Topics - Ship Accidents - 1952

 
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USS Valley Forge (CV-45)

On January 09, 1952, an F4U-4 Corsair fighter with Fighter Squadron 653 aboard this aircraft carrier, while on patrol in the 20 miles northwest of Yodo-ri, North Korea, became separated from the wingman. The pilot reported loss of oil pressure and was not heard from again. The pilot was presumed dead on May 24, 1954.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Died That Day

Lt. William Mark Frankovich
Born July 19, 1923 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania


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USS Dextrous (AM-341)

On January 11, 1952, this minesweeper received minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  there were three casualties (one killed/two wounded).

In Memory of the One Crew Member Who Died That Day

Gerald Lee Swan, Electrician's Mate Fireman
Born December 12, 1932, Mill City, Oregon,
son of John Earl and Letticia Swan
Buried in Belcrest Memorial Park, Salem, OR
Enlisted in the Navy February 27, 1951


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USS Essex (CV-9)

On January 11, 1952, an AD-4 Skyraider dive bomber with Fighter Squadron 54, aboard this aircraft carrier jettisoned a one thousand pound bomb after take-off and then crashed into the sea. His remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Died That Day

Lt. jg. Joseph Henry Gollner
Born March 07, 1927, Salisbury, Maryland


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USS Antietam (CV-36)

On January 21, 1952, a serviceman for the F9F-4 Pantherjet fighter with Fighter Squadron 837 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Antietam (CV-36) was preparing for the morning launch in a snowstorm when he became disoriented and fell overboard. A search for him was unsuccessful.

In Memory of the Airman Who Lost His Life That Day

Edward Joseph Cavan Farrell
born July 10, 1930 in Manhasset, New York


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USS Essex (CV-9)

On January 26, 1952, a F0F-2 PantherjetFighter with Fighter Squadron 51 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Essex (CV-9) was struck by anti-aircraft fire. During the ditching process in Wosan Harbor, North Korea, the pilot ejected at about 150 feet and was killed. His remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Lieutenant JG Who Became Missing in Action That Day

Leonard Ray Cheshire
Born May 09, 1927, McNary, Arizona


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USS Porterfield (DD-682)

On February 03, 1952, this ship had minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Sokto, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Endicott (DMS-35)

On February 04, 1952, this ship received minor damage after two hits from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Rowan (DD-782)

On February 22, 1952, this ship received minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Essex (CV-9)

On February 21, 1952, an F4U-4B Corsair fighter with Fighter Squadron 53, aboard this aircraft carrier was escorting a flak damaged aircraft to Sokcho-ri Airfield (K-50), North Korea through a snow storm, when the pilot became disoriented and his aircraft suddenly swerved and crashed into the sea. His remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Died

Lt. jg. Francis Gene Gergen
Born October 20, 1926, Geneva, Nebraska


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USS Shelton (DD-790)

On February 22, 1952, this ship received moderate damage after three hits from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  There were 15 casualties.


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USS Henderson (DD-785)

On February 23, 1952, this ship had minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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LCPL of LST 561

On March 02, 1952, a small LCPL left LST 561 on a reconnaissance mission.  There were twelve men onboard.  The LCPL floundered in the rough Yellow Sea and all of the men were lost between Moi-do and Soyonp'yong-do off the west coast of Korea.  The men could not have survived in the icy water for over ten minutes.  A search party found only debris.

In Memory of the Twelve Men Lost at Sea That Day

LCDR Thomas Boggs Brooks, Chester, SC

SA Elma Isaac Chavers, Amite, LA

FN Willie Encil Lewis, New Cumberland, WV

SN William Rudolph Overman, Dallas, TX

Lt. (jg) Richard George Sigg, Conshohocken, PA

SA Eugene John Thome, Stacyville, IA

SA Alton Waldrop, Centralia, LA

Maj. James F. Keenan, Naugatuck, CT (Army)

Maj. Donald J. Maus, Santa Clara, CA (Army)

Sgt. J.H. James (British Royal Marine-HMS Belfast

Cpl. P. Hamill (British Royal Marine-HMS Belfast)

Lt. Kim Myung Whan (ROK Navy)


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USS Bairoko (CVE-115)

On March 05, 1952, an F4U-4 Corsair fighter with the Marine Fighter Squadron 312, Marine Air Group 12 aboard this aircraft carrier, while on a combat mission near Taetan, North Korea, was struck by anti-aircraft fire, lost its port wing and crashed. The pilot's remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the USMC Captain Who Was Missing in Action That Day

Kenneth Leroy Dodson
Born April 06, 1921, Rivergrove, Illinois


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USS Hyman (DD-732)

On March 10, 1952, a crew member of this destroyer accidentally fell overboard in the Pacific Ocean and was drowned.

In Memory of the Seaman Who Drowned That Day

Kenneth M. McWayne
Born June 17, 1931, Hounsfield, New York


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USS Wisconsin (BB-64)

On March 16, 1952, this ship had insignificant damage after one hit from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  There were three injured.


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USS James E. Kyes (DD-787)

On March 19, 1952, while in Wonsan harbor drawing fire to pinpoint shore batteries, this ship was hit by a North Korean 155mm shell on port deck near Mount 53.  Damage was superficial.  Nine members of the crew sustained wounds.


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USS Brinkley Bass (DD-887)

On March 24, 1952, this ship received moderate damage after one hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were five wounded.


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USS Union (AKA-106)

On March 26, 1952, this ship lost two men overboard at Pohang-dong, Korea.  From the Korean War Project website:

"Ted Nunez, a radioman aboard the USS Union AKA-106 states: 'The USS Union was on a mission to supply an outpost.  It was night, and the ship was under 'darken ship.'  It was cold, and the water was very cold.  On the way back to the USS Union, Boatswains Mates Sawyers and Young fell overboard from the ship's boat.  The USS Union's captain ordered the ship's searchlights turned on to look for the men, but the men were never found.  They could not have survived over a few minutes in the cold water.'"

In Memory of the Two Crew Members Lost at Sea That Night

BM2 Robert Eugene "Buzz" Sawyers - MIA
born May 12, 1923 in Welch, West Virginia

BM2 Harry Thomas Young - MIA
born October 18, 1926, Tickfaw, Louisiana


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USS Endicott (DMS-35)

On April 07, 1952, this ship received insignificant damage after being hit by a shore battery at Chongjin, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Endicott (DMS-35)

On April 19, 1952, this ship received minor damage after one hit from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS St. Paul (CA-73)

On April 21, 1952, there was a turret fire on this ship.  There were 30 fatalities as a result of the turret.  The fire was caused by an explosion in the magazine storage area.

In Memory of Those Who Died Due to the Fire

INCOMPLETE LIST

SMN James Robert Hudgens
SMN Paul Howard June
SMN James Douglas Overstreet
SMN Commie Eugene Price Jr.
Gunners Mate 3c Lester Paul "Bobby" Thurman
GM3 Gerald Zimmerman


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USS Osprey (AMS-28)

On April 24, 1952, this ship had minor damage after one hit from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Cabildo (LSD-16)

On April 26, 1952, this ship received minor damage after one hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were two wounded--one seriously and one slightly in his face.


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USS Hobson (DMS-26)/USS Wasp (DV-18)

On April 26, 1952, the USS Wasp accidentally collided with the USS Hobson, causing her to sink and lose the lives of 176 crew members as well as the skipper. Some 150 of the fatalities were sleeping at the time of the collision.  The USS Wasp did not sustain any casualties in the accident and was able to save the lives of 52 men during the incident. Unfortunately, the USS Wasp suffered an injury to her bow during the accident which was repaired in ten days by the use of the bow from the USS Hornet. For a list of the fatalities, click HERE.


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USS Laffey (DD-724)

On April 30, 1952, this ship received superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Maddox (DD-731)

On April 30, 1952, this ship received superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Valley Forge (CV-45)

On May 02, 1952, an F9F-2 Pantherjet fighter with Fighter Squadron 52, aboard the aircraft carrier USS Valley Forge (CV-45), while on a combat mission over the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea, was struck by small arms fire and crashed. The pilot's remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Was Missing in Action That Day

Lt. John Zachary Carros
Born January 20, 1920 in West Hartford, Connecticut


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USS Leonard F. Mason (DD-852)

On May 2, 1952, this ship received superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS James C. Owens (DD-776)

On May 07, 1952, this ship received considerable damage after six hits from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea. There were 10 casualties. [Not all names found yet.]

In Memory of Those Who Died That Day

1. Commissaryman 3c Stanley Howard Emond
2. Seaman E2 William Joseph Murphy III
3. Instrumentman Thomas Eugene Ramsey (died May 08, 1952 on the USS Haven)


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USS Herbert J. Thomas (DDR-833)

On May 12, 1952, this ship received superficial damage after one hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Douglas H. Fox (DD-779)

On May 14, 1952, this ship received minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea.  There were two casualties.


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USS Cabildo (LSD-16)

On May 25, 1952, this ship had superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were two casualties.


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USS Swallow (AMS-26)

On May 25, 1952, this ship had slight damage after three hits from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Murrelet (AM-372)

On May 26, 1952, this ship received slight damage after being hit by a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Valley Forge (CV-45)

On May 29, 1952, an F4U-4 Corsair fighter with Fighter Squadron 653 aboard this aircraft carrier crashed into the sea during take-off on a combat mission.  The pilot's remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Died That Day

Lt. jg. Channing Gardner
Born August 25, 1926, Duluth, Minnesota


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USS Firecrest (AMS-10)

On May 30, 1952, this ship had minor damage after hits from machine gun mounts.  There were no casualties.


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USS Valley Forge (CV-45)

On May 30, 1952, an F4U-4 Corsair fighter with Fighter Squadron 653 aboard this aircraft carrier, while making a test flight, crashed into the water near Task Force Seventy-seven. The pilot's remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Died That Day

Ens. Gordon Ray Galloway
Born June 08, 1923, Glendale, California


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USS Philippine Sea (CV-47)

On June 2, 1952, Navy Ensign Gerald Brown was piloting his F4U-4 to a combat mission. During the take-off, he was struck by the “slip stream of another aircraft, fell into the sea and its belly tank exploded.” The body of Ensign Brown was never recovered.

In Memory of Ensign Brown

Gerald Rodney Brown

Gerald Rodney Brown was born on October 2, 1929, in Mitchell, South Dakota, to Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dean Brown. His family later moved to Gann Valley, South Dakota. Gerald attended high school at the Owatanna Military School in Minnesota.  He enlisted in the service on September 11, 1947. Navy Ensign Brown was assigned to service in San Diego in early 1951 and then on April 14, 1951, he became part of Fighter Squadron 113, where he was a pilot flying a F4U-4 Corsair fighter.


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USS Princeton (CVA-37)

On June 08, 1952, an AD-4NL Skyraider night fighter with Composite Squadron 35 aboard this aircraft carrier crashed into the sea while returning from combat reconnaissance killing the pilot and his radarman. Their remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Two Men Who Died That Day

Lt. Richard Eugene Garver
Born November 30, 1921, Rosemead, California

Aviation Electrician's Mate 3C Adler Earl Ruddell
Born October 13, 1931, Independence, Arkansas


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USS Buck (DD-761)

On June 13, 1952, this ship's motor launch was damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Kojo, North Korea.  There were two casualties.


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USS Orleck (DD-886)

On June 13, 1952, this ship had minor damage from one hit after receiving 50 rounds of 75 mm.  There were four casualties.


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USS Princeton (CV-37)

On June 14, 1952, an F9F-2 Pantherjet fighter with Fighter Squadron 191 aboard this aircraft carrier, while on a railroad interdiction run, was hit by enemy ground fire, crashed and exploded. The pilot's remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Lieutenant JG Who Went Missing That Day

Ralph Cross
Born February 18, 1928
He was from Soda Springs, Idaho.


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USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31)

On June 25, 1952, an F4U-4 Corsair fighter with Fighter Squadron 74 aboard this aircraft carrier was attacking target in the Wonsan area of North Korea, when it was hit by flak at an altitude of 8,000 feet.  The pilot bailed out and he was successfully picked up by a H-5H helicopter piloted by Captain Leslie W. Lear from the 3rd Rescue Squadron, U.S. Air Force. Captain Lear's aircraft was hit by enemy fire and crashed ten miles south of Chongsong-ni Korea, killing all three on board. The Corsair pilot's remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Corsair Pilot Who Died That Day

Ens. Ronald Dow Eaton
Born December 22, 1929
Wilmington, Massachusetts


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USS Boxer (CV-21)

On July 04, 1952, an F9F-2 Pantherjet fighter with Fighter Squadron 24 aboard this carrier, while serving as a photographic escort south of Wonsan, Korea, was struck by anti-aircraft fire, crashed and exploded. The pilot was listed as Missing in Action and was presumed dead on May 25, 1954.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Died That Day

Lt. Jack Walter Griffith
Born March 01, 1920, Evansville, Indiana
USNA Class of 1944


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USS Philippine Sea (CV-47)

On July 04, 1952, the pilot of an F4U-4 Corsair Fighter with Fighter Squadron 113 aboard this aircraft carrier was on a strafing run when his aircraft was hit by small arms fire and crashed into a mountain.  His remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Was Missing in Action That Day

Lt. jg Grover Cleveland Chick Jr.
Born June 08, 1924, Oakland, California


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USS Bon Homme Richard (CVA-31)

On July 11, 1952, Lieutenant Edward Cummings was the pilot of an AD-3Q Skyraider dive bomber with Detachment 41, Composite Squadron 33 aboard this aircraft carrier. That day, his aircraft was diving at a target at Pyongyang, North Korea, when it was hit by anti-aircraft fire. It lost part of its tail surface and crashed about a mile away near Pyongyang. He was presumed dead on May 25, 1954.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Went Missing That Day

Edward Patrick Cummings
Born June 28, 1928 in Jersey City, New Jersey


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USS Princeton (CVA-37)

On July 11, 1952, an AD-4 Skyraider dive bomber with Attack Squadron 195 aboard this aircraft carrier, while on a strike on Pyongyang, Korea, was struck by enemy ground fire and crashed. The pilot was listed as Missing in Action and was presumed dead on June 4, 1954.

In Memory of the Pilot Missing in Action That Day

LTC Lynn Francis DuTemple
Born August 02, 1920 in Santa Rosa, California


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USS Boxer

On August 6, 1952, while engaged in combat operations, she suffered damage and casualties when a fire broke out in her hangar deck.  She had nine men killed and two seriously injured in a fire which swept the hangar deck. After emergency repairs at Yokosuka, Japan (11-23 August) Boxer returned to duty off Korea. She arrived at San Francisco 25 September and underwent repairs until March 1953. The carrier departed for the Far East 30 March 1953 and went into action a month later. She took part in the final actions of the Korean conflict and remained in Asiatic waters until November.

In Memory of the Nine Men Killed That Day

1. Aviation Electronics Tech 3C W.D. Burdette (VC-35)
2. Airman Apprentice Ignacio Canales Jr. (VA-65)
3. PN3 V.L. Conger (VF-24)
4. Pfc. Arthur Masaru Kozuki, USMC
5. Cpl. Terrell Ray Roulston, USMC
6. AT2 D.G. Seden (VC-35)
7. Lt. James E. Shropshire (CVG-2 Flight Surgeon)
8. Hospital Corpsman Richard Smith Taylor (VF-24)
9. Hospital Corpsman James Veryle Wark (VF-64)

Ignacio Canales Jr. was born August 12, 1933, son of Ignacio Canales (1910-1964) and Hortencia Gonzales Canales (1911-2002).

Terrell Roulston, born September 7, 1928 and entered the USMC on December 8, 1950.  He was from Oklahoma.

James Wark was born November 22, 1925, son of Alexander Joseph Wark (1889-1938) and Viola Verna Wark (1898-1957).

Lieutenant Shropshire, Airman Canales, and PN3 Conger lost their lives while attempting to rescue those trapped in the Flight Surgeon's office.

Action Report for 6 August 1952

[Source: Fist of the Fleet Association website]

USS Boxer (CV-21) Fire
Sea of Japan off the Coast of Korea

The fire started about 0530 as Boxer began launching the morning strike. Ten prop-aircraft (F4U-5N – AD-4N – AD-4W) were airborne from the 0300 launch. All the scheduled prop-aircraft were on the flight deck, while the jets on the hangar deck were being prepared for a later launch – all aircraft arriving over the target at the same time.

[Fist of the Fleet Association Editor: The following text is from the declassified USS Boxer Action Report for 1 August through 11 August 1952. Most of the text on the fire was in one long paragraph, which has been broken into shorter paragraphs for easier reading. Some comments have been added in parenthesis.]

“Eight combat sorties had been launched when the outbreak of a fire on the hangar deck precluded fight operations. In a matter of seconds the hangar deck was a raging inferno as the result of an explosion of a gasoline tank on one airplane which quickly set off others. On deck there were some 58 aircraft loaded with ammunition including high explosive, fragmentation, incendiaries, and 50 Cal., and 20mm ammunition. The ship was making 30 knots at the time.

The decision to be made was “whether to launch what was on deck with a view of saving planes or to take a chance and taxi the planes forward, jettison the bombs and ammunition, reduce the ship’s speed and fight the fire.” The latter, of course, was chosen. Word was soon received that entry to the hangar deck could not be made on the starboard side and that the flames would have to be attacked from the Number Two elevator (deck edge – port side amidships), which was in the raised position.

Accordingly, a turn was made to starboard so that the fire fighting crews could enter the hangar deck from up wind. There followed a grim fight on the part of the crew to control the fire in spite of 50 Cal. and 20mm shells exploding all over the hangar deck. The holocaust was added to by the exploding of a 500 pound bomb. Sixty-three men, who were trapped, jumped over the side and were quickly rescued by attending helicopters, destroyers and cruisers.

The smoke was terrific and enveloped the entire ship. Engineering spaces were almost untenable and two fire rooms had to be abandoned. It was at this point that considerable doubt existed as to our ability to control the fire. A further loss of power would have left us dead in the water and without water pressure for the fire hoses. Fortunately, tenacious men in the engineering department hung on to the point of exhaustion until the flames could be controlled. The Damage Control Central Station functioned throughout and was in constant communications with its four repair parties.

Every man not trapped below unhesitatingly entered the inferno without regard to personal danger from exploding ammunition and bombs. The performance of the crew was magnificent and was a most impressive demonstration of a selflessness, determination and teamwork.

While the fire fighting was progressing on the hangar deck, crews on the flight deck removed bombs and ammunition from aircraft and ready service lockers thus eliminating a terrible threat against the life of the ship. After having accomplished this Herculean task in a matter of minutes, these men turned to the business of fighting the fire.

It was from 4 to 5 hours later before we could be sure that there was no additional threat of fire, enter spaces, and determine who of those who had been trapped were safe and who of those who had been driven over the side had been rescued by accompanying ships. The final total was determined to be: 8 dead, 1 missing, 1 critically injured, 1 seriously burned and some 70 overcome by smoke. Of the 63 who had gone over the side, all were rescued and returned to the ship. (The Sea of Japan water is cold even in summer.)

Work was immediately started to make repairs and restore the ship to operating condition after assessing the damage. By dint of whole hearted effort on the part of the crew, the ship was restored to a condition in which it could operate its aircraft. 18 aircraft (mostly F9F-2 Panthers) were damaged (fire and salt water) or destroyed. It was decided by higher authority that the ship was to return to the Repair Base at Yokosuka to get rid of its duds (damaged aircraft), receive replacement aircraft, make minimum repairs and return to the operating line."


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USS John R. Pierce (DD-753)

On August 6, 1952, there was moderate damage after seven hits from a shore battery at Tanchon, North Korea.  There were 13 casualties (wounded).


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USS Barton (DD-722)

On August 10, 1952, this ship had minor damage after one hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea while silencing enemy batteries on the island of Hodo Pando Barton was hit on her number one stack by a 105 mm shell from an enemy shore battery. Two men were wounded. After a short repair period at Yokosuka (25-31 August) she returned to Korean waters.


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USS Grapple (ARS-7)

On August 12, 1952, this ship received minor damage after one hit below the waterline from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Bon Homme Richard (CVA-31)

On August 14, 1952, a F4U Corsair fighter with Fighter Squadron 74, aboard the aircraft carrier Bon Homme Richard (CVA-31) was on a strike mission in North Korea, when the aircraft made a dive from 8,000 feet toward the target but failed to pull out of the dive, crashed and exploded.

In Memory of The Pilot Who Lost His Life That Day

Ens. Donald Edwin Adams, pilot
Born December 26, 1929, Milwaukee, WI


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USS Thompson (DMS-38)

On August 20, 1952, this ship had minor damage in the vicinity of the bridge after an air burst and near misses from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  There were four killed and nine wounded.

In Memory of the Four Crew Members Who Lost Their Lives That Day

Quartermaster Howard Joseph Connors, b. 9/25/1918
Chief QM Willis Devon Grogg - b. 12/19/20 in Elkhart, IN
Seaman Marcus Lejoie Minor Jr. - b. April 4, 1931, St. Joseph, MO
Ens. John H. Thomas - b. 1/1/28 in Wisconsin


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USS Competent (AM-316)

On August 27, 1952, this ship had superficial damage and lost sweep gear after a shrapnel near miss from a shore battery at Pkg. 4-5.  There were no casualties.


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USS McDermut (DD-677)

On August 27, 1952, this ship had superficial damage after receiving 60 rounds at 3,700 yards while at Pkg 4-5.  There were no casualties.


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USS Sarsi (ATF111)

On August 27, 1952, this ship was lost in a mine explosion.  For details about the ship sinking as told by the survivors, click HERE.

In Memory of the Five Men Who Died in The Ship Sinking That Day

Chief Quartermaster Raymond Parrish
Steward 2C Hampton Carter
Radarman 3C Robert Slattery
Damage Control Man Charles Kunsch, Jr.
Yeoman 3C Hubert Demerest


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USS Agerholm (DD-826)

On September 01, 1952, this ship had superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at the Kangsong, North Korea area bombline.  There was one man slightly wounded.


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USS Frank E. Evans (DD-754)

On September 08, 1952, this ship had slight damage from near misses, after receiving 69 rounds, from a shore battery at Tanchon, North Korea.  There were no casualties.


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USS Barton (DD-722)

On September 16, 1952, this ship had major damage after striking a mine 90 miles east of Wonsan, North Korea.  There were five MIA and seven WIA.

In Memory of the Five Lives Lost That Day

Russel John Graf
Harold Joseph Savoie
John Martin Sherry
Walter Edwin Thierfelder
John Laurice Walton


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USS Alfred A. Cunningham (DD-752)

On September 19, 1952, this ship had moderate damage from five hits and seven air bursts. She received 150 rounds of 105 mm from three guns. The first round was a direct hit at a initial range of 3,500 yards. There were 13 wounded, mostly caused by shrapnel.


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Landing Ship Tank (LST 1077)

On October 04, 1952, a falling boom on this ship struck and killed a crew member while in Korean waters.

In Memory of the Man Who Lost His Life That Day

Chief Commissaryman Allen Brandon Lacy
Born November 09, 1918
Hopkinsville, KY


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USS Perkins (DDR-877)

On October 13, 1952, this ship received superficial damage after being straddled by five rounds, from a shore battery at range of 5,000 yards, at Kojo, North Korea. The ship was sprayed with shrapnel from two near misses.  There were 17 wounded and one killed.

In Memory of the One Crew Member Who Lost His Life That Day

 Lyle Allen Sorensen
Interior Communications Electrician Third Class, U.S. Navy
Place of Birth: Burlington, Iowa
Date of Birth: June 05, 1928


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USS Osprey (AMS-28)

On October 14, 1952, this ship received minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Kojo, North Korea.  There were four casualties.


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USS Lewis (DE-535)

On October 21,1952, this ship came to the aid of two ROK minesweepers under fire in Wonsan harbor. As she approached, at least four enemy batteries opened up on the destroyer escort. Lewis returned fire and laid down a smoke screen to cover the minesweepers retreat. Shortly thereafter the destroyer escort took two 75mm shell hits, the first plowed into the forward fire room and pierced the No. 1 boiler – killing six fire and boilermen outright and mortally wounding a seventh. The second hit exploded on the main deck, port side, lightly wounding one sailor. Following hull and machinery repairs at Yokosuka in mid-November, the destroyer escort sailed for home on 17 November, arriving in San Diego via Pearl Harbor on December 2.

In Memory of the Seven Men Who Lost Their Lives That Day

Boiler Technician 1 Richard E. Brower, Canton, Ohio

Boiler Technician Fireman James Theodore Crossman, South Dakota

Boiler Technican 3 Arnold W. Karlin, Marion, Oregon

BTG1 Raymond E. Reimers, Honolulu, Hawaii

Chief Boiler Technician David John Schmit, Long Beach, California

Boiler Technician Fireman George N. Schofield Jr., Fairoaks, Pennsylvania

Boiler Technician Fireman Floyd Sneed, Sidney, Arkansas


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USS Mansfield (DD-728)

On October 28, 1952, this ship had minor shrapnel damage after receiving 40 rounds from 4 guns. The suspected radar controlled guns straddled the ship at a range of 4,300-8,000 yards. There were no casualties.


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USS Kearsarge (CVA-33)

On November 01, 1952, an F9F-2 Pantherjet fighter with Fighter Squadron 141 (721) aboard this aircraft carrier was making a strike in support of front lines troops near Chon-chon, North Korea, when its engine began to run irregularly. The pilot headed towards the east coast of Korea and crashed about ten miles from the shore line. He was presumed dead on November 2, 1953.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Went Missing That Day

Lt. Charles Olan Glisson Jr.
Born August 24, 1925, Washington, D.C.


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USS Princeton (CV-37)

On November 01, 1952, this ship listed an Aviation Ordnanceman Third Class who was a member of Attack Squadron 55 aboard the aircraft carrier as Missing In Actiobn. He was last seen at 2200 on October 31, 1952.

In Memory of the Missing Ordnanceman

Gordon Harwood Chandler
Born August 10, 1932 inb Jennings, Kansas


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USS Uhlmann (DD-687)

On November 03, 1952, this ship had minor damage from three hits after receiving 160 rounds from a shore battery.  There were 13 wounded.


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USS LST 611

On November 04, 1952, a member of the crew of the landing ship tank (USS LST 611) in Korean waters suffered severe injuries from a fall aboard his ship.  He was evacuated to a hospital in Japan, and died on November 4, 1952.

In Memory of the Seaman Who Died That Day

John Vincent Brantigan
Born May 10, 1931, Albany, New York


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USS Kearsarge (CVA-33)

On November 08, 1952, the pilot of a F4U-4 Corsair fighter and the commander of Fighter Squadron 114 (884) aboard carrier USS Kearsarge (CVA-33) was attacking enemy artillery positions near Wosan, North Korea, when his aircraft was struck by anti-aircraft fire and crashed in the vicinity of Pyongyang, North Korea.

In Memory of the Pilot Lost in Action That Day

LCDR Frederick William Bowen - MIA
Born June 08, 1910


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USS Ruchamkin APD89

On November 14, 1952, the SS Washington, a tanker rammed this ship off Cape Henry, Virginia.  The Ruchamkin had taken an Army Recon unit (41 members) aboard at Little Creek two days before to demonstrate the latest in amphibious assault. The army troops were taken back aboard about four hours before the ship was rammed. APD's have a troop compartment on each side (in place of weather deck on a DE) and they were assigned to the port compartment. The 10,000-ton tanker rammed the port side, and six were killed.

See also the Coast Guard investigation report:

http://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg5/cg545/docs/boards/washington.pdf

In Memory of the Recon Troops Killed on This Day

Pfc. Kenneth W. Allred, b. January 1, 1929, Tulsa, OK

Pfc. Ralph A. Bode (died November 16 at Naval Hospital)

Cpl. Edward J. Eckert Jr., b. January 1, 1932, Marlboro, NY

Pvt. John T. Fulwiler

Cpl. Raymond Kenny

Pfc. Pasquale Pompa, b. January 1, 1930, Wayne, PA


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USS Oriskany (CVA-34)

On November 15, 1952, an AD-3 Skyraider dive bomber with Attack Squadron 125 (923) aboard this carrier, while striking the enemy main supply route between Majon-ni and Yangdok, North Korea, was struck by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into a mountain. The pilot's remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Lieutenant Who Died That Day

George Aloysius Gaudette Jr.
Born December 19, 1922, Utica, New York


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USS Kite (AMS-22)

On November 19, 1952, one small boat of this ship was destroyed by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There were five men with minor wounds.


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USS Thompson (DMS-38)

On November 20, 1952, this ship had minor damage from ine hit after receiving 89 rounds from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea.  There was one casualty.


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USS Essex (CV-9)

On November 21, 1952, an F9F-2 Pantherjet fighter with Fighter Squadron 23 aboard this aircraft carrier, after a normal take off on a combat mission, struck the ocean about 250 yards off the port bow and disintegrated. The pilot's remains were not recovered.

In Memory of the Pilot Who Died That Day

Lt. jg. Leo Thomas Freitas
Born December 03, 1927, San Rafael, California


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USS Hanna (DE-449)

On November 24, 1952, this ship received moderate damage from one hit after receiving 60 rounds from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea.  There was one fatality.

In Memory of the One Crew Member Who Died That Day

Robert Joseph Potts MM3
Born December 30, 1931.
Buried in Saint Peters Cemetery, Mt. Oliver, PA


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USS Ajax (AR-6)

On November 30, 1952, this ship lost crew members.  The Ajax was alongside of the USS Ashtabula when an explosion on the Ashtabula (see the next entry) caused a total of six deaths.

In Memory of the Crew Members Who Lost Their Lives That Day [incomplete?]

Fireman William Estill Jones
Born April 9, 1933 at Mt. Sterling, KY

Fireman E2 Alvin Bratton McKinney Jr.,
Born May 20, 1935 in Ada, OK

Fireman Raymond John Marlier
Born January 11, 1932 in Miami, FL


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USS Ashtabula

On November 30, 1952, this ship was completing an upkeep period in Sasabo, Japan alongside repair ship USS Ajax when tragedy struck. In the early afternoon, gasoline fumes in two of the forward tanks ignited and the force of the explosion caused the 01 deck to curl back to the superstructure. Several storerooms and bulkheads were destroyed. A portion of the port side hull split allowing sea water to rush in, deck equipment was thrown from the deck landing harmlessly in the water. Six people lost their lives. Repair work took three months to accomplish and the USS Ashtabula returned to normal replenishment duties.

In Memory of the Men Who Lost Their Lives That Day

Names not yet found


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USS Missouri (BB-63)

On December 21, 1952, a helicopter (H03S-1 helicopter from VMO-6) with two Marines from this ship's Marine detachment crashed into the sea off east cost of North Korea near Chosen-Haeman while on a naval gunnery spotting mission.

In Memory of Two Marines Who Lost Their Lives That Day

1Lt. Robert Dorman Dern
Born November 07, 1923, York, PA

1Lt. Rex Donald Ellison
Born October 23, 1926, Long Beach, CA

 
 

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