Topics - Ship Accidents - 1951

 
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Army Tugboat T6

This 64-foot craft was carrying three Army crewmen and 17 Air Force off-duty personnel on a weekend fishing trip when it was overturned by a huge wave six miles outside of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco.  The accident occurred on February 5, 1951, near the site where the sinking of the USS Benevolence hospital ship had taken place just months before.  The wreckage of the hospital ship was still visible in the water.

There were six fatalities (three Air Force Coast Guard officers/three Army personnel). Fourteen survivors were found in the water.  Five were rescued by the fishing craft, Jerry 11 and taken to Ft. Point Coast Guard station.  Five were taken to  Ft. Point in the private yacht, the Aloyd.  The men were rescued after the Aloyd's owner and skipper, Lloyd A. Lundstrom, said that he saw 12 heads bobbing in the water and threw life buoys to them.  Four others were rescued by a fishing boat owned by Nick Sasicos of San Francisco and taken to Ft. Baker.  All of the rescued were hospitalized for various degrees of shock, exposure, and broken bones.  The capsized tug was towed to the Fort Mason dock in San Francisco and a floating barge crane lifted it out of the water.

Fatalities
  • Cpl. Albert E. Buswell, crewman, Milo, Maine
  • Charles C. Goodwin, crewman, formerly of Gatesville, Texas
  • William Hartenstein, skipper, formerly of Yeadon, Pennsylvania
  • ?
  • ?
  • ?

Survivors

  • Atheson, Maj. William - commander, 117th Special Air Missions Squadron. In spite of a broken arm he kept Colonel Mears afloat until they were rescued.
  • Mears, Col. J.S. Mears, 32, Commanding Officer, 1100th Special Air Mission Group, Bolling Field, Washington, D.C.  He and a group of officers from his staff were in San Francisco on an inspection trip.

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USS Partridge

On February 02, 1951, the Partridge struck a mine while clearing Wonsan Harbor and sank.  There were eight fatalities.  To read more about the USS Partridge, click HERE.


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Landing Craft

On February 02, 1951, the ramp on a landing craft accidentally fell on an Army Private who was a member of the Company B, 562nd Engineer Boat Shore Regiment, crushing his pelvis near Ulsani, South Korea.

In Memory of the Private Who Lost His Life That Day

Salvadore Francis Sacco
Born August 19, 1931 in Freeland, Pennsylvania


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USS Princeton (CV-37)

On  March 09, 1951, an F4U-5N Corsair Night Fighter with Composite Squadron 3 aboard this aircraft carrier was on a combat mission when it plunged into the sea.  The pilot was Missing in Action.

In Memory of the Lieutenant JG Whose Corsair Plunged Into the Sea That Day

Baxter Hughes Cook
Born April 30, 1922, Nashville, Tennessee


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USS Saint Paul (CA-73) Whaleboat

On March 11, 1951, a motorized whaleboat returning to the USS Saint Paul (CA-73) from the fleet flagship, USS Eldorado (AGC11) disappeared in Inchon Harbor, South Korea.  Six seamen were missing in action.

In Memory of the Six Men Who Were Lost That Day

William Moran Barker
John Philip Caprio
Roy Lee Estes
Lloyd Morgan Faver
Morgan Knowles Groover Jr.
James Francis Statia


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USS Consolation (AH-15)

On April 01, 1951, a crew member of this ship was lost at sea.

In Memory of The Crew Member Who Lost His Life That Day

Seaman E2 Carol Joseph Jones
Born December 09, 1931, Detroit, Michigan


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USS Philippine Sea (CV-47)

On April 16, 1951, an AD-4 Skyraider dive bomber with Attack Squadron 65, aboard the carrier USS Philippine Sea (CV-47), while on a combat mission over North Korea, was struck by anti-aircraft fire and crashed.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Lost His Life That Day

Ensign Elwood Earl Brey
Born June 25, 1928 in Bergenfeld, New Jersey


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USS Philippine Sea (CV-47)

On April 20, 1951, while on a combat mission over North Korea, an F4U-4 Corsair fighter with Fighter Squadron 24 aboard this aircraft carrier was struck by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into the sea. The pilot was unable to eject.

In Memory of the Lieutenant Commander Who Lost His Life That Day

Emory Ronald Coffman
Born September 21, 1912, Elkmont, Alabama


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USS Princeton (CV-37)

On April 29, 1951, an F4U-4 Corsair fighter with Fighter Squadron 193 aboard this ship was on a combat mission over North Korea, when it was struck by anti-aircraft fire.  The pilot parachuted safely to the ground about four miles east of the Hwachon Reservoir, where he was taken Prisoner of War and died while a prisoner.

In Memory of a Pilot Taken POW

Ensign Thomas Clarence Biesterveld
Born December 17, 1928 in Eau Claire, WI


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Army Boat

On April 30, 1951, a member of Company B, 434th Engineer Construction Battalion, U.S. Army, drowned when his boat overturned on the Han River near Tanyang, South Korea.

In Memory of the Army Private Who Drowned That Day

Arthur J. Vogel
Born February 04, 1933, Chicago, Illinois


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USS Hoquiam (PF-5)

On May 07, 1951, the patrol frigate USS Hoquiam (PF-5) was slightly damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  There was one casualty.  The ship was named for Hoquiam, Washington. She also served in the Soviet Navy as EK-13 and in the Republic of Korea Navy as ROKS Nae Tong.

In Memory of the USS Hoquiam's One Korean War Casualty

SA Gene Kent Krongard

Born December 10, 1933 in Yellow Medecine, Minnesota, he
died of wounds on May 13, 1951.  He is buried in St. Paul's Cemetery,
Granite Falls, Minnesota.


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USS Princeton (CV-37)

On May 07, 1951, an F9F-2B Pantherjet fighter with Fighter Squadron 191, aboard the aircraft carrier USS Princeton (CV-37) was flying at about 500 feet above ground, attacking enemy trucks near Inchon, South Korea, when the aircraft was struck by anti-aircraft fire and crashed. The pilot's remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Ensign Who Died That Day

Lowell Ray Brewer
Born May 7, 1928, he died on his birthday in 1951.


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USS Bairoko (CVE-115)

On May 10, 1951, Bairoko suffered an explosion and flash fire while in port at Yokosuka. The fire broke out in the flight hanger and spread into the engine room. Five men died and 13 men were injured before the flames were extinguished. The fire also damaged bulkheads and burned out numerous ventilation and electrical systems. Repairs were started immediately and, after they were completed in late June, the escort carrier resumed training operations off the coast of Japan on 3 July.

In Memory of the Five Men Who Lost Their Lives That Day

1. Vernon Francis Frankenberg
2. William M. Schweitzer
3. Doris Frances "Dave" Brown (died May 13, 1951)
4. ?
5. ?


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SS Thomas Tracy/USS Valcour (AVP-55)

On May 14, 1951 these two ships collided.  While everyone on the Thomas Tracy survived, the crew of the USS Valcour was not as lucky.  It lost 5 dead and numerous injured.  Even though the KWE information on this collision is incomplete, readers can learn a little more about this accident, click HERE.


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USS Boxer (CV-21)

On May 18, 1951, an F4U-4 Corsair fighter with Fighter Squadron 114 (884) aboard this aircraft carrier was working with a ground controller when the aircraft was hit by small arms fire. The pilot tried to parachute but struck the tail assembly. He landed and was taken prisoner. He was presumed dead on May 24, 1954.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Died That Day

Lt. Charles Garrison
Born March 10, 1920, Adrian, Missouri


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USS New Jersey (BB-62)

On May 20, 1951, this ship was slightly damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  In her two Korean tours, it was her first mission at Wonsan where New Jersey received her only combat casualties of the Korean war. One of her men was killed by shrapnel while running to his battle station and three were severely wounded (Seaman Apprentice J.E. Schaniel, Seaman J.H. Dezekou, and FCS3 C.A. Van Fleet) when she took a hit from a shore battery on her number one turret and received a near miss aft to port.

In Memory of the One Man Who Lost His Life That Day

Seaman Cook Robert H. Osterwind


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USS Brinkley Bass (DD-887)

On May 22, 1951, the Brinkley Bass suffered minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There was one killed and nine casualties.

In Memory of the One Man Who Lost His Life That Day

Fireman (E2) John Dwayne Bryan

Born October 27, 1931, John D. Bryan was mortally wounded in the abdomen.  He was the son of Claud Ozias Bryan (1892-1976) and Margueritte Charlotte Peer Bryan (1899-1969).  His sisters were Dorothy Ellen Bryan Baker (1917-2012), Klair Emma Bryan Savage (1922-2011) and Wanda J. Bryan Mears (born 1933).  John is buried in Oddfellows Cemetery, The Dalles, Oregon.


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Launch, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI

On May 24, 1951, over 100 shipmates were on a 50-foot whaleboat en route from Newport, Rhode Island to their ships after shore leave when a giant wave overturned the boat.  Twenty-two men lost their lives.  For further information about this capsize, click HERE.


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USS Burlington (PF-51)

On May 30, 1951, a fireman 2c was lost overboard on this ship while fighting the enemy near Songjin, Korea.  His remains were not recovered.

In Memory of Jimmy

FA James John "Jimmy" Krcil Jr - MIA
Born June 22, 1931 in Wagner, South Dakota,
son of James & Carrie Klufa Krcil
brother of Delores, Marlene (Schramm), & Joyce (Carda)
Enlisted US Navy December 15, 1950


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USS Walke (DD-723)

On June 12, 1951, this ship was extensively damaged after striking a mine off the east coast of Korea.  There were 66 casualties, including 26 fatalities.

In Memory of the Twenty-Six Men Who Lost Their Lives That Day

1. Robert Eugene Bertain - KIA
2. Bruce L. Carrington
3. Harry John Chewning - KIA
4. Charles H. Francis
5. Wilba Green - KIA
6. Leonard Harold Hansen - KIA
7. George Walter Hart, Jr. - KIA
8. Edwin Howe, Jr.
9. Earl G. Hudson
10. Buster Brown Jones - KIA
11. Merlin R. Lowe
12. John "L" Lowe, Jr.
13. Harold Meyers
14. Otis E. Milan
15. Ralph F. Morton
16. Richard D. Mosgrove
17. Eugene Rilet Owens - KIA
18. Frank J. Rogers
19. Thurman M. Shults
20. Robert S. Smith
21. Robert Nathan Stone - KIA
22. Wilbur T. Tarwater
23. William Marshall Taylor Jr. -KIA
24. Robert D. Truelock
25. John E. Walker
26. John Robert Ward - KIA

Korean War History

Following a little over three years in the San Diego Group, Pacific Reserve Fleet, Walke was re-commissioned on 5 October 1950, Comdr. Marshall F. Thompson in command. After shakedown training along the west coast, the destroyer departed San Diego on 2 January 1951 and set a course for the Far East and service in the six-month old Korean conflict. She repaired storm damage at Yokosuka, Japan, before joining TF 77 off the coast of Korea.

In addition to providing antisubmarine protection for the carriers of TF 77, she moved close to the Korean coast to bombard such places as Yondae Gap, Wonsan, Songjin, Chongjin, and Chuminjin as well as various other rail and road locations. On 12 June, while steaming some 60 miles off the Korean coast with TF 77, Walke struck a floating mine which severely damaged her hull on the port side, killed 26 men, and wounded another 40 sailors.

She made temporary repairs at Sasebo and then headed back to the United States where she entered the Mare Island Naval Shipyard in July for permanent repairs and a complete overhaul. Walke returned to the Korean combat zone in June of 1952 and resumed screening duty with TF 77 punctuated by shore bombardment missions. That combat cruise lasted until January 1953, when she arrived in Long Beach, Calif., and took up normal west coast operations. In July, the warship rejoined TF 77 off the Korean coast for another seven months of duty screening the fast carriers; but, by that time, the armistice had been signed ending the combat aspect of her duties.

[Source: USS Walke website]


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Army Boat MT-351

On June 14, 1951, this boat became confused as to direction and headed toward enemy held territory when last sighted. Lieutenant Cochran was taken POW.

In Memory of the Missing That Day

Lt. jg. Billy Edward Cochran
Born May 16, 1925, from McKeesport, Pennsylvania
Bronze Star recipient/POW/MIA


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USS Thompson (DMS-38)

On June 14, 1951, this ship was extensively damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  There were three killed and four wounded.  Note the date of this damage was June 14, 1952.  There were more casualties in August of 1952 during another battle-related incident.

In Memory of the Three Men Who Were Killed That Day

 NAMES NOT YET FOUND

Korean War History

The Thompson and Carmick joined the hastily assembled minesweeping task group consisting of the Forrest Royal (DD-872), Catamount (LSD-17), Horace A. Bass (APD-124), Pelican (AMS-32), Swallow (AMS-36), and Gull (AMS-16), LST Q-007, four Republic of Korea minesweepers, and a helicopter from the Rochester (CA-124). Their mission was to open up the mined port of Chinnampo, which they did in slightly over two weeks. By early November, Chinese Communist forces had driven United Nations troops back to the coast. One of the evacuation ports was Chinnampo. There, the Thompson escorted the troopships loaded with evacuees out of the harbor.

Following duty as a harbor control vessel at Inchon, she was ordered to Sasebo, where MineRon 1 was regrouping. On 30 December 1950, with the Doyle (DMS- 34) and Endicott (DMS-36) she left for the east coast of Korea to clear the way for fire support ships. By mid-February 1951, she was operating from Wonsan north almost to the Manchurian border. Later, she screened the Missouri (BB-63) and Manchester (CL-83), during their bombardment of Songjin. At Chunron Jang, the Thompson's guns destroyed two railroad bridges. She also took part in “junk-busting” operations, patrolling for suspicious junks used by communist forces for infiltration and minelaying, and on one occasion, eliminating six North Korean junks.

From 1 April to 3 November 1951, the Thompson shelled communist positions, supply lines, and troop concentrations. On 14 June 1951, her gunners had just destroyed a railroad bridge near Songjin when shore batteries opened fire. One shell struck her bridge, knocking out her fire control, killing three of her crew, and wounding three others. Before she retired, however, she had destroyed one enemy battery and damaged another. She remained in Korean waters until 3 November when she headed for home.

In June 1952, she was again bound for Korea. Based in Songjin, she patrolled the coast and provided gunfire support. On 20 August 1952, off Songjin, a shell from a Chinese battery hit her flying bridge, killing four and wounding nine. Retiring from the scene, she transferred her casualties to the Iowa (BB-64). Following repairs at Sasebo, she headed back to Songjin to patrol as part of the United Nations blockade. On 20 November, while serving as gunfire support ship for the Kite (AMS-22) in Wonsan Harbor, she was hit by enemy fire amidships on the starboard side. Following repairs at Yokosuka, she returned to Songjin for the first of three tours that took her into February of 1953 when she and the Carmick headed for the states.

She operated on the West Coast with MineDiv 11 through the summer of 1953, when she served as the Caine during the filming of The Caine Mutiny. On 18 May 1954, the Thompson was decommissioned and placed in reserve. She was struck from the navy list on 1 July 1971 and sold to the American Ship Dismantlers of Portland, Oregon, on 7 August 1972 for scrapping.

[Source: Tin Can Sailors website]


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USS Frank E. Evans (DD-754)

On June 18, 1951, this ship was slightly damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were four casualties.


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USS Henry W. Tucker (DDR-875)

On June 18, 1951, this ship had superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.


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USS  Princeton (CV-37)

On June 20, 1951, Lieutenant Royce Carruth was a pilot of an F4U-4 Corsair fighter with Fighter Squadron 821 aboard the USS Princeton (CV-37) when his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire, crashed and exploded near Sinpyong, Korea. He was listed as Missing in Action and was presumed dead on May 21, 1954.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Was Missing in Action That Day

Lt. Royce Carruth
Born May 10, 1921 in Wingate, Texas


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USS Boxer (CV-21)

On June 21, 1951, an AD-2 Skyraider dive bomber assigned to the USS Boxer (CV-21) was flying an armed reconnaissance near Yangdok, North Korea, when the aircraft was struck by anti-aircraft fire and crashed.

In Memory of The Pilot Who Lost His Life That Day

Lt. David Arthur Arrivee, pilot - MIA
Born February February 13, 1920, Weiser, ID


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USS Everett (PF-8)

On July 3, 1951, this ship had minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were eight casualties--one KIA and seven WIA.  A note from Ray Riesgo of San Diego, California that was found on the Korean War Project website (www.kwp.org), explains what happened that day:

"The next incident occurred while the ship was one of two ships assigned to draw fire from mainland Korea. They were, slowly, circling an Island in Wonson Harbor as each ship came into firing range it would fire one round per minute in order to get a response. (I think this was called an Indian War Dance?)

The Everett finally got a response. It took one or two shells amidship. The after 3-inch Mount was hit and its crew was critically injured and the smokestack was holed. Both ships returned fire. The PF-8 was released in order to transfer, at sea, the injured and dead to large ships of Task Force 77, they had medical doctors on board.

After the transfer, we were directed to get repairs by a destroyer repair ship in Sasebo Harbor. On arrival, I was transferred to USS Prairie AD-15 and sent to work in its Boiler Room. I stayed in the Navy and retired in 1971."

In Memory of The Crew Member Who Died of Wounds

Lawrence Blake Floyd
Gunner's Mate 2C
Born September 2, 1923 in Fairmont, NC
Died of wounds July 5, 1951.
Buried in Fairmont Cemetery


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USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31)

On July 04, 1951, Lieutenant Junior Grade Arthur Dixon was the pilot of a F4U-4 Corsair fighter assigned to Carrier Air Group 102 aboard this aircraft carrier.  When his aircraft was on the base leg of landing approach at about 150 feet altitude, it stalled and crashed into the sea inverted. His remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Lost His Life That Day

Arthur Dixon
Born March 10, 1923, Monterey Park, California


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USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31)

On July 18, 1951, an AD-3 Skyraider dive bomber with Attack Squadron 923 aboard this aircraft carrier, after attacking a bridge target in North Korea, failed to meet at the rendezvous point with the rest of the flight. The pilot was listed as Missing in Action and was presumed dead on May 19, 1954.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Went Missing That Day

Lt. Orville Melvin Cook
Born March 11, 1922, Savanna, Illinois


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USS Helena (CA-75)

On July 31, 1951, this ship suffered minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were two casualties.


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USS Dextrous (AM-341)

On August 11, 1951, this ship received superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There was one killed and three wounded.


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USS Essex (CV-9)

On August 23, 1951, an F4U-4B Corsair fighter bomber with Fighter Squadron 53 aboard this aircraft carrier was flying on instruments and became separated from its flight leader near Wonsan Harbor, North Korea. The pilot was listed as Missing in Action and was presumed dead on May 20, 1954.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Went Missing That Day

Lt. jg. Eugene Leo Franz
Born June 06, 1927, Ness City, Kansas


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USS Essex (CV-9)

On August 26, 1951, about five minutes after take-off from the USS Essex, an AD-4Q Skyraider dive bomber with Composite Squadron 35 burst into flames and crashed into the sea.

In Memory of Those Who Lost Their Lives That Day

Phillip Kendall Balch - MIA
radarman - Aviation Electronics Technician First Airman
Born June 21, 1929, he was from Claremont, NH.

Loren Dickerson Smith - MIA
lieutenant jg - Born October 28, 1927, he was from Minco, OK


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USS Essex (CV-9)

On September 04, 1951, while on a mission over Haengsan, Korea, an F9F-2 Pantherjet fighter with Fighter Squadron 51 aboard the carrier USS Essex (CV-9) was struck by anti-aircraft fire, crashed and exploded. The pilot's remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Lieutenant Who Lost His Life That Day

Ross Kay Bramwell
Born June 08, 1925 in Ogden, Utah,
he was in the USNA Class of 1948.


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USS William Seiverling (DE-441)

On September 8, 1951, the fireroom of this ship flooded after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Heron (AMS-18)

On September 10, 1951, superficial damage was done tot his ship after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Redstart (AM-378)

On September 10, 1951, minor damage was done to this ship after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Essex (CV-9)

On September 16, 1951, an F2H Banshee fighter, damaged on a combat mission, crashed into aircraft parked on the forward flight deck of the USS Essex while attempting to land on the Essex, causing an explosion.  The tailhook did not engage and the aircraft bounced over the barriers, struck other aircraft and burst into flames. Eight were killed.

In Memory of the Eight Fatalities That Day

1. Barfield, AD3 Wade Hilton (SC)
2. Hammond, AA Roger Clark (MT)
3. Harrell, AA Charles Lamar (AL)
4. Keller, John Kemp - MIA (MI)
5. Neifer, Earl Kenneth (OH)
6. Netolicky, AN Vernon (IA)
7. Sanders, Sidney Maurice (CA)
8. Stewart, ADC William J. (TX)

From researcher T.E. Moore (on the Korean War Project at www.kwp.org):

A VF-172 F2H Banshee piloted by Lt. (jg) John Kemp Keller, collided with another aircraft during a high-elevation practice maneuver.  The collision was not fatal, but its aftermath was.  The damage to his plane's tail section forced Lt. Keller to return to the USS Essex CV-9 for an emergency landing.  Everything seemed normal during approach, until Lt. Keller, perhaps shaken by the experience of the collision, neglected, or was unable to lower his Banjo's tailhook.  This action was compounded by the LSO crew, who failed to spot the still-retracted plane's tailhook.  14 tons of jet aircraft, still heavy with fuel, hit the flight deck, raced past the arresting wires, tore through the flight barriers, and smashed into a stack of aircraft parked forward on the ship's flight deck. There was an explosion, and a terrible blaze that instantly killed three crewmen.  To prevent an even bigger calamity, the dead Lt. Keller and his plane were pushed overboard into the sea.  Meanwhile, five more USS Essex flight deck hands, each swathed in a curl of flames, jumped overboard into the sea, without life jackets.  Two men were recovered, severely burned, but still alive, but the other three men were never recovered.  Lieutenant Keller was also never recovered.


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USS Firecrest (AMS-10)

On October 5, 1951, this ship had slight damage after being hit by a shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea.  There were no casualties,


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USS Ernest G. Small (DDR-838)

On October 07, 1951, this ship received extensive damage after striking a mine off the East coast of North Korea.  There were nine Missing in Action and 51 WIA.

In Memory of Those Who Lost Their Lives That Day

1. Grubb, Frank Clark - MIA
2. Hamilton, Thomas Ray - MIA
3. Kravetz, Edward N. - MIA
4. Manning, Elija Keith - MIA
5. Middleton, Rex B. - MIA
6. Munier, ME/3 Joseph F. - KIA*
7. Obee, Melvin Dale - MIA
8. Porter, Ronald John - MIA
9. Schlueter, DC3 Allen F. - KIA*

GRUBB, FRANK CLARK, Altadena, CA
E3 Grubb, USN, 4255363, served in the U.S.S. Ernest G. Small-DDR-838. His ship was damaged in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 10/07/51.  Born 12/12/32, he was a USN Seaman Sonarman.

HAMILTON, THOMAS RAY, 3404964, Murphysboro, IL
E3 Hamilton, USN, served in the U.S.S. Ernest G. Small-DDR-838. His ship was damaged in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 10/07/51.  Born 1/27/33, he was a USN Seaman. One KIA on the Ernest Small floated away when the ship's bow separated from the rest of the ship. That sailor was Thomas Hamilton.

KRAVETZ, EDWARD (nmi), 7190078, Bronx, NY
E4 Kravetz, USN, served in the U.S.S. Ernest G. Small-DDR-838. His ship was damaged in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 10/07/51.  Born 5/18/30, he was a Sonarman 3rd Class.

MANNING, ELIJA Keith, 9300295, Pineville, WVA
E4 Manning, USN, served in the U.S.S. Ernest G. Small-DDR-838. His ship was damaged in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 10/07/51.  Born 4/22/29, he was a USN Sonarman 3rd Class.

MIDDLETON, REX B., 7651344, Seattle, WA
Middleton, USN, served in the U.S.S. Ernest G. Small-DDR-838.  His ship was damaged in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 10/07/51.  Born 6/5/25, he was a USN Sonarman 1st Class.

MUNIER, JOSEPH FRANCIS, 3030444, Hammond, IN
Munier, USN, served in the U.S.S. Ernest G. Small-DDR-838.  His ship was damaged in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 10/07/51.  Born 7//9/28, he was a USN Metalsmith 3rd Class.

OBEE, MELVIN DALE, 2841945, Whitehouse, OH
E5 Obee, USN, served in the U.S.S. Ernest G. Small-DDR-838. His ship was damaged in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 10/07/51.  Born 10/7/28, he was a USN Sonarman 2nd Class.

PORTER, RONALD JOHN, 5692308, Sacramento, CA
Porter, USN, served in the U.S.S. Ernest G. Small-DDR-838.  His ship was damaged in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 10/07/51.  Born 10/25/29, he was a USN Sonarman 3rd Class.

SCHLUETER, ALLEN FRANCIS, 3613582, Fredericksburg, TX
Schlueter, USN, served in the U.S.S. Ernest G. Small-DDR-838.  His ship was damaged in enemy action in North Korea, and he was killed in that action, 10/07/51.  Born 10/22/30, he was a USN Damage Control 3/c.

*Joseph Munier and Allen F. Schlueter were buried at sea on October 8.  Four months later, the baby daughter of Allen Schlueter, Jackie Schlueter (now Jackie Hogan) was born. 

The wounded were as follows:

• BROWN, Melvin LeRoy, 345 49 47, SA, USN
Fracture, ribs
• EDWARDS, John Lester, 260 86 88, SN, USN
Fracture, ankle
• MARLIN, Frank Taylor, 296 76 01, SN, USN
Lumbar sprain
• WILLS, Finley Lavin, 280 95 50, SN, USN
Pneumonia, aspiration
• CLARK, Paul Aaron, 988 85 83, FN, USN
Contusion, left foot
• COOPER, Franklin Delano, 427 70 69, SA, USN
Multiple abrasions
• GALYARDT, Marvin Dean, 345 49 28, SN, USN
Blast concussion
• ARMENTROUT, Graham Lee, 422 05 31, SN, USN
Laceration, eye
• BATES, Wilbur Dean, 345 49 32, SN, USN
Abrasion, elbow
• BAUER, Vernon Jake, 345 49 54, SN, USN
Contusion Right hip
• BRANDON, Quentin "V", 342 05 53, HMC, USN
Blast concussion, air, legs and back
• BROWN, William Vincent, 718 88 78, SN, USN
Laceration, left leg
• BRYAN, Delwyn Raymond, 989 13 37, SN, USN
Laceration, hand, Contusion, leg
• CAMPBELL, Marshall Lee, 327 42 49, SN, USN
Contusion, left knee
• CLARKE, Bruce Elmer, 366 56 35, SK3, USN
Contusion, head
• DOAN, Joseph David, 954 66 42, SN, USN
Contusions and abrasions, face and knee
• DOYLE, John Cleve, 281 10 45, SN, USN
Contusion, left elbow
• EARL, Richard Bartlett, 260 59 55, SA, USN
Blast concussion, air, head
• EGAN, Herbert Winfred, 231 278 48, SN, USN
Contusions, hip and back
• FARMER, Rex "D", 393 79 59, GMSN, USN
Contusions, left leg, knee, ankle
• FRANZEN, Marion LeRoy, 989 21 88, SN, USN
Contusions, left leg and chest
• FRAZIER, Jimmie Allen, 340 40 02, SN, USN
Blast concussion, air
• GERLACH, Frank Leon, 351 88 90, SA, USN
Contusions, head and leg
• GLENN, John Joseph Jr., 280 19 28, SN, V-6, USNR
Blast concussion, air, leg, arm and head
• HILL, Frank Orlin, 724 77 55, TMT2, V-6, USNR
Laceration, scalp and multiple contusions
• HOGAN, Jack (n) , 348 06 98, SA, USN
Abrasion, left leg
* HUBER, Leo Frederick, 393 72 94, ENC, USN
Laceration, left hand
• JEFFERSON, David William, 710 86 67, SN, USN
Abrasion and sprain, right ankle
• JOHNSON, Harry Wesley, 321 05 53, GMC, USN
Contusion, hand. Multiple lacerations, head and face
• KEARNEY, William Theodore, 954 91 41, SN, USN
Blast concussion, air
• KEMP, Herman Wesley, 280 45 27, TN, USN
Contusions, right side, knee and foot
• KNUDSON, Edward Cassidy, 988 68 09 SN, USN
Contusions, left side, arm and leg
• LIGHT, Bennie Lee, 423 12 72, FA, USN
Laceration, neck. Blast concussion, air, head and neck
• MARDON, Arthur Lawrence, 326 94 65, SA, USN
Laceration, right hand. Blast concussion, water
• MENZYK, John Stanley, 244 13 16, BM3, USN
Laceration, right leg, multiple contusions
• MORRISON, Robert Henry, 373 08 05, SN, USN
Abrasion, lumbar
• MYIRSKI, Edward Steven, 254 20 90, BM3, USN
Laceration, left leg
• NELSON, James Ransom, 262 80 338, GM2, USN
Multiple contusions
• OHMAN, Arnold Algot, 959 30 37, GM2 USN
Contusion, left arm
• OSBURN, Kenneth Walter, 283 58 61, BM2, USN
Abrasion, head, parietal
• RATHBUN, Arthur LeRoy, 875 93 95, BM3, USN
Contusions, right arm and left hip
• SACKET, David John, 652 881 65, BM3, USN
Contusion, head, left ear
* SHAWGO, Ralph Edward, 302 11 12, SN, USN
Abrasion and sprain, right ankle
• STATHAM, "J" "E", 211 49 06, SN, USN
Blast concussion, air
• STEED, Charles Thompson, 752 67 27, SN, USN
Contusion, right side
• TURNER, John Benjamin, 336 86 97, BM1, USN
Laceration, face
• WARD, Charles Quinton, 799 12 31, FN, USN
Contusion, back
• WHELAN, Charles Joseph, 361 66 79, FA, USN
Contusions, head, left leg and right arm
• WHIPPLE, Robert Earle, 211 53 76, BM3, USN
Contusion, lower back
• WHITED, Carl Gene, 297 05 45, SA, USN
Blast concussion, air
• ZERN, William Alvin E., 316 29 37, BMC, USN
Lacerations, face and scalp

For greater details about this accident and the one that occurred on October 10, 1951, read the personal account of Donald Wayman on the Internet.


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USS Renshaw (DDE-499)

On October 11, 1951, this ship had slight damage after being hit by a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  On the morning of 11 October 1951, the Renshaw was on a bombardment mission when a quartermaster on the bridge noticed large camouflage screens sliding down a 200-foot bluff adjacent to her target. Thus revealed was battery of four guns, which opened fire as their camouflage slipped away. The first two salvos were short, the next two were long and peppered the bridge and midships areas from the waterline to the topmast radar with shrapnel. Topside damage to the ship was superficial, and the one sailor who was hit suffered only slight wounds. The rest of some thirty salvos fell short as the destroyer took evasive action and blasted the enemy guns. Her fourth salvo struck an enemy gun emplacement and blew it and its crew out of their cave and down the bluff into the water, making the Renshaw the first ship to sink an enemy shore battery.


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Ship

On October 17, 1951, a member of the 866th Army Port Company fell off a ship in Inchon Harbor, South Korea and drowned.

In Memory of the Soldier Who Drowned That Day

Isadore Harris
Born August 11, 1931, Lenox, Massachusetts


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USS Ulvert M. Moore (DD-747)

On October 17, 1951, this ship received moderate damage from a hit by an enemy shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea, killing one man.

In Memory of the Seaman Who Lost His Life That Day

Wayne Allen Krueger
Born September 19, 1931, Two Rivers, Wisconsin


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USS Helena (CA-75)

On October 23, 1951, this ship had slight damage after being hit by a shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea.  There were four casualties.


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USS Essex (CV-9)

On October 28, 1951,  an F4U-4B Corsair fighter-bomber with Fighter Squadron 53 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Essex (CV-9) was hit by enemy anti-aircraft artillery fire during a glide bombing run at BU 7056, lost a section of its wing, crashed and exploded.

In Memory of The Pilot Who Lost His Life That Day

Ens. Richard Alan Bateman, pilot
Born February 07, 1930, Reading, PA


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USS Osprey (AMS-28)

On October 29, 1951, this ship had considerable damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea. The Osprey's engine room flooded after being hit three times and communications went out, one man was seriously wounded, though the ship was saved from sinking.


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USS Gloucester (PF-22)

On November 11, 1951, while conducting interdiction fire and shore bombardment off the Kojo coastline, the USS Gloucester engaged in a duel with North Korean shore batteries at Hŭngnam. The USS Gloucester took several direct hits that killed one and seriously wounded eleven others.  Louis Jaramillo was a Storekeeper on the ship and was supposed to leave the ship prior to reporting back to the war zone. However, there was no relief (replacement) for him in Sasebo, Japan, so he stayed on the ship for the next tour.

In Memory of the One Crew Member Who Died That Day

Louis Naranjo "Louie" Jaramillo
Born July 24, 1928, he was from New Mexico.
He was the son of Patricio L. Jaramillo (1891-1978)
and Gregoria N. Jaramillo (1902-1989).


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USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31)

On November 21, 1951, a fireman aboard this aircraft carrier was listed as Missing in Action while engaged with the enemy in Korea.

In Memory of the Fireman Who Lost His Life That Day

Raymond James Buntin
Born January 31, 1931, Cainsville, Missouri


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USS Hyman (DD-732)

On November 23, 1951, this ship received minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Essex (CV-9)

On November 27, 1951, a 250 pound bomb became armed while attached to an AD-4L Skyraider Diver Bomber with Fighter Squadron 54 aboard the carrier USS Essex (CV-9). The pilot's attempt to jettison it was unsuccessful. He bailed out over the ocean. After hitting the water he dropped out of sight. His remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Lost His Life That Day

Lt. jg Eugene Brewer Hale
Born January 1, 1928 in Texarkana, Texas


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USS Hyman (DD-732)

On November 23, 1951, this ship was hit by enemy shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  The Hyman was hit on the main deck, causing minor damage.  There were at least three fatalities.

In Memory of the Men Who Died That Day

Seaman Donald Norman Bennett
Born August 19, 1931, he was from
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Boatswain's Mate 2C John Rufus Cleveland
Born August 29, 1926
Houston, Texas

Seaman Ralph Regis Giles
Born December 11, 1932
Lowell, Massachusetts


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USS Crook County (LST-611)

On December 22, 1951, this ship had superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery.  There were no casualties.

 
 

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