Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "A"

 
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Abarr, Robert G.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Robert G. Abarr (ASN: 0-1041699), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy near Paekchon, Korea, on 10 October 1950. The attack of Captain Abarr's battalion on Paekchon had been temporarily halted because of intense enemy small arms fire coming from well entrenched enemy, occupying the dominating terrain in the area. Captain Abarr, the Battalion Intelligence Officer, volunteered to take the Intelligence and Reconnaissance section and one 75-mm. recoilless rifle forward and attempt to destroy the enemy positions. The group moved out, mounted on vehicles with two machine guns and one 75-mm. recoilless rifle. He personally led the patrol up the road and onto the enemy occupied hill. This was done through heavy enemy fire, with Captain Abarr continually exposing himself in order to control and direct effective counter fire upon the enemy. His aggressive and unrelenting advance placed the enemy in such a state of confusion that many of them laid down their arms and ran. During this action Captain Abarr personally destroyed one enemy machine gun emplacement. This successfully conducted action permitted the battalion to advance rapidly toward its objective, meeting only disorganized resistance. Later in the day he organized a large motorized patrol and exploited the breakthrough to advance three miles beyond friendly lines and occupy Paekchon. Captain Abarr's heroic actions and outstanding leadership prevented the enemy from effecting an organized withdrawal and resulted in the battalion accomplishing its mission, with light casualties. This gallantry in action and selfless devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Abbaticchio, John P. (name changed to John P. Abbey in 1966) (1st award)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 161 - 24 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant (then Sergeant) John P. Abbaticchio, RA13205085, Company K, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 3 September 1950 near Waegwan, Korea.  While occupying a defensive line of the forward slope of hill 518, Sergeant Abbaticchio's platoon became disorganized and scattered by a fanatical enemy banzai charge.  Singlehandedly holding off the first assault by accurately delivering fire from his rifle, Sergeant Abbaticchio displayed calm, forceful leadership, reorganized and rallied the men in his vicinity.  When they were reformed into an effective fighting team, he then stood up to draw fire from three machine guns supporting the enemy attack in order to discover their position.  When the gun emplacements were located, Sergeant Abbaticchio so effectively directed the returning fire that the enemy positions were eliminated.  His selfless courage and remarkable leadership in the face of enemy fire inspired and stimulated his men into repulsing two additional enemy attacks. Sergeant Abbaticchio's exemplary leadership and extreme courage prevented a vital position from falling into enemy hands and enabled a small force to inflict heavy losses on the enemy.  Sergeant Abbaticchio's gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered Federal service from Pennsylvania.

Abbaticchio, John P. (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 79 - 29 April 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the first Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star to Lieutenant (then Master Sergeant John P. Abbaticchio, RA13205085, Company K, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 6 February 1951, near Konjion-ni, Korea.  Lieutenant Abbaticchio's platoon was given the mission of seizing an enemy gun position that was holding up the advance of the battalion.  By aggressive movement, he forced the enemy to reveal their positions prematurely and then, with complete disregard for his own safety, he rushed to the top of the objective.  Lieutenant Abbaticchio then fearlessly moved from one enemy position to the next, killing the enemy in their holes, and directing his platoon to follow his example.  Due primarily to his efforts, the position was taken and the battalion was able to advance.  Lieutenant Abbaticchio's courage and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered Federal service from Pennsylvania.

Abbe, Lorren L.

General Orders: Headquarters IX Corps
General Orders No. 45 (April 10, 1951)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Sergeant [then Corporal] Lorren L. Abbe (MCSN: 644747), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against the enemy in Korea. On 1 March 1951, near Hongchon, Korea, Sergeant Abbe, squad leader, led his rifle squad across a ridge exposed to intense rifle and machine gun fire in an effort to assist another platoon in taking a steep hill defended by an entrenched enemy force. Upon reaching the lower slope of the objective, only seven men from the other platoon remained effective. After reorganization of the platoon, Sergeant Abbe led an assault echelon in an attempt to take the crest of the hill. A barrage of enemy grenades killed, wounded, and dazed most of the platoon and pinned down Sergeant Abbe's assault squad about forty feet from the crest of the ridge. Although dazed by grenades and painfully wounded in the face by shrapnel, Sergeant Abbe with absolute disregard for his own personal safety went from fire team to fire team reorganizing the men and directing the evacuation of wounded. During this time he was exposed to savage small arms and automatic weapons fire. On the final and successful assault, Sergeant Abbe led a flanking attack which secured the ridge, on which members of his squad killed or wounded nine enemy as they fled down the reverse slope and across a ravine to another fortified position. In the entire action, Sergeant Abbe's squad inflicted five killed and twenty-six wounded casualties upon the enemy, while suffering one killed and one wounded among its own forces. Sergeant Abbe's cool and unselfish leadership in the face of almost certain death and a fanatical enemy was a source of inspiration to all members of his command.

Abbott, Alfred J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Alfred J. Abbott (MCSN: 648225), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Repeatedly exposing himself to heavy enemy small arms and machine gun fire from a hostile position estimated to be a reinforced platoon, Corporal Abbott daringly led his fire team into the assault position and opened the attack by personally destroying an enemy machine gun nest and its protective riflemen by means of hand grenades and his effective direct fire. Seriously wounded during this action, Corporal Abbott, by his courageous initiative, leadership and devotion to duty, aided his unit materially in successfully completing its assigned mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Greenwich, Connecticut. Home Town: Stamford, Connecticut.

Abels, Richard W.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Hospitalman Richard W. Abels (NSN: 5583603), United States Navy, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kwanchikyong, Korea, on 2 June 1951. On that date, Company E was assaulting a ridge defended by well entrenched enemy forces. As a Medical Corpsman, Hospital Abels was with the leading elements of the company when the unit was subjected to intense enemy grenade, automatic weapons, and small arms fire, suffering severe casualties. Heedless of the grave personal danger, Hospitalman Abels moved quickly forward to minister to the wounded. Although many of his men were within a few yards of the enemy position, and completely exposed, he unhesitatingly moved to their aid, remaining with his patients until they could be moved to positions of comparative safety. As the attack progressed, he repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire in order to treat and evacuate wounded comrades. The gallantry, initiative, and personal heroism displayed by Hospitalman Abels on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 182 (August 16, 1951).

Acevedo, Manuel Jr.

Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders #137 (14 May 1951)

Master Sergeant Manuel Acevedo, Jr., RA6674870, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 1 February 1951, near Suwon, Korea, Sergeant Acevedo led his platoon in an assault on Hill 297. In spite of the heavy enemy machine gun and small arms fire being directed at him, he stormed the enemy positions and neutralized them with hand grenades. Owing to the intrepid action of Sergeant ACEVEDO the hill was taken and many of the enemy killed or captured. The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Acevedo reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Acevedo-Olivio, Francisco

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 139 - 9 April 1952

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Francisco Acevedo-Olivio (US50107130), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On the night of 28-29 January 1952, a reconnaissance patrol from Company B was ambushed and the forward elements of the patrol were surrounded and taken as prisoners. As a guard brought some rice into the barbed-wire enclosure where they had been placed, Private Acevedo-Olivio, a member of the patrol, took him by complete surprise by tearing the container from his hand, striking him in the face with it and running from the cage. While fleeing from the foe, Private Acevedo-Olivio was seriously wounded in the arm and leg, making it impossible for him to walk. With unflinching courage and an indomitable resolution to escape from the hands of the enemy, he crawled over four miles of snow-covered terrain and crossed a wide, icy river to return to friendly lines. His unwavering determination to return to his unit provided immense intelligence information about the enemy that could not otherwise have been obtained. Private Acevedo-Olivio's gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Adair, Hugh Donald Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Hugh Donald Adair Jr., (MCSN: 0-49616), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces south of Uijongbu, Korea, on 2 October 1950. Assigned the mission of seizing the crest of a precipitous hill defended by a fiercely resisting enemy deeply entrenched in well-camouflaged positions, Second Lieutenant Adair boldly led his unit in a vigorous assault against the hostile stronghold until pinned down near the crest of the hill by a barrage of heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire. Fearlessly charging the enemy, he inspired his platoon to launch a vigorous attack, overrun the hostile emplacements and rout the enemy. In order to hold the newly won position, he established a hasty defense and, while personally reconnoitering in front of his own line, was mortally wounded by hostile grenades. His aggressive leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and heroic devotion to duty were contributing factors in the seizure of the platoon's objective and reflect great credit upon Second Lieutenant Adair and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

Adams, Birney A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Birney A. Adams (MCSN: 0-51495), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 September 1951. When the unit was impeded by withering fire from a large bunker on commanding ground while he was leading his platoon in an attack against a heavily fortified hill position defended by a strong hostile force, Second Lieutenant Adams bravely charged forward through the devastating enemy fire and delivered effective rifle fire into the emplacement. Continuing his single-handed assault with hand grenades and a pistol, he succeeded in killing all the hostile troops within the bunker, enabling his platoon to maneuver toward its objective. Although painfully wounded by enemy shrapnel during the intensive action, he refused to accept medical treatment and continued to move forward with his unit until the objective had been secured and a defense line established. By his courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to the fulfillment of his mission, Second Lieutenant Adams served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by the company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Adams, Donald E.

Headquarters Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 373 - 30 July 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Donald E. Adams, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 16th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 51st Fighter-Interceptor Group, Fifth Air Force, on 3 May 1952. Leading a squadron of six F-86 type aircraft, Major Adams attacked a flight of twenty MIG type aircraft. In the ensuing battle, from 30,000 feet down to 5,000, Major Adams aggressively pressed the attack despite mechanical difficulties which resulted in sever frosting of his windscreen and rendered his sighting system useless. With an extraordinary display of airmanship and gunnery skill, Major Adams succeeded in destroying the flight leader of the enemy element. In succeeding maneuvers he observed a second aircraft and, unaware of the first destruction because of excessively reduced visibility, he attacked, believing this aircraft to be his first target escaping. Continuing his aggressive attack, he destroyed the second aircraft as well. The destruction of the two aircraft effectively broke up the enemy force. By his high personal courage, resourcefulness, and extraordinary flying skill, Major Adams reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Adams, James D.

Headquarters 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 94 - 4 March 1953

Sergeant First Class James D. Adams, RA18230909, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 32d Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Pokkae, Korea.  On 24 January 1953, when the assault and blocking groups moved out from their positions to attack a strategic enemy-held hill, Sergeant Adams took up his position as a leader of one of the groups.  Leading his men toward the objective in the face of intense enemy fire, Sergeant Adams continually exposed himself to direct the movements of his men in the most effective manner.  During the entire attack Sergeant Adams, with no regard for his own safety, moved among his men giving them encouragement and urging them on.  The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Adams reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Louisiana.

Adams, James Y.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 727 - 16 November 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Colonel James Y. Adams, 019755, Infantry, United States Army, Commanding Officer, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 17 September 1951 in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea. On that date, a battalion of his regiment was assigned the mission of securing commanding terrain defended by well entrenched forces. Due to the importance of this operation, Colonel Adams was ever present with the most forward elements of his command to direct the movements of his attacking units personally. Although under direct and observed hostile small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire, he remained for the duration of the action, supervising each phase of the assault. By his example of bravery under fire, Colonel Adams instilled in his men the courage and determination necessary to attack in the face of a numerically superior enemy force. His aggressive leadership and tactical ability were the major factors in the successful accomplishment of the battalion’s mission. The gallantry in action displayed by Colonel Adams on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Adams, Lewis Charlton (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 17 - 9 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Lewis Charlton Adams (ASN: US-53052547), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Byoru, Korea, on 14 October 1951. After a powerful attack on enemy positions, his company secured its first objective, a high steep terrain feature. As the friendly unit was consolidating its positions for the night, it was suddenly subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage. Under cover of this concentrated fire, the enemy launched a savage counterattack, charging with such blind fanaticism that the company was forced to withdraw to more strategically defensible positions. Private Adams, Automatic Rifleman, volunteered to remain behind to provide covering fire for his comrades as they moved back to establish new defenses. With complete disregard for his own safety, he unhesitatingly remained in his exposed position, despite murderous enemy fire, and fought off overwhelming odds. Firing with deadly accuracy, he inflicted severe casualties upon the enemy, killing ten only a few yards from his position, and enabling his company to make a successful withdrawal. When last seen, he was still fighting aggressively with tenacious determination. Later, when the objective was again secured, he was found in his position, having succumbed to mortal wounds. Private Adams' courageous action, valiant single-handed defense and magnificent intrepidity in the face of extreme adversity reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the United States Infantry.  Home of Record: Douglas, Georgia.

Adams, Raymond E.

Headquarters, Eight U.S. Army, Korea
General Orders No. 12 - 28 July 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Medical Service Corps) Raymond E. Adams (ASN: 0-2048609), United States Army, for gallantry in action with serving with Medical Company, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. On 5 July 1950, at Osan, Korea, Companies B and C, 21st Infantry Regiment, and attached medical personnel, were being forced to evacuate the position they had been holding. This evacuation was being held up by an enemy machine gun which had been emplaced on the evacuation route. Without regard for his own safety, Lieutenant Adams approached to within thirty paces of the gun's position and threw a grenade into it. This grenade attack was successful in destroying both the gun and its crew, thus allowing approximately 100 persons to continue the withdrawal. By his heroism, Lieutenant Adams brought credit to both himself and the United States Army.  Replaces a Bronze Star Medal issued under Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division General Orders No. 91 (1950).

Adkins, Aaron C. (1st award)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 92 - 16 May 151

For gallantry in action against the enemy on 13 March 1951 near Panggok, Korea.  While leading his company in attack against the enemy in the vicinity of Panggok, Lieutenant Adkins realized that the final objective, Hill 641, would be a difficult task, due to rough, rocky and high terrain that offered the enemy an excellent defensive position.  Lieutenant Adkins unhesitatingly exposed himself to enemy observation and fire as he remained forward with the assault elements to direct the attacking and supporting weapons.  Through his courageous and skillful leadership considerable hostile equipment was rendered ineffective, numerous enemy were killed and captured, and the objective was secured in a minimum amount of time.  Lieutenant Adkins' gallantry and outstanding leadership reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered federal service from Georgia.

Adkins, Aaron C. (2nd award)

Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 226 - 19 August 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant] Aaron C. Adkins (ASN: 0-60512), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer, Company L, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action on 26 May 1951, near Tongduchon-ni, Korea. As the company was attacking a rugged hill during a driving rain, it was halted by intense enemy fire from the midst-shrouded hillside. Realizing that the success of the mission depended on bold, aggressive action, Captain Adkins voluntarily advanced through a hail of enemy fire, to the position of the leading elements of his command. Here he advanced in front of the rifle positions, encouraging his men, and pointing out targets for them. Although exposed to small arms and mortar fire, he continued his personal reconnaissance. Captain Adkins' intrepidity encouraged his troops to such a degree that, when given the order to resume the attack, they swept forward to achieve their objective. His conspicuous gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Adkins, Virgil B.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 4 - 5 January 1954

Private Virgil B. Adkins, US52188840, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the morning and afternoon of 17 July 1953, in the vicinity of Sinmok-Tong, Korea, Company "B" assaulted enemy held Hill "433". In the action, many friendly casualties were sustained and Private Adkins immediately began treating and evacuating them. Disregarding the heavy enemy fire, he repeatedly moved about the terrain under fire to aid wounded raiders. When the unit began to return toward the United Nations main line of resistance, Private Adkins volunteered to remain behind and cover the retrograde movement. Courageously protecting his unit, he directed heavy fire upon the foe until mortally wounded by intense enemy automatic weapons fire. Private Adkins' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from West Virginia.

Adsem, Seymour (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 529 - 19 September 1951

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Private First Class Seymour Adsem, RA17264518, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company D, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 31 July 1951 in the vicinity of Taeusan, Korea. On that date Private Adsem was attached to Company B, 9th Infantry Regiment as a machine gunner. The unit was under heavy enemy attack, and as the assault continued, the supply of machine gun ammunition diminished. Private Adsem, with complete disregard for his own safety, made several trips to the forward supply point to bring back the badly needed ammunition. While making his way back to the machine gun position for the fourth time he was fatally wounded by an enemy sniper. His courage and stamina enabled the unit to successfully repulse the enemy attack. The gallantry in action displayed by Private Adsem reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Grafton, North Dakota.

Adwell, Arvil V.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Arvil V. Adwell (MCSN: 669022), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. When the company was attacked by a large enemy force while defending a strategic bridge, Corporal Adwell participated in the ensuing hand-grenade battle as the enemy advanced to within 25 yards of the position. Realizing that his mortar was ineffective because of the close proximity of the enemy, and that the company's supply of hand grenades was nearly exhausted, he quickly removed the bipod from his weapon and, calling for a man to assist him, fearlessly moved forward to an exposed position on the line. Holding the mortar tube in his hand while the other man loaded the gun, Corporal Adwell succeeded in placing accurate and effective fire on the attackers and, although continually exposed to enemy grenade fire, continued to pour heavy return fire on the hostile force, aiding immeasurably in the successful defense of the bridge. By his inspiring initiative, marked courage and steadfast devotion to duty, Corporal Adwell upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Joppa, Kentucky. Home Town: Louisville, Kentucky.

Affleck, John H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John H. Affleck (MCSN: 0-49494), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 January 1951. With a machine gun and rifle squad position overrun during a fierce attack by the enemy against his platoon, First Lieutenant Affleck immediately effected a reorganization of his remaining men and, although subjected to heavy and accurate hostile small arms and machine gun fire, led a brilliantly executed counterattack to re-capture the vital position. Despite multiple wounds sustained during the furious action, he staunchly refused evacuation and, remaining with his platoon, deployed his men in a defensive perimeter to repel further onslaughts. Later ordered evacuated by his executive officer, First Lieutenant Affleck, by his daring and aggressive leadership, superb combat tactics and courageous devotion to duty, served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: High Point, North Carolina. Home Town: Decatur, Georgia.

Afilani, Angelo T. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Angelo T. Afilani, Jr. (MCSN: 1335441), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 5 - 6 April 1953. With his squad assigned the mission of eliminating a hostile ambush and evacuating many serious casualties sustained by a friendly patrol during a bitter engagement far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Afilani delivered devastating fire upon the hostile force during the ensuing hand-to-hand combat, personally killing three and wounding two of the enemy. Although painfully wounded, he refused evacuation and gallantly made three trips through a hail of murderous enemy fire in order to aid in the evacuation of his more critically wounded comrades. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and resourcefulness, Private First Class Afilani contributed materially to the success of the patrol in disengaging from the numerically superior hostile force. His unwavering devotion to duty throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Aguirre, Magdaleno

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Magdaleno Aguirre (MCSN: 1179883), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 August 1952. With his squad engaged in defending a strategic sector of the company front on the forward slope of a hill when a numerically superior hostile force assaulted the position supported by intense mortar and artillery fire, Corporal Aguirre expertly directed his machine-gun squad in delivering effective fire at point-blank range upon the attackers, inflicting numerous casualties upon them. When devastating mortar and artillery fire burst near the position, knocked over the gun and severely dazed the crew, Corporal Aguirre, although suffering from the effects of concussion himself, bravely rallied his men and directed them in setting up the gun a short distance away in a new position from which they could inflict further casualties upon the enemy. After intense hostile mortar fire had blown the tripod down the hill as the machine gun was being moved to another position, he fearlessly exposed himself to the enemy barrage to retrieve the tripod and bring it back up the hill. By his courageous leadership, resolute determination and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Aguirre served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Mission, Texas. Home Town: Mission, Texas.

Ahmer, Cyril

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 216 - 5 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Cyril Ahmer (ASN: RA-35930645), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Weaegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. During the assault crossing of the Naktong River one of the boats, loaded with troops, began to drive directly toward an enemy machine gun position. With utter disregard for his own safety, he exposed himself to intense fire, swimming out to the boat and directing the successful completion of the crossing. Again disregarding the intense fire he placed the men in positions from which they delivered effective fire on the enemy, inflicting many casualties and aided greatly in the establishment of the beachhead. Sergeant Ahmer's gallant actions and superior leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri.

Ahumada, Lusio Castanoz (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Lusio Castanoz Ahumada (MCSN: 1292575), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in a reinforced platoon of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 23 February 1953. When the area was subjected to devastating enemy automatic weapons fire followed closely by a savage hostile assault immediately after he had positioned his fire team in support of a patrol operating forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Ahumada skillfully directed his men in delivering controlled counterfire which repulsed the first attack and forced the enemy to reinforce as a result of heavy casualties. Fearlessly exposing himself to the withering hostile fire as the enemy launched a final assault, he inspired his comrades to hold off the hostile forces until the platoon could rout the attackers and maintain the integrity of the position. Mortally wounded during the action, Private First Class Ahumada, by his courageous leadership, determination and self-sacrificing devotion to duty, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: December 13, 1930 at Tulare, California. Home Town: Tulare, California. Death: KIA: February 23, 1953.

Airheart, William Cararyl

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Captain William Cararyle Airheart (MCSN: 0-38302), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action while serving as Commanding Officer of a Marine Infantry Company , Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF,, in action against the enemy on Hill 872, on 19 June 1951. Assigned the mission of assaulting the strategically important hill occupied by a numerically superior enemy force, he launched an attack upon the position. When the initial assault was halted by intense automatic weapons fire, Captain Airheart led his unit in a second attack, but after seizing the objective, was forced to withdraw by a fanatic enemy counterattack. Throughout the remainder of the day, he led repeated attacks on the hill, but each time was forced to withdraw. Re-organizing his company, he led a sixth assault, and by skillful maneuvering, succeeded in occupying the position and establishing an effective defense perimeter. The gallantry, aggressiveness and outstanding courage displayed by Captain Airheart on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered service From North Carolina.

Aitcheson, James R.

Sergeant First Class James R Aitcheson, RA38784045, Armored Cavalry, US Army, Co A, 78th Heavy Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy on 12 July 1950 near Cho Chi Won (Chochiwon) Korea. The 21st Infantry Regiment was in a defensive position near the town of Cho Chi Won but due to the large attacking force of the enemy they were forced to withdraw from their positions and take up new positions farther south. SFC Aitcheson’s platoon was given the mission of protecting the rear of the regiment during their withdrawal. The rear of the column was under heavy enemy artillery and automatic weapons fire which resulted in several of the infantrymen becoming wounded. On several occasions and with disregard of his own safety SFC Aitcheson got out of his tank and helped the wounded into it; as a result he had to remain on the outside of the tank. One of the tanks of his section would not start, so SFC Aitcheson had the driver of his tank back into position and towed the disabled tank to safety. During this time he directed the fire of his own tank on enemy positions. The courage and leadership displayed by SFC Aitcheson aided in the evacuation of several wounded men, the saving of a much needed tank, and was also an inspiration to the other men in his platoon. The act of gallantry displayed by SFC Aitcheson reflects great credit on himself and the Military Service. (Aitchseon was wounded in action on July11 and July 16, 1950.) GO 64, 1 Aug 1950 Entered Service from Fort Pierce, FL.

Akins, Charles William

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Electrician's Mate Third Class Charles William Akins (NSN: 3480933), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry in action and outstanding devotion to duty as a member of the rescue party which entered the demolished living compartments on the U.S.S. Walke (DD-723) when that ship was heavily damaged due to enemy action on the morning of 12 June 1951. Knowing that a large number of wounded men were trapped in the debris and wreckage in the damaged area he voluntarily entered on of the compartments to find and rescue them. With complete disregard for his own safety, he made his way through the wreckage, and in almost complete darkness, sought out the wounded men trapped there. He helped to extricate them from the wreckage and bring them to safety. He remained in that compartment until all of the wounded had been rescued and all of the dead who could be extricated had been recovered. His personal courage, determination and devotion to duty saved the lives of several men who would otherwise have perished, and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1676 (October 18, 1951).

Alban, Paul E. (posthumous)

Major Paul E. Alban, O23500, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star posthumously for gallantry in action on 19 July 1950 at Taejon, Korea. The 11th Field Artillery was in Taejon with a mission of directly supporting an Infantry unit. The town had been completely surrounded by the enemy and was under assault by his tanks and infantry. Intense small arms and mortar fire was being directed at anything within the town that moved. In the face of such obstacles, Major Alban, seeing that no escape route remained open for the Battalion, voluntarily organized and directed a detail with gathered the bodies of the dead, arranged for the evacuation of the wounded, cleared the road of wrecked vehicles and other debris and otherwise completed preparations for the withdrawal of the Battalion. By his cool and inspiring leadership Major Alban enabled his Battalion to withdraw from an extremely difficult situation with a minimum of casualties and loss of equipment. He brought great credit on himself and to the military service. GO 69, 5 Aug 1950. Entered service from Van Wert, OH.

Alberty, Estell C. (posthumous)

Private Estell C. Alberty, RA13304167, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company D, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry division, is awarded the Silver Star posthumously for gallantry in action on 10 July 1950 near Chonui, Korea. Private Alberty had returned from Chochiwon to the 1st Battalion Motor Pool in his truck loaded with mortar and machinegun ammunition. He was aware that the enemy had penetrated forward positions and had set up a road block between the Battalion motor pool and his company. Realizing the hazard of running a road block with live ammunition and in spite of the fact that his immediate superior informed him that he did not have to go forward, Private Alberty, knowing the desperate need for ammunition by his unit volunteered to drive his truck loaded with ammunition to the front lines. In his attempt to do so he was killed. Private Alberty’s display of courage, fortitude and valor reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army. GO 71, 6 Aug 1950. Entered service from Hanaley, WV.

Alexander, James B.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 133 - 1 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) [then Sergeant First Class] James B. Alexander (ASNP 0-2263512), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company L, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 11 November 1951. His unit had the mission of giving fire support to another platoon that was attacking a strategic enemy-held knoll. The two units became pinned down by a murderous hail of hostile machine gun and small arms fire, which wounded a recoilless rifleman. Although unfamiliar with the manipulation of the weapon, Lieutenant Alexander realized the effectiveness of it. He voluntarily and with utter disregard for his own personal safety, grabbed the weapon and jumped to his feet within full view of the enemy to fire deadly, accurate bursts into the foe's machine gun emplacement. As a result of his achievement, the machine gun was rendered useless and the friendly troops were able to accomplish their mission. Lieutenant Alexander's gallant action, bold initiative and selfless devotion to duty were a great inspiration to his comrades and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered Service From Texas.

Alfe, Norman N.

Clipping from Fairport Herald-Mail, Fairport, NY November 27, 1951:

Lt. Norman Alfe Awarded Silver Star for Gallantry in Action on Korean Front

1st Lt. Norman N. Alfe, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Alfe of East Rochester, former residents of Fairport has recently received the Silver Star for gallantry in action.  Lt. Alfe is a graduate of Fairport High School and of Syracuse University in 1946, and served in World War II from 1942 to 1945 with 76th Division in France and Germany.  He was about to be shipped to Japan when the war terminated.

Lt. Alfe, Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was wounded in action in Taeusan, Korea, on July 30, 1951 during an assault on enemy positions.  His company met with heavy resistance, and according to his citation:

"with a gallant demonstration of leadership, moved among his men encouraging them and keeping his platoon well organized.  Then, with complete disregard for his safety, he assaulted an enemy machine gun emplacement with grenades, completely destroying it while inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy.  By his courageous actions, Lt. Alfe so inspired his men and led them in a final assault to repulse the enemy from their positions.  During this action, Lt. Alfe was painfully wounded but refused to leave until all other wounded members of his platoon had been evacuated.  The gallantry in action displayed by Lt. Alfe reflects great credit upon himself and the military service."

He was in the interior decorating business in Texas and was married shortly before being recalled to active duty.  He is hospitalized in Kobe, Japan, recovering from wounds received in the Korea action for which he received the citation.

Alfeo, Aurelio S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Aurelio S. Alfeo (MCSN: 1160545), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radio Operator of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. Seriously wounded by an exploding mine, which also rendered his radio useless, during the initial assault against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Private First Class Alfeo, after receiving first aid and refusing evacuation, remained until the company command group neared the mined area, and then guided the group safely through the hazardous field. Observing a wounded Marine lying in the mined area, he made his way out of the field, using a rifle for support, to find a Corpsman to treat the fallen man, refused a stretcher for himself and walked back to the battalion aid station despite his own painful wounds. By his outstanding courage, fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of others, he served to inspire all who observed him and aided in saving the lives of several Marines. Private First Class Alfeo's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Joliet, Illinois. Home Town: Joliet, Illinois.

Alfonso, Albert F.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 216 - 5 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant] Albert F. Alfonso (ASN: 0-57240), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company I, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Changyong, Korea, during the period 6 to 10 August 1950. During an attack by a hard pressing, numerically superior enemy, friendly nearby units were encircled and suffered heavy casualties. Leading his company in an attack on the hostile position, Captain Alfonso succeeded in reaching the trapped company, relieving the enemy pressure and evacuating the wounded. Through his efforts an enemy counter-attack was prevented and the company position secured. Advancing against strong opposition, he led his company to the Naktong River and assisted elements of a similarly encircled unit to reach the safety of friendly lines. Although his company in turn was trapped by the enemy, he successfully fought off the hostile forces for three days while inflicting heavy casualties and destroying much equipment. His gallant actions deprived the enemy of access to the vital road from the river and reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii.

Alitz, Charlie

Iowan To Return From Korea with Body of Brother

WITH THE U.S. SEVENTH INFANTRY DIVISION, KOREA, Wednesday (AP)

Rolland and Charlie Alitz are going back home to Iowa together after four months in Korea. They joined the army together when Charlie volunteered to be inducted ahead of time so he could serve with his brother. They trained together at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. They sailed to Korea on the same transport and both were assigned to the 17th regiment of the Seventh division.

One cold night in January on “no name hill" in eastern Korea, Rolland and Charlie were on duty together. A Communist patrol crawled up to within a few feet. Charlie stayed with his machine gun and held off the Reds until his company could get into position. He was killed before the Communists could be stopped. His action brought a recommendation for the Silver Star.

Now Rolland Alitz is going home on emergency leave — to take Charlie's body back to the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry B. Alitz of Plymouth, lA. Rolland's wife, Shirley, lives in Mason City, IA." Feb 6, 1952. Cedar Rapids Gazette

Alkire, Charles

General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
24th Infantry Division

By direction of the President, Captain Charles Alkire, O-1284980, Infantry, a member of Company D, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry. On 10 July 1950, near Chonui, Korea, Captain Alkire displayed gallantry in action while commanding Company D. Companies A and D were in defensive positions. They were subjected to intense fire from small arms, mortars and artillery, as well as infantry and armored attack by overwhelming n umbers of the enemy. There were no weapons in the Company capable of destroying the enemy tanks. However, as a result of Captain Alkire’s gallant example, his men remained in their positions in spite of direct attack by four tanks, which were from fifty to three hundred yards distant. By personally directing the fire effects of his command, Captain Alkire caused heavy casualties to the enemy. After his Company had been seriously depleted, he was ordered to withdraw. Passing the order on to his men, he personally directed the withdrawal and did not leave the position until every other man had escaped to safety. During the withdrawal, he constantly moved about the position in the face of extremely heavy fire. Due to his gallant and resourceful leadership, his company’s mission was accomplished, and it was able to again enter combat with the enemy the next day. Home of record: Missoula, Montana.

Alkire, Darr H.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Brigadier General Darr H. Alkire (AFSN: 298A/0-16639), United States Army Air Forces, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Deputy for Materiel, Far East Air Forces, in Korea, during the period July through November 1950. General Alkire was charged with assuring the constant and uninterrupted flow of materiel and the development of air bases to insure full Air Force effectiveness. By virtue of frequent visits to the most forward airfields, and both ground and aerial surveys of the combat area, General Alkire was able to fulfill his responsibilities and also complete plans for the earliest possible utilization of advanced airfields after their liberation. During these actions he was constantly subject to enemy and ground attack. The judgment, initiative, and devotion to duty shown by General Alkire materially contributed to the success of the United States Air Force and were in keeping with the highest military traditions.

Allan, Halle Charles Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Captain Halle Charles Allan, Jr. (NSN: 0-61063), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as Commander, Destroyer Squadron Nine, Joint Task Force SEVEN, United Nations Command, in action in the Inchon-Seoul operation during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army Korea, General Orders No. 49 (October 27, 1950). Born: October 29, 1904. Death: September 30, 1990.

Allen, Edward Gerald

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders #73 - 22 March 1951

Lieutenant Colonel Edward G. Allen, 031878, Infantry, Commanding Officer, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 31 January 1951, near Nubongdong-ni, Korea, Colonel Allen's battalion was withdrawing to more favorable terrain to establish a defensive perimeter for the night when it was attacked by a strong enemy force. This attack was executed by the enemy in such a manner that the supporting weapons of the battalion were in the open and exposed to enemy machine gun and small arms fire. Colonel Allen, realizing the gravity of the situation, personally supervised the organization of the supporting weapons to fight back the enemy attack. In doing this, he continually exposed himself to heavy fire. The coolness under fire, personal courage, and professional skill displayed by Colonel Allen were instrumental in defeating the enemy attack and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Vermont.

Allen, Neil E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 204 - 26 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant [then Corporal] Neil E. Allen (ASN: RA-19244097), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. During an assault crossing of the Naktong River and subsequent attack on the well-fortified enemy emplacements, his unit was subjected to intensive artillery, mortar and small arms fire. Although separated from his unit, Sergeant Allen continued to advance and encountering a small group of soldiers, organized them into a fighting unit. Leading this group he attacked and successfully eliminated two enemy strong points. Continuing his attack, he advanced with his group, although under intensive enemy fire, until the high ground had been taken by the friendly troops and the attack a success. His superior leadership, gallantry and unhesitant devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Allen, Paul T. (posthumous)

General Orders No. 68 - 20 August 1950

News clipping with partial citation:

"PFC Paul T. Allen, 8066th mechanized reconnaissance platoon, was awarded the Silver Star Medal posthumously.  His platoon was spearheading the attack of an infantry regiment.  When the gunner of his armored car was wounded, Allen moved into position and directed antitank and machine gun fire on the enemy until he was forced to abandon the vehicle.  Although seriously wounded, he continued firing on the enemy from a dismounted position until he was mortally wounded by enemy machine gun fire.  He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Ann Catherine Allen, South Aurora, IL."

Allen, Warren P.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 146 - July 19, 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant Warren P Allen, Armor, U.S. Army, Company B, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy), attached to 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 23 March 1951 near Wolsong-ni, Korea. While Lieutenant Allen was leading his platoon of tanks on a reconnaissance patrol into enemy controlled territory in an attempt to determine the strength and location of the enemy, he came under flanking fire at a range of 200 yards. Placing the remainder of the patrol in a covered position, he went forward in his lead tank, and with complete disregard for his own safety, he exposed the upper portion of his body to obtain an unobstructed view of the hostile forces. Manning his machine gun, he moved his tank up on a ridge, and in spite of the automatic and small arms fire directed toward him, overran the enemy position, withdrawing only when a mortar barrage fell near his tank. Rejoining the remainder of his platoon, Lieutenant Allen took them 3000 yards further and, before returning to friendly lines, he adjusted heavy artillery fire directly on the enemy position. Through his aggressive actions, he not only was able to gather the valuable information concerning the Chinese forces, but he inflicted many casualties on the enemy without suffering any to his patrol. Lieutenant Allen’s gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Nebraska.

Alling, John Wesley Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant John Wesley Alling, Jr. (MCSN: 0-55852), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Combat Patrol Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the early morning of 19 December 1952. After skillfully leading his patrol well forward of the main line of resistance during the hours of darkness, Second Lieutenant Alling established contact with a numerically superior hostile force and fearlessly directed a determined counterattack against the enemy. When the unit was subjected to an intense hostile mortar barrage during the course of the ensuing battle, he was ordered to disengage immediately and withdraw his men to friendly lines. Although mortally wounded by enemy fire while directing the withdrawal, Second Lieutenant Alling steadfastly refused to be evacuated to the main lines. By his courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 18, 1928 at New Haven, Connecticut. Home Town: Sausalito, California. Death: KIA: DOW January 9, 1953.

Allison, Buddy Eugene (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Buddy Eugene Allison (MCSN: 1155184), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 November 1952. Participating in a raid against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Corporal Allison bravely advanced toward the objective in the face of intense hostile machine-gun fire. When the remainder of his team was scattered by devastating enemy fire, he promptly re-grouped his men and led them in a daring final assault on the hostile stronghold. Mortally wounded while charging an enemy machine-gun position, Corporal Allison, by his outstanding courage, exemplary leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 1, 1931 at Dyersburg, Tennessee. Home Town: Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Death: KIA: November 11, 1952.

Allyn, John O.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Coast Artillery Corps) John  O. Allyn (ASN: 0-2200300), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Battery C, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 7th Infantry Division, near Sendong-Ni, Korea, on 26 November 1950. On this date, Lieutenant Allyn was a member of a reconnaissance patrol which was reconnoitering north toward the Yalu River. This patrol encountered intense enemy fire from commanding ground to the front, rear and flanks. This intense enemy fire pinned down the forces, preventing movement in any direction and necessitated additional fire power being brought to bear upon the enemy-occupied terrain. Lieutenant Allyn, commanding three sections of anti-aircraft artillery automatic weapons tracked vehicles, voluntarily and without regard to his personal safety, abandoned his position and cover and moved down the column of vehicles. Maneuvering the weapons into firing positions, Lieutenant Allyn provided a covering fire, allowing the reconnaissance patrol to withdraw. His gallant action and exemplary leadership reflect great credit on himself and the military service

Alonzo, Nichie

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 42 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Nichie Alonzo (ASN: ER-57400878), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Chugok, Korea, on 25 April 1951. He was entrenched in a forward defensive position with one other man when he was attacked by approximately 20 hostile soldiers. The first assault was beaten off with the help of supporting mortar fire but the enemy soon regrouped and charged again. Private Alonzo sent his comrade for help and remained to delay the enemy approach single-handedly. With complete disregard for his own safety, he unhesitatingly exposed himself, firing with devastating accuracy into the hostile hordes. The attack came to within 30 yards of his position before he beat it off, killing two enemy troops and wounding one. Before help could arrive, the enemy attacked again. Private Alonzo, although nearly out of ammunition, refused to budge and fought with determined aggressiveness until he was dazed by the explosion of a concussion grenade which destroyed his weapon. Undaunted, he jumped from his foxhole and, with hand grenades, forced the enemy to retreat in wild confusion. By the time help arrived, he had killed four and wounded two of the enemy. Private Alonzo's courageous action, tenacious determination and magnificent fighting spirit in the face of overwhelming odds contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Waco, Texas.

Alseth, John H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John H. Alseth (MCSN: 1089628), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 March 1951. When his platoon was subjected to withering hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire, which temporarily halted their advance, while participating as the assault element during a company attack against a heavily fortified enemy hill position, Private First Class Alseth, realizing the seriousness of the situation when attempts at eliminating a particularly large enemy bunker failed, moved forward through intense hostile fire with an armload of hand grenades and, reaching the bunker despite the heavy fire concentrated on him, skillfully hurled grenades into the apertures. Moving to another position, he dropped grenades into the connecting tunnels, thereby effectively denying their use to the enemy and rendering the positions untenable. Continuing his daring and aggressive actions, Private First Class Alseth succeeded in killing four of the enemy soldiers and wounding several others before he, himself, sustained serious wounds. By his valiant fighting spirit, resourceful initiative and unyielding devotion to duty in the face of extreme peril, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Duluth, Minnesota. Home Town: Duluth, Minnesota.

Alvarez, Hugo (MIA December 31, 1953 - Monument at Honolulu, HI)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 310 - 25 July 1951

Corporal Hugo Alvarez, ER30424065, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 23 April 1951, near Ognyo-bong, Korea, a determined enemy force attacked defensive positions occupied by the Second Platoon of "F" Company. In the ensuing action, two members of the first squad were wounded, creating a gap in the line through which the enemy could infiltrate to the unit's area. Corporal Alvarez, quickly realizing the seriousness of the situation, boldly exposed himself to the enemy fire and moved into the positions left vacant by the wounded men. Moving along a trench between the two dugouts, he alternated between them, firing at the foe from different angles, cleverly making them believe that this sector of the line was occupied by more than one man. When the squad began to run low on ammunition, Corporal Alvarez, in order to stretch his diminishing supply of hand grenades, threw them at irregular intervals interspersed with stones, keeping the enemy uncertain and pinned down until ammunitions arrived. Corporal Alvarez's gallantry and unusual presence of mind reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Alt, John B.

John B. Alt separated from the U.S. Navy on March 12, 1946, and then enlisted in the U.S. Army on November 23, 1946. He served in the U.S. occupation forces in Japan from May 15, 1947 to May 10, 1949 as the Palace guard in Tokyo. After Japan he spent a short tour of duty at Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

He then served three combat tours of duty in the Korean War from the fall of 1950 thru 1953. After helping capture the North Korean capital of Pyongyang, his infantry unit spearheaded the deepest U.S. forces penetration towards the Chinese border by capturing the town of Sonchon 17 miles south of the Yalu River (the North Korean/Chinese border).

A combat after action report indicated: "Corporal John B. Alt, a squad leader of the 3rd Platoon, Company "B", 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself and showed extraordinary heroism on July 14th 1951. As his squad moved out into the attack they were hit by a tremendous artillery barrage. One of these rounds fell in the midst of his squad, killing two men and wounding several others. Despite a heavy machine gun cross-fire and a continuous artillery barrage, Corporal Alt, in the face of almost certain death, single handedly pulled his men to a relative position of safety from which they could be evacuated. This deed was even more remarkable when one considers that Corporal Alt was wounded himself. After this was accomplished he proceeded with the remainder of his squad into the attack. When the initial objective was reached, Corporal Alt was ordered to the aid station. Despite his protests, he left the squad.

The following day Corporal Alt voluntarily returned to his squad. In a renewed attack upon the enemy he raced forward completely exposed and tossed several grenades into the enemy bunkers, killing many of the enemy. He followed this up by advancing to the next bunker, wiping out many more enemy soldiers with M-1 rifle fire. Corporal Alt's inspiring leadership and courage spurred the men to fight valiantly against a numerically superior enemy." He was awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in this action.

Alvey, Newton

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 192 - 26 September 1950

Private First Class Newton Alvey, RA16304303, Infantry, Company L, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 3 August 1950, Private First Class Alvey manned an outpost on the left flank of the company in the vicinity of Haman, Korea.  After repeated attempts, hostile forces succeeded in penetrating the forward positions of the company and attacked the outpost.  On three successive occasions Private First Class Alvey repelled determined enemy attacks with withering automatic rifle fire delivered from an exposed position.  Although all other members of the squad but one became casualties, Private First Class Alvey remained in his position until the attacks ceased, then assisted in evacuation of the wounded.  Private First Class Alvey's conspicuous gallantry and unflagging devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest ideals of the American soldier.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Amacker, Alfred

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 139 - 22 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Alfred Amacker (ASN: RA-6397141), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 17 August 1950, near Choynyong, Korea. Sergeant Amacker led his platoon in a successful assault and gained the platoon objective. Before he could organized an effective defense of the newly won position the enemy counterattacked. Moving forward, exposing himself to enemy fire, he attempted to break the enemy assault with rifle fire and grenades. Moving to another exposed position when his ammunition was exhausted he turned a captured machine gun into the enemy, firing with such volume and accuracy that the attack was broken, the enemy routed and the position held. This gallant action reflects the greatest credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Orange, Texas.

Amann, Richard Joseph (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Richard Joseph Amann (MCSN: 1101604), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Carrier in Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 21 September 1950. Repeatedly exposing himself to enemy fire, Private First Class Amann completed his assigned mission of carrying mortar ammunition up a small ridge to a mortar position. Remaining forward and engaging in the fire fight, he observed that a near-by rifleman was wounded and immediately picked up the wounded Marine's automatic weapon and directed effective fire on enemy targets of opportunity. When he spotted an enemy machine gun nest firing into his company's positions, he stood and fired long bursts at the hostile gun emplacement before he received a mortal wound by return hostile fire. By his courageous actions, he demolished the enemy machine gun and killed or wounded the entire crew. His fortitude, initiative and unswerving devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Private First Class Amann and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 28, 1930 at Providence, Rhode Island. Home Town: South Orange, New Jersey. Death: KIA: September 21, 1950

Amaro, 2nd Lt. Vidal Rodriguez (1st citation)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders #373 - 21 October 1952


2nd Lt Vidal Rodriguez Amaro (center), Co "I", 65th Inf Regt, 3rd U.S. Inf Div, is congratulated upon receiving the Silver Star Medal, by Col Chester B De Gavre, Co, 65th Inf Regt, 3rd U.S. Div, at the 65th Inf Regt Command Post, Korea
(Click picture for a larger view)

Second Lieutenant Vidal Rodriguez Amaro, 02034123, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the morning of 26 September 1952, a platoon of Company "I", led by Lieutenant Rodriguez Amaro, was assigned the mission of making contact with and locating enemy positions on a hill known as "Kelly" in the vicinity of Koyangdae, Korea. While leading his men to the crest of the hill, Lieutenant Rodriguez Amaro sustained a serious leg wound when the friendly unit was subjected to intense hostile machine gun fire. Disregarding his painful wound and ignoring the heavy hostile fire, he ordered his men to fix bayonets and fearlessly continued in the attack. The foe immediately counteracted the bayonet charge by subjecting the friendly forces to an intense barrage of mortar and artillery fire. Realizing that it would be fatal to continue in the attack in the face of such devastating fire, Lieutenant Rodriguez Amaro ordered his men to withdraw. Refusing medical aid and evacuation, he directed the withdrawal of his unit. Upon seeing a wounded soldier that was unable to participate in the retrograde, he selflessly and with complete disregard for his personal safety, carried the casualty through the shrapnel torn area towards a position of safety. During this act, he received additional wounds of a serious nature but again refused medical aid and evacuation until all friendly casualties had been removed to positions of safety. Lieutenant Rodriguez Amaro's outstanding gallantry and inspirational leadership were highly instrumental in the unit successfully accomplishing its mission and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Amaro, 2nd Lt. Vidal Rodriguez (2nd citation)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 384 - 30 December 1952

Second Lieutenant Vidal Rodriguez Amaro, 02034123, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. In the early morning hours of 7 August 1952, Company "I", of which Lieutenant Rodriguez Amaro was a platoon leader, was assigned the mission of assaulting an enemy stronghold in the vicinity of Chu-dong, Korea. As the elements of the two friendly assault platoons approached their objective, they encountered the fierce small arms and automatic weapons fire of an enemy ambush, inflicting several casualties among them and forcing them to halt in their advance. Immediately and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Rodriguez Amaro moved about the fire swept terrain shouting words of encouragement to his men, directing their fire and evacuating four wounded soldiers. Upon realizing that one of the assault platoons was disorganized, he quickly reorganized the men and led them in engaging the enemy. Employing grim determination and aggressive leadership, he boldly made a one man charge upon the foe, personally killing ten of them by subjecting them to a deadly hail of fire from his carbine and accurately hurling grenades among them. When an intense barrage of hostile mortar and artillery fire necessitated the withdrawal of the friendly unit, Lieutenant Rodriguez Amaro, oblivious to the enemy fire, directed the withdrawal of his platoon and courageously assisted in evacuating another friendly casualty. Lieutenant Rodriguez Amaro's extreme gallantry, intrepid actions, and inspirational leadership were responsible for inflicting numerous casualties among the enemy, allowed the friendly unit to elude the hostile ambush, and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Ambrosia, Eugene J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Eugene J. Ambrosia (MCSN: 0-48426), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to the Military Police Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 and 7 December 1950. At his post in the center section of the convoy and directing traffic on the main supply route during the advance of his Division from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri, First Lieutenant Ambrosia was quick to act when numerically superior hostile forces launched a fanatical attack with small arms, machine guns and mortars and succeeded in cutting the column into three sections. After organizing a defensive perimeter around his sector, he assisted the commanding officer in establishing a defense for the entire convoy and, although painfully wounded, constantly exposed himself to the intense fire while directing and employing his men to maximum advantage. Seizing a box of grenades on one occasion, he charged across 50 yards of open fire-swept terrain to within 25 yards of the enemy and hurled hand grenades with deadly accuracy, inflicting numerous casualties and assisting in repelling the onslaught. His superb leadership, dauntless courage and inspiring efforts were contributing factors in the safe passage of the convoy to its destination and reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Ambrosia and the United States Naval Service. Born: Monterey, California. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Amell, Zane S.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 283 - 11 June 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Zane S. Amell, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as Flight Leader of four F-86 type aircraft, 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Group, Fifth Air Force, on 11 March 1952. Assigned the mission of protecting fighter bombers, Major Amell and his wingman continued a patrol alone after two aircraft in his flight aborted. Sighting a formation of eight MIG-15 type aircraft letting down for a pass at the fighter bombers, Major Amell immediately attacked, although outnumbered four to one, and destroyed one of the attackers. With his ammunition expended, he then positioned his wingman to continue the attack. His wingman expended his ammunition completely in damaging one of the MIG-15s. Without ammunition, and low on fuel, they were withdrawing when they sighted another formation of six MIG-15s. Major Amell unhesitatingly turned into them as if to attack, and with daring maneuvers, caused the enemy to break up and withdraw without a shot being fired. Through his selfless courage, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Major Amell reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Ames, William L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William L. Ames (MCSN: 659920), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as an Assistant Gunner in Weapons Company, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. Quick to assume control of the gun when the gunner was killed, Private First Class Ames kept the weapon in action until it jammed beyond immediate repair and then continued to fight with his pistol fire and hand grenades. Upon learning that some of the enemy could speak English, he and his Section Leader began to converse in a loud voice to draw the fire of the enemy, thus locating the objective and enabling members of his unit to bring their fire to bear on the position. His courage, resourcefulness and aggressive fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Ames and the United States Naval Service. Born: Fort Ogden, Florida. Home Town: Highlands, Florida.

Ammon, George F. Jr.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 46 - 14 February 1951

Captain George F. Jr., 0-1325628, Infantry, Commanding Officer of Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 22 December 1950, at Hungnam, Korea, Captain Ammon's company was in a defensive position when attacked by an estimated two hundred enemy troops. Immediately, Captain Ammon, boldly went to the foremost forward position of his company, skillfully redeployed his troops and directed their fire upon the onrushing foe. While directly exposed to the enemy, he continuously moved among his men giving encouragement and directing the defense, and as a result of his determined leadership and professional skill, eight seven casualties were inflicted on the enemy while his unit was almost unscathed. The enemy was forced to withdraw. Captain Ammon's gallantry and exemplary leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Mississippi.

Amy, 1LT Armando

General Orders No. 343 - 8 August 1951
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

First Lieutenant Armando Amy, 0954374, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 4 June 1951, near Unchon-ni, Korea, Company "A" was given the mission of assaulting a mountain peak stronghold of an estimated two-battalion enemy force. During the assault, Lieutenant AMY'S platoon became subjected to a severe enemy barrage and suffered many casualties. Continually rallying his men, Lieutenant Amy and a handful of troops succeeded in reaching the objective, where they were immediately and strongly counterattacked. Although bleeding profusely from head wounds and blinded in one eye, Lieutenant Amy refused to be evacuated and continued staunchly to direct the defense of the recently gained position. Not until the company commander ordered the unit to withdraw for reorganization, did Lieutenant AMY permit himself to be taken to an aid station in a rear area. The superb gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Amy reflects the highest credit upon himself and is in keeping with the most esteemed traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Amyotte, George Alex Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class George Alex Amyotte, Jr. (MCSN: 1106667), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea on 10 December 1950. Private First Class Amyotte was serving as an automatic rifleman in a platoon assigned as rear guard for the Division during its withdrawal from Koto-ri. Although painfully wounded in both arms during a fierce attack by a numerically superior enemy, he remained steadfastly at his position until the assault was hurled back. Refusing to seek medical aid, he was assisting in the evacuation of other wounded when he was wounded for a second time, suffering painful injury to both legs. Still not allowing himself to be evacuated, he courageously returned to his weapon and continued firing on the enemy in support of the withdrawal. Private First Class Amyotte's heroic devotion to duty and fearless actions were an inspiration to all who fought with him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Anazagasty-Rodriguez, German

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class German Anazagasty-Rodriguez (MCSN: 1225351), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 - 27 October 1952. When the right flank of the attacking platoon was pinned down by a murderous hail of fire from an enemy machine gun emplaced on high ground while his platoon was counterattacking a bitterly defended hill position, Private First Class Anazagasty-Rodriguez unhesitatingly dashed from his covered position and, in company with another Marine, raced over seventy-five yards through the intense hostile fire. Fearlessly advancing, he skillfully fired his rifle and hurled hand grenades at the enemy, destroying the position, routing the hostile troops and personally accounting for one enemy dead. Painfully wounded during the fire fight, Private First Class Anazagasty-Rodriguez, by his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, contributed materially to the success of the counterattack and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Aguadilla, Puerto Rico. Home Town: Aguadilla, Puerto Rico.

Ancel, Robert M.

Pfc. Robert M. Ancel, 12325428, 3rd Infantry Division, 7th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Battalion, HQ Company. Missing in Action - Presumed Dead on 3 December 1950 near Hukau-ri, North Korea.

"On 3 December 1950, in the vicinity of Hukau-ri, Korea, Private Ancel did, without personal regard for his own safety, expose himself to intense small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire, in order to retrieve vital signal equipment which had been left in the 'G' company positions when those positions were overrun by numerically superior enemy forces. After the physically exhausting trek up the steep slope and return, Private Ancel discovered that his unit was in the process of withdrawing. He found a place on a vehicle, but after moving only a few yards he gave the place to a wounded man whom he noticed limping by. Private Ancel was last seen by his comrades trudging up the steep mountain road. Private Ancel's display of coolness and courage in the face of withering enemy fire and his concern for a wounded comrade were an inspiration to his fellow men."

Anctil, Gerald R.

General Orders No. 363 - 28 August 1953
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Corporal Gerald R. Anctil, US51180164, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning of 6 July 1953, Company "K" began to raid enemy held Hill "250" in the vicinity of Honu-Chon, Korea. Corporal Anctil was the squad leader of the machine gun squad attached to the assault platoon. After a short, but bitterly contested fire fight, the first two sectors of the hill were overrun by the attacking force. Upon reaching the crest of the second sector, Corporal Anctil immediately began to deploy his machine gun crews for the purpose of supporting the assault on another sector of the hill. Having done this, Corporal Anctil left his squad and moved to a position from which he could most effectively observe the enemy's fire. Near the crest of the hill, he observed a large machine gun bunker and supporting automatic rifle positions. Shortly thereafter, Corporal Anctil, with complete disregard for his personal safety, took several grenades and began to rush the entrenched enemy. He was last seen throwing grenades into a trench on the left flank of the enemy positions and inflicting heavy casualties when incoming enemy artillery fire critically wounded him. Corporal Anctil's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Massachusetts.

Anderson, Frank A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Frank A. Anderson (MCSN: 0-48208), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 September 1951. When a strong enemy counterattack, supported by an intense mortar barrage, was launched against his defense position during the hours of darkness, First Lieutenant Anderson bravely made his way along the lines in the face of intense hostile small-arms, hand grenade and mortar fire, skillfully directing the defense of critical points and shouting words of encouragement to his men. By his exemplary leadership, outstanding courage and gallant devotion to duty, he materially aided his men in hurling back the fanatical assaults of the numerically superior enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Des Moines, Iowa. Home Town: Des Moines, Iowa.

Anderson, Herbert Monroe (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain Herbert Monroe Anderson (MCSN: 0-41116), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1951. A skilled and courageous leader, Captain Anderson boldly led his company in an attack on strongly defended hostile positions and, in order to direct personally the foremost units as the leading elements advanced, exposed himself to enemy observation to observe and direct the assault. Braving intense hostile automatic weapons, small arms and mortar fire while skillfully directing devastating fire on the enemy, he was hit and fell mortally wounded. His cool leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty inspired his men to final success, thereby reflecting the highest credit upon Captain Anderson and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 5, 1921 at Kingsburg, California. Home Town: Kingsburg, California. Death: KIA: September 21, 1951.

Anderson, James E.

General Orders No. 41 - 19 January 1952
24th Infantry Division

Master Sergeant James E. Anderson, NG37315429, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company D, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by courageous action near Pangdangdong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951.  His machine gun section was providing supporting fire for riflemen attacking strongly reinforced enemy positions.  Sergeant Anderson, Platoon Sergeant, skillfully dispersed the machine guns in strategic positions from which they could give the most effective covering fire.  When the assaulting element was pinned down by devastating enemy fire, he moved his weapons forward into exposed positions and destroyed the enemy strongpoint, encouraging his men and maintaining their accurate supporting fire until the enemy assault was repulsed.  On one occasion he exposed himself completely to the murderous enemy fire as he moved his gun well forward to fire into an enemy mortar position and personally silenced it.  As a result of his fearless leadership, the friendly forces inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy and were able to secure and hold their objective.  Sergeant Anderson's courageous action and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from Grand Rapids, Minnesota.

Anderson, James R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James R. Anderson (MCSN: 1102885), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 March 1951. With his platoon engaged in attacking a series of heavily fortified enemy positions, Private First Class Anderson braved devastating hostile fire to initiate a daring one-man assault against a bunker, single-handedly killing its occupants and destroying a machine gun which had been delaying his unit's advance. Aggressively continuing the attack in the approaching darkness, he spearheaded a bayonet charge against an enemy strong point, permitting his platoon to advance, annihilate a numerically superior enemy force and seize the strategic ground. By his outstanding initiative, courage and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Anderson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Anderson, James R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel James R. Anderson (MCSN: 0-6227), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot and Commanding Officer of Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Forty-Two F(VMF(AW)-542), and subsequently as Commanding Officer of Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 23 February to 30 June 1951. A superb airman and skilled leader, Lieutenant Colonel Anderson personally led his squadron in repeated air strikes on hostile targets throughout this period and, despite the hazards involved in carrying out attacks at night and during instrument weather conditions, aided materially in providing effective support to friendly ground forces. On one occasion, he skillfully maneuvered his aircraft in darkness over rugged terrain and through cloud base lower than the surrounding peaks, pressing home daring attacks on an enemy truck column in the face of intense hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire and inflicting severe damage on the enemy. Flying in instrument conditions on another flight, he guided his section through hostile anti-aircraft fire down into the target area and launched bold attacks on a convoy of enemy vehicles. Locating the hostile gun positions, he released his bombs at minimum range in the face of intense hostile fire and scored direct hits on the enemy emplacements. His outstanding courage and devotion to duty inspired all those who served with him and reflect great credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Anderson and the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Paul, Minnesota. Home Town: St. Paul, Minnesota.

Anderson, Kenneth A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Kenneth A. Anderson (MCSN: 0-28674), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMF-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 October 1951. Leading a flight of twelve planes in a determined strike against rail installations on the enemy's main supply route south of Sunchon, Captain Anderson initiated a daring attack on the target in the face of a heavy concentration of hostile anti-aircraft fire, completely demolishing a railroad bridge and effecting multiple rail cuts. When one of his aircraft sustained damage by enemy ground fire and was forced to land in hostile territory, he led the remainder of his flight through thirty miles of intense antiaircraft fire to the safety of the coast and, after alerting rescue facilities and directing them to the vicinity of the crashed plane, bravely ran the gauntlet of enemy fire to provide cover for the downed pilot. Throughout a period of one hour, Captain Anderson continued to carry out effective covering action and succeeded in silencing numerous hostile anti-aircraft batteries with strafing attacks. Although his plane received some twenty hits from enemy automatic weapons fire, he remained over the downed airman until darkness and shortage of fuel forced him to return to his base. By his outstanding courage, superb airmanship and heroic devotion to duty, Captain Anderson upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Milbank, South Dakota. Home Town: Milbank, South Dakota.

Anderson, Leo Donald

General Orders No. 215 - 22 June 1951
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Captain Leo D. Anderson, 02018631, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 27 April 1951, enemy forces in the vicinity of Uijongbu, Korea, launched a powerful attack against the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 65th Infantry. Penetrating the sector of the line held by these two units, these hostile forces succeeded in isolating one company from its battalion. Captain Anderson, who was in the battalion observation post, realizing the seriousness of the situation and the possibility of a general breakthrough, moved forward to collect and assemble remnants of two companies, into a defensive perimeter to block the existing gap. With complete disregard for his own safety, he crossed the open bullet-swept terrain and organized elements of the two companies fusing them into an effective defensive force. Captain Anderson then formed squad patrols to go forward, and, under his personal supervision, they evacuated the wounded. Captain Anderson's conspicuous gallantry and courageous demeanor reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Colorado.

Anderson, Norman J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Norman J. Anderson (MCSN: 0-5256), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane and Deputy Commander of Marine Aircraft Group Thirty-Three (MAG-33), attached to the U.S.S. Badoeng Strait, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 17 August 1950. Organizing and leading a well planned aerial attack against an enemy held bridgehead across the Naktong River, south of Taegu, Korea, Lieutenant Colonel Anderson succeeded in clearing the area for later occupation by Marine ground forces. When advancing Marine troops became pinned down by intense gunfire from enemy positions along a ridge line, he daringly marked out enemy targets for his aerial attack group despite the defiladed and camouflaged nature of the hostile positions which necessitated the execution of extremely low passes directly over fire-spurting enemy guns. After the bombs and rockets of his aerial group were expended, he led his flight in bold strafing attacks against a cornered and desperately fighting enemy in support of advancing Marine troops. His cool courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Anderson and the United States Naval Service. Born: Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Home Town: Glendale, California.

Anderson, Richard D.

General Orders No. 372 - 29 July 1952
Headquarters, Far East Forces

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Richard D. Anderson, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 67th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 18th Fighter-Bomber Group, Fifth Air Force, on 27 October 1951. Leading three flights of four F-51 type aircraft, Captain Anderson displayed outstanding leadership and flying skill in a successful bombing attack on a rail target at Kuni-Ri, Korea. Captain Anderson then led his flight in an attack with rockets and machine guns against the secondary target of supplies and troop billets at Youn-dong, Korea. When his number two man was hit by ground fire and forced to bail out, Captain Anderson maintained effective air cover despite battle damage to his aircraft, accurate ground fire, and insufficient fuel to guarantee safe return. As a result of his courageous actions the downed pilot was rescued within two hours and the mission accounted for the destruction of vital enemy supplies and transportation facilities. Through his high personal courage and superior airmanship, Captain Anderson reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Anderson, Robert A.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 107 - 14 May 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class Robert A. Anderson, RA32712543, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery C, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Changbong-ni, Korea. Numerically superior enemy forces had broken through front line elements and attacked Battery C's position with heavy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire. Despite the intense fire falling in the area Private Anderson remained at his howitzer and continued firing upon the attacking enemy. When the battery was forced to withdraw, he march ordered his piece and carried wounded men to a waiting vehicle. As the battery displaced rearward, its leading vehicles were ambushed and captured by strong enemy forces who were emplaced along the route of withdrawal. Private Anderson, with the rear elements, volunteered to act as a gunner on a howitzer which was set in position to lay direct fire upon the enemy. When the enemy regrouped to attack the remainder, of the column, he poured such accurate fire into them that their assault were driven off time after time. When the battery was forced to continue its withdrawal because of a lack of ammunition, he volunteered to accompany several of his comrades to recapture the lead vehicles from the enemy. He then drove an antiaircraft firing vehicle through the enemy roadblock, and when the convoy was once more halted by enemy fire delivered from commanding ground, he aided an officer in rallying the men in his vicinity and in leading them in a charge which swept the hostile troops from the high ground. With the road once more opened, Private Anderson drove his vehicle with several wounded soldiers to the safety of an aid station. The, gallantry displayed by Private Anderson reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service, from New York.

Anderson, Robert Victor

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert Victor Anderson (MCSN: 0-48854), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Regimental Artillery Air Observer of Headquarters Battery, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. First Lieutenant Anderson was flying on a reconnaissance mission forward of friendly lines in a slow unarmed aircraft, when he observed a large enemy force placing intense fire on friendly troops. Realizing that the friendly unit was unable to see the enemy positions from its location, he courageously made a low pass through the heavy enemy fire to drop a message to the unit, and then flew low over the enemy to mark their positions with smoke grenades. Despite the fact that his aircraft was extremely damaged by enemy fire, he fearlessly and with complete disregard for his own personal safety repeatedly flew over the enemy at extremely low altitudes to assist in adjusting artillery fire, which neutralized the sector and enabled the advancing troops to seize their objective. First Lieutenant Anderson's unswerving devotion to duty and great personal bravery were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. Board Serial 268 (March 19, 1969).

Anderson, Terrell

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 311 - 28 June 1953

Sergeant Terrell Anderson, RA14144405, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 16 May 1953, a platoon of Company "G" was holding the northern sector of Outpost "Harry" in the vicinity of Songnae-dong, Korea. Sergeant Anderson, the platoon sergeant, was  among his men when enemy mortar and artillery fire began landing in the area. He immediately checked to see that all of his men had adequate cover from the shell blasts. Upon receiving word that friendly mortar flares were to be used in the area. he moved through the devastating fire, warning his men to remain concealed and not to expose their positions to the enemy. As Sergeant Anderson went to each position, he instilled confidence and a fighting spirit among his men and was inspirational to others as he repeatedly moved through the intensely shelled area in the interest of the welfare of his comrades. While he was moving to an extremely exposed position, a close landing mortar round mortally wounded him. Sergeant Anderson's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Alabama.

Anderson, Thomas W. (4th citation)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 426 - 17 September 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) Thomas W. Anderson (ASN: 0-25383), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division, in action in Korea. On 22 May 1951, the 1st Battalion, 7th Infantry, engaged in a struggle to seize a strategic mountain pass near Sangori, Korea, became critically short of water, rations, and ammunition. Since and overland supply trip would require too much time, the regimental commander urgently requested that a plane be used to fly the necessary rations to the embattled unit. Major Anderson, being advised of the situation, volunteered to perform the vital missions. Although subjected to small arms fire aimed at his unarmed aircraft, jagged mountain tops, approaching darkness and rapidly shifting ground action, he successfully flew four flights; each time accurately pin-pointing the unit to drop the supplies within the troops' immediate reach. Major Anderson's vital contribution to the welfare of the beleaguered battalion and the unwavering gallantry which he exhibited reflect high credit upon himself and the military service.

Anderson, Tilton A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Tilton A. Anderson (MCSN: 0-50314), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 September 1950. Ordered to lead his twenty-two man platoon against a strongly defended hostile position, Second Lieutenant Anderson spearheaded the attack up the nearly vertical face of the ridge under heavy enemy fire and, upon reaching a covered ledge, directed and encouraged his men to assault enemy positions on top of the ridge. Seizing the objective following a closing hand-to-hand battle, he succeeded in holding the position despite heavy odds and, effectively deploying his remaining seven men, pursued the routed enemy until he was ordered to withdraw. An inspiring and determined leader, Second Lieutenant Anderson, by his coolness under fire and heroic efforts throughout, served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Topeka, Kansas. Home Town: Topeka, Kansas.

Andrews, David

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal David Andrews (MCSN: 938249), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When his squad's vital position was subjected to a violent night attack by a numerically superior enemy force, Corporal Andrews repeatedly exposed himself to devastating hostile automatic weapons, hand grenade and small-arms fire. Continually moving from one position to another, he shouted words of encouragement to his men and effectively directed his squad's fire to assist in killing approximately twenty-five of the enemy before the attack was finally repulsed. By his outstanding courage, leadership and zealous devotion to duty, Corporal Andrews served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Vain, Oklahoma. Home Town: Alamosa, Colorado.

Andrews, Gary G. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Gary G. Andrews (MCSN: 1271399), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 24 July 1953. Volunteering to participate with the forward element in an assault to retake a critical outpost position, Private First Class Andrews advanced with his squad through heavy enemy fire to a position where the unit gained a foothold in the hostile trench line. As a member of the point of the attacking force, he courageously moved forward and succeeded in inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy troops, thereby aiding in checking hostile resistance long enough to permit his comrades to reorganize and continue the attack which drove the enemy from the position. Although mortally wounded when several hostile grenades landed in the trench line while he was pursuing the retreating force, he continued to deliver deadly fire and to inflict many casualties upon the enemy until he was completely incapacitated by his wounds and unable to continue. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and gallant spirit of self-sacrifice in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Andrews contributed in large measure to the success of his unit in regaining control of the position and in accomplishing its assigned mission. His steadfast devotion to duty throughout reflects the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 18, 1934 at Grand Rapids, Michigan. Home Town: Grand Rapids, Michigan Death: KIA: DOW July 28, 1953.

Andrews, James H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James H. Andrews (MCSN: 1161996), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. When his platoon was temporarily pinned down by devastating enemy automatic weapons, small-arm and hand grenade fire from two large enemy bunkers during the attack on a series of heavily fortified and strongly defended hill positions, Private First Class Andrews single-handedly charged forward and knocked out one bunker with rifle and hand grenade fire. Although seriously wounded by an enemy grenade while in the process of neutralizing the second emplacement, he refused medical treatment and resolutely continued forward in the assault through heavy enemy fire until the objective had been secured. By his indomitable fighting spirit, fortitude and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Andrews materially aided in the success of the attack and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tampa, Florida. Home Town: Tampa, Florida.

Andriotis, Constantine J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Constantine J. Andriotis (MCSN: 629471), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 June 1951. While firing his machine gun in support of a rifle platoon during a fierce enemy counterattack upon the company's position, Private First Class Andriotis was knocked to the ground and his weapon overturned when an enemy hand grenade exploded in his position. Although painfully wounded in the eye, he immediately regained his feet, put the gun back into action, and directed accurate and effective fire against the enemy. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, Private First Class Andriotis contributed materially to the successful repulse of the enemy attack and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Anthony, Donald J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 778 - 27 November 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class Donald J. Anthony, US55093560, (then Private), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 3 September 1951 in the vicinity of Kach’il-bong, Korea. On that date Company K was assaulting well prepared and defended enemy positions on a dominating hill. The squad, of which Private Anthony was a member, had been pinned down by intense enemy automatic weapons fire from strategically place emplacements. Private Anthony, with complete disregard for his own safety, assaulted these bunkers with hand grenades and succeeded in destroying them while killing the occupants. Later, when his squad leader was wounded, Private Anthony assumed command of his unit and led the men in a successful completion of their assigned mission with a minimum of casualties. The gallantry in action and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Private Anthony on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Anton, Anthony D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Anthony D. Anton (MCSN: 0-32547), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to the Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, First Signal Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as a Forward Air Controller of an Infantry Battalion of the First Korean Marine Corps Regiment, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 July 1951. Carrying out his mission of directing close air support against strongly entrenched hostile hill positions when the enemy suddenly launched a furious counterattack in his sector, Captain Anton immediately observed that the troops in his vicinity were in danger of giving way under the onslaught and, courageously assuming control of the force, moved calmly among the men to encourage them and direct their defense. By his daring initiative, inspiring leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of intense enemy fire, Captain Anton contributed materially to the repulse of the hostile attack and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Los Angeles, California. Home Town: Costa Mesa, California.

Aponte, Angel Escribano

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 347 - 10 August 1951

First Lieutenant Angel Escribano Aponte, 01685755, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 4 June 1951, near Sanjan-ni, Korea, the enemy launched a strong counterattack, supported by mortar and machine gun fire against defensive positions being occupied by Company "E". The First Platoon, commanded by Lieutenant Escribano Aponte, in forward positions approximately 200 yards in front of the main line of resistance, was virtually surrounded by the assaulting hostile troops. Lieutenant Escribano Aponte, to keep from being completely cut-off, ordered his unit to fight their way back to the company perimeter. After the majority of the platoon had reached the company area, Lieutenant Escribano Aponte and a small group of enlisted men still in the original positions were savagely attacked by the foe. Carefully utilizing their dwindling supply of ammunition, the valiant officer and his men held, stubbornly refusing to be overcome by the enemy. Deciding to attempt an escape, Lieutenant Escribano Aponte and his small band, after killing a number of hostile soldiers with a volley of hand grenades and forcing others to retreat, moved out toward their company's positions. They had gone only a short distance when 4 enemy soldiers attacked Lieutenant Escribano Aponte with knives. Fighting back, he killed two of them with the butt of a disabled automatic rifle, while his men eliminated the last two. Lieutenant Escribano Aponte's courageous and inspiring gallantry enabled him and his men to make a successful withdrawal and reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Appleby, Robert L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Robert L. Appleby (MCSN: 0-50471), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a 60-mm. Mortar Section Leader of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When his company's position was subjected to a savage enemy attack, Second Lieutenant Appleby moved through the intense hostile fire to the area of a neighboring platoon to observe and to direct effective mortar fire against the attacking enemy. With the numerically superior hostile force penetrating the friendly position and bringing up its reserve to exploit the gain, he fearlessly advanced to an extreme forward observation point and, skillfully directing close- in mortar fire, was instrumental in disrupting the movement of the enemy reserve forces and in inflicting heavy casualties. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and inspiring devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds, Second Lieutenant Appleby contributed greatly to the defense of the friendly position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Attleboro, Massachusetts. Home Town: Franklin, Massachusetts.

Araiza, William G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman William G. Araiza (NSN: 5688419), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 26 September 1950. While under intense enemy small-arms, machine gun, and anti-tank fire, Hospitalman Araiza fearlessly risked his life to run forward from his covered position into the fire-swept area and, although painfully wounded, succeeded in pulling a wounded Marine for a distance of about 30 yards to a semi-covered position where he administered first aid. His exceptional courage, fortitude and inspiring devotion to duty on behalf of another reflect the highest credit upon Hospitalman Araiza and the United States Naval Service.

Arakawa, Jack C.

Private First Class Jack C. Arakawa, RA30105539, Company C, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. General Order 62, 26 July 1950, Amendment IV reads: So much of Section I General Order No 47, Headquarters 24th Infantry Division APO 24 dated 20 July 50, pertaining to [Arakawa. . .] awarded the Bronze Star for gallantry in action against the enemy in Korea as reads: “Bronze Star”, is amended to read “Silver Star”. (Arakawa was captured 17 July 1950, escaped and returned to military control 20 October 1950. GO 47 unavailable.) Entered service from Hawaii.

Silver Star: The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Jack C. Arakawa (ASN: RA-30105539), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy in Korea while serving with Company C, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. On 16 July 1950, near Taejon, Korea, Private First Class Arakawa's position was subjected to intense attacks from waves of enemy infantry supported by small arms, machine gun, and mortar fire. Completely disregarding fire to which he was subjected, Private First Class Arakawa fired his machine gun at the enemy until it exploded, deafening and partially blinding him. After this accident, he picked up an automatic rifle and continued to fire at the enemy. His calmness, courage and perseverance enabled a number of his fellow soldiers to evacuate the position under attack as his company withdrew. When last seen he was firing with great volume and accuracy into the enemy ranks. His devotion to duty and great courage reflect great credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

Archer, Stephen Morris

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Stephen Morris Archer (NSN: 0-71396), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commander Underwater Reconnaissance Element in support of naval forces conducting operations in heavily mined waters during the period 10 to 22 October 1950. When the U.S.S. Pledge and U.S.S. Pirate were mined on 12 October, he conducted rescue operations for surviving personnel with disregard for his own safety in the face of enemy gunfire from shore batteries. The leadership, force, and judgment displayed by Commander Archer in directing visual and sonar searches for mines throughout this period and in supervising underwater demolition operations in the vicinity of Koto and Rei-To Islands contributed directly to the successful clearance of mine channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan, Korea. His outstanding courage and steadfast devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1204 (December 13, 1950) Born: July 18, 1911. Death: July 31, 1996.

Archuleta, Jose L. (awarded posthumously)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 142 - 24 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Jose L. Archuleta (ASN: RA-17263277), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as a member of Company B, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, on 11 August 1950, in Korea. At this time he was a member of a patrol assigned the mission of penetrating enemy lines and observing location, movement and strength of hostile troops. After proceeding 5000 yards the fourteen man patrol was fired upon from three sides by enemy riflemen of vastly superior numbers. In this fire fight the patrol leader was wounded in the right leg and ordered other members of the patrol to withdraw to the opposite bank of the Hoechon River. Private Archuleta, after killing outright five of the enemy riflemen, worked his way to the wounded patrol leader and attempted to carry him across the river. Under a direct order to leave, he crossed the river and gave covering fire to the patrol leader until seriously wounded. His outstanding devotion to his comrades, utter disregards for personal safety and gallantry in the face of overwhelming odds reflect the greatest credit on himself and the military service.

Arenda, Vernell

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 270 - 19 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Vernell Arenda (ASN: RA-17101734), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company M, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Pohang-dong, Korea, on 2 September 1950. Shortly after launching an attack the company to which he was attached was pinned down by intense machine gun and small arms fire from well dug in enemy positions. Without regard for his own safety he unhesitatingly moved forward, through a hail of withering fire, to a position from which he poured a volume of machine gun fire into the enemy's position silencing one of the enemy's machine guns and killing the crew. Again disregarding the intense fire he moved laterally across the company front and fired again and again until another machine gun was destroyed and the advance continued. Private Arenda's courageous actions and complete devotion to duty reflect he greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Denver, Colorado.

Arie, John D.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Sergeant John D. Arie (MCSN: 988565), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Section Chief of a 60-mm. Mortar Section of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action near Taedabok-Chi, Korea, on 10 August 1950. While advancing along a road near Taedabok-Chi with little cover or concealment, Company D ran into an enemy ambush which blanketed the area with intense small arms fire from well protected and hidden positions in the hills on both sides of the column, disorganizing Sergeant Arie's section. Sergeant Arie, with a portion of his section, was pinned down by enemy machine gun fire behind a column of jeeps. Unhesitatingly and with utter disregard for his life, he dashed approximately three hundred yards over terrain covered by heavy hostile fire to reach a vehicle trailer containing a 60-mm. mortar, removed it, organized a mortar crew, hurried back to the pinned-down section and placed the mortar in a firing position. Then under continuing heavy fire, Sergeant Arie raced to the top of a hill to observe and direct fire. His heroic actions in securing the weapon and effectively directing fire resulted in destruction of two enemy machine gun nests and a mortar emplacement, thus saving the lives of many men and greatly expediting the advance of the company to its destination. Sergeant Arie's display of aggressiveness, courage, initiative, and devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 66 (November 23, 1950). Entered Service From California.

Arkadis, Nickolas Daniel

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Second Lieutenant Nickolas Daniel Arkadis (MCSN: 0-49915), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in the Naktong River sector of Korea on 17 August 1950. On this date, while aggressively leading a rifle platoon in an attack against the enemy, Lieutenant Arkadis was struck in the arm by fragments from an enemy shell. Although painfully wounded he continued to lead his platoon until forced to stop due to loss of blood. His heroic actions, courageous leadership and devotion to duty contributed materially to the success of the attack. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Arkadis reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, EUSAK, General Orders 162 (November 8, 1950). Entered service From California.

Arlington, Robert C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert C. Arlington (MCSN: 1303231), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 - 25 July 1953. Although seriously wounded when a numerically superior enemy force launched a fierce attack on the company's sector of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Arlington gallantly exposed himself to murderous hostile mortar and artillery fire in order to move through the trench line, firing his weapon and shouting words of encouragement to his comrades. When the squad's ammunition supply was critically low, he voluntarily carried out repeated trips in the face of devastating enemy fire to secure vitally needed supplies. Despite the severity of his wounds which rendered him incapable of further effort, he refused evacuation until all other casualties had been removed to safe positions. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Arlington served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Bronx, New York.

Armentrout, Howard D.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 794 - 30 November 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant First Class Howard D. Armentrout, ER37805040, Corps of Engineers, Army of the United States, a member of Company D, 2d Engineer Combat Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 11 October 1951 in the vicinity of Mundung-ni, Korea. On this date Sergeant Armentrout was with a platoon of engineers, clearing a path for advancing friendly tanks, while under direct enemy observation and small arms fire. During the ensuing action, an antiaircraft gun crew, engaged in a severe fire fight with the enemy, was running critically low on ammunition. Sergeant Armentrout voluntarily and without regard for his own safety, left his position of comparative safety to obtain the necessary ammunition. Securing an M-39 personnel carrier, he loaded it with ammunition and proceeded toward the gun crew. Parking the vehicle in a defilade and out of view of the enemy, he crossed the open terrain, in spite of the intense hostile small arms and mortar fire, to deliver the ammunition. With this assistance, the gun crew was able to provide adequate supporting fire for the assaulting riflemen. The gallantry in action and outstanding devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Armentrout on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Devils Lake, North Dakota.

Armitage, Gerald T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Gerald T. Armitage (MCSN: 0-8992), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 13 to 17 August 1952. Assigned the mission of defending a strong point which had recently been captured from numerically superior forces, Lieutenant Colonel Armitage carried out trips to his most forward units and, in the face of intense enemy mortar, artillery and small arms fire, efficiently directed activities. Despite long, tedious hours, he continually moved from one unit to another in his battalion, lending words of encouragement to his men, organizing and deploying his troops and evacuating the wounded. Displaying an excellent knowledge of military tactics, he effectively maneuvered his units and quickly established defensive positions, enabling his men to inflict devastating losses upon the enemy and repel fanatical counterattacks. By his exceptional leadership, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel Armitage served to inspire the men under his command and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Haverhill, Massachusetts. Home Town: Haverhill, Massachusetts.

Armor, Marshall H. Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 215 - 4 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Field Artillery) Marshall H. Armor, Jr. (ASN: 0-45590), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Battery, 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Tuman-ni, Korea, on 16 July 1950. The enemy had established an effective roadblock and was threatening his battalion's position. Moving forward, through a hail of small arms fire and at times in full view of the enemy, he installed a wire circuit to a position from which he directed effective fire on the roadblock and eliminated this threat to the battalion. Major Armor's gallant action reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Shreveport, Louisiana.

Armstrong, Fred N.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
12 December 1950

Corporal Fred Armstrong, RA17239674, Company A, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Majon-Ri, Korea, on 29 November 1950.  Corporal Armstrong was an assistant gunner of a 60mm mortar squad, which was on a combat patrol, when the patrol was ambushed by heavy enemy fire, a jeep mounted .50 caliber machine gun jammed.  Leaving his own position of cover, under continuous fire, and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he vainly tried to place the machine gun in position.  He then procured a submachine gun from the vehicle and under cover of his own fire made his way approximately 50 yards along the exposed road to a position in the rear of a tank.  From this position of observation on the enemy, utilizing the outside phone, he directed fire of the tank weapons, thereby inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and greatly reducing the volume of enemy fire.  The gallantry displayed by Corporal Armstrong in the face of enemy fire reflects great credit upon himself and upon the military service.

Armstrong, George E.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 32 - 31 January 1951

Captain George E. Armstrong, # 0 - 1290526, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 15 December 1950, at Oro-ri, Korea, Captain Armstrong's company was attacked by an estimated three hundred enemy troops which broke through sections of the line after an intensive fire fight. After the break through, approximately fifty of the enemy attacked the unit's command post, and Captain Armstrong was seriously wounded. Although wounded and in the midst of an overwhelming enemy, he tenaciously refused to be evacuated but proceeded to reorganize his command post on higher ground and gathered elements of his company at the new position. There he personally organized the defense and assisted in carrying other wounded to safety while exposed to enemy fire. He remained at the command post directing the successful defense against a renewed enemy attack until daybreak when the enemy withdrew. The gallantry and exemplary leadership of Captain Armstrong, while seriously wounded and under fire, reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Illinois.

Armstrong, Victor (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Victor A. Armstrong (MCSN: 0-21284), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Pilot of a Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron SIX (VMO-6), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. Upon receiving information that a carrier-based pilot had been shot down in the area between Kyomip'o and P'yongyang, 85 miles behind enemy lines, Captain Armstrong immediately volunteered to attempt a rescue despite the hazards involved in landing so fare behind enemy lines. Provided an escort of two fighter aircraft while en route to the scene of the crash, Captain Armstrong was nearing his destination when taken under fire from a hostile machine gun position. Undeterred by opposition, he continued on his mission and upon reaching his objective, landed and assisted the injured pilot into the helicopter. Returning with the casualty to a rear area hospital, Captain Armstrong, by his courage, determination and devotion to duty while operating in an unarmed aircraft, was responsible for saving a downed pilot from certain capture by the enemy, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Armstrong, Victor (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Victor A. Armstrong (MCSN: 0-21284), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a Helicopter Pilot in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. Informed that a friendly helicopter, attempting to save a downed pilot, had been hit by hostile fire and crashed behind enemy lines, Captain Armstrong volunteered to go to the rescue although he had virtually no previous night helicopter operation experience and had never flown in Korea at night. Arriving at the crash area, he circled until he saw a red flare and the light from a small flashlight. Unable to determine whether the light was from friendly or hostile sources, he continued to circle until he could observed what appeared to be a wrecked helicopter. Courageously executing an extremely difficult landing on a sand bar, he picked up the two downed airmen and returned them to his base. By his daring initiative and exceptional skill, Captain Armstrong saved the two men from death or capture and, by his staunch devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bozeman, Montana. Home Town: Portland, Oregon.

Arne, Lloyd E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Lloyd E. Arne (MCSN: 644838), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 March 1951. When his squad was pinned down by a devastating hail of enemy fire during an assault on well-camouflaged and heavily entrenched positions, Sergeant Arne unhesitatingly moved forward and, joined by another Marine, launched a daring charge toward the enemy bunker. Although painfully wounded by the intense hostile grenade and automatic weapons fire, he reached the bunker and hurled hand grenades through the embrasure, killing the occupants and silencing the fire. Only after the entire objective had been cleared and his squad reorganized would he accept medical attention. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Arne was directly instrumental in the seizure of the objective and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Strawberry Point, Iowa. Home Town: Grand Rapids, Minnesota.

Arnold, Charles E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Charles E. Arnold (MCSN: 1173456), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Wireman of Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 September 1952. After completing his normal tour of duty on the front lines, Sergeant Arnold volunteered to rejoin his company to help restore communications with a strategic outpost more than one mile forward of the main line of resistance. Although two wiremen had been wounded while attempting to repair the important communication line, he fearlessly moved along the outpost trail in the face of intense enemy fire and, on five occasions, skillfully repaired the lines which were repeatedly destroyed by the enemy. Despite the hostile fire which pinned him down several times, he steadfastly continued in an attempt to maintain the vital communication until ordered to return to friendly lines. By his resolute determination, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Sergeant Arnold served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hope, Arkansas. Home Town: Lindsay, California.

Arnold, John L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant John L. Arnold (MCSN: 561886), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. With the platoon subjected to withering hostile automatic weapons, hand grenade and small arms fire during an attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position which posed a serious threat to the battalion post, Staff Sergeant Arnold bravely moved through the devastating hostile barrage to assist in the maneuvering of the men, shouting words of encouragement and skillfully directing their fire. Unhesitatingly assuming command of the squad when the platoon leader became a casualty, he spearheaded a determined assault on the position, completely routing the enemy and securing the strategic ground. Subsequently, when the hostile force regrouped on an adjacent ridge, he again led his men forward in the attack until he fell seriously wounded and was forced to submit to evacuation. By his courageous leadership, resolute determination and indomitable fighting spirit, Staff Sergeant Arnold contributed materially to the success of his company and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Jackson, Mississippi. Home Town: Jackson, Mississippi.

Arnold, Marion D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Marion D. Arnold (MCSN: 668026), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division, in Korea, on 26 September 1950. Private First Class Arnold was serving as a Squad Leader of a machine gun squad attached to a rifle platoon engaged in bitter house-to-house street fighting in the assault through the city of Seoul, Korea. He had his machine gun set up at a road block, and was delivering covering fire for the rifle platoon which was receiving heavy small arms and anti-tank gun fire. Unable to give the maximum effective fire from his position, he, upon his own initiative moved his gun across the street in the open, and in the zone of enemy fire from which he could deliver more effective fire on the enemy. An enemy anti-tank shell knocked him and his assistant gunner from their gun, seriously wounding the assistant gunner. Undaunted, and although still under heavy enemy small arms and anti-tank gun fire, Private First Class Arnold crawled back to his gun, placed it back in action and brought its fire to bear on the enemy, silencing the anti-tank gun and delivering such accurate fire that his supporting rifle platoon was enabled to successfully continue its advance. Private First Class Arnold's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Arntz, Leland G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Leland G. Arntz (NSN: 3134080), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Arntz was serving as a Corpsman with a rifle platoon on a mountainous, snow covered ridge near Yudam-ni, Korea. When his platoon was subjected to heavy enemy small arms, machine gun, Mortar and grenade fire, he fearlessly exposed himself to move among the wounded administering aid and assisting in the evacuation of the casualties. Without regard for his own personal safety, he made numerous trips evacuating the wounded from the front lines to the company command post. On one trip, he was painfully wounded in the shoulder and was ordered to submit to medical evacuation whereupon, he voluntarily returned to the front lines and continued to work in the sub-zero weather with a painful wound, for which he could have been evacuated. His actions were in inspiration to all members of his platoon and undoubtedly saved the lives of many wounded Marines who would have otherwise succumbed from the extreme exposure. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Arnitz's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 3312 (February 17, 1951).

Aruz-Perez, Catalino

Headquarters, 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 75 - 23 March 1951

Corporal Catalino Aruz Perez, RA30413623, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 13 October 1950, in the vicinity of Hwanggan, Korea, Corporal Aruz Perez was a member of a combat patrol which came under intense enemy machine gun and small arms fire. The patrol was pinned down and unable to return fire. Corporal Aruz Perez, with complete disregard for a murderous hail of fire directed against him, ran and crawled across an open field to a position from which he could fire his automatic rifle. He delivered a steady stream of fire destroying an enemy machine gun nest and enabling his patrol to withdraw to a more advantageous position. The courage and initiative displayed by Corporal Aruz Perez reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Asla, Felix Jr.

Headquarters Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 278 - 6 June 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Felix Asla Jr., United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as Flight Leader of four F-86 type aircraft, 336th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Group, Fifth Air Force, on 1 April 1952. While Major Asla and his flight were engaging six MIG-15s, they were attacked by another enemy flight. His wingman sustained a direct hit which destroyed nearly half the left wing. Despite being constantly under direct fire, Major Asla protected his wingman by turning into every pass made against the crippled F-86 by pairs of MIG-15s and successfully countered every thrust, damaging two of the enemy aircraft. Even though he knew his fuel was insufficient for his return to base, Major Asla continued his protective tactics until his wingman could bail out in a safe area. He then climbed to thirty eight thousand feet, glided back to friendly territory, and made a successful air-start, landing with less than twenty gallons of fuel. Through his selfless courage, skillful airmanship, and outstanding devotion to duty, Major Asla reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Ashley, Vernon R. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 438 - 15 November 1952

The Silver Star is awarded Posthumously to First Lieutenant Vernon R. Ashley, 02002910, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 21 July 1952 in the vicinity of Chorwon, North Korea. On that date, Lieutenant Ashley, leading a squad-sized patrol, was returning to friendly lines when he and his unit were suddenly confronted by an overwhelming number of enemy troops. Although outnumbered and surrounded, his determined and courageous leadership enable the friendly patrol to kill or wound at least twenty enemy soldiers, cutting a path through which three members of the patrol escaped. He then set up a rear guard and attempted a withdrawal to a more strategic position. Before this position could be reached, however, he and two of he men were painfully wounded by the murderous hostile small arms fire. This compelled him to change his tactics and try to force a retreat upon the enemy. The fanatical enemy would not withdraw, and when it appeared evident that they would be overrun, he ordered the remainder of the patrol to withdraw and fight their way back to friendly lines. When last seen, Lieutenant Ashley, who with complete disregard for personal safety had elected to remain with the other wounded men, was fighting courageously and fearlessly, endeavoring to hold back the hostile forces. His courageous and selfless actions enabled the remainder of the patrol to escape further casualties and reach the safety of friendly lines. Lieutenant Ashley’s outstanding gallantry and consummate devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Mississippi.

Astle, Paul J.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Paul J. Astle (ASN: RA-13310748), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Battery B, 3d Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 3d Infantry Division, near Majon-ni, Korea, on 29 November 1950. On this date, Corporal Astle was a member of a tank crew, which was furnishing protection for a convoy, when it was ambushed fifteen miles west of Majon-ni, Korea, by a well-entrenched and heavily armed enemy. During the ambush a few members of the tank crew were wounded, and two regular assigned cannoneers deserted on the outset of the fighting. Taking immediate action, Corporal Astle, while under heavy enemy fire, repeatedly exposed himself and alone loaded and fired the weapon on the vehicle. He continued his actions until a comrade came to his aid. Under Corporal Astle's direction, while still exposed to heavy enemy fire, they effectively and with great volume of fire from their weapon enabled the convoy to maneuver and then withdraw. During the withdrawal operation, Corporal Astle, again without regard for his personal safety, under enemy fire, assisted in the evacuation of the wounded and administered first aid. After completion of the withdrawal, Corporal Astle volunteered to go as gunner with another squad instead of remaining in comparative safety with his own vehicle. Corporal Astle's extraordinary valor, resourcefulness, and outstanding devotion to duty not only reflect great credit upon himself but are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Atcheson, George

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade George Atcheson (NSN: 0-476757), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Headquarters Joint Advisory Commission Korea, in action against the enemy in Korea. Late on the night of 25 January 1952, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Atcheson led a raiding party consisting of forty-five Koreans in an amphibious action designed to destroy a railway bridge located on a vital enemy transportation link extending down the east coast of northern Korea. After landing on the hostile beach and personally placing the explosive charges on the bridge, Lieutenant, Junior Grade Atcheson observed an enemy patrol entering the area. So skilled was his direction of the friendly fire that fourteen of the fifteen hostile soldiers were killed and one captured. Then, with calm efficiency, Lieutenant, Junior Grade Atcheson supervised the setting of the detonators and led his men back to the beach where they were transported back to the ship from which they had come. A short time later, the charges exploded with great force and, when morning came, a derailed locomotive was observed at the site of the destroyed bridge and was subsequently rendered useless by naval gunfire. The gallantry and singular skill displayed by Lieutenant, Junior Grade Atcheson in carrying out this vital and extremely hazardous mission reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 358 (July 8, 1952). Entered Service From California.

Atterberry, Bobbie D.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 311 -  2 August 1953

First Lieutenant Bobbie G. Atterberry, 02028541, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 10 June 1953, Company "F" commenced to attack enemy held Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. In attempting to rush enemy positions on the reverse slope of the hill, the assault unit was halted by a hail of grenades and small arms fire. Lieutenant Atterberry, braving the intense fire, moved about, reorganizing his men, encouraging them and bolstering their morale by his courage and eagerness to accomplish the mission. When his men had been re-supplied with ammunition, Lieutenant Atterberry personally led the renewed attack on the enemy positions. As he moved over the skyline, a white phosphorus grenade burst nearby, wounding him. Despite this, Lieutenant Atterberry continued his determined charge towards the entrenched enemy, hurling grenades at the foe until his supply was expended. He then took his carbine and sprayed the area with rapid fire. The effective placement of his grenades and carbine fire mortally wounded several of the enemy and rendered others as casualties. Meanwhile, the rest of the assault unit, inspired by the fighting spirit of Lieutenant Atterberry, succeeded in overrunning the remaining enemy positions on the hill. Shortly thereafter, the enemy counterattacked in reinforced platoon strength. In the ensuing action, Lieutenant Atterberry continually moved from one exposed position to another to ascertain the enemy's movements and give instructions for supporting fires. His commands enabled the artillery, coupled with his company's small arms fire, to break up the counterattack, thus securing the objective for his raiding force. Lieutenant Atterberry's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Colorado.

Atwood, Rowan Duane (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Rowan Duane Atwood (MCSN: 1123227), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Carrier in Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on 25 September 1950. Repeatedly crossing an exposed ridge in the face of constant hostile machine gun and small arms fire, Private First Class Atwood supplied needed ammunition to his own assault machine gun crew and, in addition, voluntarily provided ammunition for the gun of an adjacent friendly unit also under fire. On the following day while operating his gun in action against the enemy, he was fatally wounded by an enemy hand grenade. Private First Class Atwood's courage, initiative and unselfish devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 7, 1930 at Pasadena, California. Home Town: Altadena, California. Death: KIA: DOW September 26, 1950.

Atwood, Virgil M. (posthumous)

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority contained in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded posthumously to the following named officer:

Second Lieutenant Virgil M. Atwood (then Sergeant First Class, ER6967668) Infantry, United States Army, Company B, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 23 February 1951, near Yongdu-ri, Korea.  As his company was advancing on Hill 469, they were pinned down by intense enemy fire.  Seeing his comrades weaken and on the verge of breaking, Lieutenant Atwood, realizing the necessity for immediate action, rose to his feet in full view of the enemy and began calling encouragement and direction of fire.  He so inspired his comrades that they arose and under his leadership moved forward placing devastating fire power on the hostile forces.  His action materially aided his company in routing the enemy and gaining new positions.  Lieutenant Atwood's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered federal service from Alabama.

Audas, SSGT John D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant John D. Audas (MCSN: 407753), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. With his platoon suffering heavy casualties and its commander disabled when a numerically superior enemy launched a savage attack against the right flank of his sector, Staff Sergeant Audas immediately assumed control and, moving through treacherous ice and snow from one position to another under the intense barrage, directed effective fire and inspired each man to hold his position at all costs. Despite the bitter cold and approaching darkness, he succeeded in maneuvering an element of his platoon from the center sector to the right flank, thereby thwarting an imminent hostile breakthrough which would have endangered the entire company defense perimeter. His daring initiative, fearless and aggressive leadership and dauntless perseverance throughout the furious action reflect the highest credit upon Staff Sergeant Audas and the United States Naval Service.

Auger, George J.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal George J. Auger (ASN: RA-11186174)United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Battery D, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (SP), near Sindae-ri, Korea, on 1 December 1950. On this date, Corporal Augur was the assigned driver of an M-39 command vehicle. The gunner of an M-16 half-track which was in a convoy of vehicles loaded with wounded being evacuated was himself wounded and the M-16 protection of the convoy ceased for the time being. Corporal Augur, realizing that someone must take over the job of gunner on the M-16 in order to protect the wounded, volunteered for the hazardous task and took over at once. At this time the convoy was under heavy enemy mortar, automatic-weapons and small-arms fire from all sides. Between the approximate hours of 1500 to 1800 on this date, Corporal Augur fired the M-16 machine guns at the enemy wherever they could be seen, and by his cool and deliberate action the enemy was finally overcome to the extent that the convoy was able to proceed. During the action one of the cannoneers on the M-16 was severely wounded and Corporal Augur assumed this task in addition to that of gunner. Although he was constantly under heavy fire as a result of which he was wounded in the head and in one of his legs, Corpora Augur stayed at his post in complete disregard of his own safety. This great heroism on the part of Corporal Augur reflects much credit on himself and the military service.

Aughtry, 1st Lt. James E. Jr.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 361 - 27 August 1953

First Lieutenant James E. Aughtry, Jr., 02004604, Armor, Tank Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the morning of 20 July 1953, Lieutenant Aughtry, a platoon leader of Tank Company, was in command of a task force of tanks which went into enemy held territory in the vicinity of Kundong-Myon, Korea, with the mission of destroying enemy fortifications. As Lieutenant Aughtry led the tanks toward the objective, his tank struck an antitank mine which disabled the vehicle. He dismounted from the tank and moved through the shell fire to determine if there were more mines in the area. Upon locating other mines, he dug them out, thus clearing a path for another tank to come up to his position and tow the disabled tank back to a place of comparative safety. After clearing the area, he directed the evacuation of the tank back to the friendly lines despite intense enemy shell fire which rained in on the area. Lieutenant Aughtry's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from South Carolina.

Aukerman, Robert J. (posthumous)

Private First Class Robert J. Aukerman, RA 15415850, Infantry, US Army, a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is (posthumously) awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action near Osan, Korea on 5 July 1950. During an enemy attack of an overwhelming force on Company C’s positions the order was given for the company to withdraw to new positions. The positions were subjected to heavy small arms, mortar and artillery fire. At this time PFC Aukerman, a Browning Automatic Rifleman, volunteered to stay behind and cover his company’s withdrawal. By the accurate fire of his BAR, he was able to inflict heavy casualties on the enemy and also was able to destroy some equipment which the company was unable to take with them when withdrew. During this act of courage and bravery, PFC Aukerman was wounded three times. This gallant act on the part of PFC Aukerman reflects great credit on himself and the military service. (PFC Aukerman was listed as Missing in Action this date and later reclassified as Killed in Action.) GO 55, 24 Jul 1950.Credited to Wayne County, OH.

Ault, Vernon P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Vernon P. Ault (NSN: 3729214), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 September 1950. During an attack by his company Hospitalman Ault, acting as Company Corpsman, was painfully wounded in the leg and arm. Despite the severe pain and extreme loss of blood, he courageously continued to administer aid to the wounded while under intense enemy small arms and machine gun fire. He refused to be evacuated but continued to administer first aid until he collapsed from his extremely painful wounds and loss of blood and had to be carried to the aid station. Hospitalman Ault's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 17693 (November 3, 1950).

Aurand, Norman G.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders #66 - 1 April 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Norman G. Aurand (ASN: RA-36909677), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 29 November 1950, while serving with Company M, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, near Sinchang-ni, Korea. Sergeant Aurand was in command of a heavy machine gun platoon guarding a road block when a numerically superior enemy force attacked with resounding fury. Realizing that additional fire power was critically needed to hold back the assaulting hordes, Sergeant Aurand dauntlessly affronted the concentrated mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire which was raking the area, and fearlessly secured two additional light machine guns from another emplacement. Personally manning one of the weapons, Sergeant Aurand directed a withering stream of return fire into the hostile positions and inflicted heavy casualties. A short time later, when a friendly supporting company counterattacked, he quickly directed the mounting of his machine guns on one-quarter ton vehicles and moved forward in the attack with the riflemen. A counter enemy movement threatened to outflank the unit but Sergeant Aurand, with intrepid coolness and inspiring leadership, assumed command of the endangered area, rallied the men and aggressively led them forward to beat back the dangerous threat. Sergeant Aurand then noticed several wounded men lying on the open ground fully exposed to the intense fire sweeping the area. Totally disregarding his personal safety, he moved forward to the injured man and after several perilous trips, completed the rescue of every man to a position of cover. The sustained personal bravery, fearless leadership and undaunted courage of Sergeant Aurand were greatly responsible for the success of friendly troops in repulsing a savage enemy attack, and the saving of several wounded comrades' lives. His extreme gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Avera, Ray Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Ray Avera, Jr. (NSN: 3826736), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. Hospitalman Avera displayed outstanding courage and initiative when the platoon was subjected to a violent, night-long attack by a numerically superior enemy force. Exposing himself without regard for his personal safety to devastating enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire, he continually moved through the position rendering aid to the casualties and dragging them to covered positions. Courageously answering a call from a seriously wounded man in a forward position, he proceeded unhesitatingly along a fire-swept ridge line to reach him. Despite the fact that he was painfully wounded by an enemy bullet, he continued forward, and rendered skillful first aid. In carrying his wounded comrade back to safety, he was hit for a second time, and forced to submit to evacuation. His great personal bravery and devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospitalman Avera's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 2153 (January 27, 1952).

Averill, Gerald P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Gerald P. Averill (MCSN: 0-16736), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Operations Officer of the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 September 1951. When strong hostile forces launched a fierce attack under cover of a devastating barrage of mortar fire after he had taken up a position in the front line of two badly depleted rifle companies which were engaged in defending an extremely vulnerable and exposed sector of the regimental defense area, Major Averill, keenly aware that a breach in the line might endanger the entire regiment, bravely moved from one position to another in the face of heavy enemy fire to direct the fire and employment of the reserve elements. Although exposed to a hail of hostile fire, he skillfully organized and directed a local counterattack when one of the platoons was forced back under tremendous pressure and, undeterred by the constant danger of enemy infiltrators and persistent artillery fire, effectively reorganized the position, directing a heavy volume of fire on the hostile troops during their subsequent retreat from the area. By his courageous leadership, outstanding tactical ability and aggressive fighting spirit, Major Averill served to inspire all who observed him and contributed immeasurably to the successful defense of the vital position, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Frankfort, Maine. Home Town: Limerick, Maine.

Ayala, Isaac Paz

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders # 305 - 24 July 1951

Master Sergeant Isaac Paz Ayala, RA30432566, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 27 April 1951, Company "B", occupying a blocking position on Hill 476 near Uijongbu, Korea, had been viciously attacked by a numerically superior enemy force which managed to surround the area. When the company was ordered to withdraw, it was necessary to assault the hostile positions with a bayonet charge to create an escape gap in the enemy line. Moving forward with his platoon, Sergeant Paz Ayala located an enemy machine gun which was inflicting casualties on his unit and, maneuvering himself to within approximately 60 yards of the weapon, he killed its crew with the accurate fire of his carbine. Having eliminated the gun crew, Sergeant Paz Ayala ran through vicious enemy cross fire to the position and turning the weapon around, began firing on a group of retreating hostile soldiers, killing and wounding several. Sergeant Paz Ayala's gallant and aggressive behavior materially aided the successful withdrawal of his unit and reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Awtrey, Billy W. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 240 - 2 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Billy W. Awtrey (ASN: RA-18280057), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chinju, Korea, on 31 July to 1 August 1950. Private Awtrey, with three other men, volunteered to hold a road block forward of the 19th Infantry Regiment to insure the use of the road by the regiment in a planned attack. The block had been prepared for demolition and its destruction would have seriously imperiled the attack. Although fully aware of heavy enemy infiltration in and around the road block, he gallantly insisted upon holding the position. During the night, enemy infiltration caused the attack to be short lived, although leading elements were able to proceed past the road block before withdrawing. In the action which followed, the position was overrun and Private Awtrey was killed. His fearless action in holding this vital position against overwhelming odds reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Engineer Corps. Home Town: Jefferson County, Oklahoma. Death: KIA: August 2, 1950 - Buried at: Ringling Memorial Cemetery - Ringling, Oklahoma.

Ayers, Harold B.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 74 - 7 August 1950

Lieutenant Colonel Harold B. Ayres, O34372, Infantry, United States Army, a member of 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 21 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. LTC Ayres distinguished himself by calmly instructing his command post personnel as to the route of withdrawal, checking to see that all persons were notified and evacuated and was the last to leave even though the enemy was firing within a distance of 50 yards. During a period of time approximately thirty-six hours prior to withdrawal, Colonel Ayres, without rest or sleep had visited his companies, lending encouragement to hold off a superior number of aggressively attacking enemy. During this period of time he personally called for and adjusted artillery fire. When he lost communication he started into Taejon, which was under enemy fire, for instruction from his Regimental Commander. In this attempt he was promptly cut off by the enemy. During the night, as he escaped this encirclement, he encountered an enemy outpost which he attacked. He killed a machinegunner and drove off two riflemen allowing the passage of himself and two comrades. Hist outstanding courage and devotion to duty reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered service from New Orleans, Louisiana.

 

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