompt and courageous action undoubtedly saved the other 8 members of the team from death or serious injury. His heroic act reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Gray, Pvt. James W.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 109 - 26 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private James W. Gray (ASN: RA-16265132), United States Army, for heroism as a member of Company B, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, on 10 July 1950 at Chochiwon, Korea. On 10 July 1950 in the vicinity of Chochiwon, Korea, a truck convoy from Company B, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, of which Private Gray was a member, was strafed by a plane. A truck loaded with dynamite, TNT and anti-tank mines was hit and set afire. The driver of the truck was killed and another soldier wounded. Without hesitation and regard for personal safety, Private Gray entered the burning truck and pulled the wounded man to safety. He then, with the aid of another soldier put out the fire. By these actions he doubtless saved the lives of several soldiers from exploding demolitions. The heroism and selfless action displayed by Private Gray on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Gunn, Cpl. Norm C.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 206 - 27 September 1950

Corporal Norm C. Gunn, RA15268737, Artillery, Battery A, 64th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  At about 2300 hours, 21 August 1950 near Haman, Korea, a truckload of ammunition was brought up to a howitzer which was firing at enemy concentrations.  Just as it reached the position, the motor of the truck caught fire and the driver left the cab.  Although warned to leave, Corporal Gunn joined his sergeant in shoveling dirt on the motor until the fire was extinguished.  By his courageous action he saved not only critical ammunition and an artillery piece but also the lives of the gun crew.  Corporal Gunn's courage, initiative and devotion to his men reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Ohio.

Gurley, Sfc. Junior M.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 60 - January 27k, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Junior M. Gurley (ASN: RA-45051772), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, near Simpung-ni, Korea, on 26 November 1951. Sergeant Gurley was in the right front seat of a jeep which was pulling a trailer load of men up an icy, snow-covered road to a forward position. On a steep incline, the vehicle stalled and the driver was unable to brake it. The jeep jackknifed and started sliding backward, the force throwing a soldier under one of the wheels and momentarily paralyzing him. Displaying excellent presence of mind, Sergeant Gurley braced himself in the moving jeep and stuck his right leg out to contact the man's supine form. Using his leg as a wedge, he dragged the man's body along the icy road, preventing him from being crushed by the wheel. Although the painful effort taxed his endurance to the utmost and he was in constant danger of being dashed to the ground himself, he continued to hold the soldier inches away from serious injury until the rapidly sliding jeep caught in a rut and stopped on the edge of a precipice. Sergeant Gurley's heroism, exceptionally quick thinking and selfless devotion to his comrades reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Army.

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Hackworth, Cpl. Denver E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 286 (December 24, 1950)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Denver E. Hackworth (ASN: RA-15414706), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 24th Military Police Company, 24th Infantry Division, at Anju, Korea, on 7 November 1950. Flaming gasoline from exploding drums had ignited the clothing of several small children. He rushed to the scene and by his swift action in smothering the flames saved the children from serious burns and possibly death. He observed still another child standing amid the flames. With utter disregard for his own safety he ran through the blaze and carried the child to safety. The heroism displayed by Corporal Hackworth on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Hall, Pvt. Robert M.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 89 - October 03, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private Robert M. Hall, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while serving with Company A, 2d Infantry Regiment, on 17 June 1952 at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania. Private Hall was acting as safety man on the grenade range when another soldier dropped an activated hand grenade. Personnel in the immediate vicinity of the impending explosion, including Private Hall, dashed to take cover. Then, realizing the grave danger that threatened, Private Hall, with rare courage, returned to the grenade pit, picked up the grenade, and threw it down range away from the endangered personnel, thus saving his comrades from death or serious injury. Despite Private Hall's heroic action, four men including himself were slightly wounded when the grenade exploded. Private Hall's presence of mind and intrepid action are in keeping with the best traditions of the Infantry and the military service.

Hammer, MSgt. Fredrick J.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 206 - 27 September 1950

Master Sergeant Fredrick J. Hammer, RA32617152, Artillery Battery A, 64th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army. At about 2300 hours, 21 August 1950 near Haman, Korea, a truckload of ammunition was brought up to a howitzer which was firing at enemy concentrations.  Just as it reached the position, the motor of the truck caught fire and the driver left the cab.  Master Sergeant Hammer immediately cleared the area and tried to start the truck himself.  That failing, he opened the hood and, assisted by one man, threw sand on the motor until the fire was extinguished.  By his courageous action he saved not only critical ammunition and an artillery piece, but also the lives of the gun crew.  Master Sergeant Hammer's courage, initiative and devotion to his men reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from New York.

Harrison, Pvt. Henry (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 37 -  April 29, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pride in presenting the Soldier's Medal (Posthumously) to Private Henry Harrison, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery B, 26th Antiaircraft Automatic Weapons Battalion, (Self Propelled), 24th Infantry Division, in Japan on 21 July 1952. Sergeant Harrison and other members of a detail had been filling sandbags at Fukanuma Beach and they were authorized to swim. The water became extremely rough and dangerous with strong under-currents and the men were ordered to return to shore. One swimmer was heard calling for help and Sergeant Harrison, who was on the shore, immediately entered the water without regard for his safety in an effort to effect a rescue. When he realized that he could not save his comrade, he attempted to return to shore, hopelessly struggling against the treacherous current and high waves until he disappeared. Sergeant Harrison's prompt and heroic actions reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Heal, MSgt. Charles W.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 18 - February 18, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Charles W. Heal, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 14th Armored Cavalry, near Hershfeld, Germany, on 7 April 1952. As the battalion was moving into a field position in convoy, an ammunition truck loaded with high explosives, including 90-mm ammunition, caught fire. The driver, unable to extinguish the blaze, abandoned the vehicle and attempted to warn other trucks of the danger. Two vehicles had already moved into range of danger and being unable to move their trucks to safety, the drivers abandoned them. Sergeant Heal arrived at the scene from the head of the convoy, quickly analyzed the situation, and, ignoring his personal safety and the flying fragments of exploding ammunition, assisted in successfully moving all vehicles to a safe distance from the danger area. His prompt and unhesitating action prevented injury to comrades in the vicinity and saved valuable equipment and cargoes. Sergeant Heal's disregard for his safety, devotion to duty, and courage reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.

Heard, MSgt. Odis C.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 439 - September 18, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Odis C. Heard, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, on 8 January 1951 as Flight Engineer on a C-46 aircraft, First Troop Carrier Group (Provisional). Sergeant Heard was on an emergency resupply mission to Korea when his aircraft crashed upon landing. The entire cockpit was smashed and he was pinned against the side of the aircraft by a 10,000 pound cargo. Sergeant Heard freed himself from the debris and despite injuries worked himself through the smoke filled aircraft to the navigator's side, removing him to safety through the rear exit. Although there was serious threat of explosion, he returned to the smoking wreckage, made his way to the cockpit and tried to reach the pilot who was pinned to the forward bulkhead by the smashed nose of the aircraft. Unsuccessful in the attempt, Sergeant Heard went out through the escape hatch and tried to tear through the shattered remains of the cockpit to reach the critically injured pilot. Eventually, with the assistance of other persons, Sergeant Heard succeeded in removing the pilot. Throughout the rescue, he displayed unusual courage and composure. Sergeant Heard's disregard for personal safety and his devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Hebb, Cpl. Irvie E.

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 104 - 28 December 1950

Corporal Irvie E. Hebb, RA15284937, Tank Company (Medium), 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism near Chipyong, Korea, on 5 December 1950.  On this date, Corporal Hebb was the driver of a tank participating in a motorized night march from Wonsan, Korea, to Chipyong, Korea.  While crossing one of the many bridges, the preceding tank crashed through and fell a distance of approximately 30 feet killing six infantrymen riding on the outside deck, knocking the tank commander unconscious, and leaving the remainder of the tank crew dazed.  At the same time the oil line and gasoline lines were severed and many rounds of 76 millimeter ammunition were broken open. Corporal Hebb, following with his tank, saw the accident and realizing that some of the tank crew members were trapped, immediately brought his tank to a halt, dismounted, and dashed forward a distance of approximately 50 yards to the scene of the accident.  Unhesitatingly, and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he climbed into the wrecked tank and crawled through the driver's hatch.  Despite the imminent possibility of an explosion from the leaking oil and gasoline, and the broken rounds of ammunition, Corporal Hebb assisted each member of the tanks crew, one by one, to safety before he abandoned the tank.  Corporal Hebb's clear thinking, unhesitating action, and bravery were responsible for the safety of the entire tank crew.  The heroism displayed by Corporal Hebb reflects great credit upon himself and upon the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Minnesota.

Howland,  TSgt. George W.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 512 - November 4, 1951

Technical Sergeant George W. Howland, United States Air Force, was awarded the Soldier's Medal for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, on 21 July 1951 when he risked his life to rescue a fellow airman from drowning in the Sumida River at Asakuse-bashi, Tokyo, Japan. A group of persons was preparing to depart from a Japanese fireworks display in Sergeant Howland's motorboat. The force of starting the motor lurched the boat and threw the airman into the river. His call for help was drowned amidst the noise of many vessels carrying celebrating Japanese nationals. Sergeant Howland saw that the airman was unable to swim and realized that he would be crushed by the cruising boats. As the airman floundered between huge barges and Japanese boats, Sergeant Howland dived into the water and pulled the drowning man to the boat behind, where he was hoisted on board by another airman with the help of two nationals. Sergeant Howland's courage and skill were responsible for saving the life of a fellow airman, and his quick thinking and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Hutcheson, Pfc. William A.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 43 - 18 February 1951

The Soldier's Medal, for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy, is awarded to Private First Class William A. Hutcheson, RA17257995, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 38 Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed heroism on 18 September 1950 in the vicinity of Sindong, Korea. On that date the advance elements of his company had reached the east bank of the Naktong River and had been ordered to secure a bridgehead on the opposite bank. Private Hutcheson unhesitatingly volunteered to accompany a patrol for the mission of swimming to the opposite shore and securing boats in which the troops could cross the river. Fully aware that any enemy action might be disastrous to them, the group moved into the cold and swiftly-flowing river. In midstream, one of the men was seized by cramps and, unable to move further and at the mercy of the swift current, called for help. Private Hutcheson, fully aware of the precarious position of the soldier, immediately swam back, courageously fighting the strong current and, with the assistance of a comrade, succeeded in bringing the stricken man to a place of safety on the west bank of the river. The selfless action of Private Hutcheson in going to the aid of his comrade at the risk of his own life reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Muscatine County, Iowa.

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Johnson, 1Lt. David S.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - September 30, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery) David S. Johnson (ASN: 0-974259), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 74th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion, 18th Antiaircraft artillery Group, at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on 5 January 1954. When Lieutenant Johnson was notified that an apartment in the building across from his own was on fire he immediately rushed to the scene of the fire and attempted to enter the burning apartment which was located on the second floor. Being partially overcome by the intense smoke and heat he was unsuccessful in his first attempt and returned to the ground floor for air. With utter disregard for his personal safety he returned to the blazing apartment to make a positive determination that the occupants were either already out or attempt evacuation. He crawled into the apartment and found an unconscious woman on the floor. Unable to stand, owing to the intensity of the smoke and flames, he dragged her and himself out into the hall where he was assisted in the completion of the rescue, removing the victim to a place of safety. The prompt, courageous, and determined action taken by Lieutenant Johnson in the face of grave danger reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Johnson, 1Lt. Fal L.

Department of the Arm y
General Orders No. 61 - August 18, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to First Lieutenant (Infantry) [then Second Lieutenant] Fal L. Johnson, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of 77th Special Forces Group, (Airborne), at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 30 March 1954. A C-119 aircraft crashed into a mess hall in the area of the 77th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Lieutenant Johnson, who was two buildings away from the accident, heard the sound of the crash and ran to the scene. He stopped only long enough to procure a fire extinguisher as he noticed the plane and building both on fire. Immediately and without regard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Johnson entered the burning wreckage to lead in rescue of trapped personnel. When he saw that flames were approaching one of the planes' fuel tanks, Lieutenant Johnson seized a fire hose and without hesitation entered the flaming wreckage and directed a stream of water to prevent the flames from exploding the gas tank. During all this time it was necessary for other personnel to direct water at his feet as the debris on which he was standing was still burning. Repeatedly Lieutenant Johnson entered the flaming wreckage to look for the injured or dead, and remained at the scene of the conflagration until all rescue operations were completed and the fire was fully under control. The heroism displayed by Lieutenant Johnson in the face of imminent danger reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Jones, Sgt. J.T.

 Department of the Army
General Orders No. 40 - June 4, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant J. T. Jones, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 279th Infantry Regiment, on 8 January 1951 at Camp Polk, Louisiana. While acting as an instructor of throwing pits Nos. 1 and 3 on the hand grenade range, he observed a soldier attempting to throw an activated fragmentation grenade, which lodged on a sandbag of pit No. 1. With complete disregard for his safety, Sergeant Jones brushed the armed grenade from the sandbag and pushed the soldier down into the pit so that he would not be injured by the explosion. The soldier started to crawl from the pit and Sergeant Jones again at great hazard to himself tackled and fell upon him, shielding him from the exploding grenade. Sergeant Jones' prompt, determined action in the face of great danger reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Jones, SSgt. Roy D.

Headquarters, Far East Forces
General Orders No. 245 - 28 May 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Staff Sergeant Roy D. Jones, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, on 16 December 1950. On this date one of the organizational aircraft returning from Korea with a load of 16,800 pounds of demolition bombs crashed at the end of the runway and nosed up in a steep ravine. Arriving at the scene of the accident, Sergeant Jones and a companion discovered that the number four engine was still running and that gasoline was flowing from the damaged fuel tanks near the hot exhaust stack. Ignoring the imminent danger of an explosion and fire, Sergeant Jones, aided by his companion, entered the engine nacelle through an inspection hole and shut off the flow of fuel to the engine. His prompt and courageous action in preventing an explosion of the bomb load eliminated the possibility of extensive property damage and loss of life. The extraordinary heroism displayed by Sergeant Jones was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Jordan, Lt. Col. Ralph E.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 85 - 25 September 1951

Lieutenant Colonel Ralph E. Jordan, Artillery, United States Army, a member of the Department of Tactics, United States Military Academy, distinguished himself by heroism on 24 June 1951 at Humarock Beach, Humarock, Massachusetts.  His attention was suddenly attracted to two young ladies who were swimming approximately 100 yards off shore, were apparently being carried out to sea by a vicious undertow, and were frantically screaming for help.  He immediately ran down the beach and, without hesitation and disregarding the extreme danger from the heavy surf and the strong undertow, plunged in and swam to their rescue.  He reached the girls and was in process of bringing the one in greatest need of help toward shore when he was met by the father of the girls in a row boat.  The three had secured a grip on the row boat when it became swamped in the rough seas and had started to submerge.  The girls' father, screaming that he could not swim, became panic stricken and jumped overboard.  Colonel Jordan successfully turned the boat over, got the man safely on top of the boat, started again toward shore with one of the girls, and succeeded in getting her to another boat which had appeared on the scene to assist the stricken group.  Upon being towed to shore by means of a rope which had been brought out, Colonel Jordan immediately left the stricken girl in the hands of friends and again braved the surf to assist in completing the rescue of the other two persons.  As a result of his gallant endeavors he collapsed on the beach and had to be revived through the use of oxygen, but his alert and heroic action, which was doubtless instrumental in saving the lives of all three from death by drowning, reflects great credit on himself and the United States Army.

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Keith,  Pfc. Larry L.

Department of the Arm y
General Orders No. 49 - June 9, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Larry L. Keith, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery C, 718th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, in the vicinity of Fort Funston, California on 26 February 1953. A deep sea fishing boat Muskie of San Francisco ran aground on a sand bar approximately 150 yards off shore with four civilian men aboard. Two men gained shore, injuring themselves in the process, and approached the area for Battery C for aid for the other two men. Upon a request for volunteers by the battery commander to attempt a rescue, Private Keith unhesitatingly volunteered and immediately went on foot to the scene of the accident approximately 1 mile away. By this time, high winds and heavy breakers were breaking up the boat. The two men remaining with the boat, because of injuries, cold, dangerous undertow, and heavy seas, were clinging to the wreckage. Private Keith, with complete disregard for his safety, waded into the sea toward the boat and aided in the recovery of one of the injured civilians who was washed overboard by a huge breaker. He then again entered the water and aided in bringing the second injured men to shore. The heroism displayed by Private Keith reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Kellar, Sgt. 1c Billy E.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 35 - May 13, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Billy E. Kellar, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 2141st Army Service Unit, Fort Ritchie, Maryland, near Pennersvill, Pennsylvania, on 23 January 1954. When the frame house in which he and two other families resided caught fire, with disregard for his personal safety and despite the flames and dense smoke, he made desperate attempts to rescue the children of one of the occupants who were trapped in the fire. Each attempt was thwarted by the intensity of the blaze and the blinding, suffocating smoke which prohibited him from successful completion of his mission. Again Sergeant Keller attempted the rescue by climbing to the second story of the house on an outside drain trough, but was unsuccessful when the trough gave way and he fell to the ground. Then, learning that his wife had reentered the building to save personal property, he encouraged her to jump from the second story and he broke her fall with his body. Sergeant Keller's prompt, determined actions and heroism reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Kerr, 2Lt. Keith R. (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 92 - December 7, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, 20 July 1942, takes pride in presenting the Soldier's Medal (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant (Signal Corps) Keith R. Kerr, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 833d Signal Service Company, at Bas Samois, France, on 14 July 1953. After being involved in a collision in which one of the vehicles plunged down a precipitous embankment into the Seine River, he observed that the driver was trapped in the rapidly sinking vehicle and dire distress. Unhesitatingly, he pushed his way through heavy undergrowth covering the steep slope and jumped fully clothed into the swift and polluted water of the Seine River which was particularly turbulent at that point, in a heroic effort to extricate the man from the car. While calling words of encouragement as he swam in the darkness to the rescue of the helpless man, and guided only by his screams for help, Lieutenant Kerr was either stricken by a cramp or exhausted by his valiant efforts when he disappeared from sight and drowned. Lieutenant Kerr's prompt and courageous action, with complete disregard for his personal safety, and self-sacrifice in his valiant attempt to save a human life reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.

Kiefer, Sfc. Lonnie R.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 59 - August 4, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Lonnie R. Kiefer, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Tank Company (Medium), 29th Infantry Regiment, in Okinawa on 6 January 1953. He was at the scene of an accident in which a truck had overturned and pinned the driver under the cab of the vehicle, with his head protruding from under the cab and immersed in a stream of water. Having no tools to work with and disregarding his personal safety while constantly in danger of being trapped between the truck and the road embankment, Sergeant Kiefer dug underneath the truck with his bare hands and succeeded in holding the driver's head above water, until the driver was safely removed. Sergeant Kiefer's prompt and courageous action undoubtedly saved the life of the driver and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Kyle, 2Lt. Darwin Keith "Gus" (Co. K, 7th Inf. Rgt., 3rd Inf. Div.) (posthumous)

2d Lt. Kyle, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. When his platoon had been pinned down by intense fire, he completely exposed himself to move among and encourage his men to continue the advance against enemy forces strongly entrenched on Hill 185. Inspired by his courageous leadership, the platoon resumed the advance but was again pinned down when an enemy machine gun opened fire, wounding 6 of the men. 2d Lt. Kyle immediately charged the hostile emplacement alone, engaged the crew in hand-to-hand combat, killing all 3. Continuing on toward the objective, his platoon suddenly received an intense automatic-weapons fire from a well-concealed hostile position on its right flank. Again leading his men in a daring bayonet charge against this position, firing his carbine and throwing grenades, 2d Lt. Kyle personally destroyed 4 of the enemy before he was killed by a burst from an enemy submachine gun. The extraordinary heroism and outstanding leadership of 2d Lt. Kyle, and his gallant self-sacrifice, reflect the highest credit upon himself and are in keeping with the esteemed traditions of the military service.

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LaBeur, MSgt. Leonard

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 85 - 25 September 1951

Master Sergeant Leonard LaBeur, Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of the 6516th Army Service Unit, University of Washington ROTC Instructor Detachment, distinguished himself by heroism at Ketchikan, Alaska, on 19 March 1951.  A fellow soldier had stumbled in the darkness and fallen over the edge of the Coast Guard dock into the water, striking his head against the side of the United States Coast Guard cutter Citrus as he fell.  Without regard for his own safety, Sergeant LaBeur, without hesitation, jumped from the dock, approximately 20 feet down into the icy and debris-cluttered water, found his comrade in the darkness, and held the head of the unconscious soldier above the water until both were pulled up to safety by members of the crew of the Citrus.  The prompt and courageous action taken by Sergeant LaBeur in the face of grave dancer saved the life of his comrade and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Lackey, Sgt. Beuford J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 287 - December 29, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant Beuford J. Lackey (ASN: RA-18128636), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery A, 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, at Chonan, Korea, on 2 October 1950. His battalion was halted in a motor convoy when a prime mover carrying ammunition caught fire and in a few moments was blazing out of control. Completely unmindful of the grave danger from the flames and exploding ammunition Sergeant Lackey unhesitatingly rushed to the scene and aided in uncoupling the artillery piece from the prime mover thereby permitting the vehicle to be maneuvered and driven off the road. His heroic actions prevented further destruction of other vehicles in the convoy and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Lammers, Sfc. Raymond J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 110 - 17 May 1951

Sergeant First Class Raymond J. Lammers, RA17265365, (then Sergeant), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company M, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed heroism on 3 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. On that date, Sergeant Lammers was leader of a mortar squad which was supporting rifle elements. In the course of the firing, one of the mortar tubes came loose from the bipod just as a shell dropped into the tube. Immediately and with complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Lammers jumped into the mortar position and held the tube until the round had been discharged, thus protecting the lives of his comrades by his quick and courageous actions. Sergeant Lammers suffered a broken ear drum from the blast of the mortar, The heroism in a situation of grave danger displayed by Sergeant Lammers reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Lampley, MSgt. Lawrence H.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 17 - March 08, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Lawrence H. Lampley (ASN: RA-18011311), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company A, 432d Engineer Construction Battalion, at Kalserslautern, Germany, on 21 August 1953. While his platoon was engaged in pouring concrete for the abutment of a railroad bridge, a crane and a 3-cubic-yard steel bucket weighing approximately 9,000 pounds when loaded were used. After the bucket was loaded with wet concrete and the crane had raised it approximately 20 feet into the air, the weight of the bucket was so great it caused the crane to fall forward. Upon seeing the crane falling toward ten of his fellow soldiers, Sergeant Lampley, with complete disregard for his safety, ran under the falling crane to regain its equilibrium and prevented serious injury and possible death to himself and ten of his fellow soldiers. Sergeant Lampley's heroic act reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Landrum, Pfc. Henry J.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 17 - March 8, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Henry J. Landrum (ASN: RA-14301101), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 854th Transportation Port Company, at Camp Lloyd, Sondrestrom, Greenland, on 27 September 1953. While working on a barge unloading general cargo, a fellow soldier attempted to lift a box, lost his footing, and fell backward into the below-freezing water. Upon hearing the cry of "man overboard," Private Landrum ran from the other side of the barge, removed his heavy winter parka en route, and unhesitatingly plunged into 15 feet of icy water with complete disregard for his personal safety. His fellow soldier quickly disappeared because of the swiftness of the tide and the weight of his heavy winter clothing. Nevertheless, although unsuccessful in his attempt to save the soldier's life, Private Landrum dived repeatedly in the icy water until he was almost paralyzed and had to be pulled to safety by rescuers waiting on the barge. Private Landrum's prompt and courageous action reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Laws, Pfc. Thomas E.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 30 - March 26, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Thomas E. Laws, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company B, 703d Military Police Battalion, at Bamberg, Germany, on 8 January 1953. When Private Laws heard cries for help coming from a 5-year old German boy who had fallen into the icy, turbulent waters of the Regnitz River, he recognized that the child was in dire stress. Unhesitatingly, he jumped into the cold, swift waters, fully clothed, in a heroic effort to swim to the aid of the child. He successfully accomplished the rescue of the young boy, who was helpless to extricate himself from the dangerous waters. Private Laws prompt and courageous action, without regard for his personal safety, reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Leatherman, SSgt. Earl W.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 89 - February 19, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Staff Sergeant Earl W. Leatherman, United States Air Force, for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy on 18 November 1951 while stationed with the 344th Bombardment Squadron (M), 98th Bombardment Wing (M) (ADVON). On that date, a B-29 aircraft crashed on take off, immediately bursting into flames. Sergeant Leatherman, dental technician on a crash crew, arrived on the scene after one 500-pound bomb had already exploded. Despite the threat of unexploded bombs in the burning aircraft, and exploding .50 caliber machine gun shells, Sergeant Leatherman, disregarding his personal safety, dragged one crew member to a nearby shelter ditch, where he found two other crew members and a Japanese guard. After sending the guard for an ambulance, Sergeant Leatherman left the ditch himself to continue his search for additional wounded crew, administering first-aid under extremely dangerous conditions. The exceptional courage and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Leatherman were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Ledford, Pfc. Marshal E.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 11 - 8 February 1955

Private First Class Marshal E. Ledford, United States Army, a member of Company A, 728th Military Police Battalion, distinguished himself by heroism at Yongdung-po, Korea, on 8 August 1954.  Private Ledford was leaving the company area when he heard a loud explosion in the near vicinity.  Rushing to the scene of the disaster, he found a derailed Korean passenger train engulfed in flames.  With complete disregard for his personal safety, Private Ledford entered the blazing cab of the engine where two Korean nationals were trapped, removed them to an adjacent rice paddy, extinguished their burning garments, and assisted them to a place of safety for further treatment.  Private Ledford then hastened back to the wreckage and, despite the raging flames and intense smoke, continued to search for injured personnel.  Altogether he entered the train six times to escort or carry survivors out of the danger zone.  Private Ledford's calm and courageous actions were highly instrumental in saving the lives of eight Korean nationals, reflecting credit on himself and the military service.

Leechi,  Sgt. Vincent

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 11 - February 8, 1955   

 The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant Vincent Leechi, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Detachment No. 3, 1262d Army Service Unit, at Fort Dix New Jersey, on 7 November 1952. Sergeant Leechi, upon hearing an explosion rushed to the impact area of a rifle-grenade range and discovered that a detail of men had entered the impact area while proceeding to the scene of a brush fire. Being fully cognizant of the density of unexploded grenades in the area and without regard for his personal safety, he proceeded into the area where he administered first aid to three wounded men, prevented panic, and led the detail from the impact area to safety. While leading the men out to safety, a second explosion occurred. Sergeant Leechi found four men were injured and the range officer killed by the explosion. He again administered first aid, prevented panic, and led the remaining men of this group to a place of safety. The prompt, courageous, and determined action taken by Sergeant Leechi in twice entering a hazardous area, preventing panic, administering first aid to the wounded and guiding uninjured men from the impact area, reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Looby, 1Lt. Robert W.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - July 9, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Robert W. Looby, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company M, 129th Infantry Regiment, 44th Infantry Division, during field exercises at Yakima Firing Center, Yakima, Washington, on 14 May 1954. In the early morning hours, a mess truck of his unit suddenly caught fire caused by gasoline accidentally emitting from a M1937 fire unit, seriously injuring and rendering unconscious the cook on duty. Lieutenant Looby immediately rushed to the scene and with other members of the company attempted to remove the injured man. Seeing that the foot of the injured man was lodged between the ice chest and the truck bed, Lieutenant Looby unhesitatingly jumped onto the flame-enveloped vehicle; with his bare hands, he grasped the burning fire unit near the injured soldier, pushed it aside to free the soldiers foot, and assisted in the removal of the unconscious man from the truck. Still in the burning vehicle, Lieutenant Looby then grasped a flaming five-gallon can of gasoline and flung it clear of the vehicle to prevent further injury and damage. Though himself suffering from serious burns, he refused medical aid until the injured cook had been treated and evacuated to a hospital. The prompt and heroic action of Lieutenant Looby is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit on himself and the United States Army.

Lowman, Capt. Richard D.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 558 - November 3, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Captain (Field Artillery) Richard D. Lowman (ASN: 0-27380), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while serving with Battery B, 8th Field Artillery Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. Near Mongsa, Korea, on 21 September 1951, Lieutenant Lowman's unit was bombarding hostile positions in support of a task force advance. When a sudden fire started in an ammunition pile, quickly secured a fire extinguisher and, although exposed to the hot artillery rounds, attempted to put out the blaze. After emptying the extinguisher, he grasped a water can and continued fighting the blaze until it was under control. His valorous actions were instrumental in preventing damage to the howitzer and casualties to the men of the unit. Lieutenant Lowman's inspirational courage and unwavering devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.

Lustig, Sgt. Lawrence K.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 107 - December 14, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant [then Corporal] Lawrence K. Lustig, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company D, 364th Infantry Regiment, at Fort Dix New Jersey, on 26 May 1951. While engaged as an instructor on a hand grenade range, one of the students pulled the pin from a grenade and accidentally let it drop to the ground. Sergeant Lustig heard the fuse go off and turned and saw his comrade standing with the activated grenade at his feet. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he threw the student to the ground and dropped down in front of him , thereby receiving the full blast of the grenade. As a result, he received multiple injuries and his fellow soldier received only minor injuries. Sergeant Lustig's alert and courageous action in the face of grave danger saved his comrade from serious injury or possible death and reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Lynch, Sgt. Edgar D. (25ID, 25th QM Co.)

CITATION NOT YET FOUND

Sergeant Edgar D. Lynch, United States Army, was awarded the Soldier's Medal for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while serving with the 25th Quartermaster Company, 25th Infantry Division, in Korea.

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Maggio, Sfc. Alan B.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - September 30, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Alan B. Maggio (ASN: RA-12262338), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 77th Special Forces Group (Airborne), at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 30 March 1954. While in his unit supply room, he heard a loud crash. Running out he observed that a C-119 aircraft had crashed into a mess hall building in the area. Realizing the possibilities of an explosion, he first tried to warn personnel away from the area. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he then ran into the flaming wreckage to assist in the rescue of injured personnel. He remained until all personnel had been removed and the fire was completely under control. Sergeant First Class Maggio's prompt and courageous action was instrumental in saving lives of injured personnel and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Marruffo, Cpl. Robert P. (Amb. Co., 7th Med. Bn., 7ID)

CITATION NOT YET FOUND

Masuret, Cpl. Robert R. (DUKW)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 12 - January 22, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Robert R. Masuret, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy at Pointe de Grave, France, on 6 June 1952. While performing his duty as a jumper on a DUKW alongside the S.S. Nevadan, he observed that a member of the ship's crew had fallen overboard and was in danger of losing his life because of the churning propellers of the boats moored alongside the ship. He unhesitatingly dived into the water without regard for his safety and rescued his comrade form imminent danger. Corporal Masuret's prompt, courageous, and determined action reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Matyiasik, Sgt. Ray R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 381 - August 10, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant Ray R. Matyiasik, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, while working in the armament section of the 371st Bombardment Squadron, 307th Bombardment Wing, Medium. On 18 February 1951, a leaking variable delay fuse was discovered on a 500 pound bomb in the bomb bay of a B-29 aircraft. As Sergeant Matyiasik labored to unload the bomb, the cable of the bomb hoist broke, dropping the bomb into its cradle from the height of about five feet. He immediately hoisted the cradle onto the bomb dolly so that it could be removed a safe distance from personnel and the aircraft. A short distance from his B-29, the bomb rolled from its cradle to the ground. Not knowing at what moment it might detonate Sergeant Matyiasik without hesitation reloaded the bomb on its cradle and removed it to a safe disposal point. At the risk of his life, he saved an aircraft and the lives of other personnel in the vicinity. By his outstanding courage, professional skill and devotion to duty, Sergeant Matyiasik reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Miller, MSgt. Albert L.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 75 - August 6, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Albert L. Miller, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery C, 320th Airborne Field Artillery Battalion. Master Sergeant Miller distinguished himself by heroism at Fort Benning, Georgia, on 20 October 1951. While participating in a demonstration of dropping heavy equipment from a flying aircraft, the extraction chute attached to a 105-mm howitzer failed to function properly and necessitated releasing the equipment within the aircraft. During the binding down of this equipment, the howitzer was extracted, causing a shifting of a -ton truck which caught and pinned a member of the crew against the side of the aircraft. Acting quickly and at risk of his life, Sergeant Miller moved behind the swaying load and severed the shroud lines of the extraction chute so that the truck could be moved to free the trapped member of the crew. By his prompt and courageous action in this emergency, Sergeant Miller not only prevented possible serious injury to his comrade who was pinned by the truck but also eliminated a danger threatening the aircraft and all aboard.

Miller,  2Lt. Norman G.

Headquarters, 40th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 464 - October 01, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Second Lieutenant (Medical Corps) Norman G. Miller (ASN: 0-67945), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy. Second Lieutenant Miller, 224th Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement near Kumwha, Korea, on 14 August 1953. Lieutenant Miller, upon hearing that an ammunition dump had exploded, immediately went to the area. Learning that several men were hut by the explosion and were still in the danger zone, Lieutenant Miller, disregarding his personal safety, entered the burning and exploding area to assist in carrying the wounded men to safety. Lieutenant Miller's act was strictly voluntary and upon his own initiative, although he knew his life would be endangered during every moment he was in the danger area. Lieutenant Miller's heroic actions greatly aided in saving the lives of the men and won for him the admiration and respect of superiors and subordinates alike. The sincere devotion to duty, great bravery and initiative displayed by Lieutenant Miller reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Mizer, 1Lt. Conrad X.

Department of the Arm y
General Orders No. 49 - June 9, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery) Conrad X. Mizer, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery C, 718th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, in the vicinity of Fort Funston, California, on 26 February 1953. A deep sea fishing boat Muskie of San Francisco ran aground on a sand bar approximately 150 yards off shore with four civilian men aboard. Two men gained shore injuring themselves in the process, and approached the area of Battery C for aid for the other two men. Lieutenant Mizer quickly organized a volunteer rescue party and immediately went on foot to the scene of the accident approximately 1 mile away. The two men remaining with the boat, because of injuries, cold, dangerous undertow, and heavy seas, were clinging to the wreckage. Lieutenant Mizer, with complete disregard for his safety, waded into the sea toward the boat, leading two enlisted men who had volunteered to aid in the rescue. At this time, one of the injured civilians was washed overboard by a huge breaker but was recovered and assisted to shore. He then again led his rescue party into the water and brought the second injured man to shore. The heroism displayed by Lieutenant Mizer reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Monastra, Cpl. Nick A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 65 - January 28, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Nick A. Monastra (ASN: US_52053872), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Tonyong-ni, Korea, on 22 May 1951. Serving as Radio Operator, he accompanied his Company Commander in a trip forward to the assault elements of his unit. As he advanced along a narrow, slippery ledge, the officer suddenly slipped and fell over the precipice. In his plunge, he barely managed to grasp the ledge, to which he hung desperately in an extremely precarious position. Displaying excellent presence of mind, Corporal Monastra, although heavily burdened with his radio unhesitatingly lunged forward, grabbed his commander's arms and at the peril of his own life, pulled the officer back into the ledge. Corporal Monastra's heroism daring initiative and selfless devotion to a comrade undoubtedly saved the man's life and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

Moore, Sgt. Scott M.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 26 - April 2, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant Scott M. Moore, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the Clearing Company, 4th Medical Battalion, 4th Infantry Division, at Rimbach, Germany, on 11 September 1953. While driving a 2 1/2 ton truck and trailer in convoy on field maneuvers, he stopped his vehicle in the center of the closely congested town of Rimbach. He observed that the trailer load of gasoline which he was towing was burning fiercely. Realizing the consequences that might result to the town, its population , and himself if the gasoline exploded, Sergeant Moore, with complete disregard for his personal safety, ordered his comrades out of the truck, promptly reentered the vehicle, and moved it to an uninhabited area. With the help of another soldier and a German civilian, he disconnected the trailer. While the truck was driven to a safe area, he remained in the vicinity of the trailer to warn personnel who were unaware of the danger. Sergeant Moore's prompt and courageous actions reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Moran, Sgt. Leonard (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 17 - March 8, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pride in presenting the Soldier's Medal (Posthumously) to Sergeant Leonard Moran (ASN: RA-11182918), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery A, 34th Field Artillery Battalion, 9th Infantry Division, at Fort Dix, New Jersey, on 7 January 1954. Acting in the capacity of assistant instructor of the hand grenade range, he observed a trainee under his supervision throw a live fragmentation grenade which failed to clear the parapet of the bay where he was stationed. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Sergeant Moran courageously threw his body between the grenade and the trainee, thus shielding the soldier from danger and absorbing the full force of the grenade explosion. Sergeant Moran's consummate valor, inspirational action, and supreme sacrifice in saving a human life reflect lasting glory on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the military service.

Morgan, Sfc. Lonzo

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 2 6 - April 2, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Lonzo Morgan, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company C, 137th Tank Battalion (90-mm Gun), 37th Infantry Division, at Camp Polk, Louisiana, on 28 February 1952. He was serving as an instructor on a live hand-grenade range when an extremely nervous trainee entered the pit with him. At the command to throw, the trainee released the arming lever but held the grenade in his hand as he started to crouch below the parapet of the pit. With complete disregard for his personal safety and with utmost presence of mind, Sergeant Morgan pulled the man to an erect position and pushed him forward to the parapet, attempting to make the man throw the grenade. He grasped the man's arm and threw it in a forward motion, attempting to dislodge the grenade, but to no avail. He grasped the soldier's arm again and hit it on the forward edge of the parapet to dislodge the grenade from his hand and then pulled him to the ground. Sergeant Morgan's prompt and courageous action was responsible for preventing serious injury to his comrade and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Mozenier, Cpl. Gerald W.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders 11 - 8 February 1955

Corporal Gerald W. Mozenier, Corps of Engineers, United States Army, a member of the Engineer Fire Fighting Company, 8075th Army Unit, distinguished himself by heroism in Pusan, Korea, on 18 August 1954.  Corporal Mozenier was inspecting fire fighting equipment near the pier at Pusan Harbor when he and a comrade observed unusual actions of a young Korean girl on the sea wall and, realizing she contemplated suicide, they immediately approached her in an attempt to prevent her from leaping into the sea.  Unheeding their efforts to dissuade her she broke away from them and threw herself into the water, at that time whipped into lashing waves and treacherous currents by the high winds of "Typhoon Grace."  Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Mozenier plunged into the turbulent waters fully clothed, swam to the stricken girl, and pulled her to safety.  His prompt and courageous action in the face of danger undoubtedly saved the life of the Korean national and elicited deep respect and high commendation from his comrades and the people of Korea.  Corporal Mozenier's courageous action reflects great credit on himself and upholds the esteemed traditions of the military service.

Mc

McCauley,  2Lt. Paul J.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 30 - March 26,  1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery) Paul J. McCauley, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery C, 704th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, near Fort Dawes, Massachusetts, on 23 August 1952. Lieutenant McCauley's was attracted to cries for help coming from three men whose small fishing boat had capsized, throwing them into the rough and icy waters off Deer Island Point. He immediately rushed to the shore. Without hesitation, he dived into the icy and polluted waters of Outer Boston Harbor and, without regard for his personal safety, swam over 200 yards to assist in the rescue of the distressed men. Despite the hazards of high winds, strong tide, and dangerous cross-currents, he proceeded to effect the successful rescue, which doubtlessly was instrumental in saving the life of at least one man who was suffering from severe exposure, shock and immersion. Lieutenant McCauley ‘s prompt and courageous action reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

McDonald, A1c Newton P.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 235 - May 17, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Airman First Class Newton P. McDonald, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving actual conflict with an enemy while serving as a member of a crash rescue team, 6161st Air Installations Squadron, Yokota Air Base, on the evening of 18 November 1951. Airman McDonald and his crew arrived at the scene shortly after a bomb-laden B-29 type aircraft had crashed on take-off and burst into flame. Despite the fact that he knew the blazing aircraft was loaded with high octane gasoline and demolition bombs which could explode at any moment, Airman McDonald deliberately entered the wreckage in an attempt to rescue members of the ship's crew. Airman McDonald's selfless courage and total disregard of personal safety beyond the call of duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

McGee, Cpl. Orval D.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - September 30, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Orval D. McGee, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 77th Special Forces Group (Airborne), at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 30 March 1954. While in his unit supply room, he heard a loud crash. Running out he observed that a C-119 aircraft had crashed into a mess hall building in the area. Realizing the possibilities of an explosion, he first tried to warn personnel away from the area. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he then ran into the flaming wreckage to assist in the rescue of injured personnel. He remained until all personnel had been removed and the fire was completely under control. Corporal McGee's prompt and courageous action was instrumental in saving lives of injured personnel and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

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Nord, Pfc. Raymond A.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 37 - April 29, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Raymond A. Nord, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company G, 188th Airborne Infantry Regiment, at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, on 10 August 1951. While participating in an aerial drop, he drifted into the parachute of another man and caused it to collapse, which resulted in a free fall. Private Nord obtained a tenacious grip on the suspension lines of the other parachute, reducing the swiftness of the descent. He maintained his grasp despite extreme pain and injury to his hands and fingers from deep riser burns. The two men descended safely to the ground supported only by the parachute of Private Nord. The heroism and ability to act in an emergency as displayed by Private Nord reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the finest tradition of the military service.

Nutting, Robert Hall

Earned on May 18, 1951 while serving as a member of Company C, 72d Tank Battalion, 2d Infantry Division.

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Odom, SSgt. John H.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 245 - May 28, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Staff Sergeant John H. Odom, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, on 20 January 1951. Sergeant Odom displayed extraordinary courage by climbing an oil soaked wooden platform approximately ten feet high to extinguish flames that surrounded a diesel engine and a 100 gallon fuel tank mounted on the platform. Ignoring the danger involved, he made several trips from the ground to the fire carrying a tool box containing sand which he used to smother the flames. His quick thinking and courageous action prevented great damage to Government property. Sergeant Odom's valorous performance in an extremely hazardous situation was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

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Pace, Capt. Loran A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 85 - 25 September 1951

Captain Loran A. Pace, Transportation Corps, United States Army, a member of Headquarters, 6002d Army Service Unit, distinguished himself by heroism on 18 May 1951 at Fort Winfield Scott, California.  When an extensive fire broke out in the adjoining apartment occupied by another officer, Captain Pace crawled out his upper bedroom window to a porch roof and, without thought of personal danger, attempted to enter the blazing bedroom.  Beaten back by intense heat, he wrapped himself to a bedspread and forced his way back into the bedroom.  Although nearly blinded by heavy smoke and seared by flame in the room, he located his brother officer's 5-year-old child and lowered him to safety into the arms of his daughter on the ground below.  Searching for two other children trapped in the house, he was forced from the upper floor by intense smoke and flame and was denied entrance through a lower door because of intense heat.  Captain Pace suffered burns and shock as a result of his heroic rescue, but his prompt and courageous action in saving the life of the child reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Pacifico, Cpl. Dante A.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 37 - April 29, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Dante A. Pacifico, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Service Company, 503d Infantry Regiment, at Fort Campbell, Kentucky on 18 December 1952. While participating in a parachute jump and in the act of descending, a fellow paratrooper hurled through Private Pacifico's suspension lines immediately after jumping from the carrier aircraft. Although stunned by the impact and collision, he succeeded in straightening his tangled lines and, with complete disregard for his personal safety, grabbed the silk of the other jumper's parachute near the apex. The two men safely completed the descent to the ground, with Corporal Pacifico holding his comrade suspended by the length of the parachute. Corporal Pacifico's quick thinking and resolute courage reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Pastula, Sfc. Joseph

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - September 30, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Joseph Pastula, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 77th Special Forces Group (Airborne), at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 30 March 1954. He was in his barracks conducting a class when he heard the roar of airplane engines , followed by a load a loud crash. Running out of the building, he observed that a C-119 aircraft had crashed into a mess hall building in the area. He immediately ran to the scene of the accident and, without regard for his personal safety, entered the flaming debris to aid in the rescue of injured, trapped personnel. He continued to assist until all personnel were removed and the fire was fully under control. Sergeant First Class Pastula's prompt and courageous action was undoubtedly instrumental in saving the lives of injured personnel and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Patrick, Cpl. Edwin D.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 18 - February 18, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Edwin D. Patrick, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters Battery, 88th Airborne Antiaircraft Battalion, 11th Airborne Division, at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, on 7 November 1952. While participating in a parachute jump, his parachute was struck by the falling body of another paratrooper whose parachute had collapsed. As the man fell through Corporal Patrick's parachute and damaged it, Corporal Patrick threw his arm around the collapsed silk. As the parachute slipped from him, he again tried to obtain a hold with his hand and received severe burns. Despite this, he finally managed to secure a grip near the top of the parachute and he maintained this hold until both men safely reached the ground. Although realizing he was endangering his life, he unhesitatingly assisted his comrade. Corporal Patrick's prompt and heroic actions reflect the highest credit on himself and the military serving.

Paytes, Pfc. John L. (MIA)

Plumley, SSgt. William R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 355 - July 21, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Staff Sergeant William R. Plumley, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life on while serving with the 344th Bombardment Squadron, 98th Bombardment Wing (M), Fifth Air Force, on 18 November 1951. On that date, Sergeant Plumley, a tail gunner on a B-29, took off on a combat mission over North Korea in an aircraft which was fully loaded with 500 pound bombs and a maximum load of gasoline. Half way down the runway, when the aircraft lost power and an unsuccessful effort was made to stop, the B-29 crashed and burst into flames. Sergeant Plumley had escaped when he noticed the Radar Operator, in a state of shock, beneath the tail section of the aircraft amidst fire and exploding ammunition. Although Sergeant Plumley was well aware of the delicate nature of bomb fusing, he completely disregarded personal safety, and at the risk of his life in the face of imminent explosion, rushed back to the burning aircraft and aided the Radar Operator to safety. Immediately thereafter the first bombs exploded. The exceptional courage displayed by Sergeant Plumley was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Poggi, Pvt. Joseph Martin

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private Joseph Martin Poggi (ASN: RA-12345970), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy. On 9 November 1950, while the Company was on the rifle range, a Soldier went into an epileptic seizure. Disregarding his own safety, Private Poggi took the still discharging rifle away from the Soldier's hand, thereby avoiding possible injury to the men on the firing line. When the stricken Soldier fell to the ground Private Poggi forced open the Soldier's mouth and placed an object therein to prevent the man from biting himself. After the Soldier received medical aid, the medics stated that the actions taken by Private Poggi saved the Soldier from further injury and possible self strangulation. Private Poggi's heroic action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 278th Infantry Regiment, and the United States Army.

Pond,   Pvt. Charles R.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 26 - April 2, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pride in presenting the Soldier's Medal (Posthumously) to Private Charles R. Pond, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company A, 981st Engineer Construction Battalion, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 2 September 1953. Private pond was a member of an assault boat crew operating a boat which was participating in a class on Light Stream Crossing Equipment (Infantry Support Raft). In making a turn, the boat started to ship water and the passengers shifted to one side, causing it to overturn. Approximately one-half of the passengers were unable to swim. Private Pond, who was a swimmer, remained calm and began to place numerous no swimmers on the overturned boat. With complete disregard for his safety, he swam to the nearest bank with a non-swimmer, a feat which he repeated twice. On a subsequent trip to the scene of the accident, he became exhausted and called for assistance, but the rescue boat could not reach him in time to save him from drowning. Private Pond's courageous and heroic action in this emergency prevented the loss of life of several of his fellow soldiers and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Potter, Sfc. Clifford K.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 11 - February 8, 1955

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Clifford K. Potter, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Detachment 3320th Area Service Unit, Raleigh, North Carolina, on 17 September 1954. Sergeant Potter sighted an armed fugitive who was being pursued by a city policeman. With complete disregard for his own safety he also pursued the fugitive, captured, disarmed and restrained him until police arrived placing him under arrest. Sergeant Potter's heroism and unhesitating action exemplified the highest type of citizenship and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Prats, MSgt. Lorenzo

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 61 - August 18, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Lorenzo Prats, Jr., United States Army, for a member of 7552d Army Unit, Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Fort Brooke, Puerto Rico, in the rescue of a small child near Boca de Cangrejos, San Juan, Puerto Rico, on 23 May 1954. While fishing near Boca Cangrejos Beach, Sergeant Prats observed a small boy struggling in a vicious riptide and on the verge of drowning. Although well aware of the treacherous nature of the current and tides in the vicinity, he unhesitatingly dived into the water without regard for his personal safety and rescued the child from imminent danger. Sergeant Prats' alert and courageous action undoubtedly saved the life of the child at great risk to his own, and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Pritchett, SSgt. Donald G.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 296 - 17 June 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Staff Sergeant Donald G. Pritchett, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving actual conflict with an enemy as a member of the 1973-1 Airways and Air Communications Service Detachment on 15 December 1950. Sergeant Pritchett played an outstanding part in the rescue and subsequent recovery of member of a B-26 type aircraft which had crashed and was burning. With utter disregard for personal safety and in imminent danger from exploding gasoline and ammunition, Sergeant Pritchett helped to extract the injured pilot, navigator and engineer. He immediately applied emergency first aid, giving injections of morphine, and splinting and bandaging injured personnel. Sergeant Pritchett's immediate command of the situation and cool-headed decisions and actions contributed directly to the complete recovery of the crew, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

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Quagliaroli, A3c Peter J.

CITATION NOT YET FOUND

Airman Third Class Peter J. Quagliaroli (AFSN: AF-11255025), United States Air Force, was awarded the Soldier's Medal for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, on 2 September 1954.  He was serving with the 28th Logistical Support Squadron.

Quinn, Pfc. Robert E.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 30 - March 26, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Robert E. Quinn, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery B, 90th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion (90-mm), at South Franklin Mountain, El Paso, Texas, on 11 November 1952. While scaling a steep and treacherous peak on South Franklin Mountain, along with other climbing parties, he responded to a call for help from members of one group. One member of that party lost his footing and fell to his death and a companion was in dire stress, helpless to extricate himself from an extremely dangerous position. Private Quinn, with disregard for his personal safety, unhesitatingly climbed down the precipitous mountain side in attempt to aid the fallen man. Upon reaching his comrade and knowing that he could not help him, he hastily climbed to the position where the fallen man's companion was clinging helplessly to the face of the cliff in a state of nervous shock. With great presence of mind and using good judgment, he successfully assisted the man in his descent to a place of safety, carefully guiding and directing each step and insuring safe and secure foot holds. Private Quinn's calm, prompt, and courageous actions during the rescue activities saved the life of a fellow soldier and reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service.

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Raddatz, Pfc. Lenard

Department of the Arm y
General Orders No. 53 - July 9, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Lenard Raddatz, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of the 5015th Army Service Unit, Camp Atterbury, Indiana, at Edinburg, Indiana, on 17 April 1954. While driving home, he noticed an open evacuation of the street. He stopped at the scene and saw a man helplessly trapped at the bottom of the evacuation. The victim was submerged up to his chin in the mud and water at the bottom of the pit. Because of a broken high pressure water main, caused by a cave-on of the walls of the evacuation, the water and mud continued to rise. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Private Raddatz unhesitatingly entered the pit and attempted to stem the flow of water by improvised means. He succeeded in checking the flow of water until the supply was turned off, and then assisted in freeing the trapped man from the mud and removing him to a place of safety. Private Raddatz's alert and courageous action in the face of grave danger reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Rainville, Sfc. Herve J.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 61 - August 18, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Herve J. Rainville, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 77th Special Forces Group, (Airborne) at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 30 March 1954. A C-119 aircraft crashed into a mess hall in the area of the 77th Special Forces Group (Airborne), trapping the crew and mess hall personnel in the wreckage. Sergeant Rainville saw the aircraft crash into the building, ran to the scene of the accident, and, with complete disregard for his personal safety, entered the flaming wreckage and assisted in the rescue of the injured pilot and copilot of the C-119 aircraft. Again Sergeant Rainville entered the burning aircraft and aided in removing one of the injured cooks who was pinned in the wreckage. He remained on the scene and assisted in fighting the fire until it was completely under control. The heroism displayed by Sergeant Rainville reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Randell, Pvt. Ernest F.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 26 (April 2, 1954)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private Ernest F. Randell, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company A, 981st Engineer Construction Battalion, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 2 September 1953. Private Randall was a member of an assault-boat crew when the boat overturned on Smith Lake. All the men in the water were in a state of panic. With total disregard for his personal safety and realizing the danger, he unhesitatingly attempted to rescue his fellow soldiers. He saw a man floundering in the water. A 5-gallon gas can was floating nearby and Private Randall pushed it to the man. The man grasped it and remained afloat until rescued from the water. While swimming for shore, he came upon another man, whom he assisted to a place of safety. Private Randall's prompt actions and indomitable courage reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.

Rezsnyak,  Pfc. Rudolph N . (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 91 - October 24, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pride in presenting the Soldier's Medal (Posthumously) to Private First Class Rudolph N. Rezsnyak, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company C, 756th Transportation Railway Shop Battalion, at Virginia Beach, Virginia, on 1 August 1951. He and a comrade were bathing at the beach when they heard cries for help from a man swimming farther out from shore in deep water. His comrade could not swim and started for shore to secure help. Although he could not swim, Private Rezsnyak nevertheless, with complete disregard for his safety, waded out to give what assistance he could to the stricken swimmer. Another man on shore secured a beach raft, proceeded to the aid of the man in trouble, and brought him to shore, but Private Rezsnyak lost his life by drowning in his heroic attempt to rescue the swimmer. Private Rezsnyak's indomitable courage, consummate fortitude in the face of grave danger, and valiant self-sacrifice, reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.

Riley, Pvt. Charles E. Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 139 - April 21, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private Charles E. Riley, Jr. (ASN: US-56140714), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Dung Dac-Ro, Korea, on 4 December 1951. A comrade had attached a full can of fuel to a tent stove and, to test its operation, lifted the cover and dropped a lighted match. A roaring explosion followed, throwing flaming oil all over the soldier, who, becoming frantic, began running around and beating futilely at the leaping flames with his hands. Private Riley, displaying excellent presence of mind, raced after the man. He threw him to the ground and, wrapping a jacket around him, smothered the flames with his own hands and body. In doing so, he received several painful burns but continued until the fire was extinguished, thus saving the soldier's life. Private Riley's heroism, daring initiative and selfless devotion to an endangered comrade reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

 Rogers, 1Lt. Leo J. (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 30 - March 26, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pride in presenting the Soldier's Medal (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Leo J. Rogers, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, at Fort Dix, New Jersey, on 7 November 1952. Lieutenant Rogers arrived in the vicinity of the impact area of a rifle-grenade range and discovered that a detail of men had unknowingly entered the impact area while proceeding to the scene of a brush fire, and that one of the men in the detail had stepped on an unexploded grenade. The grenade detonated and wounded three men. Being fully cognizant of the density of unexploded grenades in the area and without regard for his personal safety, he proceeded into the area in order to lead the detail to safety. When he reached the wounded men, he attempted to guide two of them out of the danger area. Another explosion occurred when they were halfway out and Lieutenant Rogers was fatally wounded. The prompt, courageous, and determined action taken by Lieutenant Rogers in the face of grave danger reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Rosario, Sgt. Jesus T.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 43 - June 24, 1955

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant Jesus T. Rosario, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery C, 466th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion, March Air Force Base, California, on 16 September 1954. On or about 1600 hours on 16 September 1954, Sergeant Rosario, a passenger on a 5-ton truck towing a 75-mm. gun was returning from Camp Irwin, California, en route to March Air Force Base. As the truck started down Cajob Pass the brakes failed. Due to inertia and the slope of the pass the truck picked up an excessive amount of speed causing the transmission of the truck to explode. Sergeant Rosario, who at the time was riding in the bed of the truck along with five other omen, made his way down the tow bar of the gun and across the gun itself and applied the mechanical brakes on the rear bogie of the gun. The truck was traveling in excess of 70 miles per hour for approximately four miles according to a California Sate Highway Patrolman, who was attempting to clear the road for the runaway vehicle. There were turns in the road a short distance from the place the truck stopped that would have been impossible for the truck and gun to negotiate at its speed. Sergeant Rosario's action and complete disregard for his personal safety saved several lives, both military and civilian, in addition to several hundred thousand dollars of Government property reflecting credit on himself and the military service.

Rouleau, Pvt. Andre R.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 2  6 - April 2, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private Andre R. Rouleau, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company A, 981st Engineer Construction Battalion, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on 2 September 1953. Private Rouleau was a member of the crew of an assault boat which overturned on Smith Lake. The men in the water were in a state of panic. With total disregard for his personal safety and realizing the danger, he attempted to rescue his fellow soldiers. Private Rouleau placed non-swimmers on the overturned boat and proceeded to swim to shore. He came upon a man floundering in the water and immediately took the man in tow and aided him to shore, thus saving the life of a comrade. Private Roleau's alertness and prompt heroic actions reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

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Santiago, Sgt. Juan A.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 6 1 - August 18, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant Juan A. Santiago, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 7538th Army Unit, Replacement Training Center. Camp Tortuguero, Puerto Rico, at Puerto Rico Beach, Vega Baja, Puerto Rico on 28 April 1954. Hearing calls for help, Sergeant Santiago quickly determined the location of a soldier who was in dire distress at a point approximately 50 feet off-shore in water about 15 feet in depth. Unhesitatingly, he plunged into the water. Reaching the scene he dived twice in an attempt to effect a rescue and was forced to resurface for air. Then despite his own exhausted condition, Sergeant Santiago made a third attempt and located his comrade. He grasped him by his swimming trunks, later shifting his grip to the soldier's hair, and brought him safely to nearby rocks. There he promptly initiated artificial respiration procedures and succeeded in reviving his comrade. Sergeant Santiago's prompt and courageous actions during the rescue reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Schag, Chaplain (Capt.) John P.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 207 - 27 September 1950

Chaplain (Captain) John P. Schag, 0933076, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 25th Infantry Division Artillery, United States Army. At about 2300 hours, 21 August 1950 near Haman, Korea, a truckload of ammunition was brought up to a howitzer which was firing at enemy concentrations.  Just as it reached the position, the motor of the truck caught fire and the driver left the cab.  Although warned to leave, Chaplain Schag joined two enlisted men in shoveling dirt onto the motor until the fire was extinguished.  By his courageous action he helped save not only critical ammunition and an artillery piece, but also the lives of the gun crew.  Chaplain Schag's courage, initiative and devotion to his men reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Schmidt, Pfc. Robert C.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 26 - April 2, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Robert C. Schmidt, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company G, 511th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 11th Airborne Division, at Fort Campbell, Kentucky on 17 December 1953. While participating in a demonstration parachute jump at Yamoto Drop Zone and in the act of descending normally, Private Schmidt observed a fellow parachuter falling free and becoming entangled in his suspension lines. As his companion fell past him, Private Schmidt, with disregard for his personal safety and with utmost presence of mind, grabbed the suspension lines of the paratrooper and retained his hold until they safely reached the ground. Private Schmidt's prompt and courageous action undoubtedly saved the life of his comrade and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Schultz, Sgt. 1c Melvin F. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 87 - 20 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pride in presenting the Soldier's Medal (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Melvin F. Schultz (ASN: RA-37299255), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while a member of Company B, 13th Engineer Combat Battalion, at Camp Fuji, Honshu, Japan, on 25 August 1950. On this date, Sergeant Schultz was in a trench with members of his platoon acting as instructor in hand grenade throwing. Upon seeing an enlisted man accidentally drop an activated hand grenade in the trench, Sergeant Schultz ordered his men to safety and at the same time, with complete disregard for his personal safety, dived for the grenade in an attempt to clear it from the trench. As he grasped the grenade, it exploded and inflicted injuries so severe that Sergeant Schultz died immediately. By his courageous action, he saved his men from possible death or serious injury. The heroism and self-sacrifice displayed by Sergeant Schultz reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.

*Melvin joined from North Dakota, but his home was Fosston, Minnesota.

 Shaw,  MSgt. Robert B.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 12 - January 22, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Robert B. Shaw, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy at Lover's Point, Pacific Grove, California, on 7 December 1952. While swimming at Lover's Point, he observed that another swimmer had been injured and was aware of the presence of a shark, killer-whale, or dangerous sea lion. Without regard for his safety, Sergeant Shaw proceeded 100 yards through dangerous surf to assist in the rescue of the stricken swimmer. In the ensuing recovery, he refused to abandon the victim, even during repeated passes by a large man-eating shark which had mortally wounded the victim. With fearlessness and complete disregard for his safety, he attempted to save a life at great risk to his own. Sergeant Shaw's alert and courageous action reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Smith, Capt. Douglas R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 41 - 22 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Captain Douglas R. Smith, United States Air Force, for heroism involving the voluntary risk of his life while attached to the 19th Bombardment Group, (Medium), FIFTH Air Force, in the rescue of an airman on 15 November 1950 at Kadena Air Base. On that date, Captain Smith was on the scene of an aircraft accident on the runway. When he arrived at the spot, the flight engineer of the bomber was found in a semi-conscious condition, lying approximately 15 feet from the burning aircraft and unable to move. The airman was in great danger from the excessive heat, detonation of incendiary-type bombs and 50 caliber ammunition. Although realizing this, Captain Smith disregarded his own safety and assisted in the rescue of the injured crew member. Captain Smith's act made it possible to remove the flight engineer from the danger area to safety, where medical aid was administered. Captain Smith's courage, quick-thinking and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Smith, George Clayton

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 44 (1951)

Corporal George C. Smith, RA93036031, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, United States Army, displayed   heroism on 18 September 1950 in the vicinity of Sindong, Korea.  On that date the advance elements of his company had reached the east bank of the Naktong River and had been ordered to secure a bridgehead on the opposite bank.  Corporal Smith unhesitatingly volunteered to organize a patrol from his squad for the mission of swimming to the opposite shore and securing boats in which troops could cross the river. Fully aware that any enemy action might be disastrous to them, the group moved into the cold and swiftly-flowing river. In midstream, one of the men was seized by cramps and, unable to move further and at the mercy of the swift current, called for help. Corporal Smith, fully aware of the precarious position of the soldier, immediately swam back, courageously fighting the strong current and, with the assistance of a comrade, succeeded in bringing the stricken man to a place of safety on the west bank of the river. The selfless action of Corporal Smith in going to the aid of his comrade at the risk of his own life reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from California.

Snider, A1c William E.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 48 - January 27, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Airman First Class William E. Snider, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life at an Army Ordnance Dump in Korea while serving as Heavy Equipment Operator, 543d Ammunition Supply Squadron, Depot, 6405th Air Support Wing (Materiel), Far East Air Logistic Force, on 16 June 1952. On that date, Airman Snider completely disregarding his own safety, voluntarily drove a turnadozer into an area of burning and exploding munitions. Although the heat scorched the paint and set the tires afire on the turnadozer, he effectively scattered and covered the burning munitions, saving great quantities of unexploded ammunition and preventing a possible catastrophe. By virtue of his personal courage and selfless devotion to duty, Airman Snider reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Spadafore, Cpl.  Joseph P.

 Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - September 23, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Joseph P. Spadafore, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery A, 98th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, 68th Antiaircraft Artillery Group, at Spanard, Alaska, on 25 June 1953. When Corporal Spadafore heard cries for help from a companion who had fallen to the bottom of a 50-foot well, containing approximately 40 inches of icy water, he recognized immediately that his companion was in dire distress. Unhesitatingly, he descended a ladder to the bottom of the well. Being partially overcome by carbon monoxide fumes and the shock of the icy water in the well, he was unsuccessful in the attempt to rescue his companion. With great presence of mind and using extremely good judgment, he then proceeded up the ladder to save his own life. He climbed within 6 feet of the top before becoming overcome by carbon monoxide fumes and had to be pulled to safety by rescuers awaiting at the top of the well. Corporal Spadafore's prompt and courageous action, with complete disregard for his personal safety, reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Stanley, Sgt. Earl N.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 12 - January 22, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant Earl N. Stanley, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy at Lover's Point, Pacific Grove, California, on 7 December 1952. He was swimming at Lover's Point when he observed that another swimmer was in danger. He assumed that a killer-whale or dangerous sea lion had attacked. Without regard for his safety, Sergeant Stanley immediately proceeded through heavy surf and dangerous rocks to assist in the rescue of the injured swimmer. In the ensuing rescue, he refused to abandon the victim during repeated passes by a large man-eating shark which had mortally wounded the victim. With fearlessness and complete disregard for his safety, he attempted to save the stricken swimmer at great risk to his life. Sergeant Stanley's alert and courageous action reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Stump, 1LT Robert M. (3ID)

Sturges, Robert G. (USAF) (awarded in 1952)

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Titcomb, Cpl. Joseph W.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 30 - March 26,  1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Joseph W. Titcomb, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery C, 704th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, as a member of Battery C, 704th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, near Fort Dawes, Massachusetts, on 23 August 1952. Corporal Titcomb was attracted to cries for help coming from three men whose small fishing boat had capsized, throwing them into the rough and icy waters off Deer Island Point. He immediately rushed to the shore. Without hesitation, he dived into the icy and polluted waters of Outer Boston Harbor and, without regard for his personal safety, swam over 200 yards to assist in the rescue of the distressed men. Despite the hazards of high winds, strong tide, and dangerous cross-currents, he proceeded to effect the successful rescue, which doubtlessly was instrumental in saving the life of at least one man who was suffering from severe exposure, shock and immersion. Corporal Titcomb ‘s prompt and courageous action reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

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Vaillancourt, 2Lt. George A.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 11 - February 08, 1955

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery) George A. Vaillancourt, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while serving as officer in charge of a troop movement between the Islands of Hokkaido and Honshu, Japan, on 26 September 1954. The TOVA MARU heavily laden with passengers and cargo, was buffeted by merciless, high velocity winds and floundering in raging, turbulent sea. When the ferry began to list, Lieutenant Vaillancourt sought the services of an interpreter and personally brought his men from assigned quarters below deck to the 2d Class Salon area, where life belts were issued to them. Throughout a harrowing 4-hour period, Lieutenant Vaillancourt's calm steadying influence proved a source of inspiration and courage to both the troops under his command and to the civilian passengers. His selfless concern for others and keen sense of humor prevailed during the final terrifying moments before the ship capsized, and he was last seen issuing vivid instructions and aiding fellow passengers. Lieutenant Vaillancourt's intrepid leadership and consummate devotion to duty minimized panic and afforded greater opportunity for escape from the ill-fated vessel, reflecting distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Veal, Cpl. Luther

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 3 - January 20, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Corporal Luther Veal, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Service Battery, 229th Field Artillery Battalion, 28th Infantry Division, during a practice alert near Bonfeld, Germany, on 8 May 1953. While driving an ammunition truck to the battalion alert assembly area, the ammunition trailer, which was loaded with trip flares and antipersonnel mines, burst into flames. Realizing the 105-mm howitzer ammunition in the truck was in danger, Corporal Veal, without hesitation and with disregard for his safety, approached the flaming trailer and disconnected it from the truck. He then moved the truck to a safe position. Through his alert and decisive action, Corporal Veal prevented possible loss of lives and destruction of civil and Government property, and his prompt and courageous action reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Vlet, Pvt. John W.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 61 - August 18, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private John W. Viet, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Student Company 11, The Southeastern Signal School, Camp Gordon, Georgia, on 9 May 1954. While walking past a residence on Walker Street, he and a comrade observed a fire in the downstairs portion of an old frame type, two-story building. Although informed that the building was believed to be unoccupied Private Viet, with initiative and foresight, unhesitatingly entered the flaming building shouting alarms, attempting to arouse any possible residents. Two persons were vainly attempting to escape from the second floor. Despite the raging flames and intense smoke, Private Viet rushed to the assistance of the victims without regard for his personal safety. Through his heroic action the two occupants were rescued and brought to a place of safety. Private Viet's prompt and courageous action was responsible for preventing serious injury or possible death to two trapped persons and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

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Watson, Pfc. Francis

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 59 (August 4, 1953)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Francis Watson, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters Battery, Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, at O'Misawa, Japan, on 30 October 1952, when a fire of fierce intensity raged uncontrollably through three Japanese buildings. Upon arrival at the scene of the disaster, Private Watson observed a Japanese woman holding an infant in her arms standing inside one of the burning houses, apparently too terrified to move. Unmindful of the danger, he forced his way through a window into the building and, despite intense heat, smoke and imminent collapse of the walls, guided the woman and child to safety. At the same time, he discovered three small children in the area and led them safety outside. While effecting the rescue, the terrific heat singed his hair and burned his clothing, but he continued to render aid. By his courageous actions, no lives were lost. Private Watson's prompt and gallant actions reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Wegard, Capt.  Victor L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 61 - 17 October 1955

Captain Victor L. Wegard, Adjutant General's Corps, United States Army, a member of the Comptroller Section, Headquarters Korean Communications zone, distinguished himself by an act of heroism in New York City, New York on 6 January 1955, while assigned to Overseas Replacement Station, 6021st Service Unit, Personnel Center, Fort Lewis, Washington.  While walking down 57th Street in New York City, Captain Wegard observed a window washer dangling by one strap of his safety belt, the other strap had broken, below a closed window on the fifth floor of an office building.  No attempt was being made to help the man who was in grave danger of falling at any minute.  Captain Wegard rushed into the building, took an unattended elevator to the fifth floor, hurriedly found the unopened window, and instructed one of the office employees, who was unaware of the accident, to hang on to his thighs while he pulled the window washer to safety.  Disregarding his personal safety, Captain Wegard, supported by the office employee, leaned out of the window, grasped the window washer under the arms, and pulled him to safety.  Captain Wegard's decisive and courageous action prevented the certain death of the victim of the accident and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Whonic, TSgt. Stanley H.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 381 - August 10, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Technical Sergeant [then Staff Sergeant] Stanley H. Whonic, United States Air Force, for heroism involving voluntary risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy, at the Tama Arsenal, Far East Air Material Command, on 27 May 1951 while serving as an Ammunition Handling Supervisor. During the modification of 2.36 rocket motors, a White Phosphorous Grenade Head accidentally exploded, scattering phosphorous throughout the assembly building and burning personnel and equipment. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant Whonic directed and assisted in the evacuation of personnel from the building. Displaying great presence of mind and coolness he administered first aid treatment to the injured while directing the complete evacuation of burning equipment and explosives from the building. Totally disregarding possible serious injury to himself, Sergeant Whonic moved one employee suffering from severe burns to a place of safety and administered immediate first aid. His prompt action was directly responsible for saving the life of this individual who received third degree burns on the entire lower part of his body. Sergeant Whonic's courage reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Wiles, Sgt. Robert A.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 13 - January 17, 1973

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to First Sergeant [then Private First Class] Robert A. Wiles, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy on 12 April 1953. By his courageous action, humanitarian regard for his fellow man, and dedication of service to his country, First Sergeant Wiles has reflected great credit on himself and the United States Army. [This award supersedes award of the paragraph 7, AR 672-5-1, as an interim award.]

Wilkes, MSgt. Herbert

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 286 - December 24, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Master Sergeant Herbert Wilkes (ASN: RA-34517144), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery C, 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, at Pakchon, Korea, on 14 November 1950. When a fire broke out near an ammunition truck he unhesitatingly rushed to the scene to fight the blaze. With utter disregard for safety, he mounted the truck, as it became enveloped in flames and removed the ammunition. In spite of the danger of explosion he continued to brave the flames until all ammunition had been removed. The heroism displayed by Sergeant Wilkes reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Willey, Sfc. Clyde E.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - September 23, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant First Class Clyde E. Willey, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company C, 84th Tank Battalion, Combat Command A, 3d Armored Division, at Fort Knox, Kentucky, on 27 May 1953. Observing a 1,200-gallon gasoline tank truck on fire in the vicinity of bulk gasoline storage tanks, he unhesitatingly rushed to the flaming truck with a fire extinguisher and climbed to the top of the vehicle in an attempt to extinguish the fire. Unable to bring the fire under control, Sergeant Willey succeeded in closing the hatch on the truck. With complete disregard for his safety, he entered the cab of the vehicle and moved it a safe distance from the gasoline storage area, thereby reducing the danger to property and personnel to the minimum. Sergeant Willey's alertness and prompt and heroic actions reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Williams, Sgt. Merwin F.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 40 - June 4, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant Merwin F. Williams, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Company A, 231st Engineer Combat Battalion, on 16 January 1951 at Fort Lewis, Washington. While acting as a coach on the hand grenade range, he noticed a live grenade roll into his pit. With complete disregard for his safety, he grasped the grenade with his left hand and attempted to throw it from the pit. Before he could dispose of the grenade it exploded, severing his left hand at the wrist and inflicting other painful injuries. Sergeant Williams' prompt, determined action in the face of great danger saved his comrade from critical injury and reflects distinct credit on himself and the military service.

Wireman, Pvt. Gordon

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - September 30, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private Gordon Wireman, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Student Company 11, The Southeastern Signal School, Camp Gordon, Georgia, in Augusta, Georgia, on 9 May 1954. While walking past a residence on Walker Street he and comrade observed a fire in the downstairs portion of an old, frame type, two-story building. Even though informed that the building was believed to be unoccupied, with initiative and foresight he unhesitatingly entered the flaming building shouting alarms attempting to arouse any possible residents. Two persons were discovered vainly attempting to escape from the second floor. Despite the raging flames and intense smoke, Private Wireman rushed to the assistance of the victims without regard for his personal safety. Through his heroic action the two occupants were rescued and brought to a place of safety. Private Wireman's prompt and courageous action was responsible for preventing serious injury or possible death to the two trapped persons and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Woods, Sgt. Harold C.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 286  December 24, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant Harold C. Woods (ASN: RA-6985695), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery D, 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, at Chanan, Korea, on 2 October 1950. His battalion was halted in a motor convoy when a prime mover carrying ammunition caught fire and in a few moments was blazing out of control. Completely unmindful of the grave danger from the flames and exploding ammunition Sergeant Woods unhesitatingly rushed to the scene and uncoupled the artillery piece from the prime mover thereby permitting the vehicle to be maneuvered and driven off the road. His heroic actions prevented further destruction of other vehicles in the convoy and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Woodward, Sgt. John E.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 84 - November 3, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Sergeant John E. Woodward, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Headquarters Detachment, 7961st United States Army, Europe Detachment, at Suresnes, France , on 15 March 1953. A canoe in which two men of his organization were paddling in the Seine River suddenly capsized. One man was unable to swim and was being swept downstream. Realizing that the man was in dire distress and helpless to extricate himself from his grave danger, Sergeant Woodward unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his personal safety plunged into the cold, swift water fully clothed in a heroic attempt to effect rescue. With great difficulty, he reached the shore with the rescued man, after swimming approximately 150 yards in treacherous currents. Sergeant Woodward's prompt and courageous action during the rescue reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Wymer, Capt. Ralph M.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 16 - March 20, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Captain (Medical Corps) Ralph M. Wymer, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Medical Company, 112th Infantry Regiment, at Camp Atterbury, Indiana. On 23 October 1950, a civilian lineman working on a power line touched a live wire and suffered severe shock. Seeing the man suspended by his safety belt, with clothing on fire, Captain Wymer, without hesitation, climbed the ladder, put out the fire, and attempted to cut the live wire. When the power was finally turned off and the victim lowered to the ground, he administered first-aid treatment. Captain Wymer's courageous act reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

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Yochum, Pfc. Theodore D.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 30 - March 26, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Private First Class Theodore D. Yochum, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy as a member of Battery C, 704th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, near Fort Dawes, Massachusetts, on 23 August 1952. Private Yochum was attracted to cries for help from three men whose small fishing boat had capsized, throwing them into the rough and icy waters off Deer Island Point. He immediately rushed to the shore. Without hesitation, he dived into the icy and polluted waters of Outer Boston Harbor and without regard for his personal safety, swam 200 yards to assist in the rescue of the distressed men. Despite the hazards of high winds, strong tide, and dangerous cross-currents, he proceeded to effect the successful rescue, which doubtlessly was instrumental in saving the life of at least one man who was suffering from exposure, shock and immersion. Private Yochum's prompt and courageous action reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

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