Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "B"

 
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Babasa, Joseph M. Jr.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 527 - November 12, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Joseph M. Babasa, Jr., United States Air Force, for exceptional gallantry in action against an enemy as leader of a formation of B-26 attack bombers, for the 13th Bombardment Squadron (L), Fifth Air Force, on 25 February 1951. Lieutenant Babasa was element leader of four-ship of F-51 planes dispatched to attack a reported convoy in the vicinity of Kuni-Ri, Korea. Because of the numerous lucrative targets, the flight remained in the area until shortage of ammunition forced withdrawal. Just as the flight regrouped for the return flight, it was attacked from the rear by four enemy MIG-15 planes. Lieutenant Babasa's aircraft was severely damaged in the right wing and he was wounded in the left hand. He was enjoined by his flight leader to seek protection by remaining with the other flight members, or to bail out if conditions warranted. Instead, Lieutenant Babasa disregarding his own safety turned to attack a MIG-15 in an effort to draw fire away from his comrades. By skillful maneuvering he scored several hits on the enemy ship. Lieutenant Babasa met six more attacks head on, in spite of his wound, a battle-damaged airplane, and no ammunition. Through his courage, daring and superior airmanship, Lieutenant Babasa reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Babb, Earl F.

General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

First Lieutenant Earl F. Babb, 0-1307636, Infantry, a member of Company "A", 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action.  On 10 July 1950, near Chonui, Korea, Lieutenant Babb was Commanding Officer of Company "A".  His Company, and Company "D", had been ordered to hold a defensive position by the Regimental Commander.  The position was subjected to intense attack by enemy infantry and armor in overwhelming numbers.  Although his Company had no weapons with which to successfully engage the tanks, due to Lieutenant Babb's leadership and example, the men of the Company remained in their positions when subjected to the direct attack of four tanks which were from fifty to three hundred yards distance.  When the Company was reduced to ten men, the Regimental Commander ordered a withdrawal which Lieutenant Babb organized and carried into execution.  He continually exposed himself to direct enemy fire while directing the movements of his men.  Due to his daring, cool leadership, the position was successfully evacuated and the organization was again brought to a satisfactory state of tactical efficiency so that they could engage the enemy again the next day.  By his daring, gallantry, and courageous leadership, Lieutenant Babb brought great credit to himself and the United States Army.

Babson, John Low Jr. (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant John Low Babson, Jr. (MCSN: 0-54230), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 October 1952. Despite a painful wound sustained during the early stages of the action when his platoon was attacked by a numerically superior hostile force while defending an outpost some six hundred yards forward of the main line of resistance. Second Lieutenant Babson steadfastly refused to be evacuated and constantly exposed himself to a devastating barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire to direct the efforts of his small garrison of defenders. Although wounded a second time, he continued to lead his platoon in the defense of the position until mortally wounded by enemy artillery fire several hours later. By his exceptional courage, inspiring leadership and valiant fighting spirit, Second Lieutenant Babson was largely instrumental in preventing an enemy attack on the main line of resistance and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 3, 1929 at Orono, Maine. Home Town: Contoocook, New Hampshire.  Death: KIA: October 26, 1952.

Baccari, Hugo Victor (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Hugo Victor Baccari (MCSN: 1061714), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman in Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 December 1950. When the left flank of his company was subjected to a savage attack by a numerically superior enemy force, Private First Class Baccari voluntarily left his covered position and exposed himself to the heavy hostile fire to remove wounded Marines to protected areas and to render them aid and comfort. Serving to inspire all who observed his courageous actions, he continued to search for and evacuate casualties in sub-zero weather until he was mortally wounded. By his outstanding heroism, daring initiative and aggressive determination in saving others at the cost of his own life, Private First Class Baccari upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 5, 1929 at Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Back, George A.

General Orders #121 - 5 September 1950
Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) George A. Back (ASNL 0-1333299), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company A, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 6 August 1950, near the Naktong River, Korea. Lieutenant Back was leader of a platoon decimated by previous actions. Elements of C and L Companies had been completely cut off by enemy penetrations into the friendly positions. Lieutenant Back led his platoon in an attack which reached the position of the survivors of Company C. Despite intense enemy fire, he led the party with evacuated wounded from the rescued position. After the enemy had been cleared from the Company C position, Lieutenant Back led his platoon approximately three miles through heavy enemy fire to the beleaguered remnants of Company L. Upon arrival, Lieutenant BACK organized a defensive position, utilizing the remaining members of Company L and his own platoon. Because of his inspiring leadership, this position was held in the face of intense enemy attacks until relieved on 8 August. By his gallantry, inspirational conduct and devotion to duty, Lieutenant Back brought the highest credit to himself and the military service.

Backovich, Robert G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert G. Backovich (MCSN: 1091435), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters and Service Battalion, First Provisional Marine Brigade, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 August 1950. When the enemy was discovered in an attempt to ambush the battalion to which he was attached, Private First Class Backovich bravely moved forward through intense hostile fire, killing one of the enemy by an accurate stroke with the butt of his rifle. Aggressively firing a captured automatic weapon, he fearlessly continued in the attack and succeeded in killing three more of the enemy. By his marked courage, initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Backovich contributed immeasurably to the destruction of the hostile forces and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Oakland, California. Home Town: Oakland, California.

Badger, Samuel C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Samuel C. Badger (MCSN: 0-54233), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First FMFR in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 October 1952. Although painfully wounded during the early stages of an assault on a strongly defended enemy outpost, Second Lieutenant Badger aggressively continued in the attack across open terrain under an intense barrage of enemy mortar, artillery and grenade fire. When his unit was severely depleted by casualties and the communication system connecting friendly forces was destroyed, he executed a strategic withdrawal in an effort to reorganize his platoon and continue the assault. Vigorously continuing the second attack to within fifty yards of the enemy position against increasing mortar and artillery fire and ground resistance, he continually moved from one position to another, directing and encouraging his men and, when ordered to withdraw, remained in his forward position until all the wounded were evacuated to an aid station. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous leadership and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Badger served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Evanston, Illinois. Home Town: Wilmette, Illinois.

Baggio, Fioramante G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Third Class Fioramante G. Baggio, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 27 and 28 November 1950. Serving as a Corpsman attached to a rifle company, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Baggio consistently performed his duties in an exceptionally efficient manner. On 27 and 28 November when his company was subjected to an all night attack by an estimated two battalions of enemy, he utilized the only available tent in the area and organized and maintained a central aid station to care for the casualties. Throughout the night and while under enemy small arms, grenade and mortar fire, with complete disregard for his own personal safety he voluntarily made repeated trips to the front lines in order to aid the casualties. When no stretcher bearers were available and on his own initiative, he organized evacuation teams and directed movement of the casualties to his aid station. Through his tireless efforts and skillful treatment many of his comrades were saved. When it became apparent that their position could not be maintained, he again organized parties to move the casualties through the infiltrated enemy and under fire to the safety of friendly lines. During the subsequent move of our forces through the encircling enemy he continued to care for the wounded in the same daring and resourceful manner until seriously wounded himself. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Baggio's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Bagwell, William E.

General Orders #374 - 2 September 1953
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Master Sergeant William E. Bagwell, RA20463269, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 10 June 1953, in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, Company "F" assaulted enemy held Hill "412". During the first stages of the battle, Sergeant BAGWELL assisted in the evacuation of the wounded. When the support of the reserve platoon was urgently needed and the radio operator was too exhausted to ascend one of the peaks to transmit the message, Sergeant Bagwell, taking over the radio, ascended the second peak of the hill in an attempt to relay the important request. Upon reaching the peak, he was subjected to intense concentrations of enemy shellfire, making successful radio transmission impossible. He then moved down the hill to the reserve platoon's position and relayed the request for assistance and directed two squads back up the hill into position while under the heavy barrage. Upon completing his mission, he resumed his direction of the evacuation of wounded. In the last moments of the battle, Sergeant BAGWELL moved up to the highest peak of the hill, exposing himself to the enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire, to make certain that all friendly soldiers had withdrawn from the area. Sergeant Bagwell's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Arkansas.

Bailey, Charles T.

General Orders #117 - 3 September 1950
Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry), [then Second Lieutenant] Charles T. Bailey (ASN: 0-957544), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, on 18 August 1950, near Chinju, Korea. Lieutenant Bailey was commanding the Company, which was about one-half strength. Only one other officer was present. After completing a ten mile march during hours of darkness, Lieutenant Bailey was ordered to take G'Hang Hill. During the assault on the hill, Lieutenant Bailey moved fearlessly from platoon to platoon directing and encouraging his men. He personally pointed out targets to his men. Displaying a complete disregard for his own safety, he was eventually wounded in the head. After being wounded, he refused to be evacuated until the objective was secured. During the entire engagement, Lieutenant Bailey was an inspiration to his command. Because of his leadership and daring, a difficult objective was taken. His acts reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Bailey, Eirvin

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Eirvin Bailey, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the Battery D, 82d Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of Changbang-ni-Hoengsong, Korea, on 11 and 12 February 1951. On the night of 11 February 195, Sergeant First Class Bailey's battery was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force and was ordered to withdraw. When the convoy moved out he was in command of the lead vehicle. The motorized column had moved about one-half-mile when it was subjected to heavy enemy mortar fire. Sergeant Bailey's vehicle was destroyed and he was forced to seek cover along the side of the road. At dawn on 12 February 1951, he found no officers present, so he organized a crew for an anti-aircraft firing vehicle and led the convoy to Hoktam-ni. There, he was put in command of another firing vehicle, obtained another crew and voluntarily led a convoy of un-armored vehicles loaded with wounded toward Hoengsong. At five points along the road enemy positions were encountered. He continuously maintained an exposed position in order to most effectively direct the fire of his guns and on each occasion neutralized the enemy emplacements. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant First Class Bailey was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Bailey, Joseph V.

General Orders #137 - 16 December 1950
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Joseph V. Bailey, United States Air Force, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force during the period 29 June to 1 July 1950. Second Lieutenant Bailey volunteered to organize and lead a platoon of anti-aircraft artillery in the defense of the airstrip at Suwon, Korea at a time when no other friendly ground troops were in the area. On 29 and 30 June 1950, during repeated attacks by enemy aircraft against his gun position, Lieutenant Bailey, with utter disregard for his own personal safety, exposed himself directly to strafing attacks in order to direct the fire of his platoon and give instructions and encouragement where needed. This courageous action and cool leadership by Lieutenant Bailey, though resulting in his being wounded, caused the confirmed loss of two enemy aircraft and the probable loss of three more. The gallant action displayed by Lieutenant Bailey while defending the airstrip until ordered to evacuate is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.

Bailey, Kincheon H. Jr.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 255 - 28 October 1950

First Lieutenant Kincheon H. Bailey Jr., 027531, Artillery, 64th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  When his artillery section in the vicinity of Haman, Korea was being attacked by numerically superior enemy forces on 2 September 1950, Lieutenant Bailey went to a howitzer and turned it completely around to fire point blank at the oncoming enemy.  Despite the intense enemy fire he remained in the open to relay fire commands for the mission.  Lieutenant Bailey's courageous devotion to duty and outstanding leadership were responsible for disrupting the fanatical attack and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered the military service from Virginia.

Baker, George Lorin Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant George Lorin Baker, Jr. (MCSN: 1048749), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in act ion against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 September 1951. When his platoon was pinned down by intense hostile fire during an attack against a heavily fortified enemy hill position, Sergeant Baker courageously exposed himself to the vicious fire, moving coolly through the area to deploy his men and to remove the wounded to positions of relative safety. Although severely wounded at the height of the enemy barrage, he steadfastly continued to lead and encourage his men until, overcome by loss of blood, he fell and later died. By his inspiring leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Baker upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 28, 1928 at Omaha, Nebraska. Home Town: Omaha, Nebraska. Death: KIA: September 14, 1951.

Baker, Herbert M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Herbert M. Baker (MCSN: 0-51592), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMF-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 October 1951. Participating in an aerial assault against strategic installations along the enemy's main supply route leading from Sunchon to Pyongyang, Second Lieutenant Baker pressed home an extremely low-level attack on an enemy railroad bridge despite intense and accurate hostile anti-aircraft fire. Observing that two of the flight's aircraft had been hit by enemy fire and that one, seriously damaged, was forced to crash-land near the target area, he immediately notified the flight leader of the downed pilot's location in order to alert rescue facilities. Assuming sole cover over his fellow aviator, he repeatedly exposed himself to the increasingly accurate anti-aircraft fire in an effort to keep the enemy under cover until a rescue could be effected. Although his aircraft sustained repeated hits from hostile fire, he courageously maneuvered alone for seventy minutes at low altitude to prevent enemy troops from reaching the downed pilot and, despite his dangerously low fuel supply and battle-damaged plane, remained over the area until approaching darkness forced the rescue to be cancelled. His superb airmanship, marked courage and resolute determination in the face of grave personal risk reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Baker and the United States Naval Service. Born: Lovelock, Nevada. Home Town: Lovelock, Nevada.

Baker, John Edward (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant John Edward Baker (MCSN: 0-49814), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander in Company B, First Marine Transport Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced),, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When a numerically superior enemy force threatened to overrun friendly positions, Second Lieutenant Baker volunteered to lead a provisional rifle platoon composed of service personnel to reinforce the lines. After personally reconnoitering the battle situation, he repeatedly exposed himself to heavy hostile fire to place his men in the most advantageous positions. Ignoring his own personal safety, he moved among his men to direct accurate and effective fire on the enemy and to lend encouragement to his troops until he sustained a fatal wound. By his courageous actions in the face of hostile fire, he served to inspire others of his group to heroic endeavor toward repulsing the enemy attack. His outstanding leadership, initiative and aggressive fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Baker and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 9, 1922 at Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois. Death: KIA: DOW November 29, 1950.

Baker, John M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John M. Baker (MCSN: 0-17052), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 October 1941. Skillfully leading a patrol in search of guerrilla forces operating in the vicinity of Wontong-ni, First Lieutenant Baker stealthily moved forward with a comrade to an abandoned building he believed was occupied by the enemy. Discovering several hostile soldiers in the house, he quickly called upon them to surrender. When one of the enemy hurled a grenade, he immediately opened fire and bravely leaped in front of his companion to protect him from the explosion. Although painfully wounded by the hostile missile, he courageously led his men in a vigorous assault against the enemy and completely neutralized them, steadfastly continuing to lead his patrol for over a distance of five miles until severe pain and loss of blood forced him to be evacuated. By his aggressive leadership, indomitable initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Baker served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sheridan, Wyoming. Home Town: Denver, Colorado.

Baker, Ralph E. (posthumously)

General Orders #226 - 19 August 1951
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Ralph E. Baker (ASN: ER-12117560), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company E, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action on 5 May 1951, near Uijongbu, Korea. As Corporal Baker's patrol advanced up a steep slope it was suddenly subjected to a heavy barrage of grenades which momentarily halted the assault. Corporal Baker, realizing the necessity of continuing the attack, charged forward and destroyed an automatic weapons position. He then observed another and while assaulting it, was mortally wounded by enemy fire. This courageous act inspired his comrades to greater efforts and materially aided in the successful completion of the mission. Corporal Baker's heroism reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service.

Baker, Robert W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Robert W. Baker (MCSN: 0-27903), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Forward Air Controller attached to the Second Battalion, First Marines First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 July 1952. Volunteering to fly an unarmed observation plane over enemy territory on a search mission for a downed aircraft, Major Baker skillfully located the damaged plane in the face of continuous hostile anti-aircraft fire and maintained a persistent vigilance of the area in an effort to discover the missing pilot and aerial observer. Although his light aircraft received two bullet holes within the cabin, he made low passes for more than an hour and a half in the face of intense enemy fire. By his indomitable spirit, concern for his fellow Marines and selfless devotion to duty, Major Baker served to inspire al who observed him. His outstanding courage and gallant spirit of self-sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Atlanta, Georgia. Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia.

Bakker, Theodore (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 42 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Theodore Bakker (ASN: US-55042686), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 18 October 1951. During an attack on an enemy-held objective, elements of his company were suddenly pinned down in exposed positions by a steady, concentrated stream of fire from an enemy machine gun. The friendly troops, unable to move, were in extreme danger. Private Bakker, realizing the need for immediate action, leaped to his feet and, fearlessly exposing himself to the intense enemy fire, moved across a ridgeline and poured devastatingly accurate bursts of fire into the enemy position with his automatic rifle. His action forced the enemy to seek cover temporarily, enabling his comrades to gain more advantageous positions. As the friendly troops reached safety, the enemy machine gun suddenly resumed firing and mortally wounded him. Private Bakker's courageous action, daring initiative and self-sacrificing devotion to his unit's mission reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Balafas, Angelo J.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 40 - 12 October 1960

Captain Angelo J. Balafas, (then First Lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Wonju, Korea, on 15-16 January 1951.  As a platoon leader in Company G, 9th Infantry, Captain Balafas led a patrol ten miles through a narrow valley.  Despite the fact that groups of enemy troops appeared in numerous places in the rugged mountains flanking the road threatened to cut them off, Captain Balafas led a small detachment in advance of the main patrol into a minefield where an M16 half-track vehicle had been abandoned.  Clearing sufficient mines to allow passage Captain Balafas drove the vehicle out under its own power.  Fighting enemy forces which had increased in strength during the entire withdrawal, the patrol captured several prisoners and reopened an important route.  Captain Balafas' courage in exposing himself to small arms fire and mines to recover a sorely needed vehicle, his superior leadership in conducting a mission of greater scope than anticipated, and his exemplary conduct in the face of a numerically superior enemy are in the best tradition of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Home of Record: New York City.

Balchunas, George C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant George C. Balchunas (MCSN: 959454), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Leader of an 81-mm. Mortar Section of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 November 1950. Returning to his battalion position after leading his section in supporting a rifle company on patrol in the mountains southwest of Yudam-ni, Sergeant Balchunas volunteered to lead a party of stretcher bearers back up the mountains to contact the ambushed rifle company and assist in evacuating the wounded. Although almost frozen and exhausted at the outset of his mission, he led the group over four miles of hazardous enemy- held mountain terrain, covered with snow and ice, in sub-zero weather and total darkness. By his indomitable courage and unselfish efforts, he was responsible for the early evacuation of the casualties thereby saving the lives of many seriously wounded Marines. In addition, he assisted in guiding the rifle company down the dangerous mountain side, and contributed materially in its safe return to the battalion. His initiative and inspiring devotion to duty served to encourage his comrades to greater efforts, thereby reflecting the highest credit upon Sergeant Balchunas and the United States Naval Service. Born: Cicero, Illinois. Home Town: Cicero, Illinois.

Baldwin, John H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John H. Baldwin (MCSN: 1155294), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as a Flamethrower of Company G, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 December 1952. With his platoon engaged in a night raid on a strongly defended enemy hill position forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Baldwin braved a deadly hail of enemy small arms and grenade fire and fearlessly advanced to a position on the edge of the hostile trenches, pouring killing flame onto a group of onrushing troops. Although painfully wounded, he unhesitatingly moved to another area and, with his body and clothing saturated by napalm from the damaged flamethrower, steadfastly continued to deliver fire until his supply was exhausted, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy force. By his marked fortitude, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Private First Class Baldwin served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Schenectady, New York. Home Town: Buskirk, New York.

Baldwin, Richard A.

General Orders #517 - November 1951
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain [then First Lieutenant] Richard A. Baldwin, United States Air Force, for extraordinary courage and gallantry in action on 21 May 1951, as flight leader of four F-80 type aircraft in aerial combat against the enemy on a pre-briefed close support mission to the Kyebang-san sector in Korea. Departing from an air base in Japan in extremely adverse weather conditions, he led his flight into the target area flying heading, time and distance, making an instrument let-down without radio aids, and breaking his flight out of the low overcast in a corridor of extremely mountainous terrain. He quickly oriented himself and made contact with a Tactical Controller who gave the flight a target of an estimated two battalions of enemy troops that were pinning down a force of friendly troops. The enemy was defending their positions with heavy anti-aircraft guns and numerous automatic weapons while their infantry was forcing its way up a steep draw towards the United Nations troops. Due to rain showers which reduced the visibility to less than one half mile, and the low ceiling that obscured the mountains on all sides, a normal attacking pass on the target was impossible. Although the Tactical Control aircraft aborted the mission and left the area because of the low ceiling and visibility, Captain Baldwin continued his attack against the enemy, and in the face of the heavy ground fire made repeated napalm runs and fifty caliber machine gun strafing passes. At the end of each pass it was necessary to put the flight into a tight string formation and to make a standard instrument procedure turn in the overcast. Captain Baldwin so effectively engaged the enemy that friendly ground forces later counted seven hundred enemy troops killed, large quantities of supplies and equipment destroyed. The courage and skillful leadership displayed by Captain BALDWIN were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Baldwin, Robert P.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel Robert P. Baldwin, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action while serving as Pilot of an F-86 Fighter Airplane and Commanding Officer of the 51st Fighter-Interceptor Group, in action on 22 June 1953, in Korea. Colonel Baldwin distinguished himself while leading four (4) F-86 type aircraft on a fighter sweep along the Manchurian Border. He sighted four (4) enemy MIG-15 type aircraft pressing an attack against two (2) friendly aircraft and immediately led his flight into the enemy. After successfully breaking up the enemy attack, Colonel Baldwin rolled down on the trailing MIG and fired a short burst into his left wing and fuselage. Colonel Baldwin continued to score numerous hits as heavy smoke poured from both wings and the enemy aircraft went into a steep dive through the clouds. Colonel Baldwin followed him through the cloud layer and pulled up sharply to avoid hitting the ground. Later reports confirmed the destruction of the MiG. By his personal courage and exceptional flying ability in this action, Colonel Baldwin is credited with destroying his fifth (5th) MIG-15 type aircraft. Throughout his tour, Colonel Baldwin's aggressive spirit and mental alertness have brought great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Balinas, Antonio Rodriguez (1st citation)

General Orders #278 - 13 July 1951
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Second Lieutenant Antonio Rodriguez Balinas, 01685780, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 23 April 1951, while occupying defensive positions on Hill 305, in the vicinity of Ognyo-bong, Korea, Company "F" was subjected to a furious attack by an estimated 300 enemy. During the ensuing attack, Lieutenant Rodriguez Balinas, leader of the Second Platoon, continuously moved through withering hostile fire, encouraging and directing his men. Upon learning that the platoon's left flank was exposed, he personally went to the imperiled position to evaluate the situation and later returned with a squad to reinforce the weakened flank. Although the supply of ammunition was becoming critically low, he determinedly fought on until a re- supply of ammunition arrived. Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ Balinas's gallantry under fire inspired the members of his unit to contain the enemy attack and reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Balinas, Antonio Rodriguez (2nd citation)

General Orders #197 - 29 May 1952
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

First Lieutenant Antonio Rodriguez Balinas, # 01685780, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 23 December 1951, Company "G", reinforced by the weapons platoon of Company "F", attacked heavily fortified hostile positions on Hill 200, near Sangyon-Myon, Korea. Lieutenant Rodriguez Balinas, platoon leader of the weapons platoon, attached himself to the assault platoon in order to direct close support fire from the mortars and 57 millimeter rifles of his platoon. After the supporting fire was lifted, he joined the assault platoon in its attack on the well entrenched enemy. Firing his carbine and throwing hand grenades, he effectively destroyed one hostile position. During the course of this vicious fighting, Lieutenant Rodriguez Balinas lost his carbine but, armed with only two hand grenades, he undauntedly charged another position manned by an enemy machine gun crew. He fearlessly walked through the lethal hail of fire directly toward the hostile bunker, hurled his hand grenades and completely destroyed the position and its occupants. Although painfully wounded in this action, he refused evacuation until the last of the wounded men had been removed to safety. Lieutenant Rodriguez Balinas' outstanding gallantry and inspirational leadership were instrumental in the success of the mission and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Puerto Rico.

Ballem, Daniel Joseph (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Daniel Joseph Ballem (MCSN: 1033442), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 June 1951. With his platoon pinned down and suffering numerous casualties under heavy fire from a well-fortified hostile position during an assault against an enemy position near Inje, Corporal Ballem immediately joined his platoon leader in a daring attempt to neutralize the hostile weapons, permit the continuation of the attack and cover the evacuation of the numerous casualties. Dashing through a hail of machine gun and grenade fire, he reached the bunker and hurled several grenades through the aperture before he fell mortally wounded. His cool daring, personal courage and indomitable fighting spirit served to inspire all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Ballem and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 26, 1931 at New York, New York. Home Town: Lynn, Massachusetts. Death: KIA: June 17, 1951.

Ballinger, Everett M.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Everett M. Ballinger, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the Battery C, 82d Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, in action at Kunu-ri, Korea, on 30 November 1950. On the night of 30 November 1950, Sergeant First Class Ballinger was riding in a convoy which was attempting to break through an enemy roadblock that was approximately five miles in depth. As a leader of a section of anti-aircraft firing vehicles, Sergeant Ballinger successfully negotiated the roadblock, destroying several enemy machine gun positions and making it possible for other units to pass through the roadblock. Later that night he re-entered the roadblock area, on two different occasions, despite continuous enemy fire, to clear the road of destroyed vehicles and silence enemy automatic weapons. Although he was wounded in this action he continued to direct the operation of his vehicles, and is credited with saving many lives and much valuable equipment. The gallantry and inspiring leadership of Sergeant First Class Ballinger on this occasion was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Ballinger, Glenn L.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Glenn L. Ballinger (MCSN: 1088894), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action near Panjang-ni, Korea, on 28 May 1951. On that date Company F was advancing in an attack when heavy enemy mortar, small arms and automatic weapons fire was encountered. The attack was temporarily halted due to enemy land mines, necessitating engineers having to clear the mine fields in order that the attack could be resumed. While engaged in this task, several engineers were wounded. Without regard for his personal safety, Corporal Ballinger unhesitatingly moved forward through intense enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire to their aid, making three trips in order to carry the wounded back to a position where they could be evacuated. The initiative and personal bravery displayed by Corporal Ballinger on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Missouri.

Balzac, Rafael E.

General Orders #348 - 27 November 1952
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Master Sergeant Rafael E. Balzac, RA20023787, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 19 July 1952, elements of Company "C" were assaulting hostile positions near Yu-hyon, Korea, when they were suddenly subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage. Sergeant Balzac, who was severely wounded by the intense barrage, refused aid and evacuation as he undauntedly remained with his company throughout the ensuing action. When the order was given to withdraw, Sergeant Balzac assisted in evacuating a wounded comrade. Upon reaching friendly positions, he again refused medical aid, and after calling for volunteers to accompany him, left his position of comparative safety to further assist in evacuating the wounded. As he was carrying a fallen comrade to safety, the entire area was brought under a devastating barrage of enemy mortar fire resulting in Sergeant Balzac sustaining mortal wounds. The outstanding gallantry and selfless actions displayed by Sergeant Balzac under enemy fire, reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Bamford, Charles (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Charles Bamford (ASN: RA-20199383), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the Battery D, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 7th Infantry Division, in action near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, during the period 29 and 30 November 1950. On 29 November, when the unit was attacked by a numerically superior force, Sergeant First Class Bamford, who was then battery Mess Sergeant, lost his kitchen due to the enemy action. He then voluntarily assumed the task of assisting in bringing wounded men from their positions to the aid station and assisted in making the wounded more comfortable after they had been treated. In doing so, Sergeant Bamford exposed himself to intense enemy automatic weapons, mortar, and small arms fire on many occasions. On 30 November, while aiding wounded men, Sergeant Bamford was himself wounded by enemy fire. Immediately after receiving first aid, he resumed his task of bringing in and caring for other wounded men, again exposing himself to the hazards of the heavy enemy fire. As a result of his repeated disregard for his own personal safety in going to the assistance of others he was wounded twice by enemy fire. Again, despite his three wounds, Sergeant First Class Bamford voluntarily continued to assist and care for other disabled men until 2 December 1950 he was reported as Missing in Action. His outstanding heroism helped save the lives of many men, lightened the heavy burden of the medical personnel and inspired his comrades. Sergeant First Class Bamford's gallant actions and selfless devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Bancroft, Arthur Richard (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Arthur Richard Bancroft (MCSN: 0-35520), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action while serving as a helicopter pilot in Marine Observation Squadron SIX (VMO-6), by successfully rescuing a carrier based pilot who had been shot down by the enemy. On 17 September 1950, Lieutenant Bancroft received information that a carrier based pilot had been shot down approximately three miles south and east of Seoul, Korea. Without thought of the personal danger involved in landing his helicopter deep in enemy territory Lieutenant Bancroft immediately volunteered to attempt a rescue. While en route to the scene of the crash, he was provided an escort of two fighter planes. Nearing his destination he was forced to circle while his escort destroyed a gun position and distracted enemy troops which were near the crashed aircraft. During the action Lieutenant Bancroft continued on with his mission, landed near the location of the enemy troops, and effected a successful rescue. Due to his actions the downed pilot was saved from certain capture by the enemy. His display of outstanding courage and complete disregard for personal safety in the face of great danger to himself reflected great credit on himself and the Naval Services of the United States. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders (September 27, 1950). Born: April 18, 1920 at Des Moines, Iowa. Home Town: Hillsboro, Iowa. Death: KIA: September 29, 1950.

Banko, Michael D. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Michael D. Banko, Jr. (MCSN: 1166354), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 12 to 14 August 1952. When an infantry company was isolated by enemy mortar and artillery fire during an attack well forward of the main line of resistance, Corporal Banko unhesitatingly volunteered to return to friendly lines and bring critically needed ammunition, water and other supplies to the company. Organizing carrying parties of indigenous personnel, he courageously moved through intense hostile mortar and artillery fire to deliver the supplies. Although temporarily blinded and deafened by an enemy mortar burst on one occasion, he bravely continued to deliver supplies to the assaulting force. By his aggressive leadership, marked courage and steadfast devotion to duty, Corporal Banko served to inspire all who observed him and contributed greatly to the success achieved by his unit, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: West Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: West Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Banks, Ralph E.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders # 337 - July 10, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to CAPTAIN RALPH E. BANKS, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as Pilot of an F-86 type aircraft, 336th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Group, FIFTH Air Force, on 10 March 1952. Leading a flight of four F-86 type aircraft, Captain BANKS was assigned the mission of protecting an unarmed RF-80 type aircraft photographing high priority targets along the Yalu River. When the RF-80 was attacked by approximately eighteen MIG-15s, Captain BANKS exposed himself to concentrated fire from the MIGs in engaging the two leading attackers. Completely disregarding personal safety and displaying superior airmanship, Captain BANKS destroyed these two aircraft in rapid succession. His extraordinary courage and brilliant tactical skill in the face of determined opposition resulted in the destruction of two MIG-15s, the dispersal of the remaining aircraft, and the successful completion of an extremely vital reconnaissance mission. Through his high personal courage and keen professional skill, Captain BANKS reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Banner, James E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal James E. Banner (MCSN: 1213880), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 27 - 28 October 1952. Leading his squad in an assault against an enemy-held sector of the main line of resistance, Corporal Banner skillfully maneuvered his men into a firing position from which they succeeded in keeping the enemy pinned down. Braving intense hostile artillery, mortar and small arms fire, he moved from one position to another, encouraging his men and throwing grenades to maintain fire superiority over the enemy. Although painfully wounded during the course of the action, he refused medical treatment to assist in the evacuation of other casualties and made several trips to the rear area for reinforcements to strengthen his assault. By his courageous leadership, determination and gallant devotion to duty, Corporal Banner contributed materially to the success of the operation and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania.

Barber, Jack Eugene (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Jack Eugene Barber (MCSN: 1066030), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Machine Gun Squad of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. Assigned the mission of rendering overhead fire support to the attacking infantrymen during the company's assault against a heavily fortified and strongly defended enemy hill position, Corporal Barber expertly selected a firing position and directed heavy fire on the hostile strong points although constantly exposed to devastating enemy fire. When the fire of his gun was masked by friendly troops, he voluntarily led four of his men to carry ammunition and stretchers to the heavily engaged platoons, again exposing himself to intense and accurate enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire. During the final stages of the assault, he seized an automatic rifle and charged aggressively forward, pouring heavy fire on the entrenched enemy before he was struck by a burst of hostile fire and fell, mortally wounded. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, Corporal Barber aided materially in the success achieved by his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 24, 1929 at St. Joseph, Missouri. Home Town: St. Joseph, Missouri. Death: KIA: September 12, 1951.

Barber, Samuel L.

General Orders No. 41 - 19 January 1952
24th Infantry Division

Master Sergeant Samuel L. Barber, RA13357763 (then Sergeant First Class), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by courageous action near Kumsong, Korea, on 20 October 1951.  His company attacked firmly entrenched enemy forces and, after bitter fighting, forced them to retreat.  However, the determined enemy immediately launched a savage counterattack, deploying a tremendous volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire.  With complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Barber repeatedly exposed himself to the murderous enemy fire in order to better deploy his men.  He personally placed such devastatingly accurate fire upon the enemy hordes that he killed or wounded approximately ten hostile soldiers, leading to the successful repulse of the attack.  Despite sporadic sniper fire, he remained exposed to help evacuate the wounded.  Sergeant Barber's courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from Willis, Virginia.

Barbour, Robert J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Robert J. Barbour (MCSN: 0-21057), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Twelve (VMF-212), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 May 1952. Although his aircraft sustained two severely damaging hits by intense and accurate hostile fire during a massed aerial assault against vital enemy installations, Captain Barbour calmly remained over the critical target for over three hours and, skillfully maintaining control of his crippled plane, courageously directed the flight in the attack until complete destruction of the objective was achieved. By his superb airmanship, outstanding determination and selfless devotion to the fulfillment of a vital task, he served to inspire all who observed him and contributed immeasurably to the success of a mission which greatly reduced the enemy's war making potential. His gallant actions and fearless leadership reflect the highest credit upon Captain Barbour and the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Barczuk, Stanley S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Stanley S. Barczuk (MCSN: 1130564), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1951. Although painfully wounded when a sudden devastating rain of hostile fire temporarily halted his fire team during an attack against a series of heavily defended enemy positions, Corporal Barczuk skillfully maneuvered his men to within a few yards of the hostile bunker and led a vicious bayonet charge to successfully overrun the position. When the squad leader became a casualty, Corporal Barczuk immediately assumed command, reorganized the squad and again led an assault to seize the unit's final objective. His valiant fighting spirit, skilled leadership and unflinching devotion to duty served to inspire all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Barczuk and the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Paul, Minnesota. Home Town: St. Paul, Minnesota.

Bard,  Harry E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers) Harry E. Bard, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company A, 2d Engineer Combat Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 19 May 1951, in the vicinity of Hangye, Korea. His platoon had been given an infantry mission of holding a hill overlooking the main supply route. At 0600 hours the enemy, attacking with an estimated force of 100 men, succeeded in driving his platoon from the hill, inflicting many casualties. Though the enemy was concentrating a great volume of fire on the withdrawing troops, Lieutenant Bard, without regard for his safety, exposed himself to the fire and rallied his men, stopping the withdrawal. Then he organized a counterattack and, maneuvering his remaining men and other volunteers, he attacked and drove the hostile force from the hill, killing over 50 enemy thus regaining his position. The gallantry and inspiring leadership displayed by Lieutenant Bard reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Barger, Ferdinand Ora Jr.

ABBREVIATED ORDER - FULL CITATION NOT YET FOUND.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 78 - 24 February 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Ferdinand Ora Barger, Jr. (ASN: 0-70262/2028661), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 7th Infantry Division, in action near Sang-Gasan, Korea, on 8 October 1952.

[Note from Doug Sterner: He was KIA in Vietnam on September 4, 1968 and posthumously awarded the Legion of Merit.]

Barker, Edward Lee

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Edward Lee Barker (MCSN: 0-16470), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), during a rescue mission over enemy-held territory in Korea on 7 October 1951. Although keenly aware that his route required flying over the Heartbreak Ridge Area where a fierce ground battle was in progress, Major Barker volunteered to fly his slow, vulnerable aircraft behind enemy lines in an attempt to rescue a downed pilot. Making his way through a heavy artillery barrage, he bravely pressed on toward his objective and, although his aircraft was hit and damaged, carried out three daring attempts to pick up the downed airman, returning to base only when it became apparent that rescue by helicopter was impossible. By his marked courage, superb airmanship and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Major Barker upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Houston, Texas. Home Town: Crockett, Texas.

Barnes, Albert Prentiss Jr. (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Albert Prentiss Barnes, Jr. (MCSN: 571667), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 15 September 1950. When his infantry platoon was pinned down by intense enemy fire, Corporal Barnes braved the hostile fire to cut barbed wire that was stretched across the platoon's only possible avenue of escape. Repeatedly risking his life to carry out his task of wire-cutting, he was about to sever the last wire strand when mortally wounded. By his courageous actions, he was responsible for effecting the escape of the remaining members of his platoon. His fortitude, initiative and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Barnes and reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Barnes and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 21, 1928 at Flora, Mississippi. Home Town: Flora, Mississippi. Death: KIA: September 15, 1950.

Barnwell, Archibald S. Jr.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders # 278 - June 6, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Archibald S. Barnwell, Jr., United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as Group Leader of fourteen F-84 type aircraft, 7th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 49th Fighter-Bomber Group, FIFTH Air Force, on 17 February 1952. Captain Barnwell planned, briefed, and deployed his flight on an unarmed reconnaissance and interdiction mission in the vicinity of Kwaksan, Korea. Captain Barnwell led his flight through intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire to the target area, inflicting grave damage on vehicles, bridges, rail equipment and gun positions, Completely disregarding personal safety, Captain Barnwell personally destroyed four trucks, pressing his attacks at point blank range while being subjected to intense automatic weapons fire. Through his skillful airmanship, devotion to duty and high courage in the face of determined opposition, Captain Barnwell reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Barr, Andrew McIver (2nd citation)

Headquarters, US Army, Korea
General Orders # 221 - April 19, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Chemical Corps) Andrew McIver Barr (ASN: 0-62281), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company A, 2d Chemical Mortar Battalion, in action on the morning of 24 April 1951, near Kapyong, South Korea. On that date, Company A was in support of the Princess Pat Canadian Light Infantry Battalion of the 28th British Commonwealth Brigade. The Chinese had infiltrated the infantry position, and the mortar position of Company A was attacked by a numerically superior Chinese Communist force. The Second Platoon, under the leadership of Lieutenant Barr, bore the brunt of the attack. He ordered his men to their defensive position and successfully repulsed the enemy attacks, thus preventing the Company from being overrun from that flank. Lieutenant Barr held his platoon firmly in position and repelled these attacks until ordered to withdraw. When he received the order to withdraw, he left his machine gun outpost in position to provide covering fire for the remainder of his platoon, while they loaded all of the platoon equipment into jeeps and trailers. Disregarding the fact that the position was under enemy small arms and machine gun fire, Lieutenant Barr moved openly about the area encouraging his men to load everything and went to each mortar position to assure himself that all equipment was loaded. He then called in his outpost and withdrew his platoon from the area. After his platoon had withdrawn, he re-entered the Company position alone and fired armor piercing ammunition into the barrels of the mortars of another platoon that could not be disassembled or evacuated. As a result these mortars were pierced or dented and rendered useless to the enemy. After the Company had withdrawn to an area north of Kapyong, South Korea, Lieutenant Barr organized a group of men to return to the mortar position and recover some equipment that had been left by another platoon. As the group moved through a narrow mountain pass, they were fired upon from a planned enemy ambush. Lieutenant Barr deployed his men, and as they returned the enemy fire, he moved about the area to determine the enemy strength and disposition. He came upon a position occupied by three enemy soldiers and ordered them to surrender, but was fired upon. He then killed two of them and wounded the third. Learning that his group of facing a superior number, he ordered a withdrawal and disengaged from the action suffering no casualties. Two English soldiers, who were wounded, were brought to safety, as well as the vehicle that had transported Lieutenant Barr's party even though the brake line and one tire was shot out. The outstanding courage, leadership and gallant conduct of Lieutenant Barr in the action reflect great credit upon himself and the military service, and was greatly responsible for permitting Company A to return to action that same afternoon as an effective combat unit, and assist in halting the Chinese breakthrough in the Kapyong-Chunchon area.

Barr, Joseph L.

Citation not yet found.

"Sgt. Joseph L. Barr, 26, of 414 Fourth Street West in Kalispell is missing in action in Korea, his wife here has learned.  Sgt. Barr served with the Air Force in Korea and is the father of four children here, the youngest only nine months old.  The Defense department telegram did not give details but said circumstances would be explained in a letter later.  He was recently awarded the Silver Star for action at the Korean front.  Sgt. Barr has served a total of 9 1/2 years in the Air Force and served in the South Pacific during World War II.  His wife is the daughter of Mrs. Carl Jahnkne who received the news here.  He was reported missing on Thursday." - The Daily Inter Lake, June 10, 1951

Barrett, John C. Jr.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 41 - 16 November 1961

Major John C. Barrett, Jr., (then First Lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 12 September 1950.  As a Platoon Leader, Company K, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division in Korea, Major Barrett's courageous conduct in battle during a critical period of highly concentrated enemy action was thoroughly manifested by his outstanding bravery, selfless devotion to troop welfare and superior leadership.  Leading a platoon in an aggressive assault on an enemy-held position north of Taegu, Major Barrett's bold and skillful actions were conspicuously evidenced.  Despite the fact that he was wounded, he never stopped fighting and valiantly led his men in the face of heavy mortar, small arms and automatic weapons fire from a fanatically determined and numerically superior enemy.  His singular efforts were instrumental in successfully capturing the strategic hill and in holding it against the enemy until reinforcements moved up and organized the position.  Major Barrett's heroic efforts and unselfish regard for his own personal safety are in the most cherished traditions of the United States Army, and reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Omaha, Nebraska.

Barrett. Roscoe L. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Roscoe L. Barrett, Jr. (MCSN: 0-460062), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 and 29 November 1950. Learning that enemy troops had penetrated exposed left-flank positions while he was directing the reorganization of his command post during an attack by numerically superior hostile forces at Hagaru-ri, First Lieutenant Barrett bravely moved to the point of penetration in the face of intense enemy small-arms, mortar, automatic weapons and artillery fire and personally directed and coordinated the fire of his left-flank squad to cover the infiltration. Selecting a hazardous observation post, he called for mortar fire within several yards of his front lines and, continually exposing himself to heavy hostile fire, checked and adjusted his platoon positions until the enemy breakthrough was sealed and the attack contained. Although painfully wounded by a hostile phosphorous shell and stunned by a grenade which bounced off his helmet and exploded nearby, he constantly moved among his men to encourage them throughout the night and administered aid to the wounded in the sub-zero temperature until the enemy attack ceased at dawn. By his outstanding courage, skilled leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Barrett served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by his company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fort Worth, Texas. Home Town: Lawton, Oklahoma.

Barrett, Roscoe L.  (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Roscoe L. Barrett, Jr. (MCSN: 0-460062), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Leader of Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. When his platoon was assigned the dual mission of assaulting an enemy position and maneuvering to protect the battalion's right flank in the vicinity of Hongchon, First Lieutenant Barrett fearlessly led his unit in seizing the initial objective in the face of an intense hostile mortar barrage and, despite extreme fatigue, carried out a thorough reconnaissance of the area before initiating the next attack. Although subjected to heavy enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire from his front, right flank and rear, he bravely moved forward to observe the hostile emplacements and, locating the positions occupied by an enemy knee mortar and two machine guns, secured a rocket squad, personally pointed out the targets and directed effective rocket fire on the objectives until all the hostile weapons were neutralized. By his outstanding leadership, marked courage and expert tactical skill in the employment of his platoon, First Lieutenant Barrett was greatly instrumental in the complete routing of the enemy force and contributed materially to the success achieved by his battalion, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fort Worth, Texas. Home Town: Lawton, Oklahoma.

Barrone, James D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal James D. Barrone (MCSN: 1219503), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 October 1952. Although seriously wounded when a direct hit destroyed the bunker he and two comrades were occupying during an intense enemy artillery barrage, Corporal Barrone quickly removed the two Marines from the damaged shelter and, despite the intense pain of his wounds and the continuing enemy fire, skillfully administered first aid to the stricken man. Unable to put on his shoes because of his severely wounded feet, he unhesitatingly ran barefoot through three hundred yards of rock and shrapnel-filled trench line. Forced to crawl through the trench on repeated occasions to evade hostile fire, he succeeded in reaching the platoon command post to obtain additional aid for his companions. After receiving medical treatment, he requested permission to remain on the lines with three remaining members of his squad and, throughout the entire afternoon and night, supervised the operation of three machine guns despite the critical condition of his wounds which made it almost impossible to move. By his courageous initiative, marked fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Corporal Barrone served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Merrill, Wisconsin. Home Town: Merrill, Wisconsin.

Barronton, John C.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 108 - 23 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) John C. Barronton (ASN: 0-1331254), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company I, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 10 July 1950 at Chonui, Korea. During the first phase of an attack by his company, Lieutenant Barronton, the Company Commander, was wounded in the left hand. Upon arrival in a small village about 1,000 yards south of the objective, the company began to receive heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire which held up the advance of the company. Lieutenant Barronton led his company forward under enemy small arms fire to the objective where he again placed his men and weapons in position. It was not until after this was completed that Lieutenant Barronton took time to have his wound attended. Later in the day a counterattack was made on Lieutenant Barronton's company. He was wounded three times but until he was evacuated about one and one half hours later, he successfully directed the operation of his unit from a litter. This outstanding example of leadership and courage on the part of Lieutenant Barronton reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Craddock, Virginia.

Barrow, Robert H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Robert H. Barrow (MCSN: 0-23471), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yongdungp'o, Korea, on 21 September 1950. Realizing the impossibility of immediate reorganization at the outskirts of the city, when a strong hostile counterattack threatened his company's flank, Captain Barrow unhesitatingly moved to an exposed position from which he could best direct the fire of his units after their successful 3,000 yard advance toward their objective. Under his able direction, the fire proved sufficiently effective to repel the counterattack and to cause the enemy to withdraw. While the company was preparing defensive positions and was forced to take cover from hostile sniper fire, he again exposed himself to place his men in advantageous firing positions and to further the development of their defense. Later, during an enemy attack, he supervised the firing of bazookas, thereby contributing to the destruction of one hostile tank, the damaging of another and the repulse of the assault. By his daring initiative, outstanding leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Captain Barrow upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. Born: February 5, 1922 at Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Home Town: St. Francisville, Louisiana.

Barry, Edgar L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 120

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class [then Sergeant] Edgar L. Barry (ASN: RA-13318967), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Battery A, 26th AAA (Automatic Weapons) Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 20 July 1950, at Taejon, Korea. The second platoon of Battery A, 26th AAA (AW) Battalion had the mission of protecting the 24th Infantry Regimental Command Post. An enemy tank approached the position and the M-15 half-track commanded by Sergeant Barry immediately engaged the tank. Without regard for his own safety and in spite of heavy fire from the tank, Sergeant Barry exposed himself to the enemy fire and manned the 37MM gun mounted on the half-track with the result that the tank was so disabled that it was forced to withdraw. This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of Sergeant Barry reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service.

Barry, Thomas E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Thomas E. Barry, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 12 - 13 August 1952. Participating in the successful defense of an outpost against an enemy company which surrounded the position and made three desperate attempts to take the outpost, Corporal Barry took charge as the eyes and ears of the officer in command of the outpost when that leader was critically wounded and blinded. Exercising a high degree of skill and leadership, he consolidated the force's position, directed their fire, made constant checks on the condition of his men, and participated decisively in the close fighting which lasted approximately four hours. Although the hill was overrun on several occasions, Corporal Barry inspired his meager force to make a heroic stand and successfully retain the vital position. His outstanding skill, courage, and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: June 13, 1928 at Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Bronx, New York.

Barszcz, Anthony

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 139 - 22 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Anthony Barszcz (ASN: 0-1301926), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 16 August 1950, in the vicinity of the Naktong River, Korea. Company G in conjunction with Company E of the 19th Infantry Regiment launched an attack on Ohang Hill in the face of severe enemy resistance. Counterattacking the friendly troops, the enemy successfully out-flanked the two companies and gained the high ground to the left and right. Their automatic weapons fire cut off the forward elements of Company E and pinned down the remnants of the two rifle companies. Captain Barszcz, realizing the severity of the enemy's actions, exposed himself repeatedly while moving among his men in an attempt to rally them to renew their efforts. Although numerically outnumbered by a determined enemy, the friendly forces succeeded in repulsing the attack and continued on until their assigned objectives were secured. Only then did he seed medical aid for wounds received during this action. The superior leadership, courage, and unhesitant devotion to duty displayed by Captain Barszcz, all with complete disregard for his own safety, served well to inspire his men and reflects the greatest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered Service From Illinois.

Bartels, Jean E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Jean E. Bartels (MCSN: 923681), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 27 November 1950. When an enemy soldier opened fire on him at point blank range while he was unloading ammunition for his gun on the company's perimeter defense position during an intense hostile attack, Corporal Bartels rolled down a hill toward the enemy and, while bayoneting his attacker, was assaulted by a second hostile soldier with an entrenching tool. Despite severe wounds sustained during the ensuing hand-to-hand struggle, he bayoneted the second enemy soldier and returned to his gun position, continuing to keep the weapon in action throughout the remainder of the night. Although suffering intense pain as a result of his wounds, he courageously delivered a tremendous volume of deadly accurate fire upon the hostile troops, accounting for approximately seventy-five enemy dead and one hundred wounded, thereby contributing greatly to the defense of the position. By his gallant fighting spirit, indomitable fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds, Corporal Bartels served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Saginaw, Michigan. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Barter, Charles Tracey (MIA/Died While POW)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 107 - 22 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Major (Field Artillery) Charles Tracey Barter (ASN: 0-451624), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Headquarters, 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 14 July 1950 near the Kum River, Korea. Serving as Battalion S-3, Major Barter was in charge of the fire direction center, directing the Battalion's fire on enemy targets when the position was subjected to enemy ground attack on both flanks and from the rear. Disregarding his own safety, Major Barter continued to operate the fire direction center until it received a direct hit from mortar fire. Although wounded, major Barter supervised the destruction of the Battalion Command Post and led the personnel of the Battalion through an escape corridor to safety. After having reached a safe position, Major Barter returned to the Command Post area to collect wounded and stragglers. Major Barter has been missing since. By his gallant acts, Major Barter brought great credit to himself and to the military service. Home Town: Norman, Oklahoma.

Barth, George B. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 246 - 26 October 1950

Brigadier General George B. Barth, 011241, 25th Infantry Division Artillery, United States Army.  On 11 and 12 August 1950 when elements of the division were subjected to repeated fanatic attacks by numerically superior hostile forces in the vicinity of Chinju, Korea, General Barth made frequent trips to the forward positions of the infantry units over roads exposed to heavy concentrations of hostile fire to obtain accurate information on the disposition of enemy forces and coordinate supporting artillery fire.  On 12 August 1950 General Barth organized isolated units into a task force and led them in an attack to clear the main supply route and rescue a beleaguered battalion.  While at a forward command post, General Barth coordinated artillery fire to repulse a hostile force which threatened envelopment of the command post; when the area had been secured, he arranged for air evacuation of the wounded.  General Barth's conspicuous courage, inspired leadership and notable tactical skill served as an inspiration to his men and contributed materially to the successful operations of the Division during a most critical period.  His actions reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Kansas.

Bartolo, Leo R. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 244 - 26 October 1950

Sergeant (then Corporal) Leo R. Bartolo, RA15259890, Infantry, Company E, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  During an attack on his company position near Hwanggan, Korea on 25 July 1950, Sergeant Bartolo learned of two additional enemy machine guns going into action to the front and flank.  Seizing a rocket launcher and ammunition Sergeant Bartolo crawled about 75 yards under intense automatic weapons fire, fired one round for a direct hit on the one machine gun, crawled a short distance and silenced the second machine gun, and then having subdued the small arms fire with his last round, he returned to his position.  Sergeant Bartolo's initiative, courageous devotion to duty, and military skill reflect great credit upon himself and the American soldier.  Entered the military service from Kentucky.

[KWE Note: Sergeant Bartolo was killed in later action in Korea on September 02, 1950.]

Barton, Floyd T.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Floyd T. Barton, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the Battery C, 21st Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 25th Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of Yongdungp'o, Korea, on 14 February 1951. On that date, Sergeant Barton's half-track was suddenly attacked by a hostile patrol which was attempting to cross the Han River. Although the initial onslaught forced the entire crew to take cover, he and the driver made their way back through enemy lines to recover the vehicle. Quickly mounting the machine gun turret as the driver mounted the cab, he delivered a steady stream of deadly fire to inflict numerous casualties on the surrounding foe and drive the remainder into disorderly retreat. Sergeant Barton's courageous leadership and selfless devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Barton, Frederick E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Frederick E. Barton, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the Battery A, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 7th Infantry Division, in action near Haengsong, Korea, on 13 February 1951. On that date, Private First Class Barton was cannoneer on an M-16 multiple machine gun half-track, which was part of the rear guard covering the withdrawal of an infantry task force. During the night, the other cannoneer was wounded by the intense enemy fire directed at the weapon from both sides of the road. Disregarding his own personal safety, Private First Class Barton exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire to assist in removing the wounded man from the turret. He then voluntarily assumed the tasks of both cannoneers for a period of over an hour to insure the continued firing of the guns. By his outstanding personal courage, Private First Class Barton kept all four guns of his half-track in action against the enemy and insured the success of the mission. Private First Class Barton's gallant actions and selfless devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Bartos, Joseph Stephen Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Joseph Stephen Bartos, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49359), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to the First Provisional Casual Company, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, and serving as Yangdo Island Defense Commander, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 20 February 1952. When a determined and large hostile force launched an amphibious landing on the island, First Lieutenant Bartos skillfully employed an interpreter to rally Republic of Korea Marine Corps troops and succeeded in confining the enemy to the crest of the hill. With local outpost telephonic and ship-to-shore communications rendered inoperable during the initial stages of the assault, he effectively deployed the friendly troops to vantage points and, waiting out five hours of darkness and adverse weather, kept the enemy localized to the one position. As dawn approached, he directed several infantry attacks against the opposing force and, failing to dislodge the enemy, controlled and directed the fire of two 81-mm. mortars, killing approximately one-half of the raiding force and capturing or wounding a large number before the remaining enemy troops were forced to withdraw. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and zealous devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Bartos contributed materially to the success of friendly forces in holding the strategic island and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Bartosh, Robert J.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 100 - 12 December 1950

Corporal Robert J. Bartosh, US57222100, Company A, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against an armed enemy.  Near Majon-ni, Korea, on 29 November 1952, the squad in which Corporal Bartosh was an automatic rifleman was ambushed by heavy enemy forces from a position 15 to 20 feet away.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he immediately began to return fire from an open position, although his automatic rifle had to be operated manually initially.  In spite of the intense fire from superior enemy forces he continued to return fire, covering the withdrawal of his squad to safety.  Only after his squad reached more covered positions did he withdraw himself.  As a result of this action, he enabled his squad to withdraw to more covered positions without a casualty.  The gallantry displayed by Corporal Bartosh on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and upon the military service.

Baslee, Herbert Lester Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant Commander Herbert Lester Baslee, Jr. (NSN: 0-165577), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while acting as a strike leader of a flight of Panther Jets of Fighter Squadron Fifty-two (VF-52), embarked in U.S.S. Valley Forge (CV-45), on an interdiction strike mission against enemy rail lines in the vicinity of Munchon, North Korea, on 17 March 1952. Leading his flight against enemy gun positions, Lieutenant Commander Baslee pressed home his aggressive and determined attack through a veritable hail of intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire, with utter disregard for his own personal safety, in order to silence the weapons and permit the flight to accomplish their assigned mission. Although his aircraft received several lethal hits, Lieutenant Commander Baslee continued to fire his guns against the enemy's positions until his plane crashed into the ground resulting in his death. His exceptional courage in the face of the gravest hazards, and his unswerving determination in pressing home his attack to insure the success of the mission exemplifies his extraordinary bravery and devotion to duty. His gallant fighting spirit reflect the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander, ATG-1: Serial 132 (March 28, 1952) Born: April 30, 1920. Home Town: Albany, Oregon. Death: KIA: March 17, 1952 - Buried at: Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery - San Diego, California.

Bason, Lester (posthumous)

General Orders No. 58 - 24 January 1951
25th Infantry Division

The Silver Star (Posthumous) is awarded to Private First Class Lester Bason, RA17265263, Infantry, Company L, 5th Infantry Regiment, United States Army. During the night of 2-3 September 1950, when numerically superior hostile forces launched an attack on the company positions in the vicinity of Chinmock, Korea, Private First Class Bason remained in his position despite the huge volume of enemy machine gun and rifle fire concentrated in the area. He courageously held his position and directed withering fire at the attackers until he was mortally wounded. By his indomitable courage, soldierly ability and outstanding devotion to duty, Private First Class Bason contributed materially to the successful defense of the position. His exemplary action was an inspiration to his comrades and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States soldier. Entered military service from Minnesota.

Bass, James C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James C. Bass (MCSN: 1151642), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 August 1952. When intense enemy fire inflicted numerous casualties on friendly forces assaulting two enemy-held hills, Sergeant Bass quickly picked up an automatic rifle from a severely wounded comrade and delivered deadly fire on the hostile positions, permitting the remaining squad members to evacuate the casualties from the hill. Although subjected to continuous enemy mortar and sniper fire, he unhesitatingly carried the wounded rifleman to a defiladed position and, reorganizing his squad, set up a hasty defense to protect the casualties until reinforcements arrived. By his skilled leadership, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Bass served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Okeechobee, Florida. Home Town: Okeechobee, Florida.

Bateman, Marlyn J. (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Marlyn J. Bateman (MCSN: 1058589), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 June 1951. When the gunner of a light machine gun squad became a casualty during a heavy attack against the company perimeter, Private First Class Bateman promptly left his foxhole, ran through a hail of hostile fire and, although painfully wounded, returned the weapon into action. Bravely maintaining his hazardous position, he continued to direct intense and accurate fire to account for many enemy dead and wounded before he was mortally wounded when hit a second time by hostile fire. By his marked courage, fortitude and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Bateman was greatly instrumental in preserving the security of the company position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 22, 1928 at Ottertail, Minnesota. Home Town: Eugene, Oregon. Death: KIA: June 9, 1951.

Bates, Roy B.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Roy B. Bates (MCSN: 1137480), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced),, in the vicinity of Saemol, Korea, on 3 June 1951. During an attack on a heavily fortified enemy position by the platoon of which Private Bates was a member, a well-concealed enemy machine gun nest forced the platoon to seek cover. Disregarding his personal safety, Private Bates exposed himself to a deadly hail of enemy fire, in order to locate the well-concealed position. Upon locating the position, he quickly and accurately fired a while phosphorus grenade, killing two of the enemy, and wounding the remainder of the gun crews. His fearless action effectively eliminated the threat to his platoon, and permitted the advance to continue until the objective was secured. The gallantry and initiative displayed by Private Bates on this occasion contributed greatly to the success of his unit's mission, and reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 176 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Kentucky.

Bates, William L. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major William L. Bates, Jr. (MCSN: 0-10657), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer and Supporting Arms Coordinator of Weapons Company, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 and 9 December 1950. Advancing with his company in an attack on a precipitous enemy-held hill, dominating Koto-ri Pass, Major Bates repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire to move among the leading elements and direct the positioning and employment of his battalion's heavy machine guns, rocket launchers and mortars in support of assaulting troops. Reconnoitering deep within hostile territory on several occasions, he directed the combined fire of medium and light artillery, anti-aircraft machine guns, mortars, aircraft and the organic weapons of his battalion, which were brought to bear with devastating effect and in perfect coordination with the infantry attack. By his skilled leadership and daring tactics, he contributed materially to the total destruction of heavily fortified hostile positions with tremendous casualties to the enemy. By his determined fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty, Major Bates contributed materially to the breakthrough of the First Marine Division from the Chosin Reservoir area and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Columbia, South Carolina. Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia.

Batley, W.E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant W. E. Batley (MCSN: 1124100), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 April 1953. When the platoon commander and platoon sergeant were seriously wounded during an assault against an enemy-held installation, Sergeant Batley immediately assumed command of the unit and, organizing his men, led them in an assault against the hostile position until forced to withdraw because of the intensity of the enemy fire. Although painfully wounded, he skillfully reorganized his unit and led it to the safety of an assembly area, personally returning to the objective to aid in the evacuation of the wounded. With an enemy raiding party attempting to capture the wounded Marines, he successfully held off the attackers and fearlessly remained in his position until all of his comrades were removed from the danger area. By his skilled leadership, courageous initiative and inspiring devotion to duty, Sergeant Batley upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Carson, Alabama. Home Town: Carson, Alabama.

Batterton, Roy J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Roy J. Batterton, Jr. (MCSN: 0-6629), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 9 to 13 August 1952. Assigned the mission of assaulting and capturing a hill defended by well-entrenched and numerically superior hostile forces, Lieutenant Colonel Batterton continually placed himself with the most forward elements of his battalion in the face of fierce enemy mortar, artillery and small arms fire to direct the attack more effectively. Throughout the long, grueling hours of battle which continued for days and nights without respite, he moved among his units, attending to the details of organization, the deployment of troops and the evacuation of wounded personnel, and ultimately maneuvered his men to positions where they inflicted devastating losses upon the defending hostile force and drove them from their positions. By his inspiring leadership, determination and selfless devotion to the welfare of his officers and men, Lieutenant Colonel Batterton was greatly instrumental in inflicting devastating losses upon the enemy and in the successful accomplishment of the mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lexington, Kentucky. Home Town: Lexington, Kentucky.

Bauer, John William (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant John William Bauer (MCSN: 305444), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 June 1951. During an attack against heavily fortified positions on the crest of Hill 421, Sergeant Bauer repeatedly exposed himself to devastating enemy small arms, grenade and automatic weapons fire to effectively deploy his squad. When his unit was raked by heavy fire from a cleverly camouflaged position, he unhesitatingly moved forward in an attempt to gain better observation. Mortally wounded during this courageous action, Sergeant Bauer, by his heroic leadership and daring initiative, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Indianapolis, Indiana. Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana. Death: KIA: June 8, 1951.

Bauer, Robert A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert A. Baur (MCSN: 1167247), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 May 1952. Serving as a tank crew member when the position was subjected to enemy artillery fire, Sergeant Baur unhesitatingly ran to the aid of the wounded. Although wounded himself during this action, he rendered first aid to the other casualties and carried the two most seriously wounded comrades to a bunker. When a helicopter was summoned, he served as litter bearer and steadfastly refused evacuation for himself until all other wounded had been treated. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades while under constant and heavy enemy artillery fire, Sergeant Baur served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Louis, Missouri. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri.

Baughman, Robert A.

"An Oak Leaf cluster to the Silver Star has been conferred on 1st Lieutenant Robert A. Baughman, Whitehall, for gallantry in action in Korea.  Baughman distinguished himself on September 12, 1951 near Kumhwa when Company G of the 27th "Wolfhound" regiment was attacking a strong hostile force on commanding ground.  The citation states:

When an area of open terrain had to be crossed under intense enemy fire, Lieutenant Baughman skillfully deployed one squad across and, continually disregarding the devastating barrage, returned to lead the rest of his platoon toward the objective.  As the assault was temporarily halted by heavy concentrations from well-emplaced automatic weapon positions, he moved ahead of the unit to secure a vantage point where he was successful in killing three enemy and neutralizing the fortification with accurate carbine fire to allow his men to regain the initiative and secure the objective.  Lieutenant Baughman's notable military skill, inspirational leadership and courageous devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest tradition of the United States.

On Thanksgiving day, Lieutenant Baughman was presented the Silver Star by Lieutenant Colonel George B. Sloan, commander of the 27th regiment.  Baughman, a member of the Reserves, was called back into service in October 1950, and left for service in Korea last spring.  He is a veteran of World War II and was wounded twice in the European theater.  Following the war he purchased the Whitehall Rendering works but was forced to turn it over to a manager when recalled to service.  His wife and two children are with her parents at Rolf, Iowa, during his absence." - Winona Republican-Herald (MN) - 18 December 1951

Baughn, Jack Jr.

General Orders #88 - 5 June 1954|
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Sergeant First Class Jack Baughn, Jr., US52218139, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the evening and night of 14 June 1953, in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, Company "E" commenced a raid on enemy held Hill "412". As Sergeant Baughn's squad neared the objective, it was subjected to heavy enemy fire which wounded the squad leader. Sergeant Baughn immediately assumed command of the squad, reorganized it and aggressively led the group up the slope. He courageously guided his men through the intense defensive barrages, forced the enemy to retreat and, upon reaching the crest, deployed his men in an effective defense perimeter. Upon receiving the order to withdraw, Sergeant Baughn skillfully led the squad to the assembly area and then volunteered to guide a screening patrol back to the shell torn objective in an attempt to retrieve wounded personnel. Disregarding the heavy enemy artillery and mortar bombardment, he again moved into the area under fire and succeeded in evacuating several United Nations casualties to safety. Sergeant Baughn then led the screening patrol back to the main line of resistance. Sergeant Baughn's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Kentucky.

Baxter, Roy Samuel

Newspaper Account - "City Soldier Gets Silver Star"

"The Silver Star for gallantry in action has been awarded to Pfc. Roy S. Baxter, 3815 Bloomington Avenue, a member of the Second Infantry Division in Korea.  Baxter distinguished himself last October 10 in the vicinity of Sutae-ri when his unit was temporarily halted by a heavy volume of hostile fire.

Setting up his weapon in an exposed spot and with complete disregard for his own safety, Baxter delivered accurate fire until his unit was able to continue the advance.  Later he secured another weapon when his broke down, and again joined in the assault."

[KWE Note: Roy Baxter was from Minnesota.]

Bean, Billy T.

Private (then Recruit) Billy T. Bean, RA15274893, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950 near Yongdong, Korea. The enemy was attacking the firing positions of the Battery at point blank range. Under intense mortar and small arms fire, Private Bean carried many rounds of ammunition to the howitzers, enabling them to fire at the enemy. He also carried ammunition to the machineguns which were defending the perimeter. Noticing that a group of his comrades had been wounded, Private Bean carried them across fire swept terrain to a defiladed position. There, in the absence of trained medical personnel, he rendered first aid to them. By his gallant deeds, Private Bean brought great credit to himself and the military service. GO 82, 10 Aug 1950. Entered service from Avendale, WV.

Beard, Howard Jr.

General Orders #4 - 5 January 1954
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Corporal Howard Beard, Jr., US55197372, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the morning and afternoon of 17 July 1953, in the vicinity of Sinmok-Tong, Korea, Corporal Beard was a member of a company raiding force advancing on enemy held Hill "433". He aggressively climbed the slope and charged the enemy, throwing hand grenades and firing his weapon. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Corporal Beard repeatedly moved within a few yards of enemy bunkers and trenches to effectively fire upon the defenders. His courageous actions and constant encouragement inspired his men to fight still harder and to inflict extensive damage upon the foe. Observing heavy fire coming from a bunker, he valiantly rushed to an exposed position and fired upon the enemy troops in the fortification in an attempt to neutralize their fire. In this brave move to protect his comrades, Corporal Beard was mortally wounded by a burst of enemy small arms fire. Corporal Beard's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Illinois.

Beatty, Richard H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 57 - 26 January 1952

By direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to First Lieutenant Richard H. Beatty, 02017638, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Third Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, (then a member of Company L, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division), distinguished himself by courageous action near Congar-ni, Korea, on 14 April 1951. Serving as platoon leader, he led his unit in an attack against firmly entrenched enemy fonces. The friendly troops were suddenly pinned down by intense enemy machine gun fire as they advanced along a ridgeline. Realizing the danger of the situation, Lieutenant Beatty advanced far ahead of his men and, armed only with a carbine, single-handedly destroyed the enemy position responsible for the deadly fire. The platoon was thus able to advance but was again stopped by another machine gun on higher ground. Lieutenant Beatty obtained some hand grenades and moved forward once more. In so doing, he was completely exposed and was subjected to a tremendous concentration of firepower. Nevertheless, he unswervingly/continued, and wiped out the machine gun nest with well placed grenades. Inspired by his fearlessness, his men resumed the attack and secured the objective. Lieutenant Beatty's courageous action, intrepid leadership and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Defiance, Ohio.

Beauchamp, Victor P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Victor P. Beauchamp (MCSN: 315377), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 September 1950. During an attack in a built-up area in Seoul, Corporal Beauchamp fearlessly exposed himself to heavy hostile fire in order to withdraw his fire team to a more advantageous position. As a result of the effective covering fire delivered by his team, his Platoon Commander, who had been seriously wounded, was safely evacuated and the platoon was enabled to take up a better position and overrun the enemy. On the same day, when his squad was subjected to intense hostile fire, Corporal Beauchamp again exposed himself to the enemy's fire to direct corpsmen to the wounded while he ordered and supervised covering fire. Seriously wounded and ordered to be evacuated during this action, Corporal Beauchamp, by his heroic leadership, fortitude and devotion to duty, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Portland, Oregon. Home Town: Jerome, Arizona.

Becerril-Saavedra, Miguel L.

General Orders #205 - 19 June 1951
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Private First Class Miguel L. Becerril Saavedra , RA30451639, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 19 April 1951, when the First Platoon of Company "C" was ordered to attack and seize the high ground near Hwanchan-dong, Korea, Private Becerril Saavedra, an acting squad leader, and his men were leading the advance. Upon coming under intense enemy small arms and mortar fire, Private Becerril Saavedra, with no thought for his personal safety, completely exposed himself in order to direct the fire and movement of his squad by arm and oral commands. After a long fire fight with the enemy, he led his squad in a bayonet assault which resulted in the death of five enemy soldiers, the capture of an enemy mortar and the seizure of the objective. The gallantry and exceptional leadership displayed by Private Becerril Saavedra reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Becicka, Leonard (1st award)

General Orders No. 42 - 21 January 1951
25th Infantry Division

The Silver Star is awarded to Captain LEONARD Becicka, Infantry, Company I, 35th Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army. On 14 September 1950 Captain Becicka led his company in an assault on a key terrain feature near Ungjon, Korea. Although the only route of approach was a steep, open slope and along a barren ridge, he moved out in the face of heavy hostile machine guns and small arms fire to direct the attack. Inspiring his men to great effort and zeal by his personal display of courage and determination he enabled his unit to seize their objective despite the enemy advantages of numbers and position. Captain Becicka’s valorous leadership and notable military skill are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Armed Forces. Entered military service from Minnesota.

Becicka, Leonard (2nd award)

General Orders No. 77 - 28 January 1951
25th Infantry Division

The First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Captain Leonard Becicka, 058288, Infantry, Company I, 35th Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army. Near Oryong, Korea, on 8 September 1950, Captain Becicka’s company was mounting a fierce determined assault on enemy positions. Although exposed to a withering concentration of small arms and automatic weapons fire, he calmly supervised effective counterfire. When the enemy attempted a flanking attack, he crawled and ran from man to man, skillfully maneuvered them to meet the hostile threat, delivered devastating fire that inflicted heavy casualties and routed the enemy and secured the position without losses among his men. Captain Becicka’s courage, tactical skill and inspirational leadership are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered military service from Minnesota.

Beck, John W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant John W. Beck (MCSN: 0-52704), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 13 August 1952. Serving as a Platoon Commander, Second Lieutenant Beck displayed exceptional heroism and leadership when the unit was engaged in the defense of a strategically important hill position well forward of friendly lines. With no concern for his personal safety, he fearlessly exposed himself to intense enemy small arms, mortar and artillery fire, moving amongst his men, directing their fire and encouraging them. On numerous occasions the company's perimeter of defense was assaulted by a numerically superior enemy force, and on each occasion, Second Lieutenant Beck skillfully maneuvered his men to aid in repelling the enemy. After these assaults, he rapidly reorganized and redeployed the platoon. Later, he dauntlessly led his platoon in a flanking movement around the hill to rout entrenched enemy troops. Second Lieutenant Beck's selfless devotion to duty and outstanding leadership were inspirational to all who observed him. His gallant and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Beck, Robert N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert N. Beck (MCSN: 1193182), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 August 1952. Guarding a critical sector of the company's defense perimeter, Private First Class Beck skillfully employed personal weapons and hand grenades to repulse the many enemy probes and never once committed his crew-served weapons into action. When a reinforced hostile squad attacked the position, he aggressively engaged the enemy and, aided by his assistant machine gunner, repelled the enemy force with small arms and hand grenades. Although painfully wounded by enemy concussion grenades, he continued in the action until the enemy was defeated and refused medical aid and evacuation until his wounded comrade had been treated. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Beck served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Balsam, North Carolina. Home Town: Balsam, North Carolina.

Becker, Richard S.

Silver Star
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders #574 - December 6, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Richard S. Becker, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Pilot, 334th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Fifth Air Force, on 9 September 1951. On that date, Captain Becker led a flight of six F-86 aircraft on a combat aerial patrol in the Sinuiju-Yalu River area of North Korea. Shortly after arriving in the target area, Captain Becker's flight sighted a formation of approximately 30 enemy MIG-15 planes in an advantageous position over his Squadron. He advised his squadron leader and the entire section turned to the attack. At this point, Captain Becker sighted a second enemy formation bearing down on his Squadron. Displaying outstanding airmanship, Captain Becker engaged this formation with a head-on pass, disrupting their planned assault and causing them to disperse. In the ensuing battle Captain Becker's flight became separated. Captain Becker rolled out of this attack alone at 39,000 feet. He prepared to withdraw when he sighted an enemy formation of 12 MIG-15s preparing to enter the battle. Captain Becker, although alone and with no possibility of friendly assistance, flew into their midst. The brilliance of his vicious assault on the enemy and the dauntlessness with which he engaged this enemy force totally disrupted them. Skillfully bringing his guns to bear on one of the enemy, Captain Becker destroyed him. Continuing to engage the remainder of the enemy formation until low on fuel, Captain Becker then eluded then and returned to his home base. The destruction of the enemy MIG-15 brought Captain Becker's score to five destroyed, one probably destroyed and two damaged in his 82 combat missions over North Korea, making him one of the JET aces in the world. Captain Becker's heroism and his brilliant airmanship reflect great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Beckley, Jerry E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Gunner's Mate Third Class [then Private First Class, United States Army] Jerry E. Beckley (NSN: 4606831/ASN: RA-19323889), United States Navy, for gallantry in action while serving with Battery B, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, on 12 August 1950 near San Gam-ni, Korea, when Private First Class Beckley's battery was subjected to a powerful hostile assault. Although his position was in grave danger of being isolated, he remained at his post and assisted in directing a heavy volume of effective 3.5 rocket launcher fire at the onrushing enemy. When an exploding ammunition truck endangered another fully loaded truck, he voluntarily exposed himself to the flying fragments and evacuated the vehicle to safety. Private First Class Beckley's courage, initiative and steadfast devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself, his unit and the United States Armed Forces. Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 125 (February 17, 1951). Entered Service From California.

Bedenbaugh, Charles W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Charles W. Bedenbaugh (MCSN: 0-55996), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Reconnaissance Patrol Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 29 - 30 January 1953. When his patrol reached a point close to its objective far forward of the main lines, Second Lieutenant Bedenbaugh discovered a numerically superior enemy force moving into a position to completely cut off the patrol from friendly forces. Immediately leading his men to more advantageous terrain, he quickly placed them in a hasty defense to repel the attackers. With the enemy employing automatic weapons and machine guns which were located at critical points throughout the surrounding area, he continually moved along the line to direct the fire of his men and to call in mortar fire from friendly positions, inflicting severe casualties upon the enemy and forcing them to withdraw. Despite heavy enemy machine gun and mortar fire, he succeeded in recovering all friendly casualties and in gathering enemy equipment before leading his patrol over hazardous ice-covered terrain to friendly lines. By his inspiring leadership, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Bedenbaugh upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Greenville, South Carolina. Home Town: Greenville, South Carolina.

Bee, Thomas G.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders #659 - December 31, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Thomas G. Bee (AFSN: AO-949005), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action as a Pilot with the 49th Fighter-Bomber Wing, Fifth Air Force, while participating in aerial flight over enemy-held territory in a flight of four F-84 aircraft on a close support mission near Pyongyang, Korea, on 13 August 1952. The flight, pre-briefed to attack artillery positions with napalm, was orbiting in an attempt to identify the target when Captain Bee's aircraft was hit in the nose section by an explosive 45 millimeter shell. As a result of the explosion the aircraft inverted in a burst of flame. Despite the hopelessness of his precarious situation, Captain Bee decided against abandoning the aircraft, and through an outstanding demonstration of carefully executed airmanship maneuvered his crippled aircraft back to home base. The extraordinary coolness, high courage and exceptional pilot skill displayed by Captain Bee during this critical operation reflected great credit upon himself, the FAR EAST Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Beebe, John Ward (MIA) (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Major John Ward Beebe (MCSN: 0-10206), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Senior Pilot of a flight of aircraft while attached to Marine Night Fighter Squadron FIVE HUNDRED FORTY-TWO (VMF(N)-542), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 24 September 1950. Engaged in close support of ground forces, Major Beebe led his flight in attacks against a hostile position which was inflicting heavy casualties on friendly forces. Although the target was obscured by dense smoke and haze which made its location from the air extremely difficult, he repeatedly descended to perilously low altitudes through intense enemy anti-aircraft fire in order to neutralize the assigned target. Pressing home his final attack with determination in defiance of all personal danger, Major Beebe lost his life when his plane was struck by enemy fire and crashed. His cool courage, skilled airmanship and devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Major Beebe and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 3, 1918 at St. Paul, Minnesota. Home Town: White Bear Lake, Minnesota. Death: MIA: September 24, 1950.

Beechler, John G.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders #194 - June 18, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery) John G. Beechler (ASN: 0-1879006), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in Korea while serving with Battery B, 39th Field Artillery Battalion, 3d Infantry Division, in action against the enemy on 24 and 25 April 1953, at Surang-Ni, Korea. On the night of 24 April and during the early morning hours of 25 April 1953, enemy forces attacked the defensive position of Company F on Outpost Harry, in the vicinity of Surang-Ni. Lieutenant Beechler was forward observer for his artillery unit which was supporting the position. The enemy laid down a heavy barrage on the outpost and Lieutenant Beechler immediately proceeded to give accurate counter-battery fire orders. When his bunker was hit and the enemy managed to gain the trenches, although fully aware of the danger involved and without regard for his personal safety, he engaged in hand-to-hand combat with the enemy, mortally wounding all of them that reached his bunker. Despite wounds sustained while saving a fellow soldier's life, he remained in his position, fighting until the enemy was finally driven off the hill and all positions were secure from further attack. First Lieutenant Beechler's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 3d Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

Beechner, Robert L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Robert L. Beechner (MCSN: 0-55298), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Infantry Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 12 - 13 October 1952. Although painfully wounded when the platoon was subjected to intense hostile machine gun and automatic weapons rifle fire during a night attack against an enemy strong point well forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Beechner repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire and moved about the area in total darkness in an effort to reorganize the platoon. Refusing medical attention for himself, he supervised the evacuation of other casualties and directed friendly mortar and artillery fire on the enemy position. When the unit was pinned down by devastating hostile machine gun fire while he was again leading his men in the attack on the enemy strong point, he continued to direct and encourage his men until reinforcements arrived. During the platoon's withdrawal to friendly lines, he remained at the rear to ensure the safe return of his men, consenting to treatment and evacuation for himself only after the others had reached safety. By his outstanding courage, expert leadership and resolute determination, Second Lieutenant Beechner served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kansas City, Missouri. Home Town: Rockford, Illinois.

Beeks, Alton

General Orders #341 - 15 August 1953
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Sergeant First Class Alton Beeks, RA34647640, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June and during the early morning hours of 15 June 1953, Company "E" had the mission of raiding an enemy outpost in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. A platoon, of which Sergeant Beeks was platoon sergeant, departed from the friendly lines under heavy enemy fire and advanced toward the enemy stronghold when the platoon leader became seriously wounded. Sergeant Beeks immediately accepted the responsibility of command and led his platoon in combat. When ordered to return to friendly lines, he organized his platoon, supervised the evacuation of wounded and then remained on the objective to search for missing personnel. Although hampered by darkness and enemy fire, he found several wounded comrades and evacuated them to a point from which they could be returned to friendly lines by litter. When assistance arrived, he directed the further evacuation with the utmost efficiency. Sergeant Beeks' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from South Carolina.

Beeler, James Dayton (awarded posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant James Dayton Beeler (MCSN: 0-50152), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Rifle Platoon Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 2 November 1950. Assigned the mission of leading his platoon as guard for a motor convoy carrying supplies to a front line infantry unit, Second Lieutenant Beeler was quick to act when a numerically superior enemy force suddenly attacked with heavy small-arms and machine-gun fire. Realizing that it was impossible to continue the advance along the mountainous terrain after analyzing the situation, he assumed an exposed position to direct counterfire against the attackers, at the same time ordering the convoy to turn around and evacuate the wounded. Remaining in his position until the convoy had effected a withdrawal, he further exposed himself to direct enemy fire to make certain that all casualties had been evacuated and, while searching the area, was mortally wounded. By his courageous and inspiring leadership, heroic efforts and grave concern for the safety of others at great personal risk, Second Lieutenant Beeler contributed to the saving of many lives and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

Begale (Bagale), John D. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman First Class John D. Begale (Bagale) (NSN: 7532247), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 May 1951. Hospitalman First Class Begale displayed outstanding courage and devotion to duty when the company position was attacked during hours of darkness by a numerically superior enemy force. Courageously moving to the portion of the line under heaviest assault, he exposed himself to devastating enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire to render first aid to the wounded and drag them to safety. Refusing to seek safety for himself, he was moving across a fire-swept area to reach another wounded comrade when he was mortally wounded by enemy fire, gallantly giving his life for his country. Hospitalman First Class Begale's great personal bravery and heroic actions were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 41350 (October 1, 1951). Born: August 14, 1927. Home Town: Jacksonville, Illinois. Death: KIA: May 17, 1951 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Begay, Joe M.

Corporal Joe M. Begay, US 56144291 (then Private First Class), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company F, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by courageous action near Kumsong, Korea, on 16 October 1951.  His company was attacking an enemy-occupied objective.  The two assault squads had nearly attained the top of a strategic knoll when they were subjected to a tremendous volume of enemy automatic weapons and grenade fire from positions above them and were forced to withdraw temporarily.  Discovering that the squad's air panel, used to mark friendly positions as protection from allied aircraft, had been left at the highest position they had attained, Corporal Begay volunteered to return to it.  Leaving his position of cover, he started threading his way through the enemy fire and grenades.  Upon reaching the panel, he rolled it up and tossed it down to his comrades.  Then, with complete disregard for his own safety, he advanced on the first enemy position, a machine gun emplacement.  Approaching within range, he tossed a grenade into it, silencing the weapon and killing two hostile soldiers and wounding another.  Rearming himself with some enemy grenades found in the destroyed position, he again braved the devastating enemy fire and assaulted a second bunker.  His deadly tosses wiped out this position also, killing two and wounding another of the enemy.  The five remaining enemy on the knoll were so panicked by his single-handed attack that they threw down their arms and surrendered, enabling the mission to be successfully accomplished.  Corporal Begay's courageous action, aggressive initiative and selfless performance of duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from Tuba City, Arizona.

Begay, Marco Y.

General Orders #138
Headquarters, X Corps

Corporal Marco Y. Begay, ER18147454, (then Private First Class), Infantry, United States Army, Company "C", 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry in action against the enemy on 20 May 1951, in the vicinity of Hangye, Korea.  On that date he was a member of a machine gun squad, assisting in the defense of his unit's perimeter against a numerically superior enemy force.  As the enemy attack neared his squad's position, he arose and engaged the enemy with hand grenades and carbine fire.  Although subjected to intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, he remained in his exposed position until the wounded were removed.  He then recovered his machine gun and placed neutralizing fire on the attackers, allowing the other members of his platoon to prepare a new position from which the enemy attack was successfully repelled.  The gallant conduct displayed by Corporal Begay on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered Federal service from New Jersey.

Behne, Edward P.

General Orders #190 - 16 June 1953
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

First Lieutenant (then Second Lieutenant) Edward P. Behne, 02103674, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 20 September 1952, Lieutenant Behne's platoon was assigned the mission of attacking a heavily defended enemy position on Kelly Hill in the vicinity of Koyang-dae, Korea. Despite intensive enemy mortar barrages and machine gun fire, Lieutenant Behne led his platoon up the fire swept slopes towards the hostile trenches. Realizing the danger to his men who were halted in an extremely exposed and untenable position, Lieutenant Behne, with complete disregard for his personal safety, started the assault on the trenches. As a result of his inspirational actions, his men, in hand to hand combat, drove the enemy from the trenches, mortally wounding many of the foe. Leading a small group, he then moved toward the final enemy held position on the knob of the hill. Observers noted a large hostile force of two groups closing in on Lieutenant Behne's platoon from both flanks and ordered his immediate return to safety. After insuring that all his wounded were evacuated, Lieutenant Behne covered the retrograde movement of his men until the entire group had successfully disengaged. In the final moments of the battle, Lieutenant Behne, leaving seconds before the enemy closed in on his position, mortally wounded two attacking enemy soldiers. Lieutenant Behne's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Wisconsin.

Bell, Benjamin H.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Benjamin H. Bell, United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy as a member of the Medical Detachment, 1st Cavalry Division Artillery, in action on 7 September 1950 near Taegu, Korea. Upon hearing that an infantry unit forced to withdraw under heavy pressure, had left a wounded comrade in their old position, Corporal Bell, without hesitation, volunteered to make the evacuation. With another aid man, Corporal Bell moved forward in a ton litter vehicle as far as practicable and then dismounting, started off on toot. After traveling over a mile and a half, through territory recently abandoned by friendly forces and under heavy enemy fire, they reached the wounded man and hand carried him back to their vehicle. Corporal Bell, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, through outstanding courage and determination, undoubtedly saved the life of a fellow soldier. Corporal Bell’s gallant actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. General Orders: General Orders number 172, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division, 1 December 1950. Home of Record: Louisiana.

Bell, Van Daley Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Van Daley Bell, Jr. (MCSN: 0-44563), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 25 April 1951. With his platoon fighting a rear guard action to permit the withdrawal of the remainder of the company, First Lieutenant Bell, repeatedly exposing himself to enemy close range small-arms and machine-gun fire, coordinated an deployed his squads to successfully repulse a fanatical hostile attack. When ordered to displace his platoon and rejoining the company, he skillfully broke contact with the enemy and effected a rapid movement to the new position. Informed that one of his men had been missing for almost an hour, he immediately turned his command over to the platoon sergeant and, after retracing the rout e to the old position and finding the missing Marine who was wounded and unable to move, carried him a distance of 400 yards to safety while exposed to hostile observation and steadily increasing sniper fire. By his courageous leadership, daring initiative and selfless devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Bell served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: August 15, 1918 at Atlanta, Georgia. Home Town: Portsmouth, Rhode Island. Death: June 3, 2009 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Bendix, John Dean (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private John Dean Bendix (ASN: RA-17272826), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 16 August 1950, near Waegwan, Korea. While his company was participating in a combined tank-infantry attack on a strong enemy position, two friendly tanks were made inoperable by enemy action. Realizing that in order to escape, the crews of the disabled tanks would need strong covering fire, Private Bendix, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, mounted the open decks of another tank and opened fire on the enemy with a .50 caliber machine gun. Remaining in his exposed and vulnerable position until he was certain that all the tank crew had withdrawn, Private Bendix continued to man his machine gun until he was mortally wounded. His courageous aggressiveness, at the sacrifice of his own life, was directly responsible for the safe withdrawal of two tank crews. Private Bendix's gallant actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of Record: Minnesota.

Benge, Martin (posthumous)

Private First Class Martin Benge, RA20828251, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 6 July 1950 near Chonan, Korea. PFC Benge’s unit was withdrawing from its position when it was noticed that a vehicle and four wounded soldiers had been left behind. Without regard for his personal safety, PFC Benge voluntarily re-entered the area which was under heavy enemy fire and brought the vehicle and four wounded soldiers to safety. PFC Benge’s display of courage, fortitude and valor reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. GO 74, 7 Aug 1950. Entered service from Oklahoma City, OK.

Bennett, Chauncey Aubrey Jr. (posthumous - MIA)

Citation not yet found.

Captain Bennett was the pilot of a F-51D Mustang night fighter with the 12th Fighter Bomber Squadron, 18th Fighter Bomber Wing. On April 30, 1951, while on a combat mission, his aircraft received a direct hit by anti-aircraft fire. He bailed out over enemy territory and was taken Prisoner of War. He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953. His remains were not recovered. For his leadership and valor, Captain Bennett was awarded the Silver Star, the Air Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Purple Heart, the Prisoner of War Medal, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

Bennett, Raymond Rodney (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Raymond Rodney Bennett (MCSN: 1176741), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Bearer in Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 September 1951. Observing several wounded Marines lying exposed to heavy enemy fire when he moved into newly seized positions, Private First Class Bennett bravely crawled forward across the fire-swept area and dragged one of the stricken men to safety. He then volunteered as a stretcher bearer to assist in recovering the remainder of the casualties, making repeated trips across tortuous terrain and carrying vitally needed ammunition on the return journeys. Despite near exhaustion, he persevered in his task until struck by a burst of enemy fire and mortally wounded. By his marked courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Private First Class Bennett served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 24, 1933 at Washington Courthouse, Ohio. Home Town: Washington Courthouse, Ohio. Death: KIA: September 19, 1951.

Bennett, Vernon A.

Headquarters, X Corps
General Orders #5 - September 27, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Vernon A. Bennett (MCSN: 657094), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division, by firing on an enemy bunker in order that other landing craft could safely land. On the evening of 15 September 1950, on RED BEACH 1, Inchon, Korea, the landing boat in which Private First Class Bennett came ashore landing next to an enemy bunker, and all personnel were wounded with the exception of three men. Private First Class Bennett, an assistant machine gunner, came ashore regardless of the personal danger involved and set up his machine gun, without tripod, and began to fire on the bunker, pinning the enemy down. Due to his conspicuous gallantry, another boat was able to land troops who in turn destroyed the bunker. Private First Class Bennett performed the above action after having been painfully wounded by enemy gun fire. His display of alertness and gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the Naval Service.  Home Town: South Bend, Washington.

Benson, Kenneth R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Kenneth R. Benson, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with operations against the enemy while serving as Rifleman, Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division in Korea on 28 November 1950. The company was tasked with securing the Tokong Pass and providing security along the road between Hagaru and Yudam-ni. Private First Class Benson was manning a listening post during the early morning hours with another Marine forward to the main line of defense when Chinese soldiers attacked the company's hill position in regimental strength. Private First Class Benson and the other Marine were returning to the company's defense perimeter when an enemy hand grenade landed near them. He picked it up and threw it back towards the enemy, but it exploded wounding and temporarily blinding him. Unable to locate the main line of defense, hand grenades, and mortar fire, he and the other Marine manned a dangerously exposed position at the head of the ravine, which led to the company's left flank and engaged the enemy. Although unable to use his weapon because of temporary blindness, he continuously reloaded the weapons of the other Marine to ensure accurate and effective fire at the attacking enemy, ultimately stopping the seizure of the top of Fox Hill. By his extraordinary heroism in the face of extreme danger, Private First Class Benson reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Benson, Walter R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Walter R. Benson (MCSN: 1089516), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1951. Bravely leading his men through withering enemy fire to support the leading squad which was pinned down by hostile fire, Private First Class Benson skillfully maneuvered his unit over open terrain and succeeded in relieving the hard-pressed squad. Finding that the companion unit had suffered heavy casualties, he unhesitatingly led his own squad forward in the attack, seized the objective and, after establishing an effective defense line, directed his men in covering fire for the advance of adjacent units. With his squad engaged in repulsing a counterattack during the ensuing fire fight, he boldly charged forward through a hail of enemy fire to rescue a wounded comrade. His aggressive fighting spirit, outstanding courage and inspiring initiative reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Benson and the United States Naval Service. Born: Long Lake, Minnesota. Home Town: Long Lake, Minnesota.

Bentley, William L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant William L. Bentley (MCSN: 1000597), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 June 1951. When fierce enemy machine gun fire halted and pinned down his squad during an assault against a heavily fortified strong point north of Inje, Sergeant Bentley immediately moved to an exposed position from which he could more effectively direct the fire of his unit. Although seriously wounded in both legs, he bravely remained in position and continued to control his squad until ordered to accept medical aid. By his marked courage, daring leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, Sergeant Bentley contributed materially to the success of the company's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Muskegon Township, Michigan. Home Town: Schofield, Wisconsin.

Benton, Robert E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Robert E. Benton (MCSN: 0-27510), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Photographic Squadron One in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 August 1952. Escorted by jet fighters while piloting his aircraft on a high priority photo reconnaissance mission over a heavily defended enemy power complex, Captain Benton descended through successive cloud layers and approached the objective area beneath a low overcast where increasingly intense and accurate hostile anti-aircraft fire prevented full photographic coverage of the assigned targets during the initial run. With his plane thrown into an uncontrolled dive by a shattering burst of enemy fire which struck the left wing while he was returning for a second approach, Captain Benton regained control of his severely damaged aircraft at a minimum altitude and returned through instrument weather to his base. Refusing to abandon his plane although the landing gear, speed brake, flap and aileron boost controls were completely destroyed, he skillfully executed a power-off crash landing without injury to himself or damage to the valuable film. By his outstanding courage, skilled airmanship and unswerving devotion to the fulfillment of a vital mission, Captain Benton preserved valuable intelligence information for use in future operations against the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: El Paso, Texas. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Berg, Elmer

Full citation not yet found.

"Sgt. Elmer Berg, who has been on the lighting front in Korea for several months, recently received the Silver Star for gallantry in action.  While serving with the 38th infantry regiment of the Second Division he distinguished himself by gallantry in action on February 14 this year in the vicinity of Wonju.  The citation states that his company on that date was in defensive position fighting off heavy attacks by the enemy and the platoon in which Sgt. Berg was a squad leader became encircled.  Sgt. Berg observed another squad which had become leaderless due to the loss of the squad leader.  He immediately took charge of this squad and led it back to the platoon area, then proceeded to direct it in the defense of the platoon perimeter.  'Throwing heavy fire at the enemy under Sgt. Berg's skillful and courageous leadership,' the citation reads, 'this squad aided materially in the successful defensive action of the platoon.  When the platoon later determined to force its way through the enemy lines, the evacuation of the wounded made a grave problem.  Sgt. Berg, with complete disregard for his own safety, volunteered to act as the covering force for the evacuation.  Remaining alone in position under incessant mortar and small arms fire from the enemy, Sgt. Berg covered the withdrawal himself, falling back only, after all wounded had been safely removed.  The gallantry displayed by Sgt. Berg reflects great credit upon imself and the military service.'" - Mason City Globe-Gazette, July 30, 1951

Bergelt, Eugene L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Eugene L. Bergelt, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Tank Gunner with Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 June 1951. Sergeant Bergelt was subjected to intense enemy fire in a position forward of the infantry battalion he was supporting. Tracer bullets from enemy machine guns ignited the infantry squad packs containing numerous hand grenades which were resting on his tank's engine compartment. The packs burst into flame threatening the safety of the tank and its crew. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he crawled from the turret of his tank, and, while exposed to the direct fire of at least three enemy machine guns, laboriously dislodged the packs before the flames could ignite the hand grenades and damage the tank or injure its crew. Sergeant Bergelt's coolness under fire and heroic actions were directly responsible for the safety of the crew and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: November 15, 1930 at Cincinnati, Ohio. Home Town: Opa Locke, Florida.

Bergman, Robert Arnold (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Robert Arnold Bergman (NSN: 2357326), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company I, 3d Battalion, 7th Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 16 June 1952. When the squad to which he was attached was ambushed by the enemy, and the forward elements of the unit were pinned down within 20 yards of the assigned objective by intense hostile small-arms and grenade fire, Hospitalman Bergman unhesitatingly dashed forward through a hail of enemy fire to survey the area for casualties. Learning that medical assistance was not required at the point of the squad, he bravely raced across 150 yards of open, fire-swept terrain to reach the main body of the unit and to administer medical aid to the wounded during a heavy barrage of hostile mortar fire. Although severely wounded by enemy fire while treating a stricken Marine, he refused to be evacuated and calmly instructed another member of the squad in administering aid to the casualty. Subsequently evacuated from the area, he later succumbed to the wounds received in this action. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Hospitalman Bergman served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

Berlette, Billie M.

"A LaHarpe, Iowa, soldier, Cpl. Billie M. Berlett, has been awarded the silver star and citation for bravery and devotion to duty in Korea. According to his citation, on July 27, 1951, Berlett carried messages between forward elements of the unit and the rear command post, supplied men on the front line with ammunition and helped evacuate comrades, all 'with complete indifference to intense enemy fire.' Berlett is the husband of Mrs. Barbara Jean Sutton Berlett, and the son of Wiley Berlett, both of LaHarpe." Burlington Hawk-Eye Gazette, Dec 8, 1951 Cedar Rapids.

Bernier, Raymond H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Raymond H. Bernier (NSN: 2100008), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. Hospitalman Bernier was acting as a Corpsman with an infantry platoon. During the attack by his platoon against intense enemy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire, he observed a wounded Marine. Without regard for his personal safety, he fearlessly and courageously ran through the intense enemy fire to administer aid. On the way he was painfully wounded in the leg, however, despite the pain and suffering from loss of blood he continued to the wounded Marine. He then pulled the wounded Marine to a position of cover and administered aid. Hospitalman Bernier then continued to go among the wounded and administer aid until he became so weak from the loss of blood and suffering from the painful wound that it became necessary to evacuate him. Hospitalman Bernier's display of initiative and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 17671 (November 3, 1950).

Berry, James C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James C. Berry (MCSN: 661191), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Bulldozer Operator attached to Company A, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 December 1950. With a regimental convoy subjected to violent attack by a strong hostile force employing automatic weapons and small arms during the movement south from Yudam-ni to Koto-ri, Sergeant Barry was quick to act when an ambulance attempting to evacuate wounded came under intense automatic weapons fire. Boldly driving his bulldozer between the enemy and the ambulance, he positioned his vehicle to draw the heavy fire to himself and provide a shield to cover the movement of the ambulance around a curve in the road and to a rear aid station. Fearlessly continuing at the head of the convoy, he worked tirelessly and with superb courage under blistering fire, filling craters, constructing by-passes and repairing damaged roads to permit the advance of the convoy. Despite a painful leg wound, he staunchly refused to be evacuated, remaining with the point of the column and continuing his efforts until his vehicle was rendered inoperative by enemy action. By his daring initiative, individual heroism and unrelenting devotion to duty, Sergeant Berry undoubtedly saved the lives of many who otherwise might have perished and expedited the movement of the regimental convoy to its destination. His selfless actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Taylorsport, Kentucky. Home Town: Taylorsport, Kentucky.

Betthauser, Michael Duane (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Michael Duane Betthauser (MCSN: 606451), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a 4.2" Mortar Company of the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 November 1950. During a fierce counterattack by a numerically superior enemy force employing small arms, machine guns and hand grenades, Private First Class Betthauser steadfastly remained at his mortar position and engaged the overrunning hostile troops in hand-to-hand combat until mortally wounded. By his aggressive fighting spirit, determination and unfaltering devotion to duty throughout, Private First Class Betthauser served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 14, 1928 at Tomah, Wisconsin. Home Town: Tomah, Wisconsin. Death: KIA: November 2, 1950.

Bey, Robert T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert T. Bey (MCSN: 0-46068), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. With his company disposed in defensive positions on a hill north of Yudam-ni when a vastly outnumbering enemy suddenly attacked in force and inflicted heavy casualties in the ranks, First Lieutenant Bey promptly established a temporary aid station in the platoon warming tent and supervised the transporting of casualties into it. When the company commander was killed, he organized several of his men into a relief unit under the command of his platoon sergeant and dispatched them to the company command post to reinforce two other platoons that were without leaders and being hard pressed. After supervising the evacuation of wounded through the infiltrating hostile forces, he further exposed himself to intense small arms, mortar and machine gun fire to lead his remaining men to the command post where he reorganized the depleted company for the final drive to repel the onslaught and retain the key terrain until relief arrived. His daring and aggressive leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and superb courage served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Bey and the United States Naval Service. Born: May 26, 1925 at Zanesville, Ohio. Home Town: Zanesville, Ohio.

Beziat, Robert L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 116 - 3 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Cavalry) Robert L. Beziat (ASN: 0-371342), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 78th Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 11 July 1950 in the vicinity of Tanae, Korea. When Captain Beziat observed one of his tanks moving out of action he investigated the reason. When he was informed that the tank was running on one engine he ordered the tank back into action. He then assumed command and promptly climbed upon the tank in an exposed position where he manned the .50 caliber machine gun mounted on the turret. He destroyed an enemy machine gun nest and many enemy troops. Realizing that his tank was in such position as to prevent elevation of the 75-mm. gun to effectively fire on the enemy, he ordered the tank into a more exposed position. He continued to fire the .50 caliber machine gun until it became inoperative. Captain Beziat then directed the fire of the 75-mm. gun in destroying the enemy. The leadership, initiative and disregard for personal safety displayed by Captain Beziat was an inspiration to the infantry and his tank crew. This action reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.

Bibler, John L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private John L. Bibler (MCSN: 1082774), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 28 November to 3 December 1950. When a numerically superior hostile force armed with automatic weapons, small arms and mortars launched a fierce counterattack against his platoon on 3 December, Private Bibler quickly and voluntarily brought his machine gun into action and delivered intense, accurate fire which destroyed the leading elements of the hostile force and disorganized the remainder. After the hostile troops had reformed and were continuing the attack, he staunchly manned his weapon in the face of a concentration of heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire and, although painfully wounded, bravely continued to direct effective fire until the hostile counterattack was repelled. His courageous initiative, coolness in the face of grave personal risk and indomitable fighting spirit served to inspire the members of his platoon and his company, thereby reflecting great credit upon Private Bibler and the United States Naval Service. Born: Springport, Michigan. Home Town: Jackson, Michigan.

Biebinger, Oscar L.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Hospitalman Third Class Oscar L. Biebinger (NSN: 6577232), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Corpsman attached to the First Motor Transport Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea. On 3 December 1950, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Biebinger's unit, together with other United Nations Forces, made a successful break-through in the Chosin Reservoir area. As a result of this action, a considerable number of Army infantrymen were wounded. Immediately realizing the peril of the wounded infantrymen, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Biebinger, on his own initiative, in company with two other Marines, volunteered to go forward and attempt to rescue the wounded. With utter disregard for his personal safety, and in the face of enemy hand grenades, mortar and small arms fire, he ventured approximately three miles beyond enemy lines and worked tirelessly until all known wounded had been removed. The devotion to duty, determination and gallantry displayed by Hospital Corpsman Third Class Biebinger on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 106 (June 4, 1951). Entered Service From North Carolina.

Biederstadt, Cletus

Corporal Cletus Biederstadt, RA19303889, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of the Clearing Company, 24th Medical Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy on 20 July 1950 at Taejon, Korea. When American units were fighting in Taejon against a superior enemy force, the need for medical supplies was urgent. Realizing this, CPL Biederstadt, even though wounded in both legs from mall arms enemy fire and with his assistant driver severely wounded, drove his vehicle through enemy fire for a distance of two miles to deliver the much needed supplies. His high regard for duty, his courage and extreme efforts to aid the sick and wounded reflects the highest credit on CPL Biederstadt and the Medical Department. GO 82, 10 Aug 1950. Entered service from Bremerton, WA. (See Gerald Millman citation.)

Biel, Bruce E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Bruce E. Biel (MCSN: 0-54259), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 13 September 1952. Despite continuous enemy mortar and small-arms fire, Second Lieutenant Biel fearlessly led two Marines to the forward slope of the position to lay napalm charges during the defense of a forward outpost. When the enemy increased the intensity of their fire, he unhesitatingly assumed an exposed position to draw the hostile fire away from the working Marines. Upon completion of the task, he ordered the men to the reverse slope and remained in the forward are to personally check the charges and further reconnoiter the sector, returning to the reverse slope when assured that the explosives were properly set. Later, when the enemy launched a determined assault, he quickly advanced to the exposed area and set off the charges, thereby preventing the hostile force from overrunning the outpost. By his gallant leadership, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Biel served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Richmond, Virginia. Home Town: Upper Darby, Pennsylvania.

Biggs, Ernest E.

Silver Star
Headquarters, Far East Forces
General Orders # 259 - June 5, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major [then Captain] Ernest E. Biggs, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 3 December 1950 while flying in close support of the United Nations ground forces in the Chosin Reservoir area. Major Biggs led his flight of F-51 aircraft to the area in answer to an emergency call from elements of the First Marine Division who were surrounded by enemy forces. These elements were trying to evacuate approximately 900 wounded and were caught in a vicious cross fire. Major Biggs directed his flight in a devastating attack against the enemy, making pass after pass at an extremely low level in the face of heavy small arms and anti-aircraft fire. On his tenth pass, Major Biggs' aircraft received several direct hits by 20 MM shells which seriously damaged the left wing, left main gasoline tank and horizontal stabilizer. Despite the damage suffered by his aircraft, Major Biggs continued to press the attack on the enemy until his ammunition was expended. The heavy damage inflicted upon the enemy as a result of Major Biggs' intrepidity permitted the Marines to carry out their mission of evacuating wounded personnel. Major Biggs' courageous performance was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Biggs, George M. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class George M. Biggs, Jr. (MCSN: 1072815), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 March 1951. Quickly locating the position of two of the enemy when the leading elements of his company were taken under intense fire from well-concealed and entrenched hostile strong points, Private First Class Biggs bravely crawled through the heavy fire to a point within ten yards of the enemy and promptly killed the hostile troops with accurate rifle fire, greatly aiding his unit in securing its objective. Learning that a supporting company was subjected to heavy enemy fire and urgently needed a serviceable radio, he boldly made his way along an exposed, fire-swept ridge to reach the unit and, although severely wounded in the head, successfully delivered the vital radio equipment. By his exceptional courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Biggs served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Boise, Idaho. Home Town: Nampa, Idaho.

Binder, Milton W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Milton W. Binder (MCSN: 1088408), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radio Operator of Battery H, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 September 1950. Although in grave danger of collapse from multiple wounds received when a hostile mortar shell exploded among the forward observer team and killed the officer in charge of his unit, Private First Class Binder bravely refused to be evacuated, moving his radio to a position where he could observe the enemy and make an adjustment to bring fire down on the enemy. Despite severe pain and loss of blood, he persevered in his task until he became unconscious. By his marked courage, technical skill and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Binder upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cincinnati, Ohio. Home Town: Cincinnati, Ohio.

Bindewald, James A.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 81 - 29 March 1951

"Award of the Silver Star - By direction of the President under the act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WB Bulletin 43, 1918), the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following-named enlisted man:

Corporal James A. Bindewald, RA17264720, Medical Corps, Medical Detachment Headquarters 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 18 January 1951, near Kumyangjang-ni, Korea, Corporal Bindewald was aid man for the 3d Reconnaissance Company when it was ambushed by a well-armed and determined enemy force. During the action, Corporal Bindewald, voluntarily and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, ran through heavy machine gun and mortar fire to administer first aid. Repeatedly he risked his life to aid the wounded who lay in exposed positions, raked by enemy fire. He sought cover only when all the wounded had been cared for, the more serious cases being placed on litter jeeps and evacuated. The professional skill, selfless devotion to duty, and gallantry displayed by Corporal Bindewald reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Iowa.

Binkley, James Frederick (posthumous)

General Orders No. 148 - 7 June 1951

Private James F. Binkley, RA15381249, (posthumous), a member of Detachment E, 205th Signal Repair Company, Signal Corps, attached to the 6th Republic of Korea Division, for gallantry in battle at the Chosin Reservoir on 1 December 1950.  Observing that the enemy was rapidly approaching the defense position, Private Binkley, acting without hesitation and well aware of the personal risk involved, ran through a veritable hail of fire over [words missing due to damaged newspaper] ground to the left side of the area under attack.  Although constantly exposed to enemy observation and deliberately firing to disconcert the determined foe, he drew attention to himself and afforded time for friendly forces to gain tactical advantage and launch an assault from the right flank.  In the ensuing action, Private Binkley was mortally wounded, but his heroic stand enabled friendly elements to destroy great numbers of the enemy and demoralize and disperse the remainder.  Private Binkley's valor, consummate intrepidity and noble self-sacrifice reflect utmost honor on himself and the heroic traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Kentucky.

Bird, Douglas V.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Douglas V. Bird (MCSN: 1122905), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Bearer in Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. When the company was subjected to a violent attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Private First Class Bird fearlessly exposed himself to devastating enemy fire to direct heavy rifle fire on the advancing attackers. With his ammunition expended as a small group of hostile soldiers penetrated the position after the main enemy attack was successfully repulsed, he courageously grappled with one of the enemy with his bare hands and, although painfully wounded, succeeded in hurling the enemy bodily from the position. By his aggressive fighting spirit, daring initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Private First Class Bird served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Syracuse, New York. Home Town: Memphis, New York.

Bissell, John Jackson Jr. (1st award) (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant John Jackson Bissell, Jr. (MCSN: 0-54261), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 13 to 15 August 1952. Although wounded while the company was defending a portion of a strategic hill position against a fanatical enemy force, Second Lieutenant Bissell courageously exposed himself to intense enemy sniper, mortar and artillery fire to check his sector, care for the wounded, repair weapons, and, on occasions, to act as a stretcher bearer in evacuating casualties. Repeatedly carrying critical supplies of ammunition, food and water to his men, he continued to move about his unit during the enemy attacks to direct fire and lend words of encouragement. After the hostile attacks had subsided, he led a party of men forward of friendly lines to search enemy dead for intelligence information although subjected to hostile mortar and artillery fire. By his exceptional courage, outstanding leadership and coolness under fire, Second Lieutenant Bissell served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: October 5, 1928 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Death: MIA: October 7, 1952.

Bissell, John Jackson Jr. (2nd award) (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant John Jackson Bissell, Jr. (MCSN: 0-54261), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 - 7 October 1952. When a friendly outpost position far forward of the main line of resistance was subjected to a devastating mortar and artillery barrage, followed by an attack by an overwhelming enemy force which overran and seized the outpost, Second Lieutenant Bissell immediately organized two squads and fearlessly led his men through a murderous hail of enemy artillery and mortar fire to assault the position. With his unit sustaining numerous casualties from the heavy fire, he skillfully assisted in their evacuation and, observing a wounded Marine lying in a completely exposed area, unhesitatingly proceeded to the side of the stricken man. Mortally wounded while moving to the aid of his comrade, Second Lieutenant Bissell, by his outstanding courage, resourceful initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of another, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 5, 1928 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Death: MIA: October 7, 1952.

Black, Henry H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Henry H. Black (MCSN: 667269), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Jeep Driver of Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Observing that a 60-mm. mortar section was rapidly exhausting its supply of ammunition during a fierce attack against his company's positions by numerically superior enemy forces, Corporal Black accompanied by a fellow Marine voluntarily completed two trips to the company ammunition dump, which had been overrun by the enemy, and returning on foot on each occasion, brought back mortar ammunition in the face of a continued enemy barrage of small arms, machine gun and mortar fire. Risking his life again, he led his companion through the enemy penetration, obtained a jeep and trailer, assisted in loading the vehicles with ammunition and boldly drove through the intense fire to his company command post. By his daring initiative, aggressive determination and courageous efforts in the face of extreme peril, Corporal Black contributed materially to the successful repulse of the attackers and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: February 9, 1929 at Imperial, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Imperial, Pennsylvania.

Blackburn, Elmer C.

General Orders No. 41 - 19 January 1952
24th Infantry Division

Sergeant Elmer C. Blackburn, US52006305, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company G, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by courageous action near Hudong-ni, Korea, on 12 October 1951.  A squad of his company was given the mission of clearing a hill of enemy troops.  Sergeant Blackburn volunteered as an automatic rifleman.  As the infantrymen advanced up the hill, they were subjected to devastating small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire from an enemy bunker.  Sergeant Blackburn unhesitatingly exposed himself to the enemy fire as he moved boldly forward, firing concentrated bursts into the enemy emplacement.  During his assault, he received serious leg wounds but he did not falter in his mission.  With complete disregard for his own safety, he crawled to the entrance of the bunker and firing with devastating accuracy, killed its three occupants.  With this key position destroyed, his comrades were able to successfully accomplish their mission.  Sergeant Blackburn's courageous action, aggressive initiative and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from Prestonburg, Kentucky.

Blair, Henry C.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Henry C. Blair, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the Battery A, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 7th Infantry Division, in action at Hoengsong, Korea, on 12 February 1951. On that date, Corporal Blair was in charge of an M-16 multiple machine gun half-track which was protecting a road intersection to permit the passage of the vehicles of a tank force near Wonju, Korea. While his M-16 was engaged in firing at the enemy, Corporal Blair heard a call for assistance from his Section Chief who had discovered eight seriously wounded soldiers in a burning house. Corporal Blair unhesitatingly made his way to the house through intense enemy fire to assist in carrying the wounded men to a place of comparative safety, after which he helped to load them onto passing vehicles for evacuation. Corporal Blair's gallant actions resulted in saving the lives of eight men and were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service, reflecting great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Blake, James F.

Silver Star
Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders #256 - May 27, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) James F. Blake (ASN: 0-2028544), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, near Chorwon, Korea. On 17 April 1953, elements of the battalion had regained the crest of a strategic enemy-held hill and were engaged in vicious hand to hand combat with the enemy for control of the hill. Wire communication had gone out and the radio reports were spotty and confused. Although all approaches to the hill crest were under intense enemy artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire, Lieutenant Blake, with no regard for his personal safety, moved through the withering enemy fire to the top of the hill and contacted officers of the assault elements. Lieutenant Blake then returned through the enemy fire to the forward Battalion Command Post with vital information which enabled the battalion commander to reinforce the hill at a critical time. Lieutenant Blake's heroic actions contributed materially to the successful completion of the battalion's mission. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Blake reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Blake, John E.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders # 540 - November 20, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major John E. Blake, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy on 21 April 1951. On that date, Major Blake was Pilot of a B-26 attack bomber from the 13th Bombardment Squadron, (L-NI), FIFTH Air Force, on a single plane low-level combat mission over Korea. Major Blake successfully reached the target area despite the hazardous weather conditions. In the vicinity of the target he encountered intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire from many dug-in gun emplacements. Although his plane did not have turret guns to give additional protection during the low level attacks, he proceeded to bomb and strafe repeatedly, destroying a multiple mount .50 caliber gun emplacement, and silencing all anti-aircraft fire in the area. major Blake then located five railroad engines in a marshalling yard south of Songchon. Again under heavy anti-aircraft fire which shot two radio antennae off his aircraft and inflicted other damage, he made repeated attacks, destroying one locomotive, damaging four others, and damaging fifteen boxcars. After expending all bombs and ammunition, Major Blake remained in the target area until after daylight to observe any movement of rolling stock. At daylight he called for fighter aircraft and led them to the railroad yards. Disregarding the fact that he had no armament; Major Blake made a simulated attack on the targets and positively identified them to the fighter aircraft, insuring complete destruction. He then turned homeward after five hours in the target area. Through his outstanding skill, heroism and devotion to duty, Major Blake reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Blakey, Robert Turner (posthumous)

General Orders: Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 409 - December 10, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (posthumously) to First Lieutenant Robert Turner Blakey, United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action on 6 November 1951, near Sangnyong, Korea.  On that date, Company C was being attacked by a large enemy force.  As the Chinese troops charged up the hill, Lieutenant Blakey continually exposed himself to the intense small arms and grenade fire while moving among his men encouraging them to hold their positions.  Inspired by Lieutenant Blakey's courage the friendly troops fought valiantly, inflicting severe casualties on the foe.  When the overwhelming number of hostile troops forced a withdrawal, Lieutenant Blakey was fatally wounded while exposing himself to pass the word among the men.  His gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Blakley, Clifford C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Clifford C. Blakley (MCSN: 381913), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 December 1950. While leading his squad in an assault on a heavily fortified hostile position, Corporal Blakley observed that the entire company was being endangered by intense fire from an enemy machine gun emplacement and, quickly appraising the situation, voluntarily advanced to a point about fifty yards ahead of his unit where he threw hand grenades into the hostile position and succeeded in neutralizing the enemy weapon. His initiative and skill in the face of heavy enemy fire were contributing factors in permitting the company to go forward and continue the attack and in saving the lives of many Marines. By his courage and indomitable fighting spirit, Corporal Blakley upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Diego, California. Home Town: San Diego, California.

Blalock, Douglas W. (POW - Escapee)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 159 - 5 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Douglas W. Blalock (ASN: 0-947892), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery A, 26th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (AW) Battalion, 24th ID, in action against the enemy near Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. During a withdrawal, his battery and other unites encountered an effective enemy road block protected by hostile fire from a nearby hill and enemy-held village. Leaving the protection of buildings lining the road, Lieutenant Blalock and a soldier directed the crews of two anti-aircraft vehicles to mount their vehicles and bring the fire of their automatic weapons to bear on the enemy held positions. By directing the friendly fire into the enemy positions, although exposed to small arms and automatic fire, Lieutenant Blalock succeeded in burning out the enemy-held village and reducing the accuracy of the hillside fire. Through his efforts the road block was reduced and the road reopened to friendly troops. When last seen Lieutenant Blalock was still advancing against the enemy positions. His gallant actions, with complete disregard for his own safety, reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Home Town: Heflin, Alabama.

Blanchard, Don H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Don H. Blanchard (MCSN: 0-39061), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. Conducting a daylight raid with two reinforced platoons against a strongly fortified enemy position, Captain Blanchard established his command post in an exposed position far forward of friendly outposts to control the units more effectively. Despite the continuous enemy small arms, mortar and artillery fire, he fearlessly remained in the position for over four hours and, skillfully utilizing and coordinating the fire of his supporting arms and weapons, succeeded in capturing the assigned objectives, and in repulsing three enemy counterattacks, accounting for numerous enemy casualties and inflicting heavy damage on installations and material. Upon the successful completion of his mission, he directed the withdrawal of his units under heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire and remained in his exposed command post until all of his troops, including casualties, had been removed to the rear of the main lines. By his outstanding leadership, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Captain Blanchard served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ontario, California. Home Town: Inglewood, California.

Blanchard, Donald Roy (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Donald Roy Blanchard (MCSN: 1112535), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner in Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 September 1950. Providing fire cover for the assault on an infantry company which was pinned down by enemy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire, Private First Class Blanchard moved his gun to an exposed position and delivered effective direct fire on enemy positions while trying to divert the hostile fire to his exposed positions, continuing his efforts until mortally wounded. By his courageous actions, he rendered invaluable assistance in enabling the assault company to regain fire superiority and to overrun the hostile positions. His fortitude, initiative and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Blanchard and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Buffalo, New York. Home Town: Eggertsville, New York. Death: KIA: September 26, 1950.

Blanchard, Robert

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 106 - 31 December 1950

Lieutenant Colonel Robert Blanchard, 019282, Infantry, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 26 November 1950, Lieutenant Colonel Blanchard was in command of the 1st Battalion Combat Team, 15th Infantry, and distinguished himself by his gallantry and outstanding leadership in driving back a determined enemy force which temporarily halted the battalion.  He met the opposition, which was well entrenched and cleverly camouflaged from commanding ground, and through skillful maneuver moved Company "C" to its objective to act as a base of fire and immediately thereafter rejoined the remainder of his combat team; accomplished the necessary coordination, and led it to the combat team objective.  The gallantry, disregard for his own personal safety while exposed to enemy fire, and aggressive leadership of Lieutenant Colonel Blanchard served as an inspiration to his men and caused the enemy to be complete routed with considerable losses of personnel and equipment.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Colonel Blanchard reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered military service from the Territory of Hawaii.

Bland, Kenneth R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 421 - 21 August 1952

First Lieutenant Kenneth R. Bland, 22818A, United States Air Force.  Lieutenant Bland distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as Lead Navigator-Bombardier, 728th Bombardment Squadron, 452nd Bombardment Group, on 30 November 1950.  Leading a flight of four B-26 type aircraft in an attack against the Chinese Communist forces at Kunu-ri, Korea, Lieutenant Bland demonstrated outstanding gallantry, airmanship, and resourcefulness, the combination of which was greatly responsible for the safe evacuation of a large number of friendly forces from Kunu-ri.  Lieutenant Bland planned and led a devastating attack against a huge ground force in such a manner that a major Communist advance was stalled.  Lieutenant Bland, utilizing a self-invented bombsight, led his flight directly into the face of the enemy's gunfire, dropping bombs with unusual accuracy.  Even though his own aircraft was damaged and his face and hands numbed by the sub-zero airblast from a hole in his aircraft, Lieutenant Bland refused to leave his bombsight, pin-pointing his fragmentation bombs with deadly accuracy.  Later reports indicated that this lone airstrike so stalled the enemy's advance that friendly forces were allowed time to regroup over a wide front, and the trapped forces in Kunu-ri were able to escape.  Through his keen professional ability, courage, and outstanding devotion to duty, Lieutenant Bland reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Force, and the United States Air Force.

Bland, Richard L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Richard L. Bland (MCSN: 0-24168), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Company Commander of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Assigned the mission of assaulting an enemy village, Captain Bland led his men in single file across a steel girder of a destroyed bridge and continued the assault through approximately 3,000 yards of open rice paddies infested with strong enemy positions. Despite the heavy casualties suffered, he and his men went forward under intense hostile small arms, machine gun and mortar fire and continued the attack until darkness. During the night, Captain Bland supervised the evacuation of the 29 wounded by hand-carry over the fire-swept field since there was no possible avenue of approach for vehicles. Resuming the attack in the early ours of morning, he discovered that the enemy had withdrawn leaving large numbers of their dead and a considerable amount of equipment. By his heroic initiative, inspiring leadership and courageous devotion to duty in the face of heavy hostile fire, Captain Bland aided directly in the successful completion of the assigned mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Key West, Florida. Home Town: Miami, Florida.

Blankinship, James I.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 207 - 27 September 1950

Corporal James I. Blankinship, RA33812581, Infantry, Heavy Mortar Company, 35th Infantry, United States Army.  On the night of 6 August 1950 near Chungam-ni, Korea, the infantry company with which Corporal Blankinship's mortar tam was serving was subjected to repeated banzai attacks.  Taking up a position in the most forward area, Corporal Blankinship called down precision mortar fire on the attackers and at the same time joined the continuing fire fight with his rifle.  Often bringing mortar fire within 40 yards of the lines, he staved off successive attacks and inflicted heavy casualties among the enemy forces.  He was wounded the following day while moving to a still better position from which to continue his work.  Corporal Blankinship's gallant determination and conspicuous military ability reflect great credit on himself, his unit and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Virginia.

Blanton, Wallace E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Wallace E. Blanton (MCSN: 1129134), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Patrol Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 10 to 12 April 1953. Moving with the forward element of a combat patrol, Sergeant Blanton skillfully maneuvered his two fire teams into position and delivered effective small arms and grenade fire, inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy. When the patrol was subjected to an intense grenade barrage and the patrol leader was among the many casualties, he unhesitatingly assumed command and, while reorganizing the unit, discovered that two of his men were missing. Rather than risk the lives of the few remaining men, he broke contact with the enemy and supervised the evacuation of wounded Marines. After returning to the main line of resistance, he volunteered to lead a patrol to search for his missing comrades and carried out a thorough but unsuccessful search of the area. On the following afternoon, Sergeant Blanton again led a small group of volunteers to investigate what appeared to be one of the missing Marines lying adjacent to a trench in the enemy's defensive position. Although aware of the possibility of enemy ambush, he fearlessly entered the hostile trench and worked his way toward the point where the Marine was last seen. Encountering an enemy soldier disguised in a Marine uniform, he immediately engaged the imposter in a brief fire fight and, as other hostile troops moved into the trench, coolly extricated his unit from the trap, returning safely to friendly lines. On the third day, when the enemy placed the bodies of the missing Marines out in the open in close proximity to friendly lines, he effectively planned his course of action and, assuming the point position, advanced with his gallant group of volunteers to successfully recover the bodies. By his courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and resolute determination, Sergeant Blanton was directly instrumental in the success of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fairfax, Alabama. Home Town: West Point, Georgia.

Blasinski, Richard J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Richard J. Blasinski (MCSN: 1071442), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. When his unit was attacked and overrun by a numerically superior hostile force, Corporal Blasinski quickly reorganized his squad an deployed them to localize the enemy penetration. Moving from end to end of his unit, he placed the men in advantageous firing positions, ignoring the heavy enemy fire directed on the area. Courageously remaining in an exposed position, he competently and effectively supervised return fire which directly aided the company in halting the hostile advance. During the brief respite which followed, he evacuated his wounded and, on his own initiative, skillfully improved his defenses. When the enemy attacked again, he boldly led his men through intense small arms, machine gun and grenade fire, engaging the hostile troops in fierce hand-to-hand combat, dislodging the enemy from their well-entrenched positions and securing the flank. Covering the reorganization of the company, he successfully warded off hostile probes until the remainder of the unit was in position. By his aggressive determination, outstanding leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy enemy opposition, Corporal Blasinski upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Buffalo, New York. Home Town: Buffalo, New York.

Blatt, Wallace D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Wallace D. Blatt (MCSN: 0-23261), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1950. A skilled and courageous pilot, Captain Blatt voluntarily flew his unarmed aircraft twelve miles behind hostile lines to rescue a downed pilot. Undaunted by the knowledge that the airman's position was at the extreme operational range of his helicopter, he maneuvered his plane into mountainous terrain known to be infested with enemy troops and, in the face of severe turbulent winds, succeeded in evacuating the endangered pilot. His gallant initiative, airmanship and unselfish consideration for another served to inspire his squadron mates and undoubtedly saved the pilot from capture or possible death, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Altoona, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Wormleysburg, Pennsylvania.

Blazewicz, Stanley A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Stanley A. Blazewicz (MCSN: 622857), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Gunner in a 75-mm. Recoilless Rifle Platoon of an Anti-Tank Company of the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 November 1950. Remaining in an exposed position at his gun during a vicious attack by an enemy force estimated at company strength and supported by four tanks, Private First Class Blazewicz continued fighting until his gun was put out of action by hostile fire. On his own initiative, he then carried the remaining ammunition across open, fire-swept terrain to an adjacent gun, making numerous trips under intense fire until the enemy force was annihilated and the tanks destroyed. His superb courage, valiant fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds reflect great credit upon Private First Class Blazewicz and the United States Naval Service. Born: New Brighton, New York. Home Town: New Brighton, New York.

Blazey, Frank Earl

General Orders #365 - 18 August 1951
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Captain Frank E., 028693, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 25-26 April 1951, near Tokchong, Korea, as Company "E" was occupying a defensive position on the Elgin Line, it was attacked by an enemy force of estimated regimental strength. Captain Blazey, company commander, forced to tighten his perimeter in the face of the heavy pressure exerted by the enemy, fearlessly moved through the intense enemy fire as he organized a defensive position around the command post. When the supply of ammunition became critically low, Captain Blazey, on three occasions, personally led a party through the heavy hostile fire to procure more. Throughout the entire action, his confident manner and vigorous exhortations were a source of inspiration to the members of his command. Captain Blazey's superb gallantry and resourceful leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Blesse, Frederick Corbin

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Frederick Corbin Blesse, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as Pilot of an F-86 Fighter Airplane of the 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, Far East Air Forces, on 4 September 1952. Leading a flight of four F-86s on patrol, Major Blesse directed two of his flight to return to base as a result of faulty wing tank feeding on one F-86. After initiating an attack on two sighted MiGs, Major Blesse was about to close when three more MiGs positioned behind him and his wingman. Realizing the seriousness of his position, Major Blesse broke, and after a series of evasive actions ending in a maximum performance diving turn, he shook off the enemy aircraft. As he returned to his patrol, a three-ship enemy flight was sighted. As Major Blesse pressed his attack, two of the enemy broke into the overcast. Concentrating on the remaining MiG, he closed to 1,000 feet, following the enemy through a series of violent evasive actions as he attempted to shake free. Firing, Major Blesse scored hits on the fuselage, mid-section and wing roots, causing the pilot to eject himself when the MiG broke into flame. Through his skillful airmanship and gallantry in action against a determined enemy, Major Blesse reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Blesse, Frederick Corbin (1st Oak Leaf Cluster) UPGRADED TO DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 660 - 21 December 1952

Major Frederick C. Blesse, 017010A, United States Air Force.  Major Blesse distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 8 September 1942.  Leading a flight of four F-86s protecting fighter bombers from possible attack by enemy MiGs, Major Blesse positioned his flight for an attack on four sighted MiGs.  Singling out one of the MiGs, Major Blesse followed it up into an overcast and broke out between layers of clouds.  As the two aircraft emerged from the clouds, Major Blesse was still in position, so he closed and fired, causing the MiG to burst into flames and the pilot to eject himself.  Major Blesse then sighted a lone MiG, and positioned himself for another attack.  The MiG began violent, evasive maneuvers, but through superior airmanship Major Blesse scored hits, causing the MiG to snap and spin.  Major Blesse followed closely until the MiG recovered.  He then scored hits with another long burst which caused the pilot to eject himself.  Through his courage, keen flying ability and devotion to duty, Major Blesse reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Blevins, Paul (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Paul Blevins (MCSN: 1074622), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman with a Machine Gun Section in Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced),, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 25 September 1950. Working in support of an infantry platoon in the attack, Private Blevins exposed himself to intense hostile small arms and machine gun fire in order to secure vantage ground in bringing his fire to bear upon the enemy and in protecting the right flank of his machine gun crews. As a result of this maneuver, he destroyed an enemy automatic weapon and assisted materially in aiding his platoon to regain fire superiority and to continue the attack. Mortally wounded in the ensuing action, Private Blevins, by his courage, initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Dayton, Ohio. Home Town: Zona, West Virginia. Death: KIA: September 25, 1950.

Blevins, Robert N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert N. Blevins (MCSN: 1126056), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. When intense automatic weapons fire from an enemy bunker on commanding ground impeded the advance of the leading elements of his unit during a platoon attack, Corporal Blevins bravely charged up the slope in the face of withering fire and assaulted the hostile emplacement with hand grenades. Although painfully wounded in the face and body by enemy grenade fragments, he continued to move toward his objective and led the platoon in the final assault against the enemy strong point. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Blevins served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by his company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Parkin, Arkansas. Home Town: Earle, Arkansas.

Blizard, Herbert E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Herbert E. Blizard (MCSN: 855060), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Battery H, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. When heavy fire from hostile machine guns covering a roadblock held up part of a large truck convoy, Sergeant Blizard voluntarily braved enemy fire to lead a tank through the darkness to a strategic point where he assisted in directing effective fire to silence the enemy weapons. Returning immediately to his battery position during a fierce hostile attack, he directed the fire of his howitzer at point-blank range on the advancing enemy troops and, although seriously wounded by a hostile mortar shell, resolutely remained at his post until the attack was repulsed with many casualties inflicted upon the enemy. By his quick initiative, personal courage and indomitable devotion to duty, Sergeant Blizard contributed materially to the successful arrival of the convoy at its destination, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Camden, New Jersey. Home Town: Brooklawn, New Jersey.

Blouch, Frederick H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Frederick H. Blouch (MCSN: 1189937), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 and 28 October 1952. During an assault to recapture a sector of the main line of resistance that had been previously overrun by the enemy, Private First Class Blouch spearheaded his platoon's first attack on the objective. When the initial assault was turned back after suffering numerous casualties from the intense enemy mortar, artillery and sniper fire, he immediately joined another platoon in a second assault which was also forced to withdraw by the heavy enemy fire. Joining a third platoon in another attempt, he stormed forward and, first to reach the objective, quickly set up an automatic weapon to provide supporting fire for the remainder of the assault troops. After destroying two enemy riflemen who had inflicted many casualties on his unit, he moved forward of the new perimeter of defense and assisted in the evacuation of wounded Marines. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Private First Class Blouch served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the recapture of the critical terrain, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Waldenburg, Michigan. Home Town: Rochester, Michigan.

Blyth, Charles W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Charles W. Blyth (MCSN: 0-48857), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 April 1951. When radio failure prevented him from maintaining effective coordination of supporting fire while his platoon was engaged in supporting an attack on an enemy strong point, First Lieutenant Blyth left the protection of his tank and ran seventy-five yards across open terrain to confer with the infantry company commander. Re-crossing the extremely dangerous area, he re-joined his tank platoon and, skillfully directing the fire of his tanks, succeeded in destroying three key enemy bunkers. Later, directing the stretcher bearers to carry the casualties beside the protective shelter of his tank, he personally supervised the evacuation of nineteen severely wounded Marines under intense enemy machine gun and mortar fire. Although sustaining painful wounds during the hazardous evacuation, he carried out three trips and constantly exposed himself to the withering fire to control the speed of the tanks. By his valiant fighting spirit, outstanding skill and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of his comrades, First Lieutenant Blyth contributed materially to saving the lives of several Marines and served to inspire all who observed him. His courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Arlington, California. Home Town: Montrose, California.

Bock, Robert A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert A. Bock (MCSN: 1093257), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Machine Gunner of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. When the machine gunner was seriously wounded and had to be evacuated during an attack against the company defensive position in the vicinity of Hwachon by a numerically superior enemy force, Private First Class Bock unhesitatingly manned the gun and directed accurate fire against the attackers. Throughout the long battle which lasted until the early hours of the morning, he steadfastly remained at his post, loading and firing his weapon. Although the hostile force advanced many times to within a few feet of his position and killed or wounded all the other men of the squad, Private First Class Bock continued to fire his gun and succeeded in driving the enemy away and inflicting numerous casualties upon them. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and gallant devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Bodell, Thomas Richard (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Thomas Richard Bodell (MCSN: 867266), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Although wounded and knocked down the hill while leading his unit up a steep slope in the face of heavy enemy fire, Sergeant Bodell bravely regained his feet and, refusing to be evacuated to the rear for treatment, moved back up the incline to rejoin his squad. Skillfully directing the fire and movement of his team, he succeeded in advancing them to the crest of the hill where, during a final assault on the objective, in the face of intense hostile fire, he was again hit and mortally wounded. By his marked courage, aggressive leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, Sergeant Bodell served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Murray, Utah. Home Town: Salt Lake City, Utah. Death: KIA: June 10, 1951.

Bogan, Daniel J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Daniel J. Bogan (MCSN: 1161265), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 August 1952. When enemy fire damaged one of the machine gun emplacements during a night assault by a numerically superior enemy force employing intense artillery, mortar and grenade fire, Corporal Bogan fearlessly moved across an exposed area to the gun position to repair the disabled weapon. Although painfully wounded while en route to the position, he bravely continued onward and, after reaching the emplacement, administered first aid to the wounded, reorganized his squad and placed the gun back in operation. By his aggressiveness, courageous initiative and resolute determination, Corporal Bogan contributed materially to the successful defense of the strategic area and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Somerville, Massachusetts. Home Town: Reading, Massachusetts.

Boggs, Edward H.

General Orders #30 - 15 January 1952
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul. 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority contained in Air Force Regulation 30-14, 22 August 1950 and Section VII, General Orders Number 63, Department of the Air Force, 19 September 1950, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to Technical Sergeant Edward H. Boggs, United States Air Force.

Sergeant Boggs distinguished himself by gallantry in action and heroism against an enemy near Munsan, Korea, on 31 March 1951. On that date, Sergeant Boggs, an Aero Medical crew member on a rescue helicopter with Detachment 1, Third Air Rescue Squadron, flew to an area where critically wounded United Nations troops were cut off by enemy forces. The helicopter landed amidst enemy small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. When he realized there were too many wounded men to evacuate before dark, Sergeant Boggs volunteered to remain on the ground with the trapped men in order that one additional wounded man could be evacuated on each flight to a nearby aid station. Sergeant Boggs was well aware that by remaining behind he would risk his own life. While the helicopter shuttled back and forth, Sergeant Boggs took full charge of the disorganized and weary group. He directed survivors to defensive positions in order to repulse enemy infiltration. Constantly exposing himself to enemy fire, Sergeant Boggs established a system of priority for evacuation and gave all first-aid possible. Not until the last wounded man was evacuated did Sergeant Boggs consider leaving the area. By his expert leadership and exceptional bravery under fire, Sergeant Boggs brought about the rescue of a large number of seriously wounded men. Sergeant Boggs' heroism and selflessness were in keeping with the highest tradition of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Bohannon, Johnnie L.

General Orders No. 324 - 28 July 1951
Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division

For gallantry in action.  On 4 June 1951, Sergeant Johnnie L. Bohannon was supervising and assisting in the construction of a footbridge across the Hant'an River, near Song'jong, Korea.  Although the bridge site was under intense enemy machine gun and mortar fire, he remained exposed to direct the construction and aid in the evacuation of wounded infantrymen from the far shore.  Numerous times, Sergeant Bohannon swam the river, swollen by a heavy rain, in attempts to carry a rope across and anchor the bridge.  The ingenuity, gallantry, and courage displayed by Sergeant Bohannon in the successful completion of the bridge reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Georgia.

Bohannon, Thomas J. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Thomas J. Bohannon (MCSN: 0-21354), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 February 1951. When his company was assigned the mission of seizing a strongly defended ridge on the flank of the battalion objective, Captain Bohannon unhesitatingly led his men in a determined attack up the hazardous ridge in the face of intense hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire, destroying numerous enemy entrenchments. Although the unit was temporarily pinned down by devastating hostile fire from reverse slope positions, which was also delaying the advance of friendly units on his flanks, he bravely moved forward through the heavy enemy fire to the foremost elements of his company and launched a vicious assault on the hostile bunkers, engaging in hand-to-hand combat and completely routing the enemy. By his inspiring leadership, resolute determination and indomitable fighting spirit, Captain Bohannon contributed materially to the successful seizure of the battalion objective and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Bohannon, Thomas J. (3rd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Second Gold Star in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Captain Thomas J. Bohannon (MCSN: 0-21354), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. Assigned the mission of seizing and holding vital high ground to permit the battalion to fight its way out of encirclement by a numerically superior hostile force, Captain Bohannon skillfully led a vigorous attack against the well-entrenched enemy occupying the assigned objective. Braving hostile mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire, he spearheaded an assault to seize the hostile strongpoint and then fearlessly moved among his men, inspiring and encouraging them as he organized defenses of the area in the face of strong enemy resistance. After effectively leading his company in repulsing frequent hostile counterattacks for approximately two hours, he skillfully conducted the disengagement of his unit, despite increasing intense enemy fire and, in addition, personally supervised the evacuation of casualties and directed the fire of supporting tanks on the rapidly closing hostile troops. His personal courage, skill as a tactician and leader, and indomitable devotion to duty were contributing factors in permitting the battalion to pass through the encirclement, thereby reflecting great credit upon Captain Bohannon and the United States Naval Service. Born: Maxwell, Iowa. Home Town: Des Moines, Iowa.

Bohn, Robert Dewey

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Robert Dewey Bohn (MCSN: 0-37498), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations while serving with a Marine Rifle Battalion in the vicinity of Kosong, Korea, on 11 August 1950. Lieutenant Bohn, as Company Commander, Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, First Marine Division, was assigned the mission of assaulting a significant hill objective defended by well entrenched enemy forces. While fearlessly leading his men up the steep hill in the face of fierce enemy grenade and automatic rifle fire, Lieutenant Bohn received severe shoulder and neck wounds. Disregarding the intense pain of his multiple wounds, Lieutenant Bohn refused to be evacuated and continued personally leading and deploying his troops into effective attack. His control and tenacious determination so inspired his men that the objective was successfully assaulted. Lieutenant Bohn ascertained that the enemy had been vanquished before allowing his wounds to be dressed. His dauntless courage, skillful leadership, and inspiring devotion to duty reflect credit on himself and uphold the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 66 (November 23, 1950). Born: Neenah, Wisconsin. Home Town: Neenah, Wisconsin.

Bolden, Robert H.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

Corporal Robert H. Holden, RA13161278, (then Private First Class), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 27 November 1950 in the vicinity of Kunu-ri, Korea.  Company E, occupying defensive positions, was subjected to repeated fanatical enemy attacks.  Corporal Bolden often exposed himself to the murderous enemy fire to inflict severe casualties on the charging enemy.  Although the enemy succeeded in penetrating the defensive perimeter on several occasions, Corporal Bolden personally drove back many of the enemy with deadly accurate fire from his automatic rifle.  Inspired by his courage, his comrades rallied to his support and threw the enemy back with heavy losses.  Although wounded, Corporal Bolden refused medical attention until comrades more seriously wounded than himself had been aided.  When the position became untenable he voluntarily remained behind to cover the withdrawal.  The gallant conduct displayed by Corporal Bolden reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Maryland.

Boles, Jack F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Jack F. Boles (MCSN: 0-48041), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 December 1950. With his company pinned down by heavy enemy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire during an attack against a deeply entrenched hostile force occupying a high hill, First Lieutenant Boles fearlessly exposed himself to the intense fire and advanced to reconnoiter the situation. Returning to the rear, he quickly organized a unit composed of a light machine gun section, company headquarters personnel and elements of a support platoon and, boldly leading them forward, assumed a favorable position to launch an attack. Inspiring and encouraging his men to heroic efforts, he directed and controlled their accurate and determined fire to neutralize the enemy's fire sufficiently to enable the assault units to advance and destroy the aggressors. By his inspiring and aggressive leadership, superb tactics and cool courage in the face of heavy odds, First Lieutenant Boles contributed materially to the successful seizure of his company's assigned objective with a minimum loss of personnel, and his unrelenting devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Devol, Oklahoma. Home Town: Devol, Oklahoma.

Bolhouse, Daniel C.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders #256 - May 27, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Daniel C. Bolhouse (ASN: 0-2041787), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a member Company B, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, near Kumhwa, Korea. On 8 October 1952, Lieutenant Bolhouse received a report from a reconnaissance patrol that an enemy force was advancing toward his outpost. Quickly realizing the gravity of the situation, Lieutenant Bolhouse ordered the return of the patrol to aid in the defense of the outpost. Before the patrol could return, the enemy launched a fanatical attack on the strategic outpost. Setting up a defensive perimeter and continually exposing himself to the enemy, Lieutenant Bolhouse moved from man to man encouraging them and checking their positions. When the reconnaissance patrol reached the scene of the battle, Lieutenant Bolhouse, reorganizing all available forces, fearlessly led a counterattack that compelled the enemy to withdraw with heavy casualties. Although wounded, Lieutenant Bolhouse persisted in his courageous assault until the enemy were repelled to their own lines. Lieutenant Bolhouse refused medical attention until all the other wounded had been treated. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Bolhouse reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Boling, Jack T.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders #59 - February 3, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Jack T. Boling, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as an Aero-Medical crew member, Detachment 1, Third Air Rescue Squadron on 3 July 1951. At the voluntary risk of his life, Sergeant Boling flew in a highly vulnerable helicopter ten miles into enemy-held territory to rescue a United States Marine fighter pilot who had parachuted from his stricken airplane near Sangyong, Korea. When the helicopter landed, Sergeant Boling observed that the downed pilot was injured and in his attempt to rise could only wave his arms. Disregarding the threat to his own safety, Sergeant Boling leaped out of the helicopter and ran through a hail of enemy small arms fire to the aid of the downed pilot. Although fully aware of the personal danger, he dragged the badly injured victim toward the rescue aircraft. Sergeant Boling signaled the helicopter pilot for assistance and together, the two helped the Marine pilot into the helicopter. During the flight to the nearest Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, Sergeant Boling rendered medical assistance. As a result of this mission, a United Nations Pilot was saved from certain death or capture. By his courage in the face of danger and his selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Boling reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Boll, Duane Lee (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Duane Lee Boll (MCSN: 1175905), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 and 9 April 1952. Learning that the leader of an ambushed patrol had failed to return from hostile territory, Sergeant Boll unhesitatingly volunteered as a member of a rescue party although keenly aware that the route lay through hazardous terrain infested by numerically superior enemy forces. When the body of the patrol leader was discovered, Sergeant Boll bravely exposed himself to intense hostile machine gun, mortar and small arms fire in an effort to locate a route to friendly lines and continued to search for a trail until he was mortally wounded by the enemy. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless devotion to the fulfillment of a vital task, Sergeant Boll served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Creighton, Nebraska. Home Town: Lincoln, Nebraska. Death: KIA: April 9, 1952.

Bollmann, Howard W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Howard W. Bollmann (MCSN: 0-10344), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Night Fighter Plane and a Division Leader in Marine Night Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Forty-Two (VMF(N)-542), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in North Korea on 19 October 1950. Assigned the mission of attacking a very large enemy convoy moving north from P'yongyang, Korea, Major Bollmann took off from Kimpo Airfield at dusk under extremely adverse weather conditions and led his flight to the target despite very low visibility and instrument flight conditions which prevailed over the entire route. Quickly taking the target under fire, he dived to perilously low altitudes in a driving rain and in the face of intense hostile ground fire to press home his determined attack which resulted in the destruction of an enemy ammunition dump, twelve trucks and a large number of the enemy. Again forced to fly on instruments after completing his mission, he led his flight back to base and, although dangerously low on fuel, remained airborne until the members of his flight were safe on the ground. By his daring leadership, courage and devotion to duty, Major Bollmann upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Elgin, Illinois. Home Town: Dundee, Illinois.

Bond, Richard A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman First Class Richard A. Bond (NSN: 2687437), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 December 1950. Hospital Corpsman First Class Bond, serving as a Corpsman with a Weapons Company exhibited numerous acts of outstanding courage and devotion to duty. While being evacuated by ambulance from Koto-ri, Korea, for frozen hands and feet, and a crushed knee, he dismounted when the head of the convoy was hit by enemy fire, and moved forward to render first aid to the wounded and assisted in their evacuation to the Regimental Aid Station. Hospital Corpsman First Class Bond repeatedly refused to be evacuated, although suffering from the extreme pain of his frostbitten feet and hands, and crushed knee that could bear little weight. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, in sub-zero weather, he aided materially in saving the lives of numerous wounded Marines. It was some twelve hours later before he would permit himself to be evacuated. Hospital Corpsman First Class Bond's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 2972 (February 2, 1951).

Bonelli, Richard A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Richard A. Bonelli (MCSN: 1089382), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. Directed to man a machine gun whose crew had become casualties during a savage night attack against the company by a large enemy force, Private First Class Bonelli bravely exposed himself to devastating hostile small arms, automatic weapons and hand grenade fire and, although his assistant gunner fell wounded during the early stages of the engagement, succeeded in delivering a large volume of accurate fire upon the advancing enemy. Ordered to disengage with the enemy and withdraw to another position, he carried his machine gun and a supply of ammunition over icy terrain to the new position. When the company launched a counterattack, he again exposed himself to intense hostile fire to move from one position to another in support of the attack. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Bonelli contributed materially to the success achieved by the company and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York.

Bonet-Morales, Carlos (posthumously)

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders #285 - 16 July 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Carlos Bonet-Morales (ASN: ER-30423990), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medical Aidman attached to Company C, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 3 June 1951, near Songbong-ni, Korea, while attacking well-defended enemy emplacements Sergeant Bonet-Morales unhesitatingly braved an intense barrage of hostile fire to render valuable medical assistance to his stricken comrades. After evacuating two infantrymen to a covered position, he again voluntarily exposed himself to administer life-saving plasma to a severely wounded soldier and, while thus engaged, was mortally wounded by shell fragments. Sergeant Bonet-Morales' gallantry, fearlessness, and genuine concern for the welfare of his fellow soldiers reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Boney, Donald M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Third Class Donald M. Boney, United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman with a Marine Artillery Battery of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 3 July 1951. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Boney displayed outstanding courage and devotion to duty when the battery was subjected to intense and accurate enemy artillery fire, causing many casualties. When he observed a wounded man lying in a gun pit, he courageously rushed across sixty yards of open ground, with shells bursting all around him, to reach his comrade and render first aid. While he was treating the wounded man, an enemy shell exploded beside him and he was himself seriously wounded, but continued steadfastly to aid his comrade despite the intense pain of his wounds. Refusing to seek medical aid, he then fearlessly continued to expose himself to the devastating enemy fire to render aid to ten other casualties, and directed their removal to covered positions, seeking aid for himself only after the enemy fire had ceased and all casualties had received treatment. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Boney's great personal bravery and heroic actions were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Bonino, John Carnevale (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class John Carnevale Bonino (MCSN: 459672), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Mortar Gunner in Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Assigned the mission of displacing his mortar and all possible ammunition that his squad could carry to a forward position, Private First Class Bonino observed that the only area from which fire could be delivered was exposed to enemy small arms and machine gun fire. Fearlessly disregarding his own personal danger, he set his mortar into action and delivered accurate and effective fire on hostile positions, neutralizing several enemy positions and causing dispersal of hostile troops surrounding this zone of action before he himself sustained a mortal wound. By his courageous actions, he materially aided his company in regaining fire superiority and in successfully completing its mission. His fortitude, initiative and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Bonino and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Springfield, Massachusetts. Home Town: Springfield, Massachusetts. Death: KIA: September 21, 1950.

Bonner, Robert A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant (Chaplain) Robert A. Bonner, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Chaplain with a Marine Artillery Regiment of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea from 15 September to 27 September 1950. Lieutenant Bonner, though not required to do so, regularly visited elements of his regiment attached to front line units, courageously exposing himself to enemy small arms and mortar fire in order to encourage and minister to the men. While returning to his regiment after one visit he was seriously wounded when the vehicle in which he was riding struck a land mine. With the vehicle in flames, he risked his life to remove three wounded comrades. Despite his own severe burns and painful wounds he then walked more than half a mile to a battalion aid station to obtain medical assistance for his comrades. Only then would he consent to treatment for his own wounds. His courageous conduct and disregard for personal safety combined with his constant concern for the officers and men in his spiritual keeping were an inspiration to all who served with him. Lieutenant Bonner's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Bordeaux, Lyle B.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 551 - November 26, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Lyle B. Bordeaux, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 22 October 1951 as a B-29 Aircraft Commander, 30th Bombardment Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group (Medium), FIFTH Air Force. While on a strike against the vital Taechon airfield in Korea. Captain Bordeaux's aircraft was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire. Displaying outstanding flying skill, Captain Bordeaux retained control of the aircraft and managed to drop his bombs on the target. Shortly afterwards, several members of the crew were wounded when the aircraft was hit by enemy fighters. With two engines out, Captain Bordeaux unable to maintain altitude, and with almost all flight controls shot away, piloted his crippled aircraft to a friendly island near Seoul, Korea, in order to avoid abandoning the plane over enemy lines. Steadily losing altitude, Captain Bordeaux circled the small island until all members of the crew had parachuted to safety. At that time, with the aircraft impossible to control, Captain Bordeaux bailed out at an altitude of less than 1,000 feet. His skillful handling of this critical situation resulted in the rescue of all twelve crew men without serious injury. Captain Bordeaux's courage, skill and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Bordelon, Guy Pierre (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Guy Pierre Bordelon (NSN: 0-278231), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Pilot of a Night Fighter Plane attached to Composing Squadron Three (VC-3), serving with Fighter Squadron One Hundred Fifty-Two (VF-52), embarked in U.S.S. Princeton (CVS-37), on 29 June 1953, in Korea. Lieutenant Bordelon, as the officer in charge of a four-plane night fighter detachment, was ordered by Commander Task Force 77 to temporarily base his unit ashore at Pyongtaek Airfield in South Korea as a means of intercepting the nightly air attacks that had been harassing friendly positions. On the night of 29 June, Lieutenant Bordelon, while flying a combat air patrol in the Suwon area of South Korea, encountered five enemy aircraft. Demonstrating outstanding skill and daring, he engaged and personally destroyed two Yakovlev Eighteen aircraft, which returned his fire and took violent evasive action at dangerously low altitude over mountainous terrain. Lieutenant Bordelon's ability, courage and complete disregard for his personal safety contributed directly to the successful accomplishment of the mission. His actions and steadfast devotion to duty were at all times in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1408 (July 5, 1953.

Bordelon, Guy Pierre (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Guy Pierre Bordelon (NSN: 0-278231), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Pilot of a Night Fighter Plane attached to Composing Squadron Three (VC-3), serving with Fighter Squadron One Hundred Fifty-Two (VF-52), embarked in U.S.S. Princeton (CVS-37), while temporarily based ashore at Pyongtaek Airfield in South Korea on 1 July 1953. Flying in total darkness over mountainous terrain and through adverse weather conditions, Lieutenant Bordelon intercepted a flight of enemy planes in the vicinity of the Jaeju peninsula of North Korea. Utilizing his intercept radar, he exhibited superior ability and airmanship by maneuvering his plane into an attack position on each of two enemy Lavochkin Nine aircraft and destroyed them. The second enemy pilot attempted to escape into the restricted air space surround the Armistice Delegation Headquarters at Munsan-ni. Despite the heavy enemy anti-aircraft fire during the pursuit, Lieutenant Bordelon was able to attack and destroy this plane just before entry into the restricted zone. By his skill, courage and complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Bordelon successfully accomplished his mission. His actions and steadfast devotion to duty were at all times in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1408 (July 5, 1953. Born: Ruston, Louisiana. Home Town: Alexandria, Louisiana. Death: December 2002.

Borgomainerio, Russell J. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Russell J. Borgomainerio (MCSN: 308403), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. Observing the enemy penetrating his left flank during a prolonged assault by a strong hostile force, Staff Sergeant Borgomainerio fearlessly exposed himself to direct enemy fire and, expertly deploying units at his command, consolidated the gap in the line. Moving among his platoon's positions, he directed the accurate and effective fire of his men, pointing out targets of opportunity and shouting words of encouragement as the battle continued. When assistance arrived, he skillfully employed his men to greater advantage, thereby successfully repelling all attempts by the enemy to break through his defense. By his superb leadership, valiant fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Staff Sergeant Borgomainerio served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Borgomainerio, Russell J. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Russell J. Borgomainerio (MCSN: 308403), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. Assigned the mission of defending positions along a railroad embankment, Staff Sergeant Borgomainerio skillfully positioned his men, aware that a dry stream bed passing under a trestle would be the most likely avenue of enemy approach. When the enemy attacked along that route and succeeded in overrunning a portion of the position and capturing a machine gun, he fearlessly exposed himself to devastating hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire to lead part of his platoon in a counterattack, driving the enemy from the position and recapturing the vital weapon. Quickly reorganizing the defense, he remained exposed to the heavy fire throughout the prolonged attack to move among his men, shouting words of encouragement and directing their fires until the opposition was forced to withdraw with heavy casualties. By his inspiring leadership, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Borgomainerio contributed materially to the successful defense of the strategic ground and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Boring, James W.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 291 - May 23, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) James W. Boring (ASN: 0-1317753), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, in Korea. In the vicinity of Yong-Pyong, Korea, on 24 April 1951, Major Boring's Battalion was heavily engaged with a numerically superior hostile force. When the infiltrating enemy threatened to overrun the flank, he immediately effected a junction with an adjacent battalion to block the hostile thrust. Repeatedly exposing himself to a devastating small arms and mortar barrage, he moved throughout the position to encourage his men and to direct more effectively their movement and fire. Despite the increasing intensity of the enemy attack, he conducted a spirited defense that maintained the integrity of friendly lines. Major Boring's inspirational leadership, military ability and selfless devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Borowski, Edward Joseph Jr. (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Edward Joseph Borowski, Jr. (MCSN: 1187691), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Machine Gunner of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FirstMarine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 and 6 September 1952. When his unit relieved friendly troops on a strategic outpost which had been subjected to an intense enemy barrage, Corporal Borowski unhesitatingly exposed himself to hostile mortar, artillery and sniper fire to remove the casualties from the forward slope position. Although the outpost was again subjected to intense enemy artillery and mortar fire on the following night, he bravely maintained his position in the face of an assault by numerically superior hostile forces and continued to deliver effective machine gun fire on the attackers until he was instantly killed by an enemy mortar shell. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Corporal Borowski upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Chelsea, Massachusetts. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York. Death: KIA: September 6, 1952.

Bose, Leroy A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Leroy A. Bose (MCSN: 1018677), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Ammunition Corporal in a Machine Gun Platoon of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 September 1951. With the company engaged in an attack against a heavily fortified hill position, Corporal Bose repeatedly exposed himself to withering enemy fire to supply the machine gun squads with ammunition and, after supplying the squad occupying the foremost position, remained with that group to assist in delivering counterfire on the hostile strong points. When advancing friendly troops were subjected to heavy fire from a formidable enemy bunker, he unhesitatingly volunteered to go forward in a daring attempt to neutralize the position, bravely charged toward his objective in the face of intense hostile fire and killed two of the enemy in the vicinity of the emplacement. Returning to his own lines to obtain a supply of hand grenades, Corporal Bose again made his way to his objective, promptly hurled two grenades through the apertures of the bunker and delivered devastating rifle fire on the occupants as he charged into the emplacement, killing a total of twelve of the enemy in the position. Forced to submit to evacuation when he was seriously wounded by hostile fire, he insisted on carrying a stricken comrade to the aid station. By his exceptional courage, outstanding initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Bose served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Francisco, California. Home Town: San Francisco, California.

Bossler, Albert D.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 106 - 31 December 1950

Captain Albert D. Bossler, 01170651, Artillery, 92d Armored Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  Captain Bossler, working in the capacity as commander of the forward observation party during "Task Force Dog" distinguished himself and displayed outstanding qualities of an officer on 10 December at Sudong, Korea by persisting in the adjustment of artillery fire on an enemy strongpoint while being under enemy machine gun and mortar fire.  Detected by the enemy, Captain Bossler observed the enemy pointing him out to an enemy machine gun and was under enemy machine gun fire.  With complete disregard for his personal safety and motivated by a sense of duty to destroy the enemy, which from his perch commanded the main supply route overflowing with Marine units.  Captain Bossler persisted in his adjustment of artillery fire and effectively destroyed the machine gun emplacement, killing several enemy and completely neutralizing the hill with time fire and white phosphorus, thereby permitting the Marine column to proceed unmolested.  Captain Bossler's heroic achievement contributed materially to the success of the operation and his exemplary behavior and effective immediate action reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Oregon.

Bott, Kenneth Andrew Sr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Kenneth Andrew Bott, Sr. (MCSN: 0-50151), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commander of an 88-mm. Mortar Section of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 2 November 1950. Suddenly stopped by an enemy roadblock and subjected to heavy and accurate small-arms, machine-gun and grenade fire from the high ground overlooking the road while proceeding in a motorized patrol with his unit, Second Lieutenant Bott realized immediately that communications with rear elements were lost and that it would be impossible to place effective fire on the enemy or to extricate the column from the narrow gorge without abandoning equipment and suffering a heavy toll in casualties and, fearlessly risking his life, made his way to the rearmost jeep of the patrol. After successfully turning the jeep around, he and his driver proceeded to run the gauntlet of intense fire and, although many bullets struck the jeep and one punctured a tire, succeeded in reaching his battalion command post to report the ambush. Undaunted by serious wounds sustained while voluntarily guiding the relieving column forward, he boldly continued to lead the column, skillfully describing the disposition of the patrol and of the enemy while continuing his valiant efforts. By his daring initiative, personal courage and grave concern for others at great risk to his own life, Second Lieutenant Bott contributed materially to the successful rescue and withdrawal of the patrol, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Bottorff, William Glenn (posthumous)

Private First Class William Glenn Bottorff, US55091295, Infantry, US Army, a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th ID, distinguished himself by courageous action near Kumsong, Korea, on 8 December 1951. His platoon, occupying defensive positions, was savagely attacked by a numerically superior enemy force, deploying a tremendous volume of small arms, grenade and automatic weapons fire. Private Bottorff, in an outpost, fired with devastating accuracy into the rapidly approaching hostile hordes but could not stop them. As the enemy wave by-passed his position, he began to collect hand grenades. Armed with these, he made his way to a position to the rear of the attacking enemy although his new position was exposed to heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire, he proceeded to throw hand grenades and fire his rifle, showing no regard for his own safety. In performing this valiant feat, he inflicted an estimated ten casualties upon the enemy, disorganizing their assault. During the last moment of the battle, however, he was mortally wounded while still carrying on his one-man defense. Private Bottorff's courageous action, tenacious determination and self-sacrificing devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Clarksville, IN.

Boucher, Edward O.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Edward O. Boucher, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the Battery A, 50th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), in action between Chinhung-ni and Koto-ri, Korea, 8 on December 1950. While his unit was guarding the main supply route between these villages, in conjunction with the 1st Battalion of the First Marine Regiment, Corporal Boucher heard from a Marine aid man that there were nine wounded Marines on Hill 1081, a distance of about one mile. Through his own initiative and in the absence of orders, Corporal Boucher organized a detail of approximately ten men, consisting of Marines and Army personnel, and embarked upon the mission of evacuating these wounded to a medical aid station. The group's progress was impeded by rugged, mountainous terrain, a foot of snow, sub-zero temperatures, darkness, and an aggressive enemy force. On several occasions during the return trips to the top of Hill 1081, it was necessary to detour from the selected routes due to enemy fire. Corporal Boucher again disregarded his personal safety and reconnoitered for a route which would not subject the group to the then heavy volume of fire. The only possible escape lay over a steep precipice. Dauntlessly, and with determination, he hastily instructed the other members of the group in the manner in which the wounded would be handed down the cliff, although it necessitated digging footholds into the cliff and holding the cliff with one hand while lifting the wounded with the other. Three trips were made until the last of the wounded was delivered to safety at approximately 2400 hours. Through the entire ordeal, Corporal Boucher never wavered in his determination to save the wounded men, regardless of the sacrifices and dangers to himself and his men. His courage, self-sacrifice, and complete disregard for personal safety were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Boudreaux, Robert O.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Third Class Robert O. Boudreaux (NSN: 4200025), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 December 1952. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Boudreaux displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. While the raiding unit of which he was a member was advancing, it was subjected to a devastating barrage of automatic weapons and grenade fire. Although painfully wounded, he moved from one casualty to another, administering first aid and preparing them for evacuation. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he aided in carrying an unconscious comrade to safety on the main line of resistance. Although weak from loss of blood, he refused aid for himself and continued in his efforts to aid and comfort the wounded. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Boudreaux's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 14842 (May 2, 1953).

Boullion, Kenneth L.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Coast Artillery Corps) Kenneth L. Boullion, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the Battery B, 82d Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of Changniyong, Korea, on 2 September 1950. On that date, Major Boullion was an Artillery Liaison Officer attached to a rifle battalion. The battalion's Command Post was subjected to heavy enemy mortar and small arms fire directed from a ridge to its immediate front. During this intense concentration of hostile fire he took command of an anti-aircraft firing vehicle and directed its crew into a position from where it could return the enemy fire. Constantly exposing himself to withering enemy fire, he was able to direct such devastating fire upon the enemy-held ridge that approximately 30 enemy soldiers were killed and the remainder routed. His heroic and quick-thinking action undoubtedly prevented many casualties to the personnel of the Command Post. The gallantry displayed by Major Boullion on this occasion was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Bowden, Raymond L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Raymond L. Bowden (MCSN: 1222125), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 May 1952. Acting as the leading point for his unit during an attack against an enemy hill position, Private First Class Bowden courageously advanced to the crest of the hill and, as his squad came under intense small arms and mortar fire, which inflicted several casualties and forced a partial withdrawal, voluntarily remained in his exposed position to deliver effective small arms fire on the enemy, thereby preventing the hostile force from initiating an attack. Returning to his squad, he continued to maintain periodic fire upon the enemy, and at the same time moved among the wounded to render first aid and to offer words of encouragement. By his aggressive fighting spirit, inspiring initiative and cool courage, Private First Class Bowden contributed materially to the successful withdrawal of the patrol and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pickway, West Virginia. Home Town: Berwind, West Virginia.

Bowen, Frank Sayles Jr. (Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, X Corps
General Orders #34 - February 25, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Silver Star to Brigadier General Frank Sayles Bowen, Jr. (ASN: 0-16434), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry in action as Commanding General of the 187th Regimental Combat Team, on 14 February 1951, in Korea. General Bowen, while directing the 187th Regimental Combat Team, with skillful determination, organized and directed the defense of the area north and northwest of Wonju, Korea. While occupying and defending the area then under constant enemy pressure, General Bowen repeatedly exposed himself to enemy small-arms fire while visiting and directing the efforts of the front line units. His display of gallant and fearless leadership reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Bower, Harry R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Harry R. Bower (MCSN: 1102905), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. Assigned the mission of leading an assault against a strongly fortified enemy hill position, Corporal Bower bravely led his squad up the steep slope in the face of withering hostile mortar and small arms fire, secured the ground halfway to the top of the hill and skillfully reorganized his unit to permit artillery fire to be brought to bear on the enemy strongpoint. Quickly moving out under cover of the friendly gunfire, he led his men in a fierce assault which caught the hostile force by surprise and, in the ensuing skirmish at the summit, personally killed three of the enemy with rifle fire and two more by hand grenades when they attempted to fire on his squad, forcing the remainder o retreat in confusion. By his courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty, Corporal Bower served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Halifax, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Halifax, Pennsylvania.

Bowers, Robert Lyman Jr. (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Robert Lyman Bowers, Jr. (MCSN: 1029442), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman in Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 19 September 1950. During the attack on strong enemy positions, Private First Class Bowers fearlessly exposed himself to intense hostile fire and volunteered to help secure aid for members of his company who were stranded in a mud bank. At a point about half way to the objective, he was fatally wounded. His courageous initiative and heroic actions in the face of grave peril reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Bowers and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Gloucester, Massachusetts. Home Town: Gloucester, Massachusetts. Death: KIA: September 19, 1950.

Bowers, Rupert D. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Rupert D. Bowers, Jr. (MCSN: 1163401), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 25 - 26 July 1953. When an enemy force of approximately squad size attempted to overrun his position while he was occupying a command post, Corporal Bowers skillfully delivered devastating fire on the onrushing troops, killing several of the enemy and forcing the remainder to retreat and occupy a bunker on the friendly lines. Although knocked to the ground by a concussion grenade during an attempt to charge the enemy-held position, he quickly regained his feet, again stormed the bunker and succeeded in annihilating the enemy troops within. Rendered unconscious a second time by an enemy grenade while moving back to his unit, he later reorganized a group of men when he regained consciousness and fearlessly led his comrades through the trench line, destroying the remaining enemy soldiers. By his indomitable fighting spirit, fortitude and courageous devotion to duty, Corporal Bowers contributed in large measure to the defense of the position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Holly Springs, Mississippi. Home Town: Holly Springs, Mississippi.

Bowman, James H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 7 - 4 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Armor) James H. Bowman (ASN: 0-1821541), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer of 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, near Nung-dong, Korea, on 8 November 1951. His company, occupying a position in front of the friendly line of resistance, was subjected to a savage night attack by a numerically superior enemy force deploying intense small arms, grenade, automatic weapons and mortar fire. Captain Bowman immediately began moving from position to position encouraging and instructing his men, completely exposing himself with utter disregard for the hail of small arms and mortar rounds hitting around him. When one position was in danger of being overrun by the enemy, he raced to it and personally poured such deadly accurate fire into the enemy hordes that they were forced to withdraw. He unhesitatingly rushed to another endangered position and, with a shotgun, again fired on the enemy until the position was stabilized. Continually exposing himself to the intense enemy fire, he moved throughout the company position, calmly and skillfully directing the defensive actions of the men, placing them in strategic positions and reassuring them. The men were so inspired by his fearless aggressiveness and skillful leadership that they doubled their efforts and drove off the enemy troops, inflicting severe casualties among them. Captain Bowman's courageous action, exemplary leadership and outstanding performance of duty contributed immeasurably to the successful defense of his company's position and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Armor. Home Town: Monroe, Michigan.

Boyce, John F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant John F. Boyce (MCSN: 367132), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1950. Painfully wounded during an attack by his company, Sergeant Boyce steadfastly refused evacuation, resolutely continuing to lead his squad forward and directing its effective fire against the enemy until he was wounded a second time and his evacuation was ordered. By his inspiring leadership, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Sergeant Boyce contributed materially to the success of his company and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Henry County, Virginia. Home Town: Martinville, Virginia.

Boyd, Edward Joseph (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Edward Joseph Boyd (MCSN: 640016), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Seoul, Korea, on 27 September 1950. Although painfully wounded in the left hand, Corporal Boyd continued to lead his fire team in the attack up a steep, well-defended hill in the face of intense enemy small-arms, grenade and automatic weapons fire. Observing two of the enemy in a foxhole immediately in front of his position upon reaching the enemy's main line of resistance, he quickly moved forward and fired into the emplacement. Noticing that the hostile troops were still alive, he immediately pushed a comrade out of the line of enemy fire and was mortally wounded while carrying out a brave attempt to dispose of the occupants of the foxhole. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Boyd contributed materially to the success achieved by his unit and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Flushing, New York. Death: KIA: September 27, 1950.

Boyd, Mose W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Mose W. Boyd (MCSN: 280844), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Leader in Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. Assigned the mission of setting up a hasty defense, Technical Sergeant Boyd quickly organized his defensive positions and succeeded in repelling a strong hostile counterattack. While covering the withdrawal of the remainder of his company, he repeatedly crossed a ridge swept by intense enemy fire and personally directed and controlled the fire of his platoon, moving from position to position to encourage his men and to assist in the evacuation of wounded Marines to a hastily constructed aid station. By his courageous initiative, inspiring leadership and devotion to duty, Technical Sergeant Boyd aided his company directly in successfully withdrawing to covered positions, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sequoyah County, Oklahoma. Home Town: Okmulgee, Oklahoma.

Boyd, Ralph C.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 126  12 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Quartermaster Corps) Ralph C. Boyd (ASN: 0-1688434), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 24th Quartermaster Company, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 20 July 1950, at Taejon, Korea. Lieutenant Boyd was in charge of a truck platoon which was assigned the mission of evacuating troops from Taejon. About two miles out of Taejon the convoy came under heavy enemy fire from an enemy roadblock. As a result of this action the convoy became disorganized and without regard for his own safety Lieutenant Boyd reorganized the convoy of vehicles still operable, improvised stretchers and loaded the wounded on vehicles and led the convoy through the roadblock. Two hundred yards down the road the convoy was gain subjected to heavy enemy fire including accurate mortar fire. This resulted in the abandonment of wrecked and burning vehicles and being unable to proceed with personnel carriers, Lieutenant Boyd loaded what personnel he could gather together on an artillery prime mover and two half tracks. By using the prime mover to push the stalled and burning vehicles off the road he went through the roadblock. Lieutenant Boyd was wounded during this action and fell from the prime mover. Making his way alone, Lieutenant Boyd returned to his unit then stationed at Yong-dong. This conspicuous act of gallantry on the part of Lieutenant Boyd reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Little Rock, Arkansas.

Boyko, Stanley W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Acting Master Sergeant [then Staff Sergeant] Stanley W. Boyko (MCSN: 1097603), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as second in command of a patrol from a platoon of the Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 January 1953. While operating with his patrol 2,500 yards behind enemy lines, with the mission of taking prisoners, Acting Master Sergeant Boyko directed the patrol point to contact with the enemy and, despite heavy hostile fire, succeeded in accounting for one enemy dead and one captured. When the patrol leader was wounded, along with three other members of the patrol, Acting Master Sergeant Boyko took command of the unit and personally accounted for eight more enemy soldiers. Following this action, he reorganized the patrol and skillfully directed the unit back to friendly lines, remaining with the rear guard. By his outstanding courage, initiative, and inspiring devotion to duty, Acting Master Sergeant Boyko was responsible in a large part for the successful accomplishment of the patrol's mission. His actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: March 23, 1926 at New York, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Boylan, Thomas B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Thomas B. Boylan (MCSN: 579667), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Combat Patrol of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1952. When the combat patrol came in contact with an enemy force forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Boylan unhesitatingly advanced through intense hostile small arms, automatic weapons and hand grenade fire to the foremost point of the unit and directed effective and damaging counterfire against the enemy positions. Repeatedly exposing himself to the hostile fire, he bravely moved from one man to another, coordinating their fire and lending words of encouragement. After directing the successful withdrawal of the unit to a small defiladed position, he skillfully reorganized the patrol. Discovering that the leader had been seriously wounded, he immediately assumed full command and led the Marines back toward the main line of resistance. Upon nearing friendly lines, he dispatched part of the patrol with the walking wounded, set up a defense around the more seriously wounded and, while awaiting the arrival of a relief squad, moved among the casualties to render aid wherever possible. When the reinforcements arrived, he assisted in the successful evacuation of his wounded comrades. By his outstanding courage, determination and gallant devotion to duty, Sergeant Boylan was largely responsible for the successful accomplishment of the patrol's mission, and the failure of the enemy to inflict more serious casualties upon the friendly forces, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Newark, Delaware. Home Town: Wilmington, Delaware.

Boyle, Charles E.

General Orders #249 - 4 July 1951
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

First Lieutenant Charles E. Boyle, 01337269, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 1 March 1951, near Tukto, Korea, Lieutenant Boyle, acting as an aerial observer on a reconnaissance mission, repeatedly requested the pilot to fly the aircraft at low altitudes, heedless of enemy ground fire, in order to better view enemy positions and entrenchment's and pinpoint their locations. While flying at extremely low altitudes, Lieutenant Boyle, observing a fire fight between friendly forces and the enemy, noted a wounded soldier being evacuated by a comrade. Knowing the danger of landing the aircraft where none had ever landed before and fully aware that in evacuating the wounded man in his aircraft it would be necessary for him to remain behind and be exposed to the heavy enemy fire falling in the area, he gallantly urged the pilot to land. After successfully landing and determining that the soldier was wounded too seriously to be evacuated in their type of aircraft, Lieutenant Boyle and the pilot returned to the home base to obtain a helicopter. The selfless concern for the safety of the soldier displayed by Lieutenant Boyle reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the Commonwealth of Virginia.,

Bradlee, 2nd Lt. Douglas H.T. (Posthumously)

In the name of the President of the United States, the Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinf) FMF, takes pride in awarding the Silver Star Medal to Second Lieutenant Douglas H.T. Bradlee, United States Marine Corps Reserve for services as set forth in the following citation:

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine infantry company in Korea on 3 June 1951. Serving as a rifle platoon commander, Second Lieutenant Bradlee displayed outstanding courage and initiative in the attack of a strongly fortified enemy hill position. Skillfully leading his men forward in the face of withering enemy mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire, he maintained maximum control of his unit, inspiring his men to charge forward and secure the strategic positions. In the final stages of the assault, while aggressively pressing his attack, he was struck and mortally wounded by enemy fire, gallantly giving his life for his country. His courageous and inspiring leadership aided materially in the success achieved by the company. Second Lieutenant Bradlee's heroic devotion to duty and great personal bravery were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."

Born: Boston, Massachusetts
Home Town: Boston, Massachusetts
Death: KIA: June 3, 1951

Bradley, Joseph Sladen (3rd award)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 78 (June 17, 1951)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Brigadier General Joseph Sladen Bradley (ASN: 0-12428), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the 25th Infantry Division, in Korea. On 7 March 1951, the Division launched an assault crossing of the Han River. At 0540 General Bradley positioned himself on a forward observation post, immediately in rear of the leading elements making the assault crossing. From this forward position he was able to effectively coordinate and direct his units, although under enemy fire, including artillery and mortar fire. General Bradley, although subjected to this intense fire, steadfastly maintained his position continuing to direct and coordinate the operations. As the attack progressed he moved about the assault area, supervising and directing the operation, while under fire. The gallant action of General Bradley was directly responsible for the coordination of the assault elements and the successful lodgment of the United Nations Forces on the north shore of the Han River, permitting the drive into North Korea by the EIGHTH Army.

Bradley, Joseph Sladen (4th award)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 126 - August 11, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Silver Star to Major General Joseph Sladen Bradley (ASN: 0-12428), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the 25th Infantry Division, in action near Topyong-ni, Korea, on 29 May 1951. On this date, the 24th Infantry Regiment was engaged in hot pursuit of the Chinese Communist Forces north of the 38th Parallel. Major General Bradley placed himself with the most forward elements of the march; personally supervising the movements by advancing on foot at the head of the column. Most of this advance was through terrain vulnerable to ambush and sniper fire. When the column was forced to deploy at Topyong-ni, Major General Bradley remained with the troops exposing himself to sniper fire until the front was cleared. Major General Bradley's selfless devotion to duty and personal exposure reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Armed Forces.

Bradshaw, Billie Frank (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Billie Frank Bradshaw (MCSN: 1079489), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Member of a Mortar Squad of the 4.2" Mortar Company, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 November 1950. During a vicious counterattack by a numerically superior enemy force employing small arms, hand grenades and machine guns, Private First Class Bradshaw steadfastly remained at his post and engaged the enemy in fierce hand-to-hand combat until he fell, mortally wounded. His outstanding courage, valiant fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds reflect great credit upon Private First Class Bradshaw and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Jefferson City, Missouri. Home Town: Toledo, Ohio. Death: KIA: November 2, 1950.

Brady, Richard G.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders Nol. 191 - 26 September 1950

Corporal Richard G. Brady, RA13268743, Infantry, Company G, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  During a company attack near Hamji, Korea, on 11 August 1950, the first platoon was stopped by intense fire from a hostile strongpoint.  Corporal Brady quickly deployed his platoon, informed each member of his plan and on his signal led them in an assault on the enemy position.  Having moved stealthily toward the positions, they then rushed on, screaming and firing their weapons.  They killed most of the enemy, captured many weapons and completely eliminated the obstacle to the platoon's advance.  Corporal Brady's distinguished leadership, outstanding gallantry and notable technical skill reflect great credit on himself, his unit and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Bragg, Julius L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 195 - 22 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Armor), [then Second Lieutenant] Julius L. Bragg (ASN: 0-60878), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Yongsan, Korea, on 11 August 1950. During a vital holding action intended to prevent the enemy from entering this strategically important town, his platoon was counterattacked by a vastly numerically superior enemy. Proceeding on foot, after his jeep had been destroyed by accurate anti-tank fire, he contacted his positions and directed effective fire into the enemy emplacements, inflicting approximately one hundred casualties. Seeing one of his tanks receive a direct hit, he immediately left the relative safety of his position, assisted in evacuating the crew and directed its complete destruction to insure against capture by hostile forces. Although attacked again in force by enemy infantry disguised as refugees, who attempted to turn his platoon's flank, he fearlessly exposed himself to the withering enemy fire and by his capable leadership and unhesitant devotion to duty successfully defended his position until reinforced by friendly troops. His gallant actions reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Army. Home Town: Dumas, Arkansas.

Branson, Clythell (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Clythell Branson (MCSN: 1200268), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. When his squad was subjected to intense hostile small arms and mortar fire during an attack against a strongly defended enemy emplacement well in advance of friendly lines, Private First Class Branson bravely entered a known enemy mine field to rescue a casualty lying in an exposed position. Mortally wounded while attempting to reach the stricken man, Private First Class Branson, by his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of a comrade, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Webb, Mississippi. Home Town: Muncie, Indiana. Death: KIA: May 28, 1952.

Braun, Thomas R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Thomas R. Braun (MCSN: 0-12237), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observer of Headquarters Battery, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 November 1950. Assigned the mission of locating enemy artillery pieces that had been placing damaging fire on friendly forces advancing toward Koto-ri, First Lieutenant Braun remained vigilant and courageous as his unarmed observation plane made several low passes over the suspected area. Discovering the positions of the well-camouflaged guns, he contacted close support aircraft and directed them to the area while the enemy sent up heavy fire from the ground. When the planes arrived, he carried out two dangerously low passes to drop his smoke grenades and mark the target for the attacking planes and then supervised a brilliantly executed strike by radio until five of the artillery pieces had been destroyed. With the enemy deserting the remaining three guns, he promptly directed several strafing runs to account for heavy casualties among the retreating troops and to neutralize the strong point. By his exceptional professional ability, dauntless perseverance and staunch devotion to duty during the hazardous mission, First Lieutenant Braun contributed materially to the successful advance of friendly forces with minimum casualties. His heroism was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Glen Ullin, North Dakota. Home Town: Fromberg, Montana.

Bray, Leland D.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Leland D. Bray, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 21st Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 25th Infantry Division, in action near Pyong-chong, Korea, on 7 March 1951. On that date, Sergeant First Class Bray's half-track section was advancing in support of a tank-infantry patrol near Pyong-chong, Korea. When hostile forces began an intense small arms and anti-tank gun barrage he advanced on foot to seek more tenable firing positions for the vehicles. Exposing himself to the deadly fire, he walked in front of each half-track to ensure the most effective placement. By directing a heavy volume of accurate counterfire, he eliminated the enemy resistance and allowed the patrol to advance. Sergeant First Class Bray's valorous initiative, aggressive leadership and unwavering devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Breaux, Edwin H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Edwin H. Breaux (MCSN: 315010), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 5 - 6 April 1953. With the lead elements of his squad pinned down by murderous enemy small arms, grenade and automatic weapons fire when the combat patrol was attacked by a numerically superior hostile force far forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Breaux skillfully led his squad forward to the area of contact and, fearlessly exposing himself to the deadly enemy fire, directed his men to vantage positions in order to bring devastating fire on the flank of the enemy force. Courageously moving about the area, he shouted words of encouragement to his men and accurately directed their fire to reduce the hostile fire and disorganize the enemy. Although painfully wounded, he continued to direct and control the fire of his squad and, when the enemy broke contact, refused medical attention for his wounds until all of his wounded comrades had been evacuated. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked courage and unyielding devotion to duty, Sergeant Breaux served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana.

Breckinridge, John Cabell (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant John C. Breckinridge (MCSN: 0-47520), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1951. During a fierce engagement with the enemy, First Lieutenant Breckinridge boldly left his covered position and ran two hundred yards through an intense hostile mortar and artillery barrage in an effort to call in counter-battery fire on the opposition. Discovering that the communication wires to the firing batteries had been knocked out by the enemy, he bravely sprinted back to the command post with hostile shells bursting around him and requested an observation aircraft to direct counter-battery fire. By his cool resourcefulness and outstanding initiative, he served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to silencing the hostile guns. His marked courage and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Breckinridge and the United States Naval Service. Born: November 19, 1925 at Winchester, Virginia. Home Town: Summit Point, West Virginia. Death: KIA: October 9, 1951.

Brennan, Francis A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Francis A. Brennan, Jr. (MCSN: 655820), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 November 1950. During the company attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Corporal Brennan skillfully led his squad to the top of the strategic hill and quickly established a defensive line. With his unit sustaining several casualties when a numerically superior hostile force almost immediately counterattacked, employing intense and accurate automatic weapons, small arms and hand grenade fire, he unhesitatingly exposed himself to the devastating enemy fire to cover the removal of the wounded and the withdrawal of his men to more tenable positions. After exhausting his supply of ammunition, he continued to engage the attackers by catching and picking up their hand grenades and throwing them back in their midst, thereby gaining time for his men to organize a new defensive line. By his outstanding leadership and great personal valor in the face of overwhelming odds, Corporal Brennan upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Columbus, Ohio. Home Town: Columbus, Ohio.

Brennan, James J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James J. Brennan (MCSN: 1116751), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company in the First Marine Division, in Korea, on 30 November 1950. Private First Class Brennan, serving as a Squad Leader, was assigned the mission of deploying his squad along a prominent terrain feature in hasty defensive positions. While moving his squad into position, he was subjected to heavy enemy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire, from enemy positions approximately one hundred yards to the front of his defensive sector. Fearlessly exposing himself to direct enemy fire, he successfully positioned his squad and moved among them, directing their effective return fire and successfully repelled several attempted enemy attacks throughout the remainder of the night. In the early morning hours, when ordered to break contact and rejoin his company, he withdrew his squad, while under heavy enemy fire, to cover offered by terrain. While en route to his objective, a member of his squad was wounded by enemy fire and fell in an exposed position. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he ran, in the face of enemy fire, to the wounded Marine, picked him up and carried him to a covered position. His leadership, initiative and actions were an inspiration to all members of his squad and undoubtedly saved the wounded Marine from receiving additional wounds. Private First Class Brennan's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Brennan, John J.

Corporal John J Brennan, US 52005049 (then Private First Class), Infantry, US Army, a member of Company C, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by courageous action near Sang-yang-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. As his company assaulted firmly entrenched hostile forces, its members were subjected to devastating enemy mortar and small arms fire, which forced them to withdraw temporarily. Corporal Brennan, with complete disregard for his own safety, unhesitatingly remained at his weapon until it was rendered ineffective by the intense enemy fire, then returned to his unit to join the attack. Corporal Brennan's courageous action, tenacious determination and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Cleveland, OH.

Brennan, Leo

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 123 (1950)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Leo Brennan (ASN: RA-13268934), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in addition on 15 August 1950, near Kuei, Korea. Corporal Brennan was lead man of his platoon in an attack on a hill. The enemy position was defended primarily by two enemy machine guns which were delivering a hail of deadly fire on the attacking troops. Corporal Brennan attacked the first of the machine gun positions, killing the entire crew with his rifle. After he had disposed of the crew of this weapon, he immediately crawled to a vantage point where he was able to fire on the other enemy position. Again he killed the entire crew with his accurate rifle fire. By eliminating these two machine guns and their crews, Corporal Brennan enabled his platoon to take a critical objective with a minimum of losses. His gallantry was outstanding and brought the highest credit to himself and to the military service. Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Brent, Joseph M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Joseph M. Brent (MCSN: 0-48879), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to the Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 April 1951. When his unit was subjected to intense and accurate enemy mortar fire during a tank-infantry patrol, First Lieutenant Brent, serving as a Forward Observer, made his way to an exposed position and called in effective artillery fire upon the hostile concentrations. Although painfully wounded, he continued to move from one exposed position to another, observing and directing the artillery. The ensuing fire was so effective that the enemy, after being forced to abandon their positions, exposed themselves to the direct fire of artillery and the patrol and thereby suffered heavy casualties. By his inspiring courage, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Brent contributed materially to the success of the patrol and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Breske, John Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John Breske, Jr. (MCSN: 1282627), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 April 1953. Participating as a member of a combat patrol operating far forward of the main line of resistance when the unit was attacked by a numerically superior hostile force which inflicted casualties on all the other members of his fire team, Private First Class Breske rushed from his position to administer first aid to his wounded comrades and, after assuring himself of their safety, fearlessly advanced in the face of a withering hail of enemy grenade, small arms and mortar fire to a firing position located extremely close to the enemy. Continuously exposing himself to the hostile fire, he delivered accurate and damaging return fire to cover the evacuation of casualties, and steadfastly remained in position to repel the savage enemy attack which threatened to overrun the patrol. When the patrol disengaged, he was the last man to withdraw from the point of contact. Later, during the night, he voluntarily guided another patrol as it searched the scene of the previous action for missing members of the stricken unit. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Breske served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Elderon, Wisconsin. Home Town: Eland, Wisconsin.

Brewer, Aubrey H.

Corporal Aubrey H. Brewer, RA14240178, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Service Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 20 July 1950 at Taejon, Korea. Corporal Brewer, Supply Sergeant of Service Company volunteered to go on a patrol, and as number two man in the patrol shot and killed a sniper that was firing at the point man. On return from the patrol Corporal Brewer acting as a Company messenger took a jeep and while under enemy tank, mortar and small arms fire made contact with the regimental command post and again returned to his company. He then volunteered to guide wounded men from his company to the Medical Aid Station while under fire. Having completed this he volunteered to be an assistant gunner on a bazooka team that was assigned to knocked out an enemy tank which had a road blocked off. His team knocked out this thank, destroyed an enemy ammunition truck and a machine gun which was firing on the Service Company Compound. By destroying the above enemy equipment Service Company was able to evacuate from Taejon. The leadership and outstanding devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Brewer reflects great credit on himself and the Armed Forces. GO 67, 5 Aug 1950. Entered service from Athens, GA.

Brewer, Eugene B.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 37 - February 10, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Eugene B. Brewer (ASN: RA-34145992), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company B, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of Pungsan, Korea, on 2 November 1950. On this date, Sergeant Brewer's platoon was ambushed by the enemy while on a combat patrol. After directing and supervising the reorganization of his squad, Sergeant Brewer remained behind to personally care for the wounded. While administering to a wounded man, Sergeant Brewer was seriously wounded in the head. Despite his serious condition, he refused to be evacuated and walked over a quarter of a mile during the reorganization of his platoon. The gallantry of Sergeant First Class Brewer on this occasion served as an inspiration to members of his squad and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Breznican, Richard E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Richard E. Breznican (MCSN: 1333569), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action, while under intensive enemy artillery fire, during the rescue of a drowning man at Yodo Island, North Korea, on 7 July 1953, while attached to the East Coast Island Defense Unit. With three Korean civilians being carried out to sea after being blown from their sampan by enemy shellfire, Private First Class Breznican volunteered to run the gauntlet of enemy shellfire in an LCM in an effort to rescue the victims. When the artillery barrage increased and killed two of the men, he unhesitatingly dived into the sea, swam approximately twenty-five yards through flying shrapnel to the survivor and towed him back to the landing craft where both were taken aboard. By his daring initiative, marked courage and resolute determination in the face of grave personal risk, Private First Class Breznican was directly responsible for saving the live of another and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Vandergrift, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Vandergrift, Pennsylvania.

Bridge, Charles F.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 196 - April 28, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Charles F. Bridge, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 6 April 1951. While piloting an unarmed T-6 aircraft on a reconnaissance mission over enemy territory in the vicinity of Chodo-ri, Korea, Lieutenant Bridge observed enemy installations consisting of supplies, ammunition dumps, vehicles, and gun emplacements. Because of poor visibility, fighter aircraft could not penetrate the target area. Returning that afternoon, Lieutenant Bridge again located the targets and, despite the limited visibility effectively directed thirteen F4U and five AD type aircraft to the targets. At great personal risk, Lieutenant Bridge made extremely low passes in the face of intense enemy ground fire to pinpoint the targets for the fighter aircraft. These strikes resulted in the destruction of nine ammunition dumps, four gun emplacements, numerous supplies and vehicles, and inflicted a large number of enemy casualties. While over the target area, Lieutenant Bridge's aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire, which necessitated landing at an advanced airstrip for repairs. After necessary repairs were made, Lieutenant Bridge, undaunted by enemy fire, returned to the target area to observe the damage inflicted by the fighter aircraft. Lieutenant Bridge's courage, determination, and outstanding skill in the face of great danger were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Bridges, J.C.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders # 64 - August 1, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class J C Bridges (ASN: RA-6903331), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with the 78th Heavy Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, on 15 July 1950 north of Taejon, Korea, along the Kum River. When several enemy tanks were supporting the Infantry crossing the Kum River, Sergeant First Class Bridges realizing his tank would be destroyed if placed in a firing position, dismounted a 30 caliber machine gun from his tank and placed it in position to cover the road and bridge that afforded the enemy crossing. Even against superior numbers and heavy enemy fire he held his position and threw back repeated attempts to cross the river at this point. It was several hours later that the enemy crossed at other points and by overwhelming numbers forced Sergeant First Class Bridges to withdraw. His initiative, tenacity, and devotion to duty is in keeping with high traditions of the Armed Forces and reflects great credit on himself and the Military Service.

Briggs, Allan F.

Allan Briggs was inducted into the Army on February 29, 1952, and took infantry basic training at Camp Breckinridge, KY.  He was then sent to the European command in Germany, but transferred to the Far East Command.  He was killed in action on June 15, 1953 in the vicinity of Ugo-bong, Korea.  He was awarded the Silver Star for Gallantry, and the citation follows:

"Pursuant to the authority in AR-600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded posthumously to the following named Enlisted Man: Pfc. Allan F. Briggs, Infantry, Company F, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, U.S. Army.

During the early morning of June 15th, 1953, in the vicinity of Ugo-bong, Korea, the main line of resistance, defenses of Company F were attacked by a numerically superior enemy force supported by intense artillery and mortar fire.  In the initial action, Pvt. Briggs bravely rushed across 150 yards of exposed terrain to carry an adequate supply of ammunition for a vital machine gun emplacement.

Then, with complete disregard for his personal safety, he assisted in operating the weapon and was instrumental in preventing the attackers from overrunning the company command post. While courageously fighting the advancing enemy, he was mortally wounded by an exploding mortar or artillery round.

Pfc. Brigg's valiant service was greatly responsible for the ensuing defeat of the enemy offensive.  Pfc. Brigg's outstanding heroism and devotion to duty reflects great credit upon himself and the military service."

By command of Maj. Gen. Canham.  Signed by John F. Franklin, Col., General Staff, Chief of Staff.

Information submitted to the KWE by his cousin, Susan Hiatt of Ohio.

Brill, Andrew J.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Andrew J. Brill, United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the Medical Company, 5th Infantry Regiment attached to the 1st Cavalry Division in the vicinity of Waogwan, Korea on 18 September 1950. As an aid man, Private Brill was advancing with an infantry rifle platoon. As they neared their objective, they were pinned down by intense enemy small arms fire and grenades. Seeing an enemy grenade land by two wounded men, he dashed forward without regard for his personal safety and attempted to throw the grenade away. Just as he reached it, it exploded, wounding him in the face and neck, but, because his body shielded them, the wounded men were not injured. His heroic actions prevented two already wounded men from sustaining additional injuries and possible death. Private Brill’s actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  General Orders: General Orders number 173, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division. Home of Record: Illinois.

Brimmer, Donald R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Donald R. Brimmer (MCSN: 0-49882), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 May 1951. When a numerically superior enemy force penetrated the company's position, First Lieutenant Brimmer quickly organized a portion of his platoon and launched a vicious counterattack. Fearlessly exposing himself to withering hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire, he skillfully maneuvered his men and succeeded in forcing the determined enemy from the strategic position, accounting for a total of 32 enemy dead. By his aggressive leadership, courageous initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Brimmer served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Rialto, California. Home Town: San Bernardino, California.

Brisco, James Ervin

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private James Ervin Brisco (ASN: 18262947), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the Battery D, 82d Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea, on the night of 31 August - 1 September 1950. At approximately 2300 hours on 31 August 1950, the crew of an Anti-Aircraft Firing Vehicle was forced to abandon the vehicle by superior enemy forces. One man, Private Brisco, was prevented from leaving the turret by very accurate small-arms fire. While wave after wave of enemy troops passed by and around the vehicle he sat motionless in the turret. When two enemy riflemen prepared to destroy the vehicle with hand grenades, Private Brisco shot them. When the early morning light disclosed no enemy troops in the immediate vicinity, Private Brisco, though without training in the operation of the vehicle, realizing the critical need for combat vehicles of this type, resolutely decided to save the vehicle. He was successful but throughout the entire distance to friendly forces he was under intense enemy mortar and small-arms fire and was forced to drive the vehicle through at least one enemy road block. The devotion to duty and indomitable courage displayed by Private Brisco on this occasion was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Bristol, Franklin F.

General Orders #72

Captain Franklin F. Bristol (then First Lieutenant), 01307364, Infantry, United States Army, Commanding Officer, Company L, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 29 November 1950 near Sinchang-ni, Korea.  On the night of 29 November 1950 a numerically superior enemy force attacked the 7th Cavalry Regiment.  The hostile troops rolled over the two covering battalions and through to a road block set up by Company L.  The Red force was stopped at the road block as a fierce fire fight ensued.  While enemy mortars, automatic and small arms fire raked his positions, Captain Bristol continually exposed himself in order to form his company for a counterattack.  Upon completion of his preparations, Captain Bristol, while continuously exposed to intense enemy fire, led his company in the counter blow.  He was out in front of the skirmish line at all times, directing and leading his men into the hail of enemy fire.  Upon reaching the former positions of the other battalions, Captain Bristol discovered that the enemy had turned his flank and were now behind him.  Holding up his attack, Captain Bristol formed his company in a wedge formation and drove back to his road block positions.  During this movement, he personally made a thorough search of all ground covered to assure himself that all the wounded had been evacuated or he personally saw to their removal from the scene of battle.  Captain Bristol's selfless devotion to duty and regard for the safety of his men while in the face of almost sure death, were [sic] responsible for the saving of many lives as well as restoring his regiment's perimeter, thus averting disaster.  Captain Bristol's courage and gallantry reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered federal service from New York.

Broadhead, George R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal George R. Broadhead (MCSN: 1199232), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Wireman of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 26 - 27 July 1953. When landline communications between the company command post and one of the platoons was severed by devastating hostile mortar and artillery fire during a vicious enemy attack on the company sector of the main line of resistance, Corporal Broadhead fearlessly traversed an open area of over seven hundred yards in the face of murderous hostile fire in order to lay new wire. Although painfully wounded, he refused medical treatment and, when the intense hostile barrage again severed the wire, voluntarily returned over the exposed area with a new spool of wire to restore communications. By his resourcefulness, courageous initiative and aggressiveness, Corporal Broadhead contributed materially to the success of his unit in repulsing an enemy attack by rapid and well-coordinated artillery fire and in remaining in control of the vital position. His inspiring devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Brodowski, Norbert E.

General Orders #365 - 18 August 1951
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

First Lieutenant Norbert E. Brodowski, 01318644, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 4 June 1951, Company "B" was attacking a ridge near Songbong-ni, Korea, held by an enemy force with such intense fire power that the company was prevented from immediately reaching its objective. While the unit was pinned down, the enemy, having secured reinforcements and utilizing a heavy volume of fire, launched a counter-attack. The initial strength of the hostile assault caused several casualties and confused the unit, so that when Lieutenant Brodowski gave the order to move forward to take up appointed positions, the dazed men began to fall back. Lieutenant Brodowski, faced with a grave emergency, moved out, heedless of the enemy fire, to regroup the company and going from man to man, personally located them in advantageous firing positions, encouraging them to repel the enemy assault. As a result of Lieutenant Brodowski's resolute actions the company steadfastly held its ground, and eventually completed the assigned mission. The gallant courage and forceful leadership exhibited by Lieutenant Brodowski reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New Jersey.

Brohen, Philip Ronald (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Philip Ronald Brohen (MCSN: 1305077), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 25 July 1953. With hordes of enemy troops moving towards his unit's position under cover of a withering mortar and artillery barrage, following a day long, unrelenting mortar and artillery attack that blanketed the entire area with murderous shell fragments, Private First Class Brohen voluntarily remained in an exposed position to protect a machine gun bunker and approximately twenty yards of trench line in order to prevent hostile troops from overrunning the sector. Although the enemy artillery and small arms fire increased in intensity, and friendly proximity-fused artillery began bursting over the area, he courageously maintained his position until he fell, mortally wounded by an enemy mortar round. By his indomitable fighting spirit, marked courage and resolute determination in the face of extremely heavy odds, Private First Class Brohen served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Newark, New Jersey. Home Town: Newark, New Jersey. Death: KIA: July 25, 1953.

Brokaw, Elmer N.

Master Sergeant Elmer N. Brokaw, RA17193415, Infantry, Company F, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 24 April and during the early morning hours of 25 April 1953, elements of Company F, of which Sergeant Brokaw was platoon sergeant, were defending their position on Outpost Harry in the vicinity of Surang-ni, Korea, when a numerically superior hostile force attacked. Sergeant Brokaw immediately dispersed his men and directed them to more tenable positions. He tried to call in friendly artillery but lost radio contact. While he was standing by the radio, a shell hit a nearby bunker, dislodging a beam which fell on his back. He freed himself from the debris and threw grenades at the charging foe. He was then informed that the platoon leader was mortally wounded and that he was to take command. Sergeant Brokaw set up a line of defense and delivered continuous fire on the hostile force, taking control of one machine gun himself. After reinforcements arrived and he was relieved of his position, he assisted in the evacuation of a wounded man who had been buried in a bunker. He then took control of several disorganized squads and successfully led a counter attack back up the hill through a heavy barrage of artillery fire. As a result of his actions, the lives of many friendly soldiers were saved and numerous hostile casualties were inflicted. Sergeant Brokaw's outstanding gallantry, initiative and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the federal service from Nebraska.

Broome, Charles III

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Charles Broome, III (MCSN: 628661), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. Engaged with his platoon in a furious assault to gain a key terrain feature situated on a craggy ridge and zealously defended by a vastly outnumbering and well-entrenched enemy, Sergeant Broome boldly led his squad up the treacherous ledge against heavy grenade, automatic weapons and machine gun fire. Knocked to the ground by grenade concussion, he regained his feet and drove on, personally neutralizing an enemy bunker with his well-placed hand grenades as the devastating fire continued. Persisting in his efforts, Sergeant Broome spearheaded the assault far in advance of his platoon and, after the assigned objective had been seized, organized a hasty defense to hold the position against repeated counterattacks launched by a hostile force determined to regain the stronghold. By his dauntless perseverance, indomitable fighting spirit and superb courage in the face of tremendous odds, Sergeant Broome contributed materially to the success of his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Poteau, Oklahoma. Home Town: Durant, Oklahoma.

Broome, John J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 52 - 25 January 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant John J. Broome (ASN: US-52000956)United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Pyoru, Korea, on 13 October 1951. His platoon had the mission of leading an attack on an enemy-held objective. As its members advanced up the hill, they were pinned down by a devastating hail of machine gun fire originating from a strategically situated enemy position. Sergeant Broome, Squad Leader, immediately directed all firepower on the position and, although fully exposed to the deadly concentration of fire, he advanced toward it, skillfully leading his men forward. Several casualties were sustained in the advance and he realized that the emplacement was capable of jeopardizing the entire attack. Deploying his men to cover him, he fearlessly charged the position, running through an intense barrage of grenades and hostile soldiers were throwing in desperation. Nevertheless, he did not falter, remaining exposed with complete disregard for his own safety. Reaching the bunker, he threw grenades into it and destroyed it, killing its three occupants and thus enabling his comrades to advance and accomplish their mission. Sergeant Broome's courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Polk, Ohio.

Broome, Laney Bruce (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Laney Bruce Broome (MCSN: 658579), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Combat Patrol in Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 20 September 1950. Taken under heavy enemy machine gun fire from hostile emplacements to the front and simultaneously enemy snipers from the rear with resultant severe casualties in his patrol, Private First Class Broome, realizing that his patrol leader was unable to make contact with his company by radio, volunteered to carry a message to the company commander. Undeterred by the great personal danger, he fearlessly exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire and, while completing his vital mission, was fatally wounded by hostile machine gun fire. His courageous initiative and heroic devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Broome and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Born: Monroe, North Carolina. Home Town: Monroe, North Carolina.

Brosi, Dale Marlow

Following is the text of a newspaper clipping regarding Brosi receiving the Silver Star:

Wins Silver Star
Sgt. Dale M. Brosi

Coatsburg, Ill., Feb. 22—Sgt. First Class Dale Marlow Brosi, son of Mrs. Ruby Brosi and the late Edgard Brosi, has been awarded the Silver Star medal for gallantry in Korea. He received the award Feb. 1.

According to the citation Sergeant Brosi was leading his squad in a combat patrol near Mundungni on Nov. 1, 1951. As the patrol advanced it was subjected to intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons, grenade and mortar fire.

Sergeant Brosi exposed himself to the concentrated fire and moving from position to position he encouraged the men and directed their fire. When the opposition increased so that the patrol was pinned down, Sergeant Brosi began inching his way toward the enemy position, rapidly firing his rifle. Moving within position he leaped to his feet, and hurling grenades, charged the enemy killing two of them and disorganizing the remainder. His squad followed him and completed the rout.

Before enlisting in the Army, Sergeant Brosi served in the Navy during World War II. His brother Sgt. Merwyn Brosi, is stationed in Okinawa.

Brosnahan, Donald Joseph

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders # 125 - May 31, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Donald Joseph Brosnahan (ASN: RA-16321543), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Headquarters Company, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 15 February 1951, in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea. On that date, an aircraft was sent to evacuate the Commanding Officer, 23d Regimental Combat Team, blew a tire and damaged the right brake in landing at Chipyong-ni. When another aircraft was dispatched to carry out the original mission, Corporal Brosnahan volunteered to go forward to repair the damaged aircraft despite the critical and dangerous tactical situation. Upon reaching the forward area, Corporal Brosnahan exposed himself heedlessly to enemy mortar and small arms fire for an extensive period and repaired the damaged aircraft. When a take-off was attempted, the aircraft veered off the runway and sustained further damages. Once again Corporal Brosnahan fearlessly exposed himself to enemy fire to further repair the aircraft. After completing the repairs he volunteered to remain behind to enable the aircraft to take off more safely with less weight. Corporal Brosnahan then attached himself first to a mortar squad and later to a group of French soldiers with whom he served as a rifleman. The gallant conduct displayed by Corporal Brosnahan reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Brossard, John Calvin (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class John Calvin Brossard (MCSN: 1197246), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 and 26 July 1952. When an intense barrage of hostile grenade and small arms fire wounded several of his fellow Marines while he was moving forward with the assault element during a platoon attack against fortified positions on a hill held by the enemy, Private First Class Brossard bravely rushed through the withering hostile fire to assist in evacuating the stricken men. Despite the intense enemy fire, he fearlessly made his way toward the hostile trenches to retrieve the automatic weapons belonging to the casualties and was mortally wounded by the enemy while returning to friendly lines. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Private First Class Brossard served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Fall River, Wisconsin. Home Town: Columbus, Wisconsin.

Broughton, 2nd Lt. Dale E.

General Orders #205 - 19 June 1951
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Second Lieutenant Dale E. Broughton, 01016508, Infantry, Tank Company, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 18 April 1951, in the vicinity of Yurhyow, Korea, the task force of which Lieutenant Broughton was a member, came under heavy fire from the enemy. When his tank became disabled while negotiating the rough terrain, making it a target for enemy fire, Lieutenant Broughton ordered the members of his crew to strip the vehicle of all weapons and withdraw to the other tanks in the platoon. Completely disregarding his personal safety, he climbed to the top of his tank turret, manned the heavy machine gun and fired at enemy emplacements, thereby furnishing cover for his crew as they escaped to the safety of the other armored vehicles. Lieutenant Broughton then dismounted from his tank and crawled to another which he maneuvered into position to fire directly at the hostile forces. Once again, exposing himself to the fire of the enemy, he stood in the tank's turret and fired at the enemy, causing him to retreat. Lieutenant Broughton's gallantry and extreme courage reflect great credit upon himself and exemplify the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Ohio.

Broujos, John H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant John H. Broujos (MCSN: 0-44800), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Combat Patrol Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 25 - 26 March 1953. Leading a night combat patrol far forward of the main line of resistance when a numerically superior enemy force was encountered and a fierce, close range fire fight ensued, Second Lieutenant Broujos courageously directed the formation of a perimeter defense and brought deadly fire to bear on the hostile unit, despite painful wounds sustained during the initial phase of the action. Fearlessly exposing himself to the enemy fire while moving among his men to direct their fire and attend to the expeditious evacuation of his wounded comrades, he greatly aided his unit in inflicting many casualties upon the hostile force and in successfully disengaging from the enemy. He later volunteered to lead a patrol far into hostile territory to search for a group of Marines who were missing in action. By his outstanding leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Broujos served to inspire all who observed him and was directly responsible for saving the lives of many of the wounded, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Wilmington, Delaware. Home Town: Wilmington, Delaware.

Brown, Alvah B. Jr.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 199 - June 19, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Alvah B. Brown, Jr. (ASN: RA-15496005), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company E, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in Korea. During the early morning hours of 15 June 1953, in the vicinity of Chat-Kol, Korea, Company E, of which Private Brown was a member, had the mission of counterattacking positions which had been overrun by a numerically superior hostile force that night. The enemy had detected friendly units in trenches which encircled the outpost and concentrated heavy mortar barrages in the area, inflicting many casualties. When the friendly elements lacked positions of safety, Private Brown, realizing that many of the men had been seriously wounded and were unable to reach safety, remained in the impact area to carry out the wounded men. Several times, he returned to the intensely shelled area to evacuate the wounded and administer first aid. After a short lull, the unit reorganized, but once again was subjected to heavy mortar fire. Private Brown, with complete disregard for his personal safety, again remained to help the wounded. His courageous action saved the lives of his fellow soldiers and raised the morale of then men, which contributed materially to the success of his unit. Private Brown's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Brown, Bernard

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 19 - 10 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Bernard Brown (ASN: 0-1018994), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, for courageous action near Wolbong-ni, Korea, on 16 and 17 October 1951. During an attack on enemy positions, the Company Commander was seriously wounded. Lieutenant Brown, Platoon Leader, immediately took command of the unit which had become pinned down by intense enemy small arms and artillery fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, he exposed himself to the devastating hail of enemy fire to reorganize his men and lead them out of the trap. Obtaining support from armored elements, he moved his troops forward behind tanks to secure a high ridgeline deeply entrenched with bunkers and occupied by a determined enemy force with a large supply of small arms ammunition. After friendly units had taken flanking ridges, Lieutenant Brown led his men in an attack on the objective. Under his inspiring and skillful leadership, his men made a powerful charge and overran the enemy positions despite heavy defensive fire. During the night, the enemy hordes counterattacked desperately but were successfully repulsed by the friendly troops. The following morning, the company continued its advance to complete the capture of the entire objective. In this assault, Lieutenant Brown fearlessly exposed himself to murderous enemy fire as he directed the deployment of his men and the supporting fire of tank units. As a result of his aggressive fighting skill, the friendly troops killed 42 enemy soldiers, wounded many more and routed the rest in such wild confusion that they abandoned artillery pieces and ammunition. Lieutenant Brown's courageous actions and selfless performance of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Flint, Michigan.

Brown, Bruce G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Bruce G. Brown (MCSN: 0-54289), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 12 - 13 October 1952. When his platoon was swept by intense hostile small arms and hand grenade fire during a night raid against an enemy strong point well forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Brown, although painfully wounded, unhesitatingly supervised the evacuation of the other casualties, reorganized his forces and continued in the ensuing fire fight, steadfastly refusing medical evacuation. After accepting first aid for his own wounds, he aggressively led his men through a mine field to a position from which they could deliver effective fire support to cover the advance and withdrawal of an adjacent platoon. When the adjacent unit had safely reached the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Brown led his own platoon to friendly lines. By his outstanding courage, exemplary leadership and indomitable fighting spirit, he contributed materially to the success of the unit and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Brown, Grantford R.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Grantford R. Brown (ASN: RA-16249353), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the Battery D, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 7th Infantry Division, in action near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, on 29 November 1950. On this date, the M-19 gun carriage which Sergeant Brown commanded was defending a sector of the defense perimeter established to protect elements of the 37th Field Artillery Battalion. Between the hours of 0030 and 0730 the enemy made repeated attacks against Sergeant Brown's position. In spite of very heavy enemy mortar, automatic weapons, and small-arms fire, Sergeant Brown exposed himself without regard for his own personal safety in order to direct the fire of his weapons more accurately. By courageously moving on the ground to various positions of vantage he was able to direct the fire to enemy targets which were most dangerous. After being hit in the leg by a mortar shell fragment, Sergeant Brown valiantly stayed at his post until the attacks by the enemy ceased. His outstanding and devoted leadership caused the enemy to be killed in large numbers and forced them to abandon the attack. Sergeant Brown's display of gallantry on this occasion was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Brown, Henry A. Jr.

General Orders #194 - 17 June 1953
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

First Lieutenant (then Second Lieutenant) Henry A. Brown, JR., 02003208, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 27 October 1952, Lieutenant BROWN and his platoon were occupying a sector of Outpost "Jackson Heights", in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, when a heavy enemy artillery concentration began. Lieutenant Brown unhesitatingly ran from his bunker to organize his platoon for the attack. The enemy followed its artillery and mortar barrage with a battalion attack coming from three sides of the outpost. Lieutenant BROWN, while moving through his now depleted platoon, was seriously wounded and temporarily blinded. He ordered the platoon to reorganize in a small perimeter with the rest of the company. He then put his platoon sergeant in command, but refused to move to a place of comparative safety. He crawled about the ground feeling for grenades and passing them to those who could see to throw them. Later, when the company was ordered to return to friendly lines, Lieutenant BROWN insisted on being in the rear guard. Unable to see, he was guided to the main line of resistance where he was evacuated. Lieutenant Brown's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from South Carolina.

Brown, Hugh A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 106 - August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry), [then Sergeant First Class] Hugh A. Brown (ASN: 0-2212070), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company L, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 10 July 1950 near Chonui, Korea. During an enemy attack which was supported by four tanks, Lieutenant Brown secured a 2.36 rocket launcher and advanced to within a few yards of the first tank which had been disabled. The crew remained in the tank and were delivering fire on Lieutenant Brown's platoon. He drove the crew from the tank with a round from his rocket launcher and members of his platoon killed three of the crew and wounded two others. Continuing to advance, Lieutenant Brown disabled another enemy tank and the remaining tanks quickly withdrew. The act of gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Brown reflects high credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Myrtle Point, Oregon.

Brown, James R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James R. Brown (MCSN: 1067095), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Machine Gun Squad of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 and 28 November 1950. One of the few survivors of a vicious night-long attack by an enemy force of an estimated two battalions, Private First Class Brown refused to take cover when his company's positions were overrun, preferring to remain alone at his post armed only with a pistol and hand grenades. From his vantage point on high ground, he continued to deliver grenade barrages so effectively that the enemy was driven from his sector. By his daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Brown contributed directly to his company's success in reorganizing and in holding the position, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Minneapolis, Minnesota. Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Brown, John B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal John B. Brown (MCSN: 449232), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 September 1951. When his squad was subjected to devastating hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire while crossing an open valley, and many of his men became casualties, Corporal Brown skillfully organized his unit to deliver effective counterfire upon the enemy and, fearlessly exposing himself to the withering hostile fire, personally assisted his wounded comrades to the safety of friendly lines. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and selfless efforts in behalf of others, he greatly aided in saving the lives of two Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Middlesboro, Kentucky. Home Town: St. Charles, Virginia.

Brown, Oscar Mullan (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Oscar Mullan Brown (MCSN: 567073), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 24 - 25 July 1953. With his squad sustaining several casualties from a direct hit which completely demolished their machine gun bunker when a numerically superior enemy force, supported by a devastating barrage of hostile mortar and artillery fire, launched a vicious assault against the outpost position, Corporal Brown, although painfully wounded himself, quickly moved his men to another firing position to continue the delivery of murderous fire upon the advancing enemy. Assured that his squad was functioning efficiently, he then directed the evacuation of the seriously wounded. Upon learning that a section of the trench line had been overrun, trapping wounded Marines, he immediately equipped himself with several hand grenades, in addition to his rifle, and was last seen alive while advancing alone toward the enemy to rescue his wounded comrades. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and self-sacrificing efforts, Corporal Brown served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Rio Grande City, Texas. Home Town: Rio Grande City, Texas.

Brown, Robert H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Robert H. Brown (MCSN: 308977), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Command Pilot of a Transport Plane of Headquarters Squadron Thirty-Three in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri and Koto-ri, Korea, from 1 to 9 December 1950. Braving a surrounding concentration of enemy troops estimated at seventy thousand, some of whom were entrenched within two hundred yards of the airstrip at Koto-ri, Master Sergeant Brown carried out a series of vital transport mission from extremely small and hastily constructed airstrips. Executing all landings and take-offs in the face of intense hostile small arms fire, he successfully delivered eight loads of urgently needed ammunition, medical supplies and food to beleaguered friendly ground troops in the Chosin Reservoir Area. Returning on each occasion with his aircraft dangerously overloaded with the sick and wounded, he carried all casualties safely to a rear area. By his outstanding airmanship, daring initiative and unfaltering devotion to duty throughout, Master Sergeant Brown upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Marys, Missouri. Home Town: St. Marys, Missouri.

Brown, Walter Jr. (posthumous)

Private First Class Walter Brown Jr., RA14315294, Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of the 567th Medical Ambulance Company, attached to the 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star Posthumously for gallantry in action on 10 July 1950 near Chonan, Korea. On the night of 10 July 1950, Private First Class Brown volunteered to go into the lines to pick up casualties. Upon returning with a wounded soldier in his jeep, Private First Class Brown was ambushed by enemy machine gun fire. Although critically wounded and subjected to further enemy fire, Private First Class Brown brought the wounded man safely through to the aid station. This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of Private First Class Brown reflects great credit on himself and the military service. GO 91, 15 August 1950. He entered the military service from Birmingham, AL.

Brown, Warren G.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Warren G. Brown, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations on 18 February 1952 as Flight Leader of two F-51 type aircraft, 39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 18th Fighter-Bomber Group, FIFTH Air Force. Lieutenant Brown displayed outstanding airmanship and courage when his flight was diverted from its primary mission to relieve another flight of United Nations aircraft in setting up a protective cover over a downed United Nations pilot. After numerous passes over the area, Lieutenant Brown's wingman abandoned his aircraft after he had received a direct hit, whereupon Lieutenant Brown began a one-man assault on enemy gun positions which were hampering rescue attempts. Although extremely heavy fire prevented the rescue of the downed pilot, and despite major damage to his aircraft, Lieutenant brown left the area only after completely destroying three anti-aircraft position, thus demonstrating courage beyond the call of duty in the face of enemy attack. By his gallantry and devotion to duty, Lieutenant Brown brought great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Brown, Wilburt S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel Wilburt S. Brown (MCSN: 0-3960), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 and 3 June 1951. When one of his assault battalions was subjected to an accurate enemy mortar and artillery barrage which inflicted heavy casualties, including four company commanders and ten other officers, Colonel Brown proceeded to the area in the face of the murderous fire and skillfully reorganized the battalion, enabling it to continue the attack. Moving to an exposed position in full view of the enemy and under continuous hostile mortar and artillery fire, he directed his men in seizing all assigned objectives and in inflicting a serious defeat upon a tenacious enemy. By his inspiring leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Colonel Brown upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: December 20, 1900 at Beverly, Massachusetts. Home Town: Holliston, Massachusetts. Death: December 17, 1968.

Brown, William

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders # 82 - September 2, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class William Brown (ASN: RA-13243158), United States Army, for gallantry in action while a member of Company H, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action at Ichon, Korea, on 30 July 1950. Sergeant First Class Brown was a member of the heavy machine gun section which was given the mission to fight a delaying action to keep the enemy out of Ichon as long as possible. Holding his machine gun position, Sergeant First Class Brown was responsible for many casualties as the first two waves of the enemy attacked and were driven off. As a third wave started to form, his machine gun ran out of ammunition, so he grabbed his individual weapon and began to fire again. Soon realizing that he was running low on small arms ammunition, he fixed his bayonet and with total disregard for his own safety, charged the enemy line until the remainder of his ammunition had been expended. He then began firing discarded enemy rifles, and throwing grenades which resulted in confusion among the enemy forcing them to retreat. The heroism displayed by Sergeant First Class Brown on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Browning, John R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders # 166 - April 19, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain John R. Browning, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving as navigator aboard a B-26 attack bomber assigned to a night intruder mission over enemy territory in Korea on 28 November 1950. While attacking enemy installations at low level near the Manchurian Border, Captain Browning's aircraft was damaged so severely by anti-aircraft fire that it was unable to climb above the mountainous terrain to return to friendly territory. Captain Browning thereupon demonstrated extraordinary navigational skill in directing a course down narrow valleys and treacherous mountain passes in spite of darkness and falling snow. He accomplished this remarkable feat solely by means of dead reckoning, since the only available navigational aids were his maps and his compass. Captain Browning eventually directed the aircraft out of the mountainous area through a low pass, and set a heading for friendly territory. On the final approach to the air base at Taegu the airplane hit a small hill and burst into flames. Although semiconscious when taken from the burning wreckage Captain Browning and the pilot reentered the aircraft amid exploding machine gun ammunition and rescued the severely injured gunner. The performance of Captain Browning was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Bruce, Sterling L. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Second Class Sterling L. Bruce, Jr. (NSN: 3569231), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Younodongpo-ri, Korea, on 20 September 1950. Hospital Corpsman Second Class Bruce was serving as a Company Corpsman when his company was attacked during the dim light of dawn by a numerically superior enemy force employing machine guns, automatic weapons, grenades and small arms and supported by four tanks. Observing a Marine become a casualty well forward of the company's front lines, he fearlessly exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire and proceeded to the side of the fallen man. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he remained in the enemy fire-swept area giving aid to the casualty. While rendering aid, the wounded Marine succumbed and although subjected to enemy fire, he removed the Marine to a position of cover prior to making his way back to his own lines. His actions were an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospital Corpsman Second Class Bruce's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 9978 (February 20, 1951).

Brumagen, Arthur

General Orders: SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Division, Serial 3908

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Arthur Brumagen (MCSN: 669182), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 November 1952. Although painfully wounded during the initial phase of an assault against an enemy hill, Corporal Brumagen unhesitatingly assumed command of the unit when the platoon commander was critically wounded and fearlessly led his men through devastating hostile small-arms and grenade fire to the crest of the hill. When ordered to withdraw, he skillfully organized the remaining members of his group, supervised the evacuation of the wounded and covered their withdrawal. Remaining in the area to assure that none of his men had been unknowingly left behind, he searched the entire sector before rejoining the platoon and refused medical treatment until he reached the aid station. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Brumagen served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Richmond, Kentucky. Home Town: Richmond, Kentucky.

[Note from Doug Sterner: Arthur Brumagen, USMC, who received the Silver Star as a Corporal in Korea, received a commission during the Vietnam War. He was KIA in Vietnam on November 24, 1966.]

Bryant, James B.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 82 (August 10, 1950)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) James B. Bryant (ASN: 0-957017), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, on 19 July 1950 at Yusong, Korea. He distinguished himself during a period of heavy shelling by the enemy when he restored communications within his unit. Being in a position about 1000 yards in front of friendly troops, and as outpost commander, Lieutenant Bryant knowing that communication was out, exposed himself to heavy concentrations of enemy mortar and artillery fire in order to restore the line, this being the only means of directing artillery fire and receiving orders. In doing so, he was severely wounded, but refused to be evacuated until the wire was spliced and communications restored. His courage and great devotion to duty reflects great credit on himself and the Military Service.

Bryant, James B.

Second Lieutenant James B Bryant, O957017, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 19 July 1950 at Yusong, Korea. He distinguished himself during a period of heavy shelling by the enemy when he restored communications within his unit. Being in a position about 1000 yards in front of friendly troops, and as outpost commander, LT Bryant knowing that communication was out, exposed himself to heavy concentrations of enemy mortar and artillery fire in order to restore the line, this being the only means of directing artillery fire and receiving orders. In doing so, he was severely wounded, but refused to be evacuated until the wire was spliced and communications restored. His courage and great devotion to duty reflects great credit on himself and the Military Service. GO 82, 10 Aug 1950. Entered service from Huntington, WV.

Bryant, Wilbur

"...near a place called Chong-dong, the local private first class exposed himself to enemy rounds in order to provide covering fire for his fellow soldiers. Out of ammo and once again banged up by an enemy grenade, Bryant then made a grenade attack on several enemy bunkers."

[Source: Springfield News-Sun, May 31, 2013]

Bryson, James K.

Staff Sergeant James K. Bryson, United States Air Force. Sergeant Bryson distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy on 23 November 1950 by assisting in the rescue of an injured American fighter pilot deep in enemy territory, five miles south of Kanggye, Korea. Sergeant Bryson, assigned as medical technician crew member of a rescue helicopter, volunteered for a pilot pick-up mission with full knowledge that the immediate area of the pick-up contained numerous enemy troops, and that the fuel supply of the helicopter might not be sufficient for the return flight to friendly territory. After flying eighty miles behind enemy lines, the helicopter landed near the injured pilot who had fired a flare to expose his position. Enemy troops immediately opened fire with automatic weapons and rifles. With complete disregard for his own life, Staff Sergeant Bryson jumped from the helicopter and ran to the aid of the injured pilot. With enemy fire striking dangerously near, often as close as two feet, Sergeant Bryson assisted the injured pilot to the helicopter. While taking off, the helicopter was hit in the tail cone, but succeeded in returning to Sinanju. Sergeant Bryson's courage in the face of enemy fire was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Buchmann, Robert Everett (posthumously) (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Robert Everett Buchmann (MCSN: 0-51091), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 March 1951. Boldly exposing himself to direct flanking fire from an enemy machine gun, Second Lieutenant Buchmann led his men across a narrow, precipitous ridge toward a jutting peak designated as their objective and, skillfully directing the platoon up the tortuous slope, arrived at a position only thirty yards below the hostile emplacements. Although painfully wounded when the enemy opened fire with a devastating hail of grenades, he again assumed an exposed position to rally and reorganize his men, continuing up the steep incline until he gained a position just below the enemy. From this vantage point, he directed such accurate and shattering grenade fire that the hostile force was completely routed. His outstanding leadership, superb courage and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Buchmann and the United States Naval Service.  Born: June 17, 1930 at New York, New York. Home Town: Bellmore, New York. Death: KIA: May 29, 1951.

Buchmann, Robert Everett (posthumously) (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Robert Everett Buchmann (MCSN: 0-51091), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. When his platoon was pinned down by devastating hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire during the attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Second Lieutenant Buchmann bravely charged up the hill and carried out a single-handed assault on the strong point. Felled by an enemy grenade while engaged in this action, he was preparing to rise and continue his one-man attack when he was struck by hostile fire and mortally wounded. By his courageous leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Second Lieutenant Buchmann served to inspire the members of his platoon to heroic efforts in completely routing the entrenched enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 17, 1930 at New York, New York. Home Town: Bellmore, New York. Death: KIA: May 29, 1951.

Buck, Calvin M.J.

Sergeant Calvin M J Buck, US 55037730, Infantry, US Army, a member of Company C, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by courageous action near Yongon-ni, Korea, on 19 October 1951. While attacking enemy positions, a group of riflemen from his company was pinned down by devastating enemy machine gun fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Buck, Squad Leader of a 57mm Recoilless Rifle Team, moved into a forward and exposed position. Firing with deadly accuracy, he destroyed the enemy machine gun nest, thus enabling his comrades to secure their objective with a minimum of casualties. Sergeant Buck's courageous action, unswerving determination and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Goodhue, MN.

Buck, George Sam

2nd Lt. George Sam Buck, a member of the 39th Field Artillery Battalion assigned as Forward Observer to Company K, 15th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. Company K was committed to the defense of "Outpost Harry", a strategically valuable position, when the enemy launched a reinforced regimental sized attack against the company. 2nd Lt. Buck moving about the outpost units while constantly exposing himself to direct enemy fire effectively called for defensive fire from the supporting indirect fire units. Learning that the enemy had reached the trenches he returned to the company command post on the outpost. 2nd Lt. Buck took a position just inside the command bunker and along with the company commander and executive officer; they repulsed several attempts by the enemy to seize the command post. The enemy threw grenades into the bunker, seriously wounding the company commander and mortally wounding the executive officer, both being knocked unconscious. Lt. Buck although seriously wounded remained at the bunker entrance protecting those inside the bunker and rendered first aid to the company commander. Repeatedly the enemy attempted to enter the bunker only to be denied entrance by the deadly carbine fire from Lt. Buck. He remained in radio contact with support units. When it became apparent that the position was untenable, he called for artillery fire upon his position, stopping the enemy advance. The enemy threw more grenades into the bunker knocking Lt. Buck down, this time wounding him in the leg and arm. On two more occasions when enemy soldiers stepped into the doorway to fire, Lt. Buck killed them, denying the enemy control of the command post and saving the life of his fellow soldiers. Finding that his carbine was jammed as the enemy entered the bunker, he wiped blood from his wounds on to his face and lay still beside the two unconscious company officers. When the K Company officers started to regain consciousness, the enemy shot them both, killing the executive officer and again wounding the company commander. Reinforcements drove the enemy from the outpost and not until Lt. Buck's Artillery forward observer replacement arrived, did Lt. Buck leave the outpost.  2nd Lt. Buck's valorous conduct and unflinching courage reflect lasting glory upon himself and uphold the noble traditions of the military service.  Hometown: Lineville, IA.

Buckley, Clement C. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Clement C. Buckley, Jr. (MCSN: 0-51375), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Flame Tank Platoon Commander of Headquarters Company, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 October 1952. Participating in a tank-infantry assault against an enemy-held outpost forward of the main line of resistance, First Lieutenant Buckley skillfully maneuvered his tanks to a position where they successfully burned the reverse slope of the enemy position. When one of the tanks was disabled during a heavy barrage of enemy artillery and mortar fire as the vehicles were preparing to return to friendly lines, he unhesitatingly moved his vehicle to a covering position to protect the immobile tank and, quickly dismounting, proceeded to assist in placing the tank in operation. Although painfully wounded and knocked down by the enemy fire, he regained his feet and continued to assist in restoring the vehicle into action. Assured that the disabled vehicle could operate under its own power, he positioned it in the center of the column and, assuming a rear position, directed the formation safely through intense enemy shellfire to friendly lines. By his outstanding leadership, courageous initiative and marked fortitude, First Lieutenant Buckley served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Amenia, New York.

Buckley, John L.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 175 - 22 September 1950

First Lieutenant John L. Buckley, 0513497, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 2 August 1950 near Chuson-ri, Korea, Lieutenant Buckley commanded the lead company in a battalion attack 20 miles into enemy territory.  When intense hostile rifle, machine gun and antitank fire from three sides disabled two of his five tanks and stopped the column, Lieutenant Buckley moved forward through the heavy fire to the lead platoon.  During the ensuing two hour fire fight, he moved about among the men directing fire, lending encouragement and improving positions.  By his heroic leadership and calm courage, Lieutenant Buckley inspired his men to rout the enemy and continue the battalion attack.  Entered the military service from New York.

Buckley, John L. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 246 - 26 October 1950

Captain (then First Lieutenant) John L. Buckley, 0513497, Infantry, Company A, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  During the night of 23 July 1950 Captain Buckley led a large combat patrol to the vicinity of Sangyong-ni, Korea.  Selecting a position commanding the approaches to a bridge, Captain Buckley deployed his troops for ambush.  A platoon of enemy advanced on the position and was annihilated by the murderous surprise cross fires.  Shortly thereafter, a hostile company attacked and suffered such heavy casualties that it was forced to retreat in panic.  Captain Buckley's cool determination, courageous leadership, and military skill resulted in over 100 enemy casualties, deceived and harassed the attacking forces, and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered the military service from California.

Buckley, John M.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 63 - 28 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal [then Private First Class] John M. Buckley (ASN: US-51006621), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Medical Detachment, 24th Infantry Division Artillery, 24th Infantry Division, (then attached to Battery D, 26th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self-Propelled), 24th Infantry Division), near Pamsong-gol, Korea, on 9 October 1951. Serving as Medical Aidman, he accompanied two sections of weapons carriers in their support mission of infantry elements attacking an enemy-held objective. During the raging conflict, the friendly infantrymen were subjected to intense mortar fire and sustained several casualties. Corporal Buckley voluntarily left his comparatively protected position and fearlessly advanced under heavy enemy fire into the raging conflict to give aid to the wounded soldiers. With complete disregard for his own safety, he remained exposed to extreme danger as he ran from one position to another, skillfully administering medical treatment, providing such comfort as was possible under the adverse conditions, and supervising the evacuation of the wounded. At the end of the action, he remained in the area, despite sporadic enemy fire, until all the wounded had been cared for and removed to safety. Corporal Buckley's courageous action, daring initiative and selfless devotion to his comrades saved many lives and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army Medical Service. Home Town: Charlestown, Massachusetts.

Bucknell, Romeo H. Jr. (1st citation)

General Orders #213 - 22 June 1951
Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division

First Lieutenant Romeo H. Bucknell, Jr., 01330151, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. Upon arrival in a defensive position near Ckuyuo, Korea, on 25 April 1951, Company "A" was ordered to seize the high ground to the immediate east, the occupation of which area by the enemy would have placed the defensive position of other friendly units in grave danger. After reaching its objective the company became engaged in a fierce battle with a large enemy force. Early in the fight, Lieutenant Bucknell, learning that a platoon leader had been wounded, voluntarily crawled forward under heavy enemy fire and assisted the wounded officer to safety. Later, he received word that a group of men were wounded and again risking his personal safety, he proceeded toward their position and directed the evacuation of the injured. Despite the bitter fire of several enemy machine guns, Lieutenant Bucknell successfully led the litter bearers to the wounded and physically assisted in their evacuation from the scene of battle. These hazardous duties safely accomplished, he returned to his platoon to encourage his men and helped distribute vitally needed ammunition among them. Lieutenant Bucknell's selfless acts of gallantry reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Bucknell, Romeo H. Jr. (2nd citation)

General Orders #364 - 18 August 1951
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

First Lieutenant Romeo H. Bucknell, Jr., 01330151, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 4 June 1951, Company "A" was assigned the mission of capturing Hill 466, near Unchon-ni, Korea, after another company, suffering a large number of casualties, had failed to gain the objective. The route to the objective was zeroed in by the enemy artillery and snipers were known to be deployed at strategic points, making any advance extremely hazardous. Lieutenant Bucknell, although constantly exposed to the heavy artillery barrage, aggressively led his company forward and going from man to man, encouraged each one to maintain the steady advance until the company, although having sustained many casualties, succeeded in reaching its goal. Almost immediately, the enemy launched a vicious counterattack, blasting the hill with a rain of hand grenades which wounded two of the company's platoon leaders and several of the ranking non-commissioned officers, depriving the unit of much of its essential leadership. Lieutenant Bucknell, seriously handicapped by this and yet possessed with a fierce determination to hold the objective, reorganized his casualty riddled company by personally placing men in important positions. Ordering them to hold firmly, he continued to move about the perimeter, urging and inspiring his men with his exemplary courage and disregard for his own well-being. During the night and the following morning the enemy, in groups of 40 and 50, attempted several assaults but the company, bolstered by Lieutenant Bucknell's tenacity and vocal reassurance, repeatedly repelled these attacks. Throughout the engagement the valiant officer, although slightly wounded, was always in the thick of the battle giving first aid, evacuating the wounded, carrying ammunition, and laying sound wire, all necessary in aiding the company to hold its ground. This containing action paved the way for the withdrawal of a friendly battalion on the left flank and prevented the enemy from jeopardizing the 1st Battalion, of which Company "A" was a part. That the company mission was so outstandingly successful despite many handicaps is due directly to Lieutenant Bucknell's resolute leadership, bold aggressiveness, and superb gallantry reflecting the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Bucknell, Romeo H. Jr. (3rd citation)

General Orders #533 - 22 November 1951
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Captain (then First Lieutenant) Romeo H. Bucknell, Jr., 01330151, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 19 March 1951, near Yuman-ni, Korea, Captain Bucknell, commanding a Battle Patrol Platoon of Company "B", fearlessly led his unit in an assault against a numerically superior and entrenched enemy force on Hill 114. Fully exposing himself at all times to the withering hostile fire, he was twice wounded; but undaunted, routing the enemy from the hill. Only after the objective had been secured and he had defensively deployed the platoon did he accept medical treatment for his wounds. The gallant leadership and courage exhibited by Captain Bucknell reflect high credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Buckthorpe, George E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class George E. Buckthorpe (MCSN: 670664), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 February 1951. When his unit was subjected to intense enemy automatic weapons fire while attacking across an exposed ridge line, and his squad leader and numerous members of his group became casualties, Private First Class Buckthorpe bravely moved through the hail of hostile fire, promptly assumed command and led the men in a successful assault against the enemy strong point. After hastily directing the squad in consolidating the new position, he ran to the assistance of a wounded Marine lying in an area exposed to heavy hostile small arms fire, carried him to a covered spot, administered firs aid and arranged for the evacuation of the stricken man. By his courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless efforts in behalf of a comrade, Private First Class Buckthorpe served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by his company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Bueno, Cayetano

General Orders #72

Corporal Cayetano Bueno (then Private First Class) RA17269520, Infantry, United States Army, Company G, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 1 November 1950 near Unsan, Korea.  During the night, the enemy attacked Company G with such overwhelming numbers that the company was forced to withdraw to secondary positions.  Corporal Bueno mounted the turret of a friendly tank which was supporting Company G and directed a deadly accurate stream of fire on the enemy, inflicting many casualties and delaying the enemy advance.  When he had expended his ammunition, he ran to another tank nearby and retrieved the .50 caliber ammunition from its machine gun, which had been disabled.  Returning to his original position, he reloaded the gun and commenced firing again on the enemy, inflicting many more casualties.  He continued to pour fire on the enemy until a direct hit on his machine gun rendered it useless.  Then he opened up with his M-1 rifle and stayed with the tank until it withdraw.  During this entire action, Corporal Bueno was constantly exposed to intense enemy fire of all kinds, but he fearlessly remained at his position, inflicting many casualties upon the enemy and providing invaluable rear guard action for his withdrawing company and tank.  This example of gallantry reflects great credit on Corporal Bueno and the military service.  Entered federal service from Colorado.

Buesing, William G. Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal William G. Buesing, Jr. (MCSN: 575795), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action near Panjang-ni, Korea, on 28 May 1951. On that date, the Second Battalion was assaulting a strategic position, defended by a numerically superior enemy force. During the attack, a mortar miss-fired, discharging the dangerous missile into the midst of the friendly forces. Realizing that an explosion would cause numerous casualties and delay the attack, Corporal Buesing quickly moved forward and buried the faulty round. He immediately returned to his gun and continued to bring heavy mortar fire to bear upon the enemy. His initiative and disregard for his personal safety contributed greatly to the saving of many lives and to the ultimate success of the mission. The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Buesing on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 180 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Florida.

Bufkin, Allen S.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders # 407 - August 25, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Allen S. Bufkin, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy as a pilot of the 452d Bomb Wing (Light), FIFTH Air Force, on 7 May 1951. The mission was to attack troop and supply concentrations in the Kumch'on area, followed by an armed reconnaissance over an enemy supply route. The troops and supplies were attacked with excellent results. On the road reconnaissance the lead aircraft was hit badly by enemy ground fire, requiring crew members to bail out over the Sinmak area. Lieutenant Bufkin immediately organized air cover for the downed crewmen and called for rescue aircraft. Since the area was heavily infested with enemy troops, immediate capture of the crewmen appeared inevitable. Lieutenant Bufkin strafed the area around the downed airmen and drove the enemy back. Heavy, intense ground fire was encountered on the strafing runs and critical battle damage was sustained by his aircraft. Undaunted, Lieutenant Bufkin continued to strafe the area for two hours and forty-five minutes, killing some eighty enemy troops and accomplished successful rescue of the crew. Through his courage, skill and devotion to duty, Lieutenant Bufkin reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Bulger, Thomas Edward

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Thomas Edward Bulger (MCSN: 0-50747), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea on 31 January 1953. Serving as Platoon Commander of a reinforced unit during a raid against a strongly defended enemy position, First Lieutenant Bulger displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. During the advance, he fearlessly directed the assault in the face of heavy enemy resistance and expressed complete disregard for his personal safety in order to maintain the forward momentum. Advancing with the forward elements of the assault force, he moved through the intense fire of enemy machine guns, small arms and grenades. As he neared the crest of the objective, he was blown back by the detonation of a satchel charge thrown at him from the hostile trenches. Despite this and the intensified enemy fire, he continued the assault and maintained contact with the enemy for approximately fifty-five minutes. Having inflicted heavy casualties on the entrenched enemy he skillfully disengaged his unit and withdrew to friendly lines. First Lieutenant Bulger's gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Staten Island, New York. Home Town: Staten Island, New York.

Bumgarner, Perry Eugene

General Orders: Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, Serial 35283 November 2, 1951

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman First Class Perry Eugene Bumgarner (NSN: 9316422), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 13 September 1951. When his platoon was pinned down under intense hostile mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire during the attack against a strongly fortified enemy hill position, Hospitalman First Class Bumgarner courageously exposed himself to the heavy fire, moving quickly forward to render aid to the casualties. Although suffering painful shrapnel wounds during the engagement, he steadfastly and expertly continued to administer first aid and to carry the wounded to covered positions. Throughout the intense, two-hour battle, he refused to seek safety for himself, and was responsible for treating a total of twenty wounded men under heavy fire and saving many lives which undoubtedly would have been lost without prompt medical attention. By his selfless and heroic devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Hospitalman First Class Bumgarner served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Bunch, Elbert (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Elbert Bunch (MCSN: 1211072), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 August 1952. Although previously wounded by enemy artillery fire, Private First Class Bunch steadfastly remained at his post while aiding in the defense of a strategically important hill position. Refusing evacuation despite the imminent danger of a hostile counterattack, he continued to fire his automatic rifle until he fell unconscious and later died of his wounds. By his inspiring courage and resolute spirit of self-sacrifice, Private First Class Bunch upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Smithfield, North Carolina. Home Town: Smithfield, North Carolina. Death: KIA: August 13, 1952.

Bundren, 1st Lt. Lee

General Orders #24 - 27 January 1951
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division


Colonel William W. Harris, Co, 65Th Infantry Rgt, 3rd Infantry Division (left), Presents the Silver Star to 1St Lt. Elmo L. Bundren of Oklahoma City, Okla., 3Rd Battalion, 65Th Infantry Rgt, for Gallantry in action against the Communist forces near Yonghung-Ni, Korea, on 16 Dec 1950, during ceremonies In Korea. - 12 Feb 1951
(Click picture for a larger view)

First Lieutenant Elmo L. Bundren, 01825586, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 16 December 1950, a determined attack was made by a large enemy force on the 65th Infantry line near Yonghung-ni, Korea. Lieutenant Bundren volunteered to go forward and reorganize the platoons which had been forced from their positions. Prior to reaching the platoons Lieutenant Bundren came under intense small arms and grenade fire. After Lieutenant Bundren had reorganized the platoons, the enemy attacked them from the rear. Lieutenant Bundren, realizing the danger, organized two squads and personally lead them against the enemy. He conducted an attack with such intensity that the enemy was forced to withdraw, abandoning their machine guns, and were forced back against the reserve company which captured them. Lieutenant Bundren's determination, personal courage, and disregard for his own safety reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Oklahoma.

Bundrick, Joseph P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Joseph P. Bundrick (MCSN: 1304905), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 - 28 March 1953. When his platoon's position on a combat outpost forward of the main line of resistance, was subjected to intense artillery and mortar fire, followed by a savage enemy attack, Private First Class Bundrick fearlessly exposed himself to the devastating fire to fight his way to a destroyed machine gun emplacement which covered the enemy's route of approach into the outpost trench and, although the target of mounting hostile small arms fire, delivered accurate and killing fire on the enemy. Although his automatic weapon was rendered inoperative and he was severely wounded by enemy mortar fire, Private First Class Bundrick refused medical treatment for his painful wounds and continued to hold his position by skillfully employing hand grenades, repeatedly exposing himself to enemy fire until the sector was reinforced by a friendly fire team. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, he contributed materially to the successful defense of the outpost and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Bunnell, Charles F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Charles F. Bunnell, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49416), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. During an attack on a strongly defended enemy hill position, First Lieutenant Bunnell skillfully led his platoon forward over precipitous terrain in the face of devastating enemy automatic weapons, hand grenade and small arms fire that threatened to halt the unit's advance. Quickly reorganizing his squads, he led them through the heavy enemy fire in a furious assault on the hostile positions and succeeded in completely routing the entrenched enemy. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, First Lieutenant Bunnell served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by the company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cambridge, Massachusetts. Home Town: Arlington, Massachusetts.

Buntin, Joseph S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major Joseph S. Buntin (MCSN: 0-14700), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of the Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 and 30 March 1953. Assigned the task of organizing the elements of two battalions into an effective force to defend a combat outpost which had been recaptured from the enemy, Major Buntin unhesitatingly proceeded to the outpost through intense hostile fire and successfully directed the defense of the position against two separate enemy counterattacks of battalion strength. Throughout a period of over thirty-six hours, he repeatedly braved hostile small arms, mortar and artillery fire to inspect and direct his defenses and to insure that the positions were defended at all times. By his indomitable courage, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to the fulfillment of a vital task, Major Buntin served to inspire all who observed him and was instrumental in the success achieved by the battalion, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ashford, Alabama. Home Town: Ashford, Alabama.

Burgess, Donald S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Donald S. Burgess (MCSN: 0-51879), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 May 1952. When the patrol was subjected to intense hostile automatic weapons and mortar fire during a raid against a well-fortified enemy position deep in hostile territory, Second Lieutenant Burgess, although suffering wounds inflicted during the early stages of the action, repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy fire and bravely made his way from one position to another, directing and controlling his platoon and offering words of encouragement. After the enemy strong point had been overrun, he skillfully reorganized the patrol and directed a successful withdrawal of his men to the main line of resistance. By his outstanding courage, exemplary leadership and gallant devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Burgess materially aided in keeping casualties to a minimum and in securing the hostile position, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Casper, Wyoming. Home Town: Casper, Wyoming.

Burke, James F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain [then Second Lieutenant] James F. Burke, Jr., United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1953, while serving with the first Air and Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific. When the Island of Taedo located in Wonsan Harbor underwent heavy artillery bombardment from enemy guns, resulting in numerous casualties and destruction of communications and gun emplacements, Captain Burke unhesitatingly volunteered to go to Taedo and reorganize its defenses. Despite the continuing, intense, hostile artillery fire, he succeeded in restoring gun emplacements and defenses, in evacuating the wounded, and in directing counter gunfire upon the enemy. By his outstanding courage and initiative in the face of hostile fire, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: June 13, 1930 at Torrington, Connecticut. Home Town: Litchfield, Connecticut.

Burke, Sherman H.

General Orders #262 - 8 July 1951
Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Captain (then First Lieutenant) Sherman H. Burke, 062829, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 29 April 1951, near Seoul, Korea, Captain Burke's unit had the mission of occupying a blocking position in the rear of a second company's flank. In order to do this and restore the main line of resistance which the enemy had penetrated, it was necessary to seize a hill in the area which was believed to be lightly occupied. Captain Burke and his platoon started at daylight to advance along a ridge, when a well-entrenched and heavily-armed enemy force opened fire, causing casualties and halting the advance. Although greatly outnumbered, Captain Burke, encouraged and directed their efforts, that the enemy's attempts to eject his troops from the ridge were futile. Again ignoring the intense enemy fire, coming from three directions, Captain Burke, moving from one place to another, supervised every element of his unit; and after placing preparatory fields of fire on the hostile positions, he led the unit in a coordinated attack, killing at least five enemy snipers as he moved forward, ahead of the assault. Captain BURKE'S outstanding exhibition of gallantry and aggressive leadership reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of California.

Burke, Thomas M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Thomas M. Burke (MCSN: 1072876), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Squad Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces near Seoul, Korea, on 24 September 1950. Observing an enemy machine gun nest on the right flank of his platoon during the assault on a heavily fortified position, Private First Class Burke fearlessly exposed himself to intense hostile fire to attack the position single-handedly, killing two of the enemy, wounding another and destroying the machine gun. By his courageous initiative and fighting spirit, Private First Class Burke aided materially in furthering the advance of his platoon, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Helena, Montana. Home Town: Great Falls, Montana.

Burkett, Joseph William (1st award)

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 210 - 28 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Joseph William Burkett (ASN: 0-69608/0-20168435), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 27 July 1951 in the vicinity of Taeusan, Korea. On that date, Company B was deployed in conjunction with the 1st Battalion of the 38th Infantry Regiment, in an attack on a strongly fortified hill held by a fanatical enemy. Lieutenant Burkett led his platoon forward under intense enemy fire. Later when his platoon lost contact with the rest of the company he acted entirely on his own initiative keeping his men in position to insure maximum effectiveness. Moving among his men, Lieutenant Burkett openly exposed himself to direct intense enemy fire in order to direct devastating fire on the enemy positions. His gallant leadership and courage were an inspiration to all who witnessed his acts. The gallantry in action displayed by Lieutenant Burkett reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Hometown: Muskogee, Oklahoma.

[KWE Note: Joseph Burkett was killed in action in Vietnam.]

Burkett, Joseph William (2nd award)

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 208 - 21 June 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Joseph William Burkett (ASN: 0-69608/0-20168435), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 2 June 1951 in the vicinity of Chap-Yong-ni, Korea. On that day Company B was attacking well entrenched enemy positions on Hill 451. As the company reached the top of the hill it was discovered that the enemy had pulled back to the reverse slope of the hill and were preparing a mass counterattack. Lieutenant Burkett maintained control of his men and built up a defense line. During the intense automatic weapons fire and grenade explosions he walked among his men encouraging them. Directing the fire of his platoon, Lieutenant Burkett inflicted numerous casualties on the enemy. As the attack stopped momentarily he had his men move to positions where there was a better field of fire. He also saw that all the positions were supplied with ammunition and grenades for the next attack. Again the enemy started his mass attack, but under devastating fire directed by Lieutenant Burkett the assault wavered and broke, and the enemy retreated in a complete rout, leaving uncounted dead on the field. Lieutenant Burkett's gallantry and brilliant leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Burkett, Richard T.

Headquarters, 25ID
General Orders No. 294 - 24 May 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Richard T. Burkett (ASN: RA-13286806), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in Korea. On 30 March 1951 near Yongju, Korea, Sergeant Burkett voluntarily led his squad in a spearhead attack against an enemy strongly entrenched on commanding ground. Although wounded by hand grenades shrapnel early in the encounter, he continually exposed himself in leading his squad to a successful completion of the advance and accounted for a number of enemy casualties himself. When hostile forces began a fierce counterattack with hand grenades and small arms fire, Sergeant Burkett was again wounded, but continued to withdraw for medical aid until his squad had been relieved by the rest of the platoon. Sergeant Burkett's courageous leadership was an inspiration to his comrades, and reflects high credit on himself and the United States Army.

Burnett, Thomas K.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Medical Service Corps) Thomas K. Burnett, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a Medical Service Corps Officer with the Medical Company, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 2 August 1950, near Kumchon, Korea. Although his normal duties were at the aid station proper, Lieutenant Burnett, realizing the need for assistance in the treatment and evacuation of the wounded, voluntarily went forward in enemy territory to render emergency treatment to the wounded. Without concern for his own personal safety, Lieutenant Burnett performed the duties of both litter bearer and aid man under direct enemy small arms fire and at a time when the enemy threatened to overrun the area where several seriously wounded men were located. Had he not aided in the quick evacuation of those wounded men many would have fallen into the hands of the enemy. When his forward aid station came under intense enemy fire, Lieutenant Burnett’s unselfish efforts and conspicuous devotion to duty were responsible for another quick and orderly evacuation of the wounded. Working under constant enemy fire he personally led many wounded men from the danger some who would not otherwise have made it. As soon as the aid station was out of the danger area, Lieutenant Burnett again set it up to care for the wounded. His conspicuous gallantry and exemplary conduct reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. General Orders: General Order number 151, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division, 11 November 1950. Home of Record: California.

Burnette, Bobby W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Bobby W. Burnette (MCSN: 0-51202), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. When his platoon's position was subjected to violent attack by a large enemy force during the hours of darkness, Second Lieutenant Burnette, despite serious wounds sustained during the initial assault, refused medical attention and, fearlessly exposing himself to the devastating hostile fire, moved from man to man, shouting words of encouragement and directing the group in delivering effective fire upon the enemy. Remaining with his unit throughout the nightlong attack although suffering from severe pain, he skillfully directed the defense of the position and inspired his men with his bravery. By his valiant fighting spirit, outstanding leadership and selfless devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Burnette aided immeasurably in the successful defense of the strategic ground and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ziegler, Illinois. Home Town: Austin, Texas.

Burns, Buford Lee (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Buford Lee Burns (MCSN: 302510), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Military Policeman in Military Police Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 30 November to 6 December 1950. During the withdrawal from Hagaru-ri to Hungnam, Staff Sergeant Burns repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy fire to direct congested traffic and to fight off attacks on emergency aid stations. On one occasion when an enemy ambush threatened to halt the convoy and thereby prevent the evacuation of many seriously wounded Marines, he quickly directed a tank into position to protect the critical area and, despite devastating hostile small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire, proceeded to repulse the savage enemy attack until he was struck down, fatally wounded. By his exceptional initiative, resolute determination and great personal courage, Staff Sergeant Burns contributed materially to the success of the withdrawal. His inspiring actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Florence, Alabama. Home Town: Winter Garden, Florida.  Death: KIA: December 6, 1950.

Burns, Robert G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert G. Burns (MCSN: 1305398), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Gunner of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 July 1953. Although painfully wounded when his mortar position received several direct hits from devastating enemy artillery and mortar fire which caused several other casualties, including the squad leader, Private First Class Burns unhesitatingly assumed command of the squad and quickly salvaged several damaged mortars to make one complete mortar capable of firing. Upon putting the mortar in action, he stationed a man to relay orders from the command post in the absence of other communications. He then courageously commenced firing the mortar unassisted and after completing several devastating fire missions he reorganized the remaining members of the squad and adeptly supervised the evacuation of the more seriously wounded. He secured a re-supply of ammunition for his mortar and established wire communications with the command post. Private First Class Burns' gallant and courageous actions combined with his determined aggressiveness served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Richmond Hill, New York.

Burrey, William Jerome (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class William Jerome Burrey (MCSN: 1231281), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 August 1952. Learning that his fire team leader had become a casualty when the squad was subjected to intense hostile mortar and artillery fire while defending a strategic point on the forward slope of "Bunker Hill," Private First Class Burrey voluntarily left the safety of his foxhole and, bravely crawling across thirty yards of fire-swept terrain in full view of the enemy, placed the stricken man in a position of safety and sought out a Corpsman to attend to the wounded Marine. When his squad leader was wounded later by enemy shell fragments, he again exposed himself to heavy hostile fire and rushed down the slope to administer first aid to the casualty. Mortally wounded by enemy mortar fragments while attempting to carry the man to safety, Private First Class Burrey, by his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Dayton, Ohio.  Home Town: Dayton, Ohio.

Burrier, Paul Aloysius

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Second Class Paul Aloysius Burrier (NSN: 2486797), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces during the company's assault against a strongly-defended hill position in Korea, on 16 June 1951. When leading elements of the company suffered numerous casualties in the face of intense and accurate hostile automatic weapons and small-arms fire, Hospital Corpsman Second Class Burrier bravely rushed forward through the heavy enemy fire and immediately began to render first aid to the stricken men. Although the area was subjected to a devastating hostile mortar barrage, and some of the wounded were lying in exposed position within twenty yards of the enemy weapons, he gallantly remained in the fire swept area until all the casualties had been treated and carried to safety. By his marked courage, steadfast devotion to duty and selfless efforts in behalf of the wounded, Hospital Corpsman Second Class Burrier served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division, Serial 36731 (November 8, 1951).

Burton, Carl E.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 256 - 25 October 1950

Sergeant First Class (then Sergeant) Carl E. Burton, RA43013214, Infantry, Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, United States Army.  On 31 July 1950 elements of headquarters company were attacked by enemy machine guns in the vicinity of Sangju, Korea and sustained several casualties.  Sergeant First Class Burton, seeing that one of the unit officers had been seriously wounded and was unable to move, crawled to his side despite the intense enemy fire, then dragged and carried him to safety before collapsing from his own wounds.  Sergeant First Class Burton's courageous devotion to duty reflects great credit upon himself and the armed forces.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Bush, Donald S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Donald S. Bush (MCSN: 0-7010), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot in Headquarters Squadron Thirty-Three during photographic missions in Korea from 8 July to 16 December 1950. Prior to and during the Inch'on-Seoul engagement, Major Bush carried out repeated, unescorted flights deep into hostile territory to procure vital aerial photographs which were subsequently used in planning operations. Despite heavy enemy anti-aircraft fire, he obtained excellent photographic coverage of hostile supply routes extending to the Manchurian Border and secured other valuable aerial photographs which aided materially in the successful withdrawal of the FIRST Marine Division from the Chosin Reservoir Area. His courage, skilled airmanship and fearless devotion to duty throughout reflect great credit upon Major Bush and the United States Naval Service. Born: Smith Center, Kansas. Home Town: Newport Beach, California.

Bustard, Melvin E. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Commander Melvin E. Bustard, Jr. (NSN: 0-127951), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Naval light forces participating in the engagement on 17 July 1951, and approximately fifty shore batteries subjecting the limited operation area of the friendly forces to intense crossfire from three directions. His zealous engaging the enemy in fierce combat coupled with his superb display of seamanship and professional ability, was instrumental in silencing several shore batteries whose fire was intense and accurate over a four and one half hour period. His utter disregard for his own personal safety in maneuvering his ships into position for close fire support with the units under heavy fire, coupled with his forceful judgment in subjecting his ships to possible injury in order that our forces could remain in Wonsan, was an inspiration to those who served under him. His leadership, coolness in the face of tremendous odds and zealous devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1795 (November 5, 1951).

Butler, Jack H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Jack H. Butler (MCSN: 0-46945), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Tank Platoon Commander of Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. Assigned the mission of advancing with an infantry platoon in the attack on Hongch'on, First Lieutenant Butler acted immediately when the forward elements were subjected to heavy fire from artillery pieces, mortars, small arms and automatic weapons. Notified that the infantry platoon commander had been wounded, he promptly informed the company commander who issued orders to move to more advantageous ground. Utilizing one tank to evacuate casualties, First Lieutenant Butler directed the others in laying down accurate and effective fire to cover the movement of friendly troops. Leaving his own vehicle and exposing himself to the intense fire, he issued orders to participating squad leaders and supervised the deployment of infantry units to better striking positions without further loss of men before forwarding vital intelligence information to higher echelons which resulted in the subsequent capture of the regimental objective. His courageous and determined leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and gallant efforts reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Butler and the United States Naval Service. Born: Ithaca, New York. Home Town: San Francisco, California.

Butterfield, Clifford E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Clifford E. Butterfield (MCSN: 1120815), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. Assuming the operation of a machine gun when its gunner became a casualty during a violent attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Private First Class Butterfield exposed himself to the deadly enemy fire to direct his own intense and accurate fire upon the advancing attackers. Painfully wounded about the face and shoulders when an enemy hand grenade put his weapon out of action, he steadfastly refused to be evacuated, seized an automatic rifle from a wounded comrade and continued to pour heavy fire on the enemy. Wounded a second time by a hostile grenade, which also damaged the automatic rifle, he again refused medical attention and proceeded to borrow a rifle, continuing to engage the enemy until the attack was repulsed. By his outstanding initiative, resolute determination and great personal bravery throughout, Private First Class Butterfield served to inspire all who observed him and aided materially in the successful defense of the strategic ground. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Parkville, Missouri. Home Town: Birmingham, Missouri.

Buttrey, Linton J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 57 - 24 July 1950

Captain Linton J. Buttrey, O407113, Medical Service Corps, US Army, a member of Medical Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950, near the Kum River, Korea. Throughout the day as casualties were brought in to an advanced aid station, Captain Buttrey constantly exposed himself to the increasingly heavy fire that was falling into the area so that he might care for the wounded. When a general withdrawal became necessary, the aid station was ordered to take up a new position some 3,000 yards to the rear. Captain Buttrey, in complete disregard for his own safety, remained with this group. He constantly exposed himself to fire and danger and did not leave until he was seriously wounded and ordered to do so by a superior officer. By his selfless devotion to duty and total disregard for his own life, Captain Buttrey assisted many grievously wounded comrades. His actions reflect the highest credit on himself and military service. Credited to Davidson County, TN.

 

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