Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "C"

 
Close this window
 
 

Cadena, Robert

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 261 - 14 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert Cadena (ASN: RA-18223130 United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chonghyen, Korea, on 5 November 1950. His company was assigned the mission of flank support between two battalions of an infantry regiment when the enemy launched a strong attack and attempted to infiltrate friendly lines. With utter disregard for his own safety he remained in his exposed position on the turret of his tank, pouring a volume of deadly fire into the ranks of the enemy, attacking from both sides, and inflicted many casualties. Continuing to service his machine gun, he remained in position until practically the entire right side of the battalion front had withdrawn and he was ordered to retire to new defensive positions. Sergeant Cadena's courageous actions and complete devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Armor. Home Town: San Antonio, Texas.

Cage, Phil B.

Headquarters Far East Air Forces APO 925
General Orders No. 22 - 30 January 1951

Lieutenant Colonel Phil B. Cage, United States Air Force. Colonel Cage distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy on 8 December 1950. Landing his C-47 transport airplane on a 1900 foot landing strip that had been hastily scraped from frozen sod at Koto-Ri, Korea, he effected the evacuation of 19 casualties who were doomed to perish from exposure or enemy capture. The peculiar location of the landing strip, which was the only level spot in the vicinity of the battlefront, made it necessary for Colonel Cage to fly his C-47 down a narrow valley which was flanked on both sides by thousands of enemy troops. As he let down on his approach to the landing strip, ridges, 2000 feet high, formed a physical hazard on each side. This hazard was further increased by intense napalm smoke, burning of abandoned supplies, and a light falling snow. As a follow-up to his daring flight, 312 additional wounded troops were swiftly evacuated by other C-47 pilots who emulated his example. Colonel Cage accomplished his mission literally within range of overwhelming enemy forces who surged to within 200 yards of Koto-Ri airstrip. His heroism, courageous devotion to duty, and superior leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Cahill, John J.H.

Headquarters, Far East Command
General Orders No. 88 - December 23, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Second Lieutenant John J. H. Cahill (MCSN: 0-49898), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations in southern Korea during the period 6 August to 8 August 1950. On 6 August 1950, Lieutenant Cahill, leader of a reinforced Marine rifle platoon of fifty-seven men from Company G, 3d Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), attached to the 5th United States Army Regimental Combat Team, was ordered to relieve an Infantry company and to occupy and hold the high ground adjacent to a village in the Chingdong-Ni area. The position was completely isolated from friendly forces, and was vital to the successful advance of the combat team and the security of the main supply route. Immediately after digging in on the perimeter of defense which afforded little concealment, the platoon was subjected to continuous and intense enemy fire. With limited food and ammunition and no possibility for re-supply, Lieutenant Cahill courageously and successfully directed his platoon's defense against an estimated strength of four hundred. While holding the almost untenable position, Lieutenant Cahill, continually exposing himself to heavy hostile fire, moved from man to man, encouraging and reassuring them until relief arrived about 0900 on 8 August 1950. It was largely due to his inspirational leadership and dauntless courage that the enemy failed in its attempt to break through this vital United Nations' defensive position. Lieutenant Cahill's outstanding and valorous conduct was in keeping with the highest military traditions.  Home of Record: Massachusetts

Cail, Ralph D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Ralph D. Cail (MCSN: 0-42348), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observer attached to the Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 May 1951. Discovering a large hostile force massing for an attack on the flank of a friendly unit while he was flying in a slow, unarmed aircraft on a reconnaissance mission over enemy-held territory, First Lieutenant Cail quickly alerted the unit by radio and advised that he would adjust artillery fire upon the enemy. Calling in successive fire missions, he maneuvered his plane over the hostile positions at extremely low altitudes in the face of devastating enemy antiaircraft fire to effectively pin-point their locations between fire missions. During one of these low-level runs his aircraft was hit in the fuel tank, causing the loss of much gasoline. Although the fuel supply in his plane was critically low and the aircraft in danger of catching fire from the leaking gasoline, he bravely remained in the area, accurately adjusting artillery fire until the enemy was dispersed with heavy losses. By his outstanding courage and gallant devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Cail materially aided in repulsing the hostile attack and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Home of Record: Ohio

Calcote, WO JG Roscoe Mayo

Warrant Officer Junior Grade Roscoe M. Calcote, while a member of Battery D, 15th AA AW Battalion (SP), distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy near the Chosin Reservoir in Korea on 28 November 1950. On this date, the command post of the 1st platoon, where Warrant Officer Calcote was located was taken under attack by a large enemy force which was firing mortars, automatic weapons, small arms and hand grenades. The enemy succeeded in closing in to extremely close quarters and began throwing hand grenades into the command post. Warrant Officer Calcote, with complete disregard for his own safety, heroically threw a number of the hand grenades back at the enemy. Eventually one of the grenades exploded in his hand before he could throw it, wounding him severely. Despite his serious wound, Warrant Officer Calcote continued firing his pistol at the enemy until he was killed by the fire of an enemy automatic weapon. His heroism saved many of his comrades from being wounded or killed. His display of gallantry on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of California.

Calderon, Gilberto

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 19 - 26 January 1951

Corporal Gilberto Calderon, ER30411615, Company "D", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 22 December 1950, near Tong-ni, Korea, Corporal Calderon distinguished himself in action against the enemy. When an enemy column, which was approximately one-hundred and fifty in number, was moving toward his position, Corporal Calderon, assistant machine gunner, and the gunner waited until the column was about one-hundred yards from their machine gun and then commenced firing. Almost immediately a concentration of fire from mortars, automatic weapons, and small arms was brought by the enemy upon Corporal Calderon's position but he continued to carry out his duties in an outstanding manner. During this action, he left the machine gun and went for ammunition through intense enemy fire. Upon returning he calmly assisted the gunner in repairing the machine gun which had jammed. As enemy mortar fire began landing as close as fifteen yards from his position, Corporal Calderon assisted in moving the machine gun to another position where he carried on his mission forcing the enemy to deploy and withdraw leaving behind eighty-one dead and four wounded. Corporal Calderon's resourcefulness and heroism on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Caldwell, Donald D. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (posthumously) to Corporal Donald Caldwell, RA17207900, for gallantry in action against the enemy on October 9, 1950, near Kaesong, Korea.  The company with which Corporal Caldwell was serving, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, was assigned a mission of forcing a crossing of the 38th parallel when a hail of automatic weapons and small arms fire pinned down the attacking unit.  Corporal Caldwell quickly evaluated the situation, inched his way forward under blazing small arms fire to search for an advantageous firing position for his automatic riflemen.  Their fire was critically needed at the time.  Heedless of the heavy fire striking the ground around him, Corporal Caldwell located a desirable firing position and signaled his automatic riflemen.  At the same time he was shot and killed instantly.  As a result of his intrepid devotion to duty and supreme sacrifice, effective automatic fire was delivered from the position and forced the enemy to withdraw.  His extreme gallantry denoted the highest credit to himself and the military service.

Waterloo Daily Courier - "While the citation was being read both parents wept openly.  A veteran of four years army service which he began immediately after his high school graduation, Corporal Caldwell served 14 months with the occupation forces in Korea in 1947 and 1948 and was transferred to a unit in Chicago in 1948.  In August, 1949, he was sent to Okinawa and went back to Korea in 1950.  He was born February 4, 1929, and graduated from the Independence High School in 1948.  Full military honors were accorded burial services at Independence, Iowa, when the body was returned recently.  Mrs. [Floyd]Caldwell's only comment at the presentation was, "What is going on in Korea?  It all seems so silly."  Surviving besides the parents are a brother, William, Waterloo; a sister, Viola Caldwell, Independence, and another sister, Mrs. Leland Hammond, Route 3, Waterloo, and three nieces."  He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Independence, IA.

Caldwell, John R.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 190 - 25 September 1950

Corporal (then Private First Class) John R. Caldwell, RA15410109, Infantry, Company E, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 25 July 1950 near Hwanggen, Korea, withdrawal of the company beset by superior numbers of enemy became necessary, but strong hostile action hindered movement.  One machine gun in particular made displacement of the 3d platoon exceedingly difficult.  When the fire let up slightly, Corporal Caldwell stood up and, firing his automatic rifle, wiped out the crew of the hostile weapon.  He remained in place firing at the advancing foe until all his comrades had successfully withdrawn.  Corporal Caldwell's exceptionally valorous action reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States soldier.  Entered the military service from West Virginia.

Caldwell, William D.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 167 - 6 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) William D. Caldwell (ASN: 0-57280), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Taejon, Korea, on 19 July 1950. His platoon, seeking to make contact with the enemy, was ambushed by a force estimated at company strength and suffered many casualties. Without regard for his own safety, he personally led an assault on the enemy's lines and the men, inspired by his gallant example, overran the position. Endeavoring to locate men known to have been wounded in the previous action, he fearlessly advanced into the face of withering fire, killed four of the enemy, reached his fallen men, and directed their evacuation to friendly positions. His gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Letart Falls, Ohio.

Calef, Charles W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles W. Calef (MCSN: 1191842), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radio Operator of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 August 1952. After his radio was completely destroyed by enemy mortar fragments during a forward movement of his platoon to establish and hold an outpost, Private First Class Calef served as a runner and moved continuously from one foxhole to another carrying messages although under constant enemy small-arms and mortar fire. When ordered to withdraw to the reverse slope of the hill, he unhesitatingly volunteered to return to the devastated area to assist in evacuating four wounded Marines. Exhibiting indomitable spirit, he moved forward under an intense barrage of hostile hand grenades and aided materially in saving the lives of his wounded comrades. By his exceptional valor, initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Private First Class Calef upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Home of Record: Iowa

Calhoun, John R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 317 - 26 June 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John R. Calhoun, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as pilot of an unarmed H-5 helicopter with Detachment 1, 3d Air Rescue Squadron, FIFTH Air Force, on 27 March 1952. Lieutenant Calhoun flew his aircraft over one hundred miles into enemy territory to rescue a captured United Nations pilot and return him to safety in friendly territory. Despite the fact that fighter cover reported that the downed pilot had been taken captive by enemy troops, Lieutenant Calhoun flew his unarmed helicopter to the site of the troops and, although unable to land and extremely vulnerable to enemy fire, helped the downed airman to effect an escape from the enemy. With the airman dangling on the side of the helicopter and the enemy firing upon him, Lieutenant Calhoun skillfully flew his damaged aircraft from the location of the pickup and aided in hoisting the man to safety in the helicopter. Through his skillful airmanship and high courage in completely disregarding personal safety, Lieutenant Calhoun effected the escape of a United Nations pilot from his captors, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Callahan, William E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal William E. Callahan (MCSN: 1137934), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1951. With his squad subjected to a sudden and devastating enemy mortar barrage which threatened to halt his unit from establishing a base of fire during an advance against strongly defended hill positions, Corporal Callahan bravely moved from one position to another along the fire swept area, issuing fire orders and directing his men to cover. Observing a seriously wounded comrade lying in an exposed area, he dashed through a hail of grazing machine-gun fire and personally carried the casualty to a safe position, immediately rushing back to his former position to continue leading his squad. By his aggressiveness, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Callahan served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Home of Record: Oklahoma

Callan, James III (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant James Callan, III (MCSN: 0-48263), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Leader of a Heavy Machine Gun Platoon of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 June 1951. Observing that his platoon was becoming confused and somewhat disorganized during a vicious enemy mortar and artillery barrage, First Lieutenant Callan courageously left his covered position to rally the men, moving through intense hostile fire to reach them. By his heroic determination and inspiring leadership, he was responsible for the rapid reorganization of the unit which promptly continued its mission, although he was mortally wounded while carrying out this daring action. First Lieutenant Callan's unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.  Home of Record: New Mexico

Callender, James M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major James Martin Callender (MCSN: 0-8570), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Operations Officer of the Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces during the advance from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri, Korea, on the night of 6 - 7 December 1950. With his fire direction center split into three echelons, one of each firing battery, and the fire direction center he was operating under heavy enemy mortar, grenade, automatic-weapons and small-arms fire, Major Callender repeatedly braved intense hostile fire to supervise the placing of howitzers into direct firing positions. In addition to assuming command of another battery which moved into an adjacent position after being held up by a large motor convoy, he organized a firing line, composed of his own personnel and drivers of vehicles along the road, to meet the anticipated enemy assault on the trucks and batteries. Coolly and efficiently directing counter-fire during the ensuing hostile attack, he moved among the emplacements of both batteries, pointing out targets and encouraging the gunners. Refusing medical aid for his wounds inflicted by hostile mortar fire early in the action, he steadfastly continued to direct effective fire and inspire the men around him to greater efforts and thereby succeeded in defending the position. His inspiring leadership and courage in the face of vigorous enemy opposition were contributing factors in saving the convoy from almost certain destruction and in preventing the hostile troops from establishing a roadblock which would have temporarily cut off elements of the division from their objective. His gallant efforts and indomitable devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Major Callender and the United States Naval Service.  Home of Record: Texas

Calvert, Philip A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Philip A. Calvert (MCSN: 640044), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. With his squad leader severely wounded during a vigorous enemy attack against his company, Private First Class Calvert voluntarily assumed command and fearlessly risking his life throughout a series of attacks against an aggressive and determined enemy, skillfully led his men in fighting off the aggressors. During a temporary lull, he skillfully redeployed his squad in vital defense positions along the front lines and on one occasion, assumed the duties of platoon sergeant. By his daring initiative, forceful and determined leadership and aggressive fighting spirit in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Calvert contributed materially to the success of his company in repulsing the enemy attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Home of Record: New York

Camacho, PFC Pedro A. Santana

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 197 - 19 June 1953

Private First Class Pedro A. Santana Camacho, US50106679, Infantry, Medical Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early evening of 14 February 1953, a friendly truck was struck by an enemy mortar round while proceeding up a road directly behind the Company "F" sector of the main line of resistance in the vicinity of Songdong-ni, Korea. The two men riding in the truck were critically wounded as a result of receiving the direct hit. Having observed the entire incident, Private SANTANA CAMACHO, a medical aid man of Company "F", left the comparative safety of his bunker, and set out for the wounded men in a litter truck. After stopping several times to avoid being hit by enemy fire, he succeeded in reaching the wounded men and began to administer first aid to them. He then placed the men on litters and put them into the truck. The increasing mortar fire forced him to place the truck under cover. Realizing that the delay in evacuating the men to the rear placed their lives in further jeopardy, he braved the hail of fire and started down the road leading to the 2d Battalion Aid Station. He arrived safely there and delivered the casualties to the surgeon. As a result of his actions, the lives of two critically wounded men were saved. Private SANTANA CAMACHO'S outstanding heroism and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Camarata, August L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant August L. Camarata (MCSN: 0-40383), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 June 1951. Assigned the mission of seizing a heavily fortified hill position which was defended by a determined enemy force, First Lieutenant Camarata led his assault element over a narrow, precipitous ridge and up an extremely steep slope in the face of devastating enemy small-arms and hand-grenade fire. Courageously exposing himself to the heavy hostile fire, he led his men in a vicious bayonet assault of the strong point, completely routing the entrenched enemy, and quickly reorganizing his company, continued the advance. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit. First Lieutenant Camarata contributed materially to the success achieved by the battalion and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Home of Record: Iowa

Camarata, Laverne

Citation not yet found:

"Marine 1st Lieutenant Laverne (Pudge) Camarata of Waterloo, who received a Silver Star in World War II, has been awarded a second Silver Star for "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity" in Korea on June 11, 1951.  Camarata, who received the gold star in place of the second Silver Star, was separated from the service two weeks ago and now is working for a Waterloo implement firm.  He is well-known in Iowa athletic circles.  The citation stated that Lt. Camarata as commander of a rifle company "with a high degree of courage and skill" led his assault element over a narrow, precipitous ridge and up an extremely steep slope in the face of devastating enemy small arms and hand grenade fire completely routing the entrenched enemy."

Cameron, Robert Carroll

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea
General Orders No. 460 - 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Robert Carroll Cameron (ASN: 0-23178), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Taepyong, Korea, between 25 and 27 October 1950. On 25 October 1950, the 10th Republic of Korea Regiment was given the mission of relieving a friendly unit that had been cut off by a large Chinese Communist force. Colonel Cameron, Senior United States Advisor to the regiment,. Moved out with the leading elements of the unit and for the next two days repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy fire to direct air strikes and artillery fire against hostile positions. At 0100 hours on 27 October, enemy launched a massive enveloping attack against the regiment and succeeded in overrunning friendly rear area security troops. Although the regiment suffered tremendous casualties, Colonel Cameron aggressively moved among the remaining troops, encouraging them and directing the establishment of a defensive perimeter which the regiment held throughout the night. At daylight he led a counterattack which enabled the regiment to halt the enemy advance and reestablish the friendly lines. The aggressive leadership and gallantry displayed by Colonel Cameron reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Camp, Gerald M.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Gerald M. Camp (ASN: 0-558267), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 17 May 1951 in the vicinity of Kunmul-gol, Korea. On this date Company C was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. Lieutenant Camp, with complete disregard for his own safety, immediately set up a perimeter of defense and daringly moved from one position to another directing devastating fire and inflicting numerous casualties upon the hostile troops. He continually exposed himself to hostile small arms, automatic weapons and artillery fire while shouting words of encouragement to his men and rendering first aid to his wounded comrades. Later, while attempting to aid a wounded man, Lieutenant Camp was fatally wounded by enemy fire. His leadership, courage, and devotion to duty were an inspiration to the entire unit and aided immeasurably in repulsing the enemy's fierce onslaughts. The gallantry in action and self-sacrificing spirit displayed by Lieutenant Camp reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the service from Texas.

Campbell, John H.

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 106 - 31 December 1950

Major John H. Campbell, 0382000, Infantry, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 29 November 1950, near Majon-Ni, Korea, Major Campbell was in command of a patrol which had the mission of clearing enemy positions along the road popularly known as "Ambush Alley".  When the unit came under intense enemy fire from positions along high ground, Major Campbell was wounded in the arm.  Despite the personal danger involved, Major Campbell, although exposed to enemy automatic and mortar fire, calmly placed a mortar squad in position and gave them fire missions.  Concurrently, by utilizing the outside phone of a "buttoned up" tank, he directed fire on enemy positions, enabling the vehicles of the convoy to withdraw safely.  While holding this phone it was shot from his hand so he proceeded to the road where he had vehicles turned around and the wounded and dead loaded aboard.  During the entire action he was continually exposed to enemy observation and fire.  His calm, cool, and forceful leadership effected an orderly withdrawal of the unit to safer positions.  The inspirational leadership, personal bravery, and gallantry displayed by Major Campbell reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the state of Arkansas.5434

Canales, Rudolph M. (posthumous)

Private First Class Rudolph M. Canales, RA16258536, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company D, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950, near the Kum River, Korea. After the Mortar Platoon had been forced to retire from the hill on which their positions had been located, Private First Class Canales fought savagely with a pistol and carbine in the effort which resulted in its recapture. After the position had been reestablished, he assumed the duties of first gunner on a mortar and poured deadly fire on the enemy. During the firing, two machine guns were destroyed and many of the enemy killed. Largely as a result of this mortar fire, the Battalion was able to withdraw, when their position was overrun, in an orderly fashion. By his example and devotion to duty, PFC Canales brought great credit to himself and the military service. (Canales was listed as MIA and later reclassified as KIA on this date.) GO 60, 25 Jul 1950 Home of record: Cook County, IL

Cano, Raul V.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 266 - December 18, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Raul V. Cano (ASN: 0-2262124), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company I, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chochiwon, Korea, on 9 - 10 July 1950. His company, occupying defensive positions north of the town, was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force supported by tanks. The enemy's deadly fire was concentrated on the command post and Lieutenant Cano's position where he was acting as Forward Observer. Completely disregarding the intense fire he remained in his forward position from which he delivered effective rifle fire silencing two machine guns and killing the crews. During the fight, he directed rocket fire on one of the enemy tanks, disabling it and killing the crew as they dismounted. The remaining enemy tank, however, placed a round of fire directly in front of his position, rendering him unconscious. Upon evacuation to the Battalion Aid Station he regained consciousness. Disregarding orders to remain, he rose to his feet, secured a carbine and ammunition and returned to the fight where he rallied men of the company and led them to more tenable positions where he effectively engaged the enemy anew. Lieutenant Cano's fearless action, complete devotion to duty and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

Canterbury, Franklin Monroe (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Franklin Monroe Canterbury (MCSN: 1110934), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader in an Antitank Assault Platoon of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. When heavy small-arms and machine-gun fire pinned down the infantry platoon which his squad was supporting, Corporal Canterbury fearlessly led his unit to a strategic location from which he could direct effective fire on the well-entrenched hostile emplacements. Undaunted by continued enemy small-arms, machine-gun and mortar fire, he remained in his hazardous position and supervised his squad in its damaging fire fight until mortally wounded. His indomitable fighting spirit, inspiring leadership and heroism were contributing factors in the subsequent success of his company and reflect great credit upon Corporal Canterbury and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Franme County, West Virginia. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.  Death: KIA: March 15, 1951.

Canzona, Nicholas

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Nicholas A. Canzona (MCSN: 0-48858), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Officer-in-Charge of a four-man demolition team attached to Company A, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. After all forces had cleared the town of Hagaru-ri, of bridges and other vital installations and, with the enemy entering the far end of the city, remained at his post until the rearmost elements of friendly forces had safely cleared to a point several hundred yards distant before he detonated the explosive charges. Leading his team through approximately five thousand North Korean civilian refugees to each the last elements of the rear guard following the completion of his mission, he continued his task of destruction throughout the night despite heavy enemy fire. By his superb leadership, courage and unrelenting devotion to duty in the face of grave peril, First Lieutenant Canzona prevented the enemy from using vital facilities and materially delayed their advance, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Home of Record: Illinois

Cappucci, Anthony Michael (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Anthony Michael Cappucci (MCSN: 420006), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader in Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When a strong enemy force succeeded in gaining commanding positions on high ground near the town of Hwschon and his squad was assigned as lead element in a counterattack to regain possession of the vital area, Sergeant Cappucci boldly led his men up the steep slope in the face of intense hostile machine gun, small arms and grenade fire, repeatedly exposing himself to seek a more covered approach to the objective. Reaching a position near the crest of the hill, he skillfully deployed his unit and spearheaded a daring charge against the enemy, driving furiously on in the assault until he fell, mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his marked courage, aggressive leadership and indomitable fighting spirit, Sergeant Cappucci served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Bristol, Rhode Island. Home Town: Bristol, Rhode Island. Death: KIA: April 23, 1951.

Carey, Richard Edward

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Richard Edward Carey (MCSN: 0-49834), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as a Machine Gun Platoon Commander of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 March 1951. Although painfully wounded in the arm by enemy shell fragments when an accurate hostile mortar barrage inflicted heavy casualties on his platoon, Second Lieutenant Carey refused to be evacuated and continued to direct effective fire on the enemy in support of the company's assault elements. After skillfully reorganizing his platoon, he personally supervised and directed the evacuation of the wounded men in his unit before permitting himself to be evacuated. By his courageous leadership, marked coolness under fire and inspiring devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Carey contributed materially to the success achieved by his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Home of Record: Ohio

Carey, Richard W.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 187 - 18 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant First Class Richard W. Carey, ER17205451, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company E, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 16 May 1951 in the vicinity of Chik-tong, Korea. On that date Company E was in a battalion perimeter to defend the high ground north of the main line of resistance. When Sergeant Carey noticed a large number of enemy advancing toward the company, he and the company commander went back to the command post. As they reached the command post they found it had been overrun by the first enemy assault. The numerical superiority of the enemy compelled the company to make a tactical withdrawal to better firing positions. In the course of this action, the company commander was wounded, and Sergeant Carey immediately assumed command and hastily reorganized the company. Utterly disregarding his own safety, he led his men in an attack under intense enemy fire, and at the same time assisted in the evacuation of many of the wounded to safety. His fearless actions enabled the company to regain all of the lost ground and firmly to secure the hill. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Carey reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army. Entered the military service from LeMars, Iowa.

Carey, Roland E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Roland E. Carey (MCSN: 0-8184), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 November 1950. When a numerically superior enemy force penetrated the defense line around the battalion command post during a violent attack under cover of darkness, Major Carey fearlessly exposed himself to devastating hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire at point-blank range and skillfully positioned his men and automatic weapons to establish a new defense line, successfully repulsing the heavy attack. Throughout the remainder of the night, as the enemy attempted to break through the defenses at successive points in the perimeter, he continually braved hostile fire to maneuver his men and to maintain the integrity of the line. By his inspiring leadership, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Major Carey contributed materially to the success of his unit in inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and in successfully defending the vital command post, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Home of Record: Maryland

Carfagno, Anthony F.

Corporal Anthony F. Carfagno, Battery A, 15rh AAA AW Bn. (Sp), displayed gallantry in action against on armed enemy near Hoengsong, Korea, on 12 February 1951. Corporal Carfagno was in charge of on M.16 multiple machine gun hall track which was protecting a road intersection to permit the passage of the vehicles of a task force near Wonju, Korea. While his M.16 was engaged in firing at the enemy, Corporal Carfagno heard a call for assistance from his section chief who had discovered eight seriously wounded soldiers in a burning house. Corporal Carfagno unhesitatingly made his way to the house through intense enemy fire to assist in carrying the wounded men to a place of comparative safety, after which he helped to load them onto passing vehicles for evacuation. Corporal Carfagno's display of gallantry resulted in the possible saving of eight lives and reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the service fromPennsylvania.

Cargill, Wayne M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Wayne M. Cargill (MCSN: 0-6145), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Marine Attack Squadron 121 (VMA-121) in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 November 1952. Acting as Tactical Air Controller Airborne during a massed aerial assault on an enemy hydroelectric installation near Chungnim, Lieutenant Colonel Cargill skillfully coordinated and directed thirty-two fighter-bomber aircraft and twenty-two attack aircraft in attacks against the heavily defended enemy target. Despite the intense and accurate hostile anti-aircraft fire, he remained over the area for forty-five minutes and effectively controlled the attacking flights, resulting in the destruction of one hydroelectric plant, a transformer yard, a power substation and six buildings. When the strike group retired, he escorted his wingman in low-level photographic reconnaissance and, when enemy fire severely damaged the photographic plane and forced the pilot to land in the Sea of Japan, calmly and efficiently directed rescue facilities to the downed pilot's location, thereby greatly aiding in the safe recovery of the stricken pilot. His superb airmanship, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Cargill and the United States Naval Service. Home of Record: Nebraska

Carlisle, Paul L.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 76 - 14 February 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Paul L. Carlisle, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Fighter Pilot, 36th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, FIFTH Air Force, on 23 November 1950. On that date Captain Carlisle flew on a combat mission against the enemy near Mupyongni, Korea. Captain Carlisle led a flight of two F-51 type aircraft on a pre-briefed mission to fly Combat Air Patrol over a downed pilot of his squadron. Because of low ceilings, darkness and adverse weather conditions, it was doubtful that the flight could penetrate into the search area. However, despite these obstacles, Captain Carlisle departed from an advance airfield in Korea on a pre-dawn take-off. He displayed outstanding navigational ability, leading his flight to the area of the downed pilot by following river beds and railroads beneath the overcast. Captain Carlisle aggressively pressed the attack against enemy forces advancing towards the downed pilot, destroying machine gun positions and continually driving the enemy back to cover. He continued to press daring passes in the face of intense ground fire, making some non-firing passes to conserve ammunition. Each pass deterred the enemy and allowed the friendly pilot to re-position himself. After flying over the downed pilot for three hours, Captain Carlisle's aircraft received a direct hit in the engine section, causing partial loss of power, restricting his aircraft to slow speed. Even though his aircraft was damaged, rather than leave the downed pilot unprotected, Captain Carlisle courageously continued his protective cover, subjecting himself to intense enemy ground fire. For two additional hours, he patrolled the area, making passes to the attacking enemy, killing an un-estimated number of enemy soldiers and destroying many gun positions. Repeated attempts were made by the enemy to reach the downed pilot but each attack was beaten off and repulsed by Captain Carlisle's skillful maneuvering and aggressive counter attacks. For five hours, this protective cover was flown over the friendly pilot. After the rescue helicopter arrived and the pilot was successfully evacuated, Captain Carlisle proceeded to the nearest friendly airfield with minimum fuel remaining. Through the risk of his own life, Captain Carlisle was directly responsible for saving a fellow pilot's life. Captain Carlisle's courage and gallant action were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Carlon, Francis Brandon

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Francis Brandon Carlon (MCSN: 0-49331), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 28 October 1950. When an enemy battalion launched a fierce attack against the company's right flank, which the platoon was defending and overran a portion of the lines, First Lieutenant Carlon courageously led his support squad in a counterattack, which re-established friendly lines, and succeeded in personally killing at least five of the enemy and in wounding three others. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, First Lieutenant Carlon was directly instrumental in repelling the enemy attack and contributed materially to the success achieved by the company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Commanding General 1st Marine Division: Serial 60174 (November 30, 1951). Born: Oil City, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Oil City, Pennsylvania.

Carlo-Perez, Vincente (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Vincente Carlo-Perez (MCSN: 1210608), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 13 to 15 August 1952. With his unit engaged in supporting the forward elements of the company defending an important hill position, Private First Class Carlo-Perez voluntarily left his position of safety during an attack by an overwhelming enemy force and, although subjected to intense hostile mortar fire, courageously rushed forward to provide vitally needed killing fire to aid in repelling the assault. Observing that a friendly machine gun crew had received a hit from a hostile mortar shell, he bravely jumped into the position and manned the gun in the face of the enemy attack, inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy. Remaining awake throughout the entire period that the company was committed to a defense of the hill position, he stayed with the machine gun, aiding in the repulse of many enemy assaults and, on many occasions, exposed himself to hostile fire to carry badly needed ammunition for the weapon. By his exceptional courage, resourcefulness and gallant spirit of self-sacrifice, Private First Class Carlo-Perez served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Juana Diaz, Puerto Rico. Home Town: Santa Isobel, Puerto Rico.

Carlson, Evans C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major Evans C. Carlson (MCSN: 0-8067), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron 113 (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 June 1951. Discovering an enemy train while reconnoitering a railroad at minimum altitude during a night intruder mission in the Sinmak Area, Major Carlson promptly initiated a series of daring low-level bombing, strafing and napalm attacks in the face of intense hostile anti-aircraft fire, destroying the locomotive and several boxcars. Although his aircraft was severely damaged by the exploding target, he bravely persisted in his efforts and, after vectoring a flare plane into the area, carried out damaging attacks against a second enemy train, scoring direct hits with bombs, napalm and 20-mm. fire on a locomotive and fourteen boxcars. Despite an acute shortage of fuel, he boldly maintained position over the mountainous terrain to coordinate a strike by additional aircraft, and skillfully pinpointed the target for an effective daylight attack by relieving fighter planes. By his marked courage, expert leadership and unswerving devotion to duty throughout the intensive action, Major Carlson was directly instrumental in inflicting extensive damage upon the enemy and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Home of Record: California

Carlton, Merrill H. (USAF)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 48 - 11 February 1951

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul. 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority contained in Air Force Regulation 30-14, 22 August 1950 and Section VII, General Order Number 63, Department of the Air Force, 19 September 1950, the Silver Star for gallantry in action against an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel (then Maj) Merrill H. Carlton, United States Air Force.

Colonel Carlton distinguished himself by meritorious achievement and conspicuous gallantry in aerial flight on 20 July 1950 in support of the United Nations Forces as pilot of and unarmed T-6 aircraft in the vicinity of Tanyang, Korea. While on a visual reconnaissance flight over mountainous terrain, deep in enemy territory, with enemy air opposition probable and expected, Colonel Carlton observed several gun positions, three vehicles, and five hay stacks which later proved to be camouflaged enemy medium tanks waiting to attack friendly forces. Realizing the military value of the targets and the damage that could be inflicted on friendly troops, Colonel Carlton immediately vectored friendly fighter aircraft to the area. With complete disregard for personal safety he dove his aircraft to within a few feet of the ground to pinpoint the targets for the fighters. Although enemy ground fire had damaged his aircraft and the enemy attacks continued, Colonel Carlton remained in the area and directed the fighter strike which resulted in total destruction of three gun positions, three vehicles, three tanks, and rendered the remainder ineffective in battle. The aggressiveness, courage under fire, and intense devotion to duty displayed by Colonel Carlton reflect great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Carmichael, Richard Henry (Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 115 - 19 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Colonel Richard Henry Carmichael (ASN: 0-20203), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action near Sinuiju, Korea, on 8 November 1950. Serving as Commanding Officer of the 98th Bombardment Group, FIFTH Air Force, Colonel Carmichael led an aerial attack against that temporary capitol of North Korea. This target was a highly important enemy supply and communications center. Because of Sinuiju's location only 666 yards across the Yalu River from An-Tung, Manchuria, attack was expected from enemy conventional and jet type aircraft known to be in the area. Anti-aircraft artillery on both sides of the river was also expected to provide further danger. However, realizing the vital importance of this target, as well as to prevent possible consequences of a Manchurian border violation, Colonel Carmichael personally led his group. His skillful, courageous leadership resulted in maximum destruction of assigned targets and served as an inspiration to the personnel of his group. The leadership and gallantry displayed by Colonel Carmichael on this mission is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
 

Carney, Vincent J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Vincent J. Carney (MCSN: 585505), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner and Squad Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 February 1951. When the leading elements of the unit were subjected to devastating enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire from concealed bunkers while he was moving with the company in an assault on a strongly defended enemy hill position, Private First Class Carney quickly moved forward through the heavy enemy fire, putting his weapon into action and delivering accurate and effective fire upon the enemy. Although his gun was hit repeatedly by enemy fire and he suffered painful multiple wounds, he continued to engage the enemy, thereby permitting his comrades to rapidly advance and seize the objective. By his exceptional courage, fortitude and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Carney served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ogden, Utah. Home Town: Ogden, Utah.

Caro, Lonial W.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 195 - 22 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant [then Sergeant First Class] Lonial W. Caro (ASN: RA-38087059), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery B, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Yong Dong, Korea, on 24 July 1950. Although harassed throughout the day by concentrated enemy artillery and mortar fire, he courageously moved to each of his heavy howitzer sections to encourage and direct the firing missions from Division Artillery. When attacked in force by enemy armor and infantry he again inspired his men by his example of fearlessness and under his direction the howitzer platoon engaged the advancing enemy. Through the accuracy and volume of their fare, the enemy advance was halted after suffering heavy losses in personnel and material. His platoon is credited with destroying seven enemy tanks during this engagement. His unhesitant devotion to duty, superior leadership and gallantry reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Cumberland, North Carolina.

Carpenter, Vail P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Chief Boatswain's Mate Vail P. Carpenter (NSN: 3930857), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and meritorious devotion to duty, as the senior surviving member of the crew of the U.S.S. Magpie (AMS-25) which was mined off the East Coast of Korea on 1 October 1950. Chief Boatswain's Mate Carpenter refused to leave his ship, which had been literally disintegrated by a mine, until he made absolutely certain that no living person remained on board, personally making a complete search of the rapidly sinking ship. Then by superb leadership and cool courage, Chief Boatswain's Mate Carpenter assisted all surviving personnel to a place of safety on board the one undamaged and overloaded life raft. Chief Boatswain's Mate Carpenter remained clear of the raft in order to avoid further overloading and was the last man to be pulled from the water during the subsequent rescue. The conduct displayed by Chief Boatswain's Mate Carpenter throughout reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 7587 (December 26, 1950).

Carr, Willis L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Willis L. Carr (MCSN: 1138815), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Runner in Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. When his company was engaged in an attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Corporal Carr bravely made his way across the precipitous terrain approaching the object to relay all commands to the leaders of the squads operating on the flank. Although exposed to intense hostile fire, he coolly directed a section of the assault element and voluntarily joined in the final attack on the crest of the hill, personally killing two of the enemy before being wounded by the burst of a hostile mortar shell. By his exceptional courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Carr served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the company's mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sheridan, Wyoming. Home Town: Lyons, Colorado.

Carreras, Roberto

Headquarters, 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No 14 - 24 January 1951

Private First Class Roberto Carreras, RA10406512, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army, is cited for gallantry in action. On 27 November 1950, near Kowan, Korea, Private Carreras platoon had established contact with a numerically superior enemy force while advancing through a small village. The lead elements of the platoon received intensified fire from automatic weapons while moving forward. Realizing that the enemy fire was causing considerable hindrance to the advance of the platoon, he, with utter disregard for his personal safety, moved his vehicle to an exposed position to the front of the platoon and began firing the fifty caliber machine gun mounted on the vehicle. Immediately the enemy concentrated their fire on Private Carreras in an attempt to render his weapon useless. Then he moved his vehicle to a more covered position and resumed firing at the enemy supporting the platoon's advance. His intrepid action caused the enemy to concentrate their fire upon him enabling the platoon to move forward successfully. The inspirational heroism under fire displayed by Private Carreras exemplifies the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Carrington, Henry P.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 240 - 2 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Field Artillery) Henry P. Carrington (ASN: 0-352502), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chonan, Korea, on 7 to 8 July 1950. Captain Carrington as Liaison Officer to the Infantry was forward with an attacking infantry battalion when the enemy attacked in force. He joined a forward observer for the artillery and repeatedly exposed himself to obtain better observation and conduct fire missions. Under his fire the enemy withdrew, only to continue the attack the following day with tank support. After the enemy had penetrated forward positions, many of the infantry officers became casualties, and the situation appeared hopeless. Captain Carrington rallied the infantry by his own actions and continued to conduct fire missions until he could effect a withdrawal of the remaining infantry in the town. His fearless example and effective leadership while under fire, reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Army. Home Town: Richmond, Virginia.

Carrion, Jose A. Rivera

Headquarters, 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 177 - 5 June 1951

Private First Class Jose A. Rivera Carrion, RA57011159, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 19 February 1951, near Myongil-li, Korea, "G" Company's mission was to capture Hill 88 and, as the company moved into the assault, it immediately received intense enemy small arms fire. Because of the enemy's almost perfect use of camouflage and color, detection of their emplacements was difficult. When the order for the final assault was given, Private Rivera Carrion, with complete disregard for his personal safety, immediately ran in front of the advancing company to charge the enemy positions with hand grenades. He blasted the enemy out of the dugouts so that his advancing comrades were able to inflict heavy casualties and drive the enemy from the hill. After Hill 88 was secured, heavy enemy mortar fire caused several casualties in other platoons and Private Rivera Carrion voluntarily assisted in the evacuation of the wounded although mortar rounds were still falling in the area. The gallantry and courage displayed by Private Rivera Carion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Carroll, Aubrey D. (posthumous)


(Click picture for a larger view)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Aubrey D. Carroll (MCSN: 1321887), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 27 - 28 March 1953. When the enemy captured the forward portion of a vital outpost far in advance of the main line of resistance and was attempting to overrun the entire position, Private First Class Carroll bravely moved through a murderous hail of hostile mortar, artillery, machine gun and small arms fire to secure a more advantageous position from which to protect the left flank of the outpost. Delivering accurate and deadly fire on the hostile forces, he succeeded in repulsing their attempt to reach the rear of the outpost and continued his courageous defense until friendly reinforcements arrived. When his squad was pinned down by heavy enemy fire while engaged in the hazardous mission of routing the hostile forces from their newly-won position on the forward portion of the outpost, he fearlessly moved forward and again brought devastating automatic weapons fire to bear upon the enemy, enabling the squad to accomplish its mission, although he fell, mortally wounded by hostile machine gun fire during the fierce encounter. By his indomitable fighting spirit, outstanding valor and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Carroll served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Van, Texas. Home Town: Yuma, Arizona. Death: KIA: March 28, 1953.

Carroll, James H. Jr. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant] James H. Carroll, Jr. (ASN:0-1335166), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer of Company I, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 10 September 1950, near Tabu-dong, Korea. When Company I was ordered to attack and secure Hill 314, the company was far below normal strength, due to the preceding days of combat. Disregarding his fact, the company commenced the attack upon an enemy who was well dug-in and had good visibility and fields of fire. During the assault, Captain Carroll constantly exposed himself to intense fire and led his men on to the hostile positions, physically forcing the enemy to vacate their emplacements. The attack was successful, and the company prepared their defensive positions. At this time, enemy forces located on an adjacent hill began directing artillery fire in on the company, and Captain Carroll moved to an advantageous position where he could direct friendly artillery fire. He attained his position, but was in full view of the enemy and under constant fire. Disregarding this danger, he remained at his position for 30 minutes, directing artillery fire. Then, realizing that a North Korean counterattack was imminent, he ordered the company to take up defending positions, and directed the evacuation of the wounded, after which the company was withdrawn with a minimum of casualties. Captain Carroll's example of extraordinary courage and heroism afforded his men a fine example, and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Carroll, Robert M.

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant Robert M. Carroll, 01020000, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company H, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against the enemy at Yongpo, Korea, on 12 August 1950. Company H was attacking a numerically superior enemy force. Because of wounds sustained just prior to the attack, Lieutenant Carroll had been told to stay at the Command Post and take charge of communications. Finding that the right flank had become pinned down by sniper fire, Lieutenant Carroll, although wounded, rushed up the hill and directed fire upon the sniper thus enabling the right flank to move forward. He then assisted in a bayonet charge which drove the enemy from their positions. During this charge Lieutenant Carroll was again wounded by enemy hand grenades. His superior leadership so inspired his men that they continued the attack and forced the enemy to retreat. Lieutenant Carroll’s actions and disregard for personal safety, even though wounded, reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered service from Mason City, Iowa.

Carsanaro, Charles S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Charles S. Carsanaro (NSN: 6066035), United States Navy, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as a Medical Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action in Korea, on 27 September 1950. During the attack by his company, Hospitalman Carsanaro, serving as a Company Corpsman, observed a wounded Marine lying in an exposed enemy fire-swept area. Without regard for his own personal safety, he fearlessly exposed himself and ran to the side of the wounded Marine. On the way he was wounded himself in the thigh. Despite the pain, and suffering from loss of blood, he courageously continued and administered aid to the wounded Marine. Another Marine became a casualty and, disregarding his own wounds, Hospitalman Carsanaro went to his assistance. While treating the wounded Marine he was again wounded. Although suffering from two painful wounds, he pulled the wounded Marine to a covered position and submitted to aid himself. By his courageous actions and display of initiative all members of his company were inspired. Hospitalman Carsanaro's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Cartagena, Victor

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 546 - 30 November 1951

Master Sergeant (then Sergeant First Class) Victor Cartagena, RA10401644, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army, On 22 April 1951, Company "E" attacked and captured a hill near Onsu-Dong, Korea; during the engagement which lasted approximately three hours, Sergeant Cartagena constantly exposed himself in order to point out and fire on enemy targets. That night, hostile forces attacked and subjected the platoon command post, held by Sergeant Cartagena and a few others, to severe fire. The enemy, of estimated battalion strength, continued to attack until daylight; and, while a slight withdrawal of friendly troops was necessary, Sergeant Cartagena personally silenced an enemy machine gun, organized defenses at great risk to himself and, with various weapons, inflected such heavy casualties on the enemy that they withdrew leaving a greater part of the objective in friendly hands. The gallantry and superb courage displayed by Sergeant Cartagena reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Carter, Bobby

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Bobby Carter (MCSN: 0-38204), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Command Pilot of a Transport Plane in Headquarters Squadron, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri and Koto-ri, Korea, from 1 to 5 December 1950. Braving a surrounding concentration of enemy troops estimated at seventy thousand, some of whom were entrenched within two hundred yards of the airstrip at Koto-ri, First Lieutenant Carter carried out a series of vital transport missions from extremely small and hastily constructed airstrips. Executing all landings and take-offs in the face of intense hostile small arms fire, he successfully delivered seventeen loads of urgently needed ammunition, medical supplies and food to beleaguered friendly ground troops in the Chosin Reservoir Area. Returning on each occasion with his aircraft dangerously overloaded with the sick and wounded, he carried all casualties safely to a rear area. By his outstanding airmanship, daring initiative and unfaltering devotion to duty throughout, First Lieutenant Carter upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hutchinson, Kansas. Home Town: Springfield, Missouri.

Carter, Francis

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Francis Carter (MCSN: 625682), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 September 1950. Ordered to displace to an alternate location and go out of action when the enemy concentrated their fire on his position, Private First Class Carter seized an automatic rifle and, advancing to an exposed area, directed his fire against the emplacement. With his fire insufficient to achieve effective results, he crawled close to the position and, fearlessly exposing himself to heavy enemy fire, hurled hand grenades to destroy the machine gun and annihilate the crew. By his daring initiative, heroic actions and fortitude at great risk to his own life, Private First Class Carter contributed materially to the success of his company's assigned mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: Gretna, Louisiana.

Carter, Harold L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 65 - 28 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Harold L. Carter (ASN: US-55033986)United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 26th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self-Propelled), 24th Infantry Division, (then a member of the 52d Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self-Propelled), 24th Infantry Division), near Paegyangni, Korea, on 8 November 1951. His unit dispatched a platoon of weapons carriers to give close fire support to infantry elements attacking an enemy held objective. As the platoon was maneuvering into position, it was subjected to an intensely concentrated enemy mortar barrage which disabled two vehicles and forced the others to withdraw temporarily. When informed of the two critical weapons abandoned in enemy territory and the possibility of wounded crewmen still being on or near the vehicles, Corporal Carter volunteered to direct his tank recovery crew in the recovery operations. With calm disregard for murderous sniper and mortar fire bursting about him, he continually exposed himself to direct the maneuvering of the retriever to the first half-track and towed it out of the area. Once this vehicle and the wounded crewman inside were brought to safety, he unhesitatingly returned through the concentrated mortar barrages and small arms fire for the other disabled carrier and towed it out of danger. As a result of his fearlessness, several lives were saved and valuable equipment was prevented from falling into enemy hands. Corporal Carter's courageous action, daring initiative, and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Artillery.  Home Town: Denver, Colorado.

Carter, Harvey R. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Harvey R. Carter, Jr. (MCSN: 668960), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 May 1951. When his squad was subjected to intense hostile fire while advancing upon an enemy position during a combat patrol deep in hostile territory, Sergeant Carter bravely led his men through the devastating machine gun and small arms fire to a point where they could assault the position. Although painfully wounded in the arm and leg by an enemy grenade, he readied his men for the attack, pulled himself to his feet and aggressively opened fire, drawing the attention of the enemy to himself while his squad began the assault. Refusing medical treatment until the objective was secured and his unit properly deployed and reorganized, Sergeant Carter, by his marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Knoxville, Tennessee. Home Town: Knoxville, Tennessee.

Carter, James M. (posthumously)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 60 - 25 July 1950

Private First Class James M. Carter, RA18289360, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950, near Taip-yong-ni, Korea. The enemy succeeded in killing a tank crew of an American tank that had been supporting Company B’s position along the Kum River. After killing the crew the enemy then proceeded to use the tank against the position of Company B. At this time, PFC Carter and two comrades took a 3.5 rocket launcher, while under cross machine gun and rifle fire, carried it 400 yards to a position about 50 yards from the American tank. Even though all these men were wounded when they reached this position they succeeded in knocking out the tank and denying its use to the enemy. PFC Carter retraced his route to bring up some more ammunition for the rocket launcher and on this trip, although wounded three times, he continued until he reached the launcher position with the extra rounds needed to knock out the tank. His heroic example of fearless action and his devotion to duty reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. (Carter was killed in action on this date. See also: PFC Merlin H. Johnson and Walter D. Dusablom, both of whom were also killed in action.) Home or county of record: Hughes, OKlahoma.

Carter, Johnny L.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Johnny L. Carter (MCSN: 0-48440), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Commanding Officer, Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. On that date, his company was given the mission of assaulting Hill 676, then occupied by a well-entrenched enemy force. During the attack, the company was pinned down by intense enemy fire. Disregarding his personal safety, Lieutenant Carter fearlessly charged the hill, urging his men on to the objective. Despite a critical shortage of ammunition and a large number of casualties, the objective was quickly secured. Lieutenant Carter then re-grouped his company and directed their fire in support of the advance of adjacent units. The gallantry, leadership and high devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Carter on this occasion contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission, and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 175 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Georgia.

Carter, Ray N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Ray N. Carter (MCSN: 0-49803), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Tank Platoon Commander of Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. When his antenna bases and periscope vision were knocked out by the intense hostile fire, pinning down his platoon and its accompanying infantry units, Second Lieutenant Carter courageously exposed himself to the heavy small arms, machine gun, mortar and anti-tank fire to contact the infantry commander and ascertain the plan of attack. Returning to his platoon, he made his way from tank to tank, personally directing effective fire on the hostile force and, although painfully wounded while adjusting the fire of one tank, continued his direction and control until the infantry battalion was able to advance. By his daring initiative, inspiring leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Second Lieutenant Carter upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Dove Creek, Colorado. Home Town: Cumberland, Maryland.

Carter, Robert E.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 834 - 8 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal Robert E. Carter, RA17215428, (then Private), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 6 October 1951 in the vicinity of Kongdong, Korea. On this date Company A was in the attack to secure heavily fortified enemy-held positions. During this action, Corporal Carter, a radioman, was assisting with the evacuation of his wounded comrades when the communication chief was wounded. Immediately taking over the communications for the company, he directed its proper function so that all contacts were maintained. Dividing his time between communications and the evacuation of the wounded, Corporal Carter repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy concentrations of hostile fire. His initiative and selfless devotion to duty were un inspiration to his comrades and undoubtedly saved the lives of many of them. The gallantry in action displayed by Corporal Carter on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Caruso, Mathew (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Mathew Caruso (MCSN: 661958), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as assistant to the Chaplain of the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. When the convoy in which he was traveling with the Chaplain was ambushed by a large hostile force employing intense and accurate automatic weapons and small arms fire, Sergeant Caruso quickly pushed his companion to the floor of the ambulance and shielded him from the enemy with his own body. Mortally wounded while protecting the Chaplain, Sergeant Caruso by his outstanding courage, self-sacrificing actions and daring initiative served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Tarrytown, New York. Home Town: Hartford, Connecticut. Death: KIA: December 6, 1950.

Casey, Herbert J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Herbert J. Casey (MCSN: 1223821), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Weapons Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as a Demolitionist in an infantry company, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. Observing that a friendly machine gun crew had been annihilated on an exposed ridgeline during a raid on a well-defended and firmly entrenched enemy force, Private First Class Casey unhesitatingly moved over an area blanketed by intense enemy small arms and mortar fire in company with several other men and succeeded in reaching the fatally stricken crew. Although painfully wounded by hostile sniper fire, he carried one of the casualties and some of the equipment across an exposed rice paddy and, despite additional wounds from enemy fire, refused medical attention to return to the scene of battle and assist in evacuating the wounded. By his courageous initiative, marked fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Private First Class Casey served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Agua Caliente, California.

Casey, James J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 285 - 11 July 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Captain James J. Casey, 0396693, Infantry, Army of the United States, Executive Officer, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in. action on 17 and 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Kunmul-gol, Korea. On the night of 17 May 1951 the enemy succeeded in breaking through the friendly defenses and overran the battalion forward and rear command posts. As a result, the men became disorganized and were unable to fight effectively. Captain Casey, during the hours of darkness, collected and organized stragglers, set up a perimeter defense and directed the recovery of equipment. Without regard tor his own safety, he moved about his men as he led a withdrawal to more favorable positions because of the numerical superiority of the enemy. When supporting tanks arrived, Captain Casey led them on toot, directing their fire and pointing out targets, Although completely exposed to the intense fire of the enemy, he continued to lead the tanks until he himself was wounded. His determined and aggressive actions and calm composure during the rage of battle inspired his men to perform courageously and eventually drive the enemy into retreat with heavy losses. The gallantry displayed by Captain Casey reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Cashion, Dana B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Dana B. Cashion (MCSN: 0-49919), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 November 1950. When a hostile force of estimated battalion strength succeeded in overrunning two platoons and occupied the high ground overlooking the battalion command post, Second Lieutenant Cashion fearlessly exposed himself to heavy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire to lead his platoon in an attack against the right flank of the position while the enemy continued to lay down a barrage against the command post and against friendly supporting weapons from within a distance of fifty yards. Although seriously wounded by a hostile hand grenade, he staunchly refused medical attention and continued to expose himself to enemy fire to move from man to man, shouting orders and words of encouragement and directing and controlling the fire of his unit in the darkness until the attackers were driven from the high ground. Positioning his men to defend against further onslaughts, he continued to risk his own life, refusing to submit to medical attention until the following day when he was assured that the enemy would not launch further attacks against his sector. His forceful leadership, heroic fighting spirit and courageous efforts in the face of heavy odds served as an inspiration to all who observed him, and reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Cashion and the United States Naval Service. Born: San Antonio, Texas. Home Town: Freer, Texas.

Casseday, George F.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 889 - 30 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant George F. Casseday, RA17290986, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 25 December 1951 in the vicinity of Kunbung-myon, Korea. On this date Sergeant Casseday volunteered to lead a squad of men from the anti-tank and mine platoon in an effort to extricate a disabled tank from an enemy mine field. Under his supervision, the squad began the mission of probing for the anti-personnel and tank mines which surrounded the disabled vehicle. From his experience on a similar mission the previous day, Sergeant Casseday skillfully directed the clearing of a path through which a tank retriever could be brought to remove the tank. For hours he worked under a heavy concentration of hostile mortar and small arms fire, inspiring his men by his own dauntless courage. As a result of his efforts, the mine field was cleared and the retriever was able to two the disabled tank back to friendly lines. The gallantry in action and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Casseday on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Casserly, Thomas F. (posthumous)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 610 - 17 November 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Thomas F. Casserly, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as a Flight Leader of three F-51 type aircraft, 51st Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, while engaged in a search mission for a mission B-26 aircraft near the Chinanypo Estuary on 5 April 1952. Flying at low altitude and at a very low airspeed necessitated by the nature of the mission, the three aircraft sustained hits from intense and heavy automatic weapons fire. The number three aircraft was completely disabled and the pilot bailed out. Lieutenant Casserly immediately alerted rescue facilities and began firing passes on various gun positions and enemy troops who were trying to reach the downed pilot. Though his aircraft was hit twice and was not developing full power, and despite heavy ground fire, Lieutenant Casserly continued to press his attacks against the enemy/ Lieutenant Casserly's strafing attacks kept the enemy troops clear of the downed pilot and reduced the heavy ground fire, enabling a helicopter to effect the rescue. By his heroic actions in disregarding his own personal safety to save a fellow pilot from certain capture, Lieutenant Casserly reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Cassube, Robert F.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 12 - 8 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class [then Sergeant] Robert F. Cassube (ASN: RA-16295602), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, near Tak Pau, Korea, on 21 October 1951. During an attack on hostile positions, friendly tanks were halted by an enemy mine field. His squad was assigned the mission of clearing a path through the area. With full knowledge of the extremely hazardous nature of the assignment, he led his men into the minefield, guiding the tanks as he proceeded. The enemy observing the move, subjected the group to concentrated machine gun, mortar and artillery fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Cassube took a completely exposed position where his men could see and hear him and directed them to safety. He then ran 150 yards through the devastating hail of enemy fire to verify good firing positions for the friendly tanks. As a result of his fearless initiative, the armored unit was able to direct effective fire on enemy emplacements, inflicting heavy casualties among the hostile troops, and to continue its support of an infantry advance. Sergeant Cassube's courageous action, indomitable determination and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Corps of Engineers. Home Town: Royal Oak, Michigan.

Castaing, Claude Camille (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Claude Camille Castaing (MCSN: 1053360), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Messenger of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. Stationed at the company command post when it was subjected to a heavy night attack by hostile forces employing automatic weapons, grenades and small arms, Corporal Castaing constantly exposed himself to direct enemy fire and, bravely moving from one position to another to bring more effective fire to bear, personally killed eight of the aggressors and neutralized three machine guns. By his marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty, Corporal Castaing served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the defense of the position, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Huntington Beach, California. Death: KIA: November 3, 1950.

Castle, Ernest Carl

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Ernest Carl Castle (NSN: 0-512965), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Minesweeping Officer on board the U.S.S. Chatterer (AMS-40), during sweeping operations in the Korean Theater on the night of 5 May 1952. When the Chatterer was working close inshore within easy range of Communist guns, an enemy mine became fouled in the ship's port otter. The sea was high and the ship was rolling heavily, posing a grave threat to the safety of ship and crew. With great courage and complete disregard for his own personal safety, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Castle volunteered to clear the fouled mine. Because of the proximity of enemy shore batteries only the most limited amount of light could be provided for the operation. He worked the mine in close to the stern of the ship and found the severed cable entwined in the otter of the sweep gear. Despite the continuing pounding of the mine by the otter which threatened to explode it at any moment, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Castle hung precariously over the stern of the ship by his legs and cleared the mine having to fend it off several times with his hands to prevent it from striking the ship and exploding, thereby averting damages or possible sinking of his ship. His outstanding courage and steadfast devotion to duty was at all times in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 971 (May 16, 1953).

Castleberry, Warren E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Warren E. Castleberry (MCSN: 1190604), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 26 October 1952. Serving as an anti-tank assault Squad Leader, Corporal Castleberry displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty during an enemy attack on the company position. Upon seeing a group of wounded Marines, under direct enemy machine gun fire, he voluntarily led a three-man rescue team to their aid. After advancing through devastating hostile fire to the position, he found it impossible to evacuate the casualties because of the concentrated enemy fire in the area. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he positioned himself in an exposed area to draw the enemy fire and enabled the rescue team to remove the wounded Marines. He remained in his position, delivering rifle fire on the enemy machine gun emplacements, until the casualties had been evacuated. Corporal Castleberry's gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Castro, Charles H.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 562 - 3 October 1951

Private First Class Charles H. Castro, ER38676096, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company F, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 19 August 1951 in the vicinity of Yao-dong, Korea.  On this date, under cover of fog and heavy underbrush, the enemy infiltrated Company F's position.  With grenades the enemy attacked the positions on the forward slope of the hill, driving friendly troops to the reverse side.  Private Castro, immediately picked up a 30-caliber light machine gun, and with a belt of ammunition over his shoulder, moved over the crest of the hill, firing the weapon as he moved under intense enemy grenade and small arms fire, inflicting numerous enemy casualties.  His courageous action dispersed the enemy patrol forcing it to withdraw, and enabled his platoon to move forward in support of the adjoining platoon which was under heavy attack by another enemy force.  The gallantry in action displayed by Private Castro reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Cate, Bradley F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Bradley F. Cate (MCSN: 666646), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 September 1951. Observing a wounded Marine lying approximately thirty yards away, immediately after his unit was relieved of its position, Private First Class Cate rushed from his covered position and, in the face of intense enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire, carried the stricken man to safety. Although painfully wounded by flying shrapnel, he refused medical aid, continued to expose himself to the deadly fire to render first aid to four other wounded men and assisted in their evacuation before allowing himself to receive medical assistance and to be evacuated. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Private First Class Cate served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Mitchel, Nebraska. Home Town: Scottsbluff, Nebraska.

Cater, Walter Bledsoe Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Walter Bledsoe Cater, Jr. (MCSN: 644124), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Seoul, Korea on 24 September 1950. With the remaining members of his gun crew wounded, Private First Class Cater staunchly continued to man his weapon until he was wounded in the face by shrapnel from a hostile grenade which also destroyed his machine gun. Instead of seeking medical aid for his wounds, he obtained another weapon and by his skilled marksmanship, succeeded in silencing the machine gun position from which the enemy had been delivering accurate fire into the company's flank. His courageous initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty were contributing factors in the successful achievement of the company's objective, and reflect great credit upon Private First Class Cater and the United States Naval Service. Born: Plainfield, New Jersey. Home Town: South Plainfield, New Jersey.

Causey, Clay H.

Headquarters 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 562 - 3 October 1951

Master Sergeant Clay H. Causey, RA15234479, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 27 August 1951 in the vicinity of Chin-kogae, Korea.  On this date the outpost positions of F and G Companies were attacked by a numerically superior enemy force.  After repeated assaults, the two units were forced to withdraw with many casualties.  Sergeant Causey reformed the platoon and voluntarily led them to defensive positions under intense enemy small arms fire.  When the enemy attacked the new position, Sergeant Causey, after exhausting his carbine ammunition, manned a machine gun to help drive back the fanatical attack.  Sergeant Causey's outstanding leadership and courage were responsible for the successful defense of the perimeter.  The gallantry and devotion to duty demonstrated by Sergeant Causey reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Cauthen, Joe H.

Headquarters, EUSAK
General Orders No. 186 - April 4, 1951

The Silver Star is presented to Sergeant First Class Joe H. Cauthen, RA17229593 (then Sergeant), Infantry, United States Army.  Sergeant Cauthen, a member of Company E, 187th Airborne Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Wonju, Korea.  On 14 February 1951, Sergeant Cauthen was serving as a squad leader of the 1st Platoon of Company E when his company was given the mission of seizing Hill 255.  This objective had previously been secured by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength.  As the platoon spearheaded the attack and neared the crest of the hill, they encountered intense machine-gun and small-arms fire.  At one point during the attack and when within assault distance of the enemy, a member of the platoon observed an enemy machine-gun position and threw a hand grenade into it.  The enemy gunner instantly grasped the grenade and was attempting to throw it back when Sergeant Cauthen stood erect, heedless of enemy fire, and killed him before he could release the grenade.  Although heavy casualties were inflicted on the enemy, the platoon was forced to withdraw momentarily because of the intensity of enemy fire.  Two additional attempts were made to assault the hill before the platoon overran the enemy positions and engaged them in hand-to-hand combat, securing the objective.  Throughout the attack and during the assault, Sergeant Cauthen displayed outstanding courage and aggressive leadership, personally killing 30 of the enemy and silencing one machine gun.  His actions were a great inspiration to his comrades and reflect high credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the federal service from New Mexico.

Cauthen, Winifred Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 186 - 15 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Winifred Cauthen, Jr. (ASN: RA-18322953), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Hohang-dong, Korea, on 2 September 1950. During the attack, Company K was held up by heavy mortar, machine gun, and small arms fire, from an enemy strong point, and suffered numerous casualties. To hold the ground then occupied, the company was ordered to dig in. Noticing that twelve men, approximately one hundred yards forward of his position, were injured and unable to move, Private Cauthen immediately left his place of comparative safety, rushed to their assistance across open terrain while under continuous enemy fire, and moved them to the safety of whatever cover was available. He then administered first aid to the many wounded soldiers, and assisted in comforting them until their evacuation was possible after night fall. Through his unselfish devotion to duty, although continuously exposed to heavy enemy fire, he saved the lives of twelve of his comrades. His gallant actions were an inspiration to the men with whom he served and reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Ozark, Alabama.  Death: KIA: September 22, 1950 - Buried at: Skipperville Community Cemetery - Skipperville, Alabama.

Cavanaugh, Charles A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Charles A. Cavanaugh, Jr. (MCSN: 527935), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 May 1952. Although severely wounded by a machine gun bullet while leading a combat patrol deep into enemy-held territory, Staff Sergeant Cavanaugh continued to aid his men and offer words of encouragement, steadfastly refusing to leave his position for medical attention until ordered to do so and then insisting on carrying another wounded comrade back to the rear area. After receiving first aid, he again made his way forward to a position where he could cover the withdrawal of his unit. By his outstanding courage, exemplary leadership and gallant devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Cavanaugh served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Portland, Maine. Home Town: Rockland, Maine.

Cavanaugh, James P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James P. Cavanaugh (MCSN: 614347), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner in a Light Machine Gun Section of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 and 7 December 1950. During twenty-two hours of continuous action in sub-zero temperatures while his company was moving from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri, Private First Class Cavanaugh frequently exposed himself to intense hostile fire to deliver his own accurate fire on the enemy. Although painfully wounded while supporting his company's assault against a well-entrenched enemy force blocking their movement he steadfastly remained at his gun, firing continually until they had achieved their objective. By his aggressive determination, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy enemy opposition, Private First Class Cavanaugh upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Waterloo, Iowa. Home Town: Woorhies, Iowa.

Cavazos, Richard E.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 194 - 22 June 1953

First Lieutenant Richard E. Cavazos, 064593, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 25 February 1953, Company "E", of which Lieutenant Cavazos was a platoon leader, was attacked by a large enemy force in the vicinity of Sangdong-Ni, Korea. The friendly company repulsed the hostile assault and inflicted numerous casualties. By the light of a flare, Lieutenant Cavazos observed an enemy soldier lying wounded not far to the front of his position. He requested and obtained permission to lead a small force to secure the prisoner. Intense enemy mortar and small arms fire completely blanketed the route to be covered. Nevertheless, Lieutenant Cavazos, with complete disregard for his personal safety, continued alone through the enemy fire to capture and return with the enemy soldier. Lieutenant Cavazos' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Texas.

Cave, Edmund H.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 355 - 14 August 1951

First Lieutenant Edmund H. Cave, 059411, Infantry, Heavy Mortar Company, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 26 April 1951, near Yungam-ni, Korea, a large enemy force powerfully attacked and penetrated the western portion of Lieutenant Cave's company's perimeter. Heedless of the severe hostile fire, Lieutenant Cavr skillfully reorganized the defense line into a tight resisting force which succeeded in beating off all further enemy attacks. When the ammunition began to run low, Lieutenant Cave, disregarding the danger to his own safety, worked his way through the hostile fusillade to an ammunition truck located in temporarily held enemy territory and returned to his own lines. Not only once but twice did Lieutenant Cave perform this daring action, thus keeping his troops supplied with vital ammunition. The gallant devotion to duty exhibited by Lieutenant CAVE reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Cave, Thomas F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Major Thomas F. Cave, Jr. (MCSN: 0-8290), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer, First Artillery Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Konmi-chi, Korea on 12 June 1951. When his battalion was given the mission of direct support of advancing infantry units, Major Cave, without regard for his personal safety, exposed himself to direct enemy fire while reconnoitering the area of advance, in order to determine the best possible artillery positions. He then moved his batteries into position, directing extensive counter-fire on the enemy. This fire was so effective that a large number of the enemy was destroyed and the remainder forced to withdraw in disorder. The gallantry, leadership and high devotion to duty displayed by Major Cave on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered Service From California.

Challacombe, Arthur D. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Arthur D. Challacombe, Jr. (MCSN: 0-23107), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Artillery Officer of Battery K, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 and 2 December 1950. Assigned the mission of establishing a rear guard at Yudam-ni after taking command of a hastily formed provisional infantry company consisting of artillerymen, Captain Challacombe quickly reconnoitered over enemy terrain where friendly forces were in contact with the enemy, and returned to guide his company to the perimeter, personally directing the emplacement of his automatic weapons to protect the front of an adjacent company which was depleted by casualties and was without adequate automatic fire power. When his company and the adjacent unit came under heavy attack during the night by an enemy force employing hand grenades and small arms fire at close range, he moved among his troops to lend them words of encouragement, personally directed their fire and kept them moving to prevent frostbite in the sub-zero weather. With the hostile force launching a fanatic all-out charge as morning approached, he placed his weapons in effective positions, skillfully directed the fire of his men and succeeded in disrupting the attack and in pursuing the opposition in a counterattack, accounting for n estimated 300 enemy dead. By his inspiring leadership, sound tactical ability and aggressive fighting spirit, Captain Challacombe upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Campagney, Cuba. Home Town: Everett, Washington.

Chaloupke, PFC Frank J.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 364 - August 28, 1953

Private First Class (then Private) Frank J. Chaloupke, US52177582, Army Medical Service, Medical Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 10 June 1953, Private Chaloupke accompanied Company "F" in its attack on the enemy held Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. When Private Chaloupke found that two wounded men from his platoon lay near the mouth of an enemy cave, unhesitatingly and without regard for his personal safety, he attempted to go to their aid. As he approached the enemy cave, he was subjected to intense sniper fire. Refusing to take cover, Private Chaloupke and another comrade who was nearby, went to the position of the wounded men and proceeded to drag them down the hill to safety while constantly vulnerable to intense enemy sniper and mortar fire. On their journey down the slope of the hill, Private Chaloupke came across another wounded man whose wounds demanded immediate attention. While his comrade went in search of litter bearers, he elected to remain with the newly found casualty and administered medical aid to him in the midst of intense enemy shell fire. He then carried the wounded man down the hill to safety after the other two wounded men had been successfully evacuated. Private Chaloupke's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Ohio.

Chalupa, Eldon J.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 300 - October 06, 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal Eldon J. Chalupa, (the Private First Class) Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Headquarters and Service company, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, who is cited for gallantry in action against the enemy on 23 August 1951 near Chimpa-ri, Korea. Corporal Chalupa, operator of a D-8 dozer, accompanied other members of a recovery force on a mission to recover damaged vehicles from enemy territory. As the party advanced over muddy fields and washed out roads, it was subjected to hostile artillery and mortar fire. In spite of the extreme danger, Corporal Chalupa continued to operate his unarmored dozer, freeing mired tanks and other vehicles and cutting new roads when necessary. Thie courageous deed inspired his comrades to greater efforts and contributed materially to the recovery of the vital equipment. Corporal Chalupa’s gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Nebraska.

Chamberlain, Smith Barton (1st citation)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 214 - 22 June 1951

First Lieutenant Smith B. Chamberlain, 027587, Infantry, Company "F', 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 31 March 1951, near Choksong-myon, Korea, Lieutenant Chamberlain, well in advance of his platoon, was leading the unit in an attack on Hill 398. When the platoon came under heavy enemy mortar fire, he returned through the shelled area and brought his men forward. Reaching a wall-like cliff, the unit was forced to take cover as the enemy hurled down grenades; but Lieutenant Chamberlain, followed by only two enlisted men, aggressively climbed in the direction from which the grenades were falling and engaged the enemy. On the arrival of one squad, Lieutenant Chamberlain gallantly initiated an attack but was repulsed by the intense hostile fire. Observing another platoon flanking the enemy, he held his position and maintained a base of fire which materially aided the assaulting unit to close with and route the enemy. Lieutenant Chamberlain's gallantry and courage were an inspiration to his men and reflect great credit upon himself and and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Chamberlain, Smith Barton (2nd citation)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 429 - 21 September 1951

First Lieutenant Smith B. Chamberlain, 027587, Infantry. Company "E", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 23 April 1951, near Onsu-dong, Korea, the Third Platoon was occupying a defensive position on Hill 150 when furiously attacked by an enemy force of battalion strength. Lieutenant Chamberlain, platoon leader, observing that his recoilless rifle positions were being overrun, raced 400 yards to reorganize that part of his platoon. Upon returning to the command post, he was cut off by hostile troops; undaunted, Lieutenant Chamberlain charged through the enemy soldiers killing five with grenades and accurate fire from his weapon. Immediately informing the company commander of the situation, he was advised to withdraw 600 yards to Hill 147. Lieutenant Chamberlain, realizing that such an action would expose the left flank of Company "F", ordered a slight displacement to the highest point of Hill 150 where, spurred by his inspirational leadership, the platoon repulsed the fanatical attacks and held the strategic hill. Lieutenant Chamberlain's gallantry, courage, and outstanding tactical skill reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Chambliss, Denver Isaah (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Denver Isaah Chambliss (MCSN: 891944), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Machine Gun Squad of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 June 1951. When his machine gun was rendered inoperative and several members of his squad were wounded during the initial stages of a night attack by a large enemy force, Sergeant Chambliss boldly exposed himself to withering hostile automatic weapons fire to reorganize his unit and, skillfully employing the small arms weapons at his disposal, succeeded in gaining fire superiority over the attackers before directing the evacuation of the casualties. Although seriously wounded by the enemy while returning to his squad after personally carrying a stricken Marine to safety, he bravely continued to move forward toward his men until he was hit a second time and mortally wounded. By his courageous leadership, fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Sergeant Chambliss served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Joelton, Tennessee. Home Town: Nashville, Tennessee. Death: KIA: June 3, 1951.

Chandler, Richard Edwin

Captain Richard E. Chandler, A0720787, United States Air Force, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as a pilot, 13th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, Photo Jet, on 23 June 1952.  On that date, Captain Chandler flew an RF-86 aircraft, with an escort of F-86 aircraft, deep into enemy-held territory on a vital photographic reconnaissance mission.  As the nature of his target precluded the possibility of protective cover from his escort, Captain chandler was forced to penetrate through to the target alone.  He made repeated low-level photographic runs on his objective, diving each time into a hail of small arms and heavy weapons fire.  Only through skillful employment of evasive tactics was he able to avoid damage to his aircraft.  Successfully eluding jet aircraft sent aloft to intercept him, Captain Chandler rejoined his escort and led the flight safely home.  The photographic intelligence Captain Chandler acquired on this mission proved invaluable to the United Nations in determining enemy capabilities and intentions.  Through his keen flying ability, high personal courage and devotion to duty, Captain Chandler upheld the highest traditions of the military service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Chandler, Woodrow W.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 285 - 23 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Woodrow W. Chandler (ASNL 0-2017009), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company L, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near I-Bang-Nayo, Korea, on 16 August 19509. His company was occupying defensive positions along the Naktong River. Receiving a report that four boat loads of the enemy were crossing the river he advanced with a machine gun to a position from which he poured a hail of deadly fire on the advancing enemy. Through his intense sustained fire he killed many and the remainder fled in disorder. Observing another group of boats leaving the far shore he sent his men to the rear for ammunition and advanced still further, through intense enemy fire, to a vantage point where he again fired with devastating effect inflicting many casualties and causing the remainder to withdraw in confusion. Lieutenant Chandler's courageous actions and devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Tonkawa, Oklahoma.

Chapman, Herschel E.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 527 - 19 September 1951

The Bronze Star Medal with V Device is awarded to First Lieutenant Herschel E. Chapman, 062471, (then Second Lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 17 and 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Hangye, Korea. On that date he was assistant operations officer with an infantry regiment engaged in a defensive operation against a fanatically determined and numerically superior enemy. Although enemy artillery fire was falling in his immediate vicinity, Lieutenant Chapman, with calm and confident attitude, remained at his post maintaining the necessary communications with front line elements and higher headquarters. During this time the operations tent was shredded by shrapnel and the clothes of Lieutenant Chapman were torn by flying metal, but he ably directed and coordinated the activities of his section efficiently. The gallant conduct displayed by Lieutenant Chapman on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Chapman, James R. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James R. Chapman, Jr. (MCSN: 1045444), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Combat Patrol Leader of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 - 15 January 1953. When his patrol leader fell mortally wounded by a sudden hail of hostile small arms and grenade fire during an action well forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Chapman, although painfully wounded himself, unhesitatingly reorganized the patrol and set up effective covering fire for the removal of the other wounded Marines to sheltered positions. After the casualties were removed to areas of comparative safety, he bravely crawled forward under the devastating hostile fire within ten yards of the enemy's fortified position in an attempt to recover his leader. While still exposed to hostile fire, he returned to the position of his wounded comrades and steadfastly refused to be evacuated until his men had received medical aid. After his own wounds were treated at the aid station, he again returned to the platoon's position. By his courageous leadership, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Sergeant Chapman contributed materially to the success of the patrol's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Llano, Texas. Home Town: Corpus Christi, Texas.

Chapman, James Virgil (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal James Virgil Chapman (MCSN: 579911), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Leader of a Rifle Squad of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. As leader of the point squad during his company's assault from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri, Corporal Chapman bravely led his squad within the vicinity of the first objective when the enemy suddenly opened fire with small arms and automatic weapons from a well-camouflaged entrenchment. Unable to ascertain the location of the position, he boldly moved forward alone, without cover or concealment, in an effort to draw the fire to himself and, as he approached his objective, was fatally struck down by hostile fire. His courageous leadership, initiative and grave concern for others at great personal risk served to inspire others to heroic endeavor in locating and neutralizing the enemy position, and his resolute devotion to duty reflects the highest credit upon Corporal Chapman and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Vanderburg County, Indiana. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan. Death: KIA: December 6, 1950.

Chapman, Robert P.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 130 - June 2, 1951

First Lieutenant Robert P. Chapman, 0975601, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company F, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 2 March 1951 in the vicinity of Tokkosan, Korea.  Company F was assaulting a hill which was defeated by a stubborn and well-entrenched enemy force.  Lieutenant Chapman's platoon was to close with the enemy and secure the position.  During this action his platoon was subjected to devastating machine gun and small arms fire on both flanks.  Casualties sustained during this assault, and the loss of several of his subordinates, temporarily disrupted the attack.  Though seriously wounded, Lieutenant Chapman rallied his platoon to continue its attack forward until within range of enemy hand grenades and machine guns.  The platoon was ordered to withdraw and the enemy position was secured by remaining elements of Company F.  The gallant conduct and inspiring leadership displayed by Lieutenant Chapman reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New York.

Chappell, Walter T.

Sergeant First Class Walter T. Chappell, RA16019977, Artillery, United States Army, while a member of Battery A, 15th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled)distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sagu-ri, Korea, on 17 November 1950. On this date, Sergeant Chappell was in charge of an automatic weapons section attached to Company B, 17th Infantry, for close ground support. At approximately 0950 hours the column came under heavy enemy fire from well hidden automatic weapons and small arms positions. An infantry soldier about one hundred yards to the right of Sergeant Chappell's M-19 was wounded. As the wounded man started crawling towards the road, he received heavy enemy sniper fire. With complete disregard far his own personal safety, Sergeant Chappell instantly leaped from his vehicle and ran to the assistance of the wounded man and with the help of a comrade carried him through the heavy enemy fire to safety behind the M-19. This action undoubtedly saved the life of the wounded soldier. Sergeant Chappell's display of gallantry an this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service, Entered the military service from the State of Illinois.

Charles, Dean Donald (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Dean Donald Charles (MCSN: 1083016), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces south of Yudam-ni, Korea on 1 December 1950. When intense hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire halted his platoon en route to assault an enemy ridge, Corporal Charles deployed his men in advantageous positions from which he directed accurate fire and, braving the intense hostile barrage, called a light machine gun forward and spotted its fire on the enemy. Undaunted by the personal risk involved, he moved fearlessly from man to man encouraging each and directing their fire. Unable to hold his position when the enemy threatened to encircle the platoon, he boldly remained behind to cover the rear guard while the platoon withdrew to new locations. While making a final check to make certain that all the wounded had been moved to safety, he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. His inspiring leadership, unselfish initiative and heroic efforts were contributing factors in the successful withdrawal of his platoon and reflect great credit upon Corporal Charles and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Central City, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Oakdale, Pennsylvania.

Charles, J.D.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 97 - 17 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal J. D. Charles (ASN: RA-20816427), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Battery A, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 20 July 1950, near Taejon, Korea. Corporal Charles unit while supporting the 34th Infantry Regiment became completely surrounded by the enemy. The battery position was taken under heavy enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire which made it necessary for him to seek a place of shelter. After reaching a place of safety behind a building, he heard the moan of a wounded soldier. With complete disregard for his own safety and under heavy automatic weapons fire, Corporal Charles ran about seventy five yards to where the wounded soldier was lying. Upon seeing that he could not be moved without a stretcher he returned to the building and tore off a door, and returned. After putting the wounded man on the make-shift stretcher, he dragged him back to the shelter of the building and had him removed to the aid station. The act of gallantry displayed by Corporal Charles reflects high credit on himself and the military service. Entered Service From Texas

Chartrand, Joseph R.A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Joseph R. A. Chartrand (MCSN: 574535), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. With his squad forced to withdraw to higher ground when a fanatical enemy of estimated battalion strength assaulted his company positions, Private First Class Chartrand, believing his fire team positions to be tenable, received permission to remain in his sector across a small snow and ice covered draw. Observing leading elements of an enemy force advancing toward his position during the early hours of darkness, he fearlessly exposed himself to short-range enemy fire to run to his platoon commander's position and give warning of the approach. Returning to his own position, he skillfully held the fire of his team until a large group came to within twenty feet and, launching a bold surprise attack, controlled and directed the firing of his team in killing more than fifty enemy soldiers and in routing the remainder. Tenaciously holding his position by using hand grenades when his ammunition was expended, Private First Class Chartrand, by his daring initiative, determined fighting spirit and daring aggressiveness, was directly instrumental in preventing an enemy penetration, and his inspiring devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lewiston, Maine. Home Town: Lewiston, Maine.

Chase, Byron Harold (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Byron Harold Chase (MCSN: 0-54329), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 August 1952. When a patrol operating well in advance of friendly lines was subjected to intense and accurate hostile mortar fire and suffered heavy casualties, Second Lieutenant Chase unhesitatingly left his position on the main line of resistance and advanced to assist the stricken patrol. Although under direct observation and constantly menaced by enemy small arms, artillery and machine gun fire, he repeatedly crossed the fire-swept area to aid in evacuating the casualties, continuing this hazardous undertaking until he fell from exhaustion. By his outstanding courage, aggressive determination and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Second Lieutenant Chase served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Death: KIA: August 10, 1952.

Chase, Fred

Citation not yet found.

"Cpl. Fred Chase of Ironton is enjoying a 30-day furlough at the home of his mother, Mrs. Frank Chase.  Cpl. Chase suffered multiple wounds while fighting in Korea and has been hospitalized for several months, first in Japan and the last two months in this country.  Cpl. Chase was awarded the Silver Star for bravery in action when he destroyed an enemy machine gun nest single-handed while fighting with the Second Division in Korea last winter." - Brainerd Daily Dispatch (MN) - 29 October 1951

Chase, Levi R.

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Levi R. Chase, Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as Commanding Officer, 8th Fighter Bomber Group, on 11 July 1952. Knowing that the defense of the target area consisted of fifty-two heavy guns, sixteen of which were radar controlled, sixteen four-gun batteries of automatic weapons and an undetermined amount of intense small arms fire, Colonel Chase led the 8th Fighter bomber Group on three highly successful missions into this heavily defended area at Pyongyang, Korea. Colonel Chase so effectively planned the attack and employed evasive tactics that he led one hundred and eighty-one effective combat sorties through the intense enemy barrage without major damage or the loss of a single aircraft. This series of devastating attacks completely destroyed a vital communications and ordnance manufacturing plant, and inflicted major damage on a roundhouse and a locomotive repair plant. Through his outstanding courage, leadership, and professional skill, Colonel Chase was instrumental in reducing the war potential of the enemy, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Chavez, Celestino

Corporal Celestino Chavez, while a member of Battery D, 15th AAA AW Battalion (SP), displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy near the Chosin Reservoir in Korea, on 30 November 1950. On this date, his M-19 twin 40mm gun carriage was defending a portion of a perimeter when the enemy began a "banzai" charge against the position shortly before 0300 hours. Corporal Chavez was struck and seriously wounded during this attack, but he refused to be evacuated to the aid station because there was no other man available to replace him. He stayed at his post voluntarily and despite his wound kept the weapon firing. When the enemy attack had been broken up by accurate and intense fire of the M-19, Corporal Chavez, weakened by loss of blood, collapsed unconscious and fell from the M-19 to the ground. He was then given medical attention and evacuated to the aid station. As a result of his heroic actions the M-19 was kept in action, the "banzai" charge was broken up, and the perimeter was kept intact at that point. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Chavez on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New Mexico.

Cheek, Robert V. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 45th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 8 - 12 February 1952

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918 ( WD Bul 43, 1918 ), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded posthumously to the following enlisted man:

Private Robert V. Cheek, US53058215, Infantry, United States Army, Company E, 180th Infantry, 45th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Sungyangi-ni, Korea. On 12 January 1952 Company E received intense enemy mortar, machine gun, and small arms fire as it assaulted violently defended Communist hill positions. Under the severe enemy fire the attack faltered, until Private Cheek, point man of the first platoon, reached the crest of the hill and single-handedly rushed the Chinese positions, intermittently blasting with his rifle and hurling grenades into their bunkers. Maintaining his assault in the face of withering fire and kicking enemy grenades aside with his feet, Private Cheek continued his one-man attack until he was finally felled by machine gun fire at the very brink of the enemy trenches. The valiant and determined charge made by Private Cheek was inspirational to his fellow soldiers and paved the way for a vigorous continuation of the attack. Private Cheek's gallant and devoted actions reflect the highest credit on himself and perpetuate the great traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Georgia.

Chegay, George (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class George Chegay (MCSN: 1320107), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company H, 3d Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 July 1953. With his company defending a vital portion of the main line of resistance while subjected to constant enemy small-arms, mortar and artillery fire, Private First Class Chegay continuously exposed himself to the murderous barrage in order to fire on hostile troops forward of his position, accounting for one enemy dead and the probable wounding of two others. Despite the increasing intensity of the enemy mortar and artillery fire, he remained in his position during the approaching hours of darkness to observe enemy activity to his front and, when the leading wave of enemy infantry charged the position, immediately proceeded to deliver intense and accurate fire, thereby warning the remainder of his company of the proximity of the hostile troops. Although his weapon was damaged by a nearby exploding enemy shell, he picked up an abandoned rifle and fearlessly moved into the trench line to engage several of the enemy who had entered the friendly position. Mortally wounded when the immediate area was shattered by an enemy mortar barrage, Private First Class Chegay, by his intrepid fighting spirit, courageous initiative and resolute determination in the face of heavy odds, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions f the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 22, 1933 at Cibeque, Arizona. Home Town: Carrizo, Arizona. Death: KIA: July 26, 1953.

Cheppa, Michael

It's been nearly 56 years since Cpl. Michael Cheppa was killed in action in Korea and his family in Centralia received a box from the Army with his clothes. Missing from the box were the many medals the decorated World War II and Korean War soldier had received. That omission will be remedied when his brother, John, the youngest and last surviving of seven siblings, receives replacement medals. Among the medals to be presented are the Bronze Star, the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Army of Occupation Medal with Germany Clasp and the Parachutist Medal for World War II service, and the Korean War Service Medal. Michael Cheppa was killed on November 30, 1950, at age 27 near Kunu-Ri, Korea. The family heard Michael "saved his entire platoon" during an ambush by Chinese soldiers, John Cheppa said. "He took a jeep with a heavy motor and destroyed the machine gun nest." On August 7, 1951, his mother, Anastasia Cheppa, received Michael's Silver Star, awarded posthumously for gallantry in action. A newspaper account at the time said Cheppa "was killed in Korea while single-handedly breaking up a roadblock under enemy fire that had tied up his outfit." John Cheppa has the Silver Star, along with the two Purple Hearts his brother also earned in Korea. - pennlive.com 16 Sep 06

Childers, Junior Albert

First Lieutenant Junior Albert Childers, O2005493, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on the 10th and 11th July 1950 near Chonue, Korea. Lieutenant Childers was ordered to make a counter-attack on enemy positions. The route of the attack was under heavy enemy artillery, automatic weapons and tank fire. After driving the enemy from their positions and the company had consolidated their positions, he was again ordered to return to their former positions. On returning to their former positions, the company was taken under heavy fire from enemy automatic weapons and tank fire and was unable to make it back. From 2400 to 0430 hours on 11 July 1950 the enemy kept attacking the Company’s positions causing heavy casualties. Through his cool and calm leadership, Lieutenant Childers was able to keep his men together and encourage them to continue fighting. After some of the enemy tanks and troops had penetrated the company’s positions, the Battalion Commander ordered all available weapons and men to cover the withdrawal of Company K. The act of gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Childers reflects the highest credit in himself and the military service. GO 79, 8 Aug 1950. Entered service from San Jose, CA.

Childress, John Leumas (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant (Armor) John Leumas Childress (ASN: 0-2003441), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Tank Company, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 26 June 1952, near Tumyong-dong, Korea. Lieutenant Childress, a tank platoon leader, was supervising tank support for Allied infantrymen who were assaulting Hill 183. Splitting his command into two sections, Lieutenant Childress deployed two of the vehicles in a covering position and led the remaining two tanks in an advance on the hill. As they moved up the steep slope in direct support of the advancing infantrymen, enemy mortar and artillery fire became so intense that the friendly riflemen were forced to seek cover. Undaunted, Lieutenant Childress led his vehicles through enemy emplacements to the very crest of the hill. During the entire assault. The commander's hatch was left open to provide Lieutenant Childress with direct observation of the battle. Suddenly enemy forces converged on the infantry position. Realizing that his machine gun might be instrumental in routing the enemy, the unhesitatingly exposed himself to the violent fire and sprayed the Chinese hordes with lethal fire. Lieutenant Childress was subsequently mortally wounded by sniper fire, but only after he had inflicted many casualties on the attackers, and his accurate fire had enabled his comrades to withstand the assault. The gallantry and courageous leadership displayed by Lieutenant Childress reflect the greatest credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.

Childs, George W.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 27 - 30 January 1951

Lieutenant Colonel George W. Childs, 020294, Infantry, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the period 5 - 11 December 1950 in the vicinity of Sudong, Korea, Colonel Childs organized and commanded a task force to assist in covering the withdrawal of the First United States Marine Division. Throughout the five difficult and critical days that the task force was under hostile fire, Colonel Childs with utter disregard for his own personal safety was always exposing himself to enemy fire in order to check fields of fire and direct gun positions. His tactical skill, conspicuous bravery, and tireless energy stimulated morale and contributed greatly to the successful evacuation of the entrapped allied forces and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Nebraska.

Chin, Gum Shoon

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Gum Shoon Chin, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action at Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 29 November 1950. At approximately 0300, on 29 November 1950, Private First Class Chin and his squad composed a part of the front lines of a perimeter defense during a fierce attack by a strong enemy force. One of the squad's two machine guns became inoperative, and because of a knoll, the remaining gun's fire was masked to its left flank. The riflemen who had been covering that flank were temporarily forced to withdraw, leaving the flank exposed to the enemy attacking from that direction. Realizing the vulnerability of the gun's position, Private First Class Chin voluntarily and unhesitatingly obtained an automatic rifle from a wounded Marine, for added fire power, and he fearlessly advanced under heavy enemy fire to a firing position on the knoll. He then commenced firing, reloading from belted machine gun ammunition. During this action, which continued until dawn, Private First Class Chin constantly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire without regard for his own personal safety. He inflicted numerous casualties upon the enemy, and his high degree of skill and aggressiveness successfully prevented the enemy from assaulting the machinegun's position through that vulnerable sector in spite of the enemy's repeated efforts to do so. Private First Class Chin's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kwantung, China. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio.

Chloupek, Laurence E.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 347 - 17 August 1953

Lieutenant Colonel Laurence E. Chloupek, 044094, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June 1953, in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, Company "E" made an assault on enemy held Hill "412". Colonel Chloupek had been directing the progress of the mission and controlling supporting fires by means of radio communications from an advantageous position in the command post on the main line of resistance. When increasing enemy fire disrupted communications, Colonel Chloupek made his way to the safe lane and forward of the main line where he came upon returning casualties. While under continuous and intense shelling by enemy mortar and artillery, he organized litter teams and directed the work while personally evacuating several of the more seriously wounded. Displaying an outstanding command ability in an area raked by fire, he effectively directed the resupply of ammunition to attacking troops on Hill "412". In the course of the action, Colonel Chloupek was wounded, but continued his actions until the assault element again returned to the safety of friendly lines. Colonel Chloupek's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Minnesota.

Christensen, Jack W. (posthumous)

Citation not yet found.

"Pfc. Jack W. Christensen of Sidney, Montana, a member of the 35th Infantry regiment, rmained in his foxhole directing fire and throwing hand grenades after his company was overrun and his position isolated.  The citation accompanying his medal award added: 'Although wounded and finally surrounded by the enemy, he continued the fight until he was killed.  His gallant and heroic action inspired his fellow soldiers to greater effort.'" - Morning Avalanche, September 12, 1950

Christensen, William R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William R. Christensen (MCSN: 1156208), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 November 1951. When two reinforced squads were engaged in a raid against a well-fortified enemy position, Private First Class Christensen skillfully led his fire team as the point of the raiding party. Although painfully wounded by an exploding enemy grenade and blown down a steep slope, he quickly arose and rejoined the assault which had been temporarily halted by fierce hostile resistance. During the final charge which overran the enemy position, Private First Class Christensen, one of the leaders, personally killed at least five of the enemy in the furious fighting which accompanied this action. Repeatedly refusing medical aid for himself, he aided in carrying those more seriously wounded to friendly lines in the face of intense hostile mortar fire. By his marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and resolute determination, Private First Class Christensen contributed materially to the success of the mission and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Racine, Wisconsin.

Chue, Kenneth

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Second Class Kenneth Chue, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 28 May 1952. Hospital Corpsman Second Class Chue displayed outstanding bravery and skill under enemy fire. When the company was engaged in the attack of a strongly defended enemy hill, he exposed himself to intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire to treat the wounded. When the other Corpsman was killed by a mine, Hospital Corpsman Second Class Chue successfully administered to the casualties and rallied the walking wounded to aid in the evacuation of the more seriously wounded. When the position had been taken, the company was subjected to intense enemy mortar and artillery fire, sustaining many more casualties. Unhesitatingly and without regard for his personal safety, he continually exposed himself to treat casualties until he was severely wounded in the hand. He calmly directed a comrade to bandage the shattered hand and administer morphine, then again proceeded to give medical assistance until the last of the wounded had been evacuated. At the aid station he went from man to man, giving them encouragement and aiding the doctors and other medical personnel, refusing treatment for himself until all others had been cared for. Hospital Corpsman Second Class Chue's courage and devotion to duty were directly responsible for the saving of many lives and were an inspiration to all who observed him. His courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Church, John Huston

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea
General Orders No. 97 - 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major General John Huston Church, United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding General, 24th Infantry Division, during the Naktong River crossing 19 September 1950. General Church with utter disregard for his own life, went to the Naktong crossing site encouraging his men and reorganizing them to speed the operation. His personal direction immeasurably aided the successful crossing and set an inspiring example to his men, encouraging them to greater effort. Born: Gleniron, Pennsylvania. Home Town: New York, New York.

Churchich, James L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James L. Churchich (MCSN: 1064088), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1951. Boldly leading his team on a daring patrol raid into the enemy's defensive line in order to knock out a strategic hostile position, Private First Class Churchich crawled stealthily into the position and, spearheading a swift and sudden assault, delivered deadly rifle and grenade fire against the hostile troops, who were caught completely off guard. By the ferocity and impact of his attack, he was largely responsible for the success of the team in killing or capturing all enemy troops within the sector. His cool courage, inspiring leadership and unflagging devotion to duty under intense hostile fire reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Churchich and the United States Naval Service. Born: Alton, Illinois. Home Town: Alton, Illinois.

Ciampa, Angelo P.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Technical Sergeant Angelo P. Ciampa (MCSN: 298162), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Sangnyong-ni, Korea, on 7 August 1950. On this date, Sergeant Ciampa was Chief Cook of the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), which was attacking enemy defensive positions two thousand yards northeast of Sangnyong-ni. When Sergeant Ciampa saw that his unit was suffering heavy casualties he, on his own initiative, organized the Battalion cooks into stretcher bearing parties and personally led many parties across the rugged fire-swept terrain to evacuate wounded. At one time when his party was pinned down by enemy fire he moved through this fire to obtain assistance and returning with one man covered the successful withdrawal of the party with casualties. Sergeant Ciampa's heroic actions permitted the evacuation of many wounded men. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Ciampa reflects great credit on himself and the Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 151 (November 1, 1950). Entered Service From Massachusetts.

Cirino-Rivera, PFC Arthur D. (KIA)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 113 - 23 April 1951

Private First Class Arthur D. Cirino-Rivera, RA29188854, Infantry, Company "I". 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 4 February 1951, near Chomchon, Korea, Private Cirino-Rivera was the radio operator attached to a platoon that was advancing under heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire. The platoon was charging over a small hill, raked by enemy fire. Private Cirino-Rivera saw that several of the men were reluctant to move through the incessant enemy barrage. He rushed forward, shouting for the others to follow. His example inspired the rest of the platoon and they followed him over the crest of the hill and toward the enemy positions. Private Cirino-Rivera was cut down by a full burst of machine gun fire. Private Cirino-Rivera's display of courage, determination, and complete disregard for his personal safety inspired his comrades and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Citino, Julius W.

Sworn Statement by David R. Hughes
1st Lt., Co. K, 7th Cav Regt., Commanding
Re: Silver Star Award to Pvt. 1C (then Private) Julius W. Citino, Jr., US 52035383
For Gallantry in Action near Lyanjo, Korea 27-28 September [sic] 1951
Awarded 11 August 1954

Having appeared before me, a person duly authorized to administer oaths, the undersigned, after being duly sworn to and informed of his rights under Article 31, deposes and says the following:

"I, Lt. David R. Hughes, Commanding Company K, was witness to the extraordinary heroism of PFC JULIUS W. CITINO on the night of 28 October [sic] 1951.  At about 0100 hours K Company came under the intense determined attack of a battalion of CCF attempting to seize the peak of Hill 339.  The fierceness of the attack overran both flanks of the company and threatened to take the top off the hill.  While confusion reigned on the left flank, and after both machine guns were silenced by the enemy, the disorganized platoon withdrew over the top of the hill.  The enemy immediately re-formed and began to assault the top of the hill.

I yelled for a man to come to me and Pfc. CITINO, a radio operator, new to the company, came forward.  I directed him to get the spare heavy machine gun in action, not realizing that he knew nothing of the operation of the water cooled weapon.  Without further orders, Pfc. CITINO picked up the weapon and tripod and a box of ammunition and rushed through the withdrawing platoon into the face of the enemy assault fire and set up the gun on the open ground opposing their attack, beyond the furthest friendly troops.  He put the gun in action and fired into the attack which was then within grenade range.  The enemy directed all their fire at the flash of his weapon and began grenading him from three sides.  Pfc. CITINO sat full upright to bring more effective fire on the enemy and dispersed their attack.

The enemy company behind the lead element set up a mortar about one hundred yards away from the machine gun and tried to knock it out.  Pfc. CITINO, however, disregarded the fire and calmly put the water hose on the overheated weapon.  He then called for more ammunition and prepared to hold again.  The enemy set up a machine gun in front of him and directed an intense volume of fire at Pfc. CITINO, who at this time manned the only weapon stopping the enemy assaults.  The enemy then attacked with fifty or sixty men in a mass attack.  Pfc. CITINO, unassisted, and with great heroism, disregarded the blistering fire and sprayed his weapon right and left, killing the enemy.  When the mortar bursts came very close he directed the fire at the sparks of the mortar and destroyed the weapon, until he discovered that the water can had been perforated and the gun was overheating.

He stopped firing and threw grenades at the assaulting troops, fired a long burst at the enemy and ran around looking for water.  He came upon a can full of coffee and used it on the weapon for forty more minutes until the enemy attack receded and I organized the men around his position.  Pfc. CITINO remained at the gun until daylight when the enemy withdrew from Hill 339.  Light disclosed that Pfc. CITINO's weapon and watercans and personal clothing had each been hit several times, although he had only been scratched.  In front of his gun, forty-five enemy lay dead within fifty yards in a semicircle around his position.

Pfc. CITINO's great personal heroism and disregard for his own life saved Hill 339 from being taken by the enemy, and saved twelve seriously wounded on top from being captured by the enemy, had he left his gun.

Further deponeth sayeth not."

Clark, A.C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class "A" "C" Clark (MCSN: 1221465), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 December 1952. When the combat patrol was subjected to intense enemy fire and two of his comrades were seriously wounded, Private First Class Clark fearlessly advanced forward of the casualties and brought devastating fire to bear upon the enemy, thereby enabling several other Marines to remove the wounded men to safety. Continuing his attack, he silenced one hostile machine gun with the fire of his automatic rifle and killed three enemy soldiers. Although twice wounded during the action, and suffering extreme pain, he refused evacuation and assisted in evacuating two other casualties to the main line of resistance. By his outstanding courage, marked fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Clark served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Minden, Louisiana. Home Town: Minden, Louisiana.

Clark, Albert L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Albert L. Clark (MCSN: 0-11852), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513) during the withdrawal from Hagaru-ri, on 7 November 1950. As a Flight Leader of a night fighter flight in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri, in the early morning of 7 December 1950, Major Clark reported into the close air support control center, which was operating from radio jeeps in the FIRST Marine Division convoy. At the time he reported into the control center, the convoy had been stopped by a well developed enemy roadblock. This roadblock was covered by mortar and machine gun fire interdicting the vehicles of the convoy. When acquainted with the extremely hazardous terrain conditions existing in the area, he executed four night close air support attacks, which successfully interdicted enemy troops moving up on the convoy. These troops moved to within thirty yards of the vehicles on the road. The extremely high degree of professional skill, determination, and courage possessed by Major Clark permitted him to press these night air attacks to within a distance of fifty yards of the friendly convoy. His personal courage, determination, outstanding leadership, and heroic actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Haslam, Texas. Home Town: Long Viet, Texas.

Clark, Daniel W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant (MC), [then Lieutenant, Junior Grade] Daniel W. Clark (NSN: 0-497706), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as a Medical Officer attached to as Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations in Korea from 21 October to 3 November 1950. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Clark displayed outstanding professional skill, ability and perseverance while serving as a Doctor in a Battalion Aid Station. On 3 November 1950, when his Battalion was subjected to a fanatical enemy attack by a numerically superior enemy force, he worked unceasingly under direct enemy fire, to aid the many casualties being brought into the Battalion Aid Station. Though the attackers were firing into the Battalion Aid Station, often wounding casualties for the second time, he with complete disregard for his own personal safety, continued to treat the patients in an expeditious and efficient manner when he was painfully wounded in the leg and refused evacuation until the great loss of blood necessitated his evacuation to the Regimental Aid Station. Upon arrival there, and seeing the pressing need for medical attention by his fellow wounded, he forced himself, regardless of his own personal suffering, to assist in the treatment of the wounded. On his knees unable to stand, he administered plasma to the other patients and again refused evacuation until the last of the patients were evacuated the morning of 5 November 1950. By his great personal courage and unselfish service, he materially assisted in saving the lives of many wounded Marines serving as an inspiration for all who observed him. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Clark's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 10981 (May 17, 1951).

Clark, Dean O.

General Orders No. 86 - 30 January 1951
25th Infantry Division

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class Dean O. Clark, RA17273449, Infantry, Company D, 35th Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 30 August 1950 near Malsan-ni, Korea, a large hostile force advanced under cover of darkness to within twenty yards of an infantry company’s position. When the position became untenable and withdrawal was ordered, Private First Class Clark remained to provide covering fire with a machine gun. After displacement had been effected, he carried a wounded man to safety and removed his machine gun to the new position. He then joined his company in a counterattack, which regained the former position and inflicted severe casualties on the enemy. Private First Class Clark courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty and to his comrades reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Clark, Eugene Franklin

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Eugene Franklin Clark, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Special Operations Group, attached to G-2, Headquarters of Commander in Chief, Far East Command, in action against enemy forces in the Korean area prior to the amphibious assault on Inchon, 1 to 15 September 1950. Responsible for carrying out a task entailing great risk, Lieutenant Clark personally organized and led a mission to obtain vital intelligence information in an area under enemy control. By his aggressive leadership and personal valor, he inspired his men to heroic and determined efforts in achieving the objective, overcoming extreme difficulties and active enemy interference in time to accomplish the assigned mission with completely successful results. Lieutenant Clark's timely and accurate reports contributed directly to the success of the Inchon landing. Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 408 (February 1951).

Clark, James Jr. (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 12 - 22 January 1953

Private First class James Clark, Jr., Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery C, 58th Armored Artillery Battalion, 3d Infantry Division, while attached to Company B, 12th Republic of Korea Security Battalion, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Pare-ryong, Korea, on 21 and 22 May 1951.  Company B, occupying dominant terrain and committed to secure the left sector of the 3d Infantry Division, was viciously attacked by approximately 400 hostile troops supported by small-arms and mortar fire.  Acting as liaison sergeant and radio operator at a forward observation post, he calmly transmitted artillery instructions to the fire direction center until the enemy disengaged and dispersed.  Later, the enemy launched a concerted attack of approximately 1,000 strength against the company perimeter.  Constantly vulnerable to withering fire, he continued to relay fire commands until the enemy attack swept over the position.  Private Clark's persistent courage and selfless devotion to duty contributed materially to the accomplishment of the division's mission.

Clark, John R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John R. Clark (MCSN: 1169176), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 5 July 1952. During the heavy fighting which ensued in and around his combat outpost when a hostile force of estimated company strength attacked the position, Private First Class Clark bravely stationed himself outside his bunker to protect several wounded Marines who had been placed inside for security. While engaged in defending the bunker, he killed one of the enemy and wounded several others. Although seriously wounded himself in both arms and legs by fragments from two hostile grenades, and unable to move, he received a pistol from one of the other wounded men and stout-heartedly continued to protect his comrades until the action ended. By his courageous spirit of self-sacrifice, indomitable fortitude and resolute efforts in behalf of the other wounded, Private First Class Clark served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Orange, New Jersey. Home Town: Spring Lake, New Jersey.

Clark, Truman

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Truman Clark (MCSN: 0-37094), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Yomp'o Area, Korea, on 7, 9 and 10 December 1950. A skilled and resourceful officer, First Lieutenant Clark voluntarily piloted a Torpedo Bomber Aircraft to an emergency airstrip at Koto-ri and, although he had not flown a plane of this type in two and one-half years, evacuated wounded personnel in the face of intense hostile small arms and mortar fire. Undeterred by the hazardous landing and take-off facilities occasioned by the temporary runway, he made a total of six flights into the area, carrying nine serious casualties to safety on each mission. His marked courage, perseverance and unwavering devotion to duty were contributing factors in saving the lives of the wounded men and reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Clark and the United States Naval Service. Born: Los Angeles, California. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Clark, Walter B.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 352 - 2 December 1952

Second Lieutenant Walter B. Clark, 065639, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Division, United States Army. In the early morning hours of 19 July 1952 the company of which Lieutenant Clark was a platoon leader was advancing against the enemy in the vicinity of Yu-hyon, Korea, when the foe directed an intense barrage of small arms and mortar fire against the friendly troops. Realizing that his men were becoming disorganized, Lieutenant Clark, shouting words of encouragement, reorganized them and fearlessly led them in the attack on the enemy positions. As he was nearing the enemy trenches, he was wounded by an enemy grenade but continued to lead his men, killing or wounding several of the foe. When his carbine refused to function, he threw away the weapon, drew his pistol and continued in the attack. Upon reaching the enemy trenches, and while hurling grenades into their positions, he again was wounded by enemy small arms fire. At last enemy fire of ever increasing intensity forced the friendly unit to move back. When the order to withdraw was given, he refused medical aid and with complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved through the heavy hostile fire assisting in the evacuation of the wounded. Only after all his men had withdrawn and all the wounded had been evacuated did he except treatment for his own wounds. The gallantry and selfless actions exhibited by Lieutenant Clark throughout this action reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Georgia.

Clark, William Copeland (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant William Copeland Clark (MCSN: 626267), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 June 1951. When the infantry company to which he was attached as a forward observer encountered an intense hostile mortar barrage while moving up a steep hill, Sergeant Clark advanced to an exposed vantage point on the crest of the hill and, although nearly exhausted from the arduous climb, succeeded in locating the enemy mortar emplacement. While transmitting his information over the radio, he was struck when a hostile shell exploded near him and fell mortally wounded. By his bold initiative, personal courage and unwavering devotion to duty, Sergeant Clark contributed materially to the subsequent destruction of the hostile mortar position, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Lincoln, Maine. Home Town: Lincoln, Maine. Death: KIA: June 16, 1951.

Clark, William H. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William H. Clark, Jr. (MCSN: 597864), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 4 - 5 October 1952. When the patrol was ambushed by a numerically superior hostile force deep in enemy territory, Private First Class Clark continually exposed himself to intense enemy rocket, automatic weapons and small arms fire to deliver effective fire and to cover the activities of other personnel who were evacuating the wounded. During the withdrawal, he skillfully directed fire against the enemy and was one of the last to leave the area. Although painfully wounded, he volunteered to return to the point of contact in an attempt to locate a missing comrade. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Clark served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Rosebud, South Dakota. Home Town: Lakeside, California.

Clarke, Arthur M.

First Lieutenant Arthur M. Clarke, O737729, Field Artillery, United States Army, Headquarters 24th Infantry Division is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 20 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. When withdrawing from Taejon with elements of the 34th Infantry Regiment, the motor column which Lieutenant Clarke was accompanying came under intense enemy machine gun fire which destroyed the leading vehicles and halted the column. The entire column was then brought under intense enemy automatic weapons fire which caused numerous casualties. Lieutenant Clarke with complete disregard of his own safety removed several of the wounded to places of relative safety. Later he organized and led a group of soldiers over thirty-five miles of enemy infested and mountainous terrain to rejoin their units. The group of men he led carried a wounded soldier over this distance, despite the fact that this action delayed their withdrawal and endangered their safety. During the course of these acts Lt. Clarke was wounded. The gallant act displayed by Lt. Clarke reflects great credit on himself and the Military Service. GO 64, 1 Aug 1950 Entered service from Boone, IA.

Clarke, Ramon A.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 19 - 15 March 1962

Captain Ramon A. Clarke, 01925027, (then Second Lieutenant, Infantry), Civil Affairs, United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in Korea on 21 February 1953, while assigned as Platoon Leader of Company B, 180th Infantry Regiment.  As the designated patrol leader of a combat patrol, Captain Clarke's mission was to make contact with the enemy's forward positions east of Saterie Valley.  Upon departure from the forward area, the contact part of the patrol which he was personally leading became heavily engaged with the enemy.  In view of this critical situation, Captain Clarke wisely decided to break off contact to preclude possible capture of any member of his patrol.  He then ordered the withdrawal of the patrol while he remained with the Browning Automatic Rifleman to cover the group.  Despite a severe arm wound from an enemy grenade, he successfully extricated his patrol.  Captain Clarke's courage, superior leadership, and his exemplary conduct under enemy fire are in the best traditions of the United States Army, and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Clary, Homer F.

Private First Class Homer F. Clary, RA15268591, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 11 July 1950 near Chonui, Korea. During and enemy attack on Company K positions, Private First Class Clary had knocked out an enemy machine gun with fire from his light machine gun. The enemy tried attacking over open ground toward the company command post. Upon seeing this he swung his machine gun around and started firing on them and after firing a few shots, his gun was disabled by enemy small arms fire. Undaunted by this and with disregard for his own safety he charged the machine gun position firing as he advanced killing all members of the crew and several other enemy in the vicinity. The act of gallantry displayed by Private First Class Clary reflects great credit on himself and the United States Army. GO 91, 15 August 1950. He entered the service from Crown, OH.

Clary, Lester O.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Lester O. Clary (MCSN: 667004), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against an armed enemy on 10 August 1950 near Kosang, Korea. On 10 August 1950, Private Clary was a member of an artillery forward observer team when he noted the forward elements of a reconnaissance company come under heavy enemy surprise fire, which caused many casualties. Without regard for his own personal safety, Private Clary voluntarily made five trips across open terrain, through intense enemy fire, and assisted in bringing six wounded men to the aid station. The gallantry displayed by Private Clary on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 72 (September 16, 1950). Entered Service From California.

Clary, Marion L. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 851 - 13 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Private Marion L. Clary, RA39126576, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company C, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 12 October 1951 in the vicinity of Mundung-ni, Korea. On this date, during an attack on heavily fortified enemy-held positions, Private Clary displayed dauntless courage and cool behavior before the enemy. Advancing under the heavy hostile small arms and machine gun fire, he succeeded in inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy forces and destroyed many of their emplacements with grenades and rifle fire. During the ensuing action Private Clary was painfully wounded but, disregarding his wounds, he continued his actions, inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy, until he was fatally wounded by enemy fire. His dauntless courage and self-sacrificing devotion to duty were an inspiration to the men of his unit and aided immeasurably to the success of his unit’s mission. The gallantry in action displayed by Private Clary reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Blue Springs, Nebraska.

Claudio, Tomas Rosa

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 214 - 22 June 1951

Private First Class Tomas Rosa Claudio, ER30443526, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 31 March 1951, Company "F" was attacking enemy positions on Hill 398 in the vicinity of Choksong-myon, Korea. As scout of the lead platoon, private Rosa Claudio was in front of the advance assault elements. In crossing an open area, he found himself being subjected to severe mortar fire and hand grenades which the enemy was directing toward his unit as it moved up the hill. Private Rosa Claudio, seeing that the barrage of grenades was causing casualties among his platoon, deliberately advanced toward the concealed foe and engaged him with small arms fire at close range. With great risk to his own life, he secured a position, despite the pressure of enemy fire, and held it, until a second platoon assaulted and drove the enemy before them. Private Rosa Claudio's inspiring example of bravery and gallant action reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Clawson, Thomas E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Thomas E. Clawson (MCSN: 1207725), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Flame Tank Commander of Headquarters Company, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. Informed that his platoon leader's tank was disabled a few yards from enemy trenches during a combat raid on strongly fortified hostile positions, Corporal Clawson fearlessly advanced through intense enemy small arms and mortar fire to the disabled tank and, discovering that the platoon leader was killed and a crew member critically wounded, immediately administered first aid to the wounded man, subsequently putting the stalled vehicle back into operation. When a heavy concentration of enemy fire and dusk prevented the tank driver from seeing well enough to drive the tank from its perilous position, Corporal Clawson unhesitatingly assumed an exposed position on the turret to direct the driver over the route of withdrawal and, despite painful wounds from hostile fire while thus exposed, remained in his position until the vehicle reached friendly lines. By his resourcefulness, courageous initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Corporal Clawson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Matsmora, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Rockland, New York.

Clayville, Howard G.

Headquarters, Far East  Air Forces
General Orders No. 526 - 12 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Howard G. Clayville, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 3 May 1951 over enemy-held territory in Korea. As deputy leader of a flight of B-26 attack bombers, Captain Clayville displayed outstanding leadership in directing attacks upon enemy supply lines and installations at Paup, which resulted in the total destruction of large sections of railroad track and equipment. On his second individual attack on the target, Captain Clayville's aircraft received three direct hits from enemy anti-aircraft fire. Relentlessly, Captain Clayville pressed the attack until all his ammunition was expended, and his aircraft so severely damaged that it was almost impossible to control. Captain Clayville considered bailed out, but decided against risking the lives of his crew. Using great physical strength, Captain Clayville kept his aircraft on course to a friendly air field. As the wheels touched, the emergency brake was applied but failed to function. Captain Clayville crash-landed with only minor injuries to his crew. The outstanding courage, flying skill and devotion to duty displayed by Captain Clayville reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Cleary, Thomas James Jr.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 310 - 25 July 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), [then Major] Thomas James Cleary, Jr. (ASN: 0-23998), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in Korea. On 21 May 1951, near Songbong-dong, Korea, as the 2d Battalion moved out in an attack, the enemy counterattacked in the rear. Under the cover of an early morning haze, the hostile forces had infiltrated to within approximately 300 yards of the battalion command post. Colonel Cleary in the command post, called for tank and artillery support and moving to an exposed position under enemy fire, he personally placed the weapons in position. Under his astute guidance the counterfire of the artillery succeeded in repulsing the enemy assault. Colonel Cleary's heroism and superb leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Cleeland, David

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major David Cleeland (MCSN: 0-16576), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312) in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 December 1952. When one of the aircraft of his flight was struck by enemy anti-aircraft fire and the pilot was forced to parachute into the icy waters of the Taedong estuary during an aerial assault against a major enemy supply installation, Major Cleeland immediately directed the remainder of his flight to form a protective screen against hostile jet interceptors and then orbited his plane at a low altitude to conduct helicopters and rescue craft to the position of the downed pilot. Despite hostile anti-aircraft fire, he directed the rescue operations and the actions of the other aircraft in defending the vulnerable units against the jet fighter attack. When enemy interceptor aircraft broke through the defensive screen, he engaged one of the enemy planes to assist in thwarting assaults on the defenseless helicopters. As the enemy plane disengaged, he maneuvered his aircraft to carry out strafing runs against hostile shore batteries, effectively suppressing the enemy fire during the withdrawal of a disabled rescue vessel. Although his fuel supply was at a dangerously low level, he remained over the area until other friendly aircraft arrived and, after briefing the relieving pilots, successfully returned to base. By his superb airmanship, courageous initiative and resolute determination in attempting to effect the rescue of the downed pilot, Major Cleeland upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Redmond, Washington. Home Town: Flushing, New York.

Clegg, Arthur L.

Sergeant Arthur L. Clegg, RA 39550907, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Battery, 13th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 and 17 July 1950 near the Kum River, Korea. The 13th Field Artillery Battalion was in direct support of the 19th Infantry Regiment in the defense of the Kum River Line. When the enemy attack was launched, wire communications between the forward Command Post and the firing positions were shot out. Sergeant Clegg volunteered to accompany the Communications Sergeant forward in attempt to reestablish these communications. They worked in open terrain and under intense mortar fire. When it became impossible to keep the wire lines intact, Sergeant Clegg joined another Field Artillery Battalion, where he took part in the fire fight. He assisted in unloading a burning ammunition truck. Sergeant Clegg organized a group of men into a rifle unit and led them in clearing the area of sniper fire. When withdrawal became necessary, Sergeant Clegg led this group in reducing a series of road blocks, enabling 200 men to withdraw. He lead this group of 200 in the withdrawal, encouraging them and caring for the wounded. By his courage gallantry and devotion to duty, Sergeant Clegg keep communications open between the firing positions and forward area as long as possible. He was largely responsible for the evacuation, as a unit, of 300 men who were then able to rejoin their unit. Sergeant Clegg’s actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. GO 78, 8 Aug 1950. Entered service from East Elmhurst, NY.

Clegghorn, J.C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class "J" "C" Cleghorn (MCSN: 1250409), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Machine Gunner of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 March 1953. When his unit was subjected to a vicious hostile night attack during the defense of a vital combat outpost located well forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Cleghorn, although painfully wounded during the early stages of the action, bravely exposed himself to murderous enemy mortar and small arms fire to act as a means of communication between a key machine gun position and the outpost command post. Despite the intensity of the hostile grenades falling around him, he made repeated trips from the command post to the gun emplacement, relaying invaluable information. Although the enemy penetrated the position and was in the trench line, he continued to relay vital messages between the gun positions. When his path was blocked by the debris from a destroyed bunker, he left the trench line and climbed over the bunker, although silhouetted by the light from hostile shells bursting around him. By his outstanding courage, initiative and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Cleghorn served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lake City, Arkansas. Home Town: Monette, Arkansas.

Clement, David Alexander

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain David Alexander Clement (MCSN: 0-44907), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 26 - 27 July 1953. Assigned the difficult and hazardous mission of reinforcing by night a vital combat outpost that was under murderous enemy mortar and artillery fire and also subjected to hostile attack, Captain Clement fearlessly led his company through hostile interdictory fire and, despite adverse weather conditions and the constant threat of enemy ambush, successfully reached his objective with a minimum of delay. Informed that the local commander had become a casualty, he immediately assumed command and exposed himself to deadly hostile fire to reorganize the defense positions, skillfully placing his men to reinforce the position, organizing and directing local counterattacks to repulse enemy infiltrations and inspiring and encouraging the heroic defenders. By his aggressive leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and marked courage, Captain Clement was largely responsible for the success of his company in defending the vital outpost despite numerous enemy attempts to overrun the position. His unwavering devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division: Serial 29787 (August 31, 1953). Born: December 26, 1924 at Peking, China. Home Town: New Haven, Connecticut. Death: August 9, 2007.

Cleveland, Charles Goold

First Lieutenant Charles G. Cleveland distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 21 September 1952 during military operations against an enemy of the United States by destroying his fifth enemy aircraft, a MIG-15, near Sinuiju, Korea. Flying the lead in a flight of two F-86 aircraft at 30,000 feet, Lieutenant Cleveland sighted two MIG-15s at his 1:00 o'clock position and immediately attacked, scoring hits on one of them in the tail pipe, engine, and right wing. There was an explosion with resulting fire, and the MIG lost airspeed and started to lose altitude with a long trail of smoke. Lieutenant Cleveland did not observe the crash, which was verified more than 50 years later through an analysis of admitted losses by the RussianAir Force on that day. By his gallantry and devotion to duty and to his country, Lieutenant Cleveland reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Close, Robert Hamilton

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Robert Hamilton Close (NSN: 0-73341), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Destroyer U.S.S. Collett (DD-730), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, from 13 to 15 September 1950. An officer of outstanding professional ability and resourcefulness, Commander Close skillfully navigated his ship through a hazardous enemy mine field and, entering the strongly fortified harbor of Inchon, conducted an effective close-in bombardment against hostile shore installations and gun emplacements. Defying the deadly and ever increasing fire from hidden enemy batteries scattered along the coastline, he boldly continued to direct furious counterfire on the hostile fortifications until the defenses were sufficiently neutralized to permit the successful amphibious landings of friendly forces at Inchon. By his marked courage, expert seamanship and loyal devotion to the fulfillment of vital operations, Commander Close upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 918 (October 14, 1950). Born: March 11, 1913 at at Mount Vernon, New York. Home Town: Rye, New York. Death: March 19, 1994.

Cloud, Paul M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Paul M. Cloud (MCSN: 1073230), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 April 1951. When the tank-infantry patrol he was accompanying was suddenly subjected to a devastating enemy mortar barrage, causing numerous casualties, while the unit was moving forward to reconnoiter a valley on the flank of the battalion position, Private First Class Cloud, quickly realizing that there was no Corpsman immediately available, courageously exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire to render first aid to the wounded men. Although suffering from a serious and painful shrapnel wound, he continued to aid his comrades until the arrival of a Corpsman, refusing to accept treatment for his own wound until all others had received attention. By his exceptional fortitude, initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Private First Class Cloud served to inspire all who observed him and undoubtedly contributed to the saving of many lives, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Aberdeen, Washington. Home Town: Kent, Washington.

Clyde, Denton P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Denton P. Clyde (MCSN: 0-37193), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Twelve (VMF-212) during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 June 1952. Assigned the mission of leading a flight of three aircraft to silence hostile automatic weapons positions near Sokchuwon-ni, Captain Clyde made repeated low runs over the target area until he located the weapons by their muzzle flashes. After rejoining his flight, he led the group in low-altitude napalm bomb, strafing and rocket attacks until two of the weapons were destroyed. By his inspiring leadership, outstanding flying skill and selfless devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire, Captain Clyde upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Gary, Indiana. Home Town: Maywood, Illinois.

Coates, Clyde Philip Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Clyde Philip Coates, Jr. (MCSN: 452412), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 September 1951. Obtaining permission to head the assault squad in an attack against a strong enemy position, Corporal Coates courageously led the men through intense hostile fire to the very edge of the enemy emplacements. When the assault began to lose momentum after severe casualties had depleted their number, he unhesitatingly rallied the group with words of encouragement and, placing several hand grenades with deadly accuracy, rose to lead the squad over the enemy position, personally destroyed one heavy machine gun and accounted for an undetermined number of hostile troops. Once the objective had been overrun, he skillfully deployed his men in hastily assumed defensive positions and repulsed a subsequent enemy counterattack. By his inspiring leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Coates upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: July 8, 1925 at Dakota, West Virginia. Home Town: Imlaystown, New Jersey. Death: KIA: September 14, 1951.

Codd, Bernard P.

Sergeant Bernard P. Codd, US51068622, Army Medical Service, United States Army, Medical Company, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed army near Homangni, Korea.  On the night of 9 June 1952, a platoon from Company L moved into positions on Hill 255 in anticipation of an enemy counterattack.  Shortly before midnight an intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage began to pound the side of the hill and one of the incoming rounds scored an almost direct hit on the bunker containing the platoon command post, severing all communications and inflicting several casualties.  Sergeant Codd immediately ran to the command post and began to administer aid to the wounded.  In the meantime, the enemy had lifted the artillery and mortar fire and were now beginning their assault on the hill with small-arms and automatic-weapons fire.  Sergeant Codd, still in the process of giving aid, took time to throw badly-needed weapons and ammunition from the command post to the men fighting nearby.  Soon, however, due to the superior numbers of the fanatical foe and a fast dwindling supply of ammunition, the friendly troops were forced to withdraw from the hillside.  Inasmuch as all the wounded could not be evacuated in the withdrawal, Sergeant Codd volunteered to stay on the hill and assist those who were left behind.  He remained hidden at the command post administering to the wounded and on several occasions he was forced to play dead to deceive the Chinese forces that were constantly roaming the position.  He spent the remainder of the night, without a weapon, caring for the wounded until he was relieved by a friendly patrol in the morning, and then helped to clear the area of all casualties before withdrawing himself.  Sergeant Codd's gallantry in the face of overwhelming odds helped to save the lives of his wounded comrades and reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the Federal service from New York.

Click HERE to view a copy of the actual citation

Cody, Raymond J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 146 -- 26 September 1950

Second Lieutenant Raymond J. Cody, 02208125, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 13th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 31 July 1950, near Chinju, Korea.  As forward observer for artillery supporting Company C, 19th Infantry Regiment, Lieutenant Cody volunteered to leave his observation post and assist in the effective deployment of replacements brought up to the infantry company position while that company was being subjected to intensive enemy fire.  With complete disregard for his own safety, he continuously moved among the men, encouraged them when they seemed to falter, and supplied them with ammunition.  Unhesitatingly he evacuated an officer and enlisted man severely wounded by the devastating fire to places of safety although in doing so he heedlessly exposed himself to enemy fire.  Although his battery could no longer give supporting fire and had been ordered to withdraw, Lieutenant Cody remained with the infantry and continued to inspire the men by his gallant actions and extreme devotion to duty.  His complete disregard for personal safety in the face of overwhelming enemy odds, reflects the greatest credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the service from Dubuque, Iowa.

Coghill, William F.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 111 - 30 August 1950

First Lieutenant William F. Coghill, 050753, Cavalry, United States Army, a member of the 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 12 August 1950 at Yongsan , Korea. By infiltration the enemy had reached the Division main supply route and succeeded in establishing a road block composed of anti-tank and automatic weapons which denied passage of supplies to front line units. Eight vehicles had been destroyed by the enemy in attempting to run this road block. Lieutenant Coghill, in an effort to locate exact enemy positions and to secure a re-supply of ammunition for the Reconnaissance Company, volunteered to run the road block in a jeep. In this attempt, he was seriously wounded through his leg but managed to get through the road block to his company command post. Although suffering intense pain, he refused treatment until he had informed his company commander of the enemy intelligence. This information enabled the company to successfully eliminate the road block and to open the Division main supply route. His bravery, devotion to duty and selfless action reflect the highest credit on Lieutenant Coghill and the armed forces. Entered military service from Nenana, Alaska.

Colburn, Donald Charles (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Donald Charles Colburn (MCSN: 0-56599), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 March 1953. With the enemy holding the crest of a vital outpost position, Second Lieutenant Colburn led his platoon in a devastating assault against the hostile forces and, when the unit had secured the objective, dauntlessly exposed himself to the vicious enemy barrage of mortar fire to organize a sound defensive position and to move among his men and lend encouragement during the ensuing battle. Volunteering to guide a relief company to the area, he unhesitatingly went back down the hill through the intense hostile fire to personally lead the new unit into position. While directing the relief company in protective cover for the new troops, he was struck by enemy shell fire and fell, mortally wounded. By his outstanding valor, indomitable fighting spirit and self-sacrificing devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Colburn served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: Los Angeles, California. Death: KIA: March 29, 1953.

Coldren, Robert H. (1st citation)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 279 - 26 July 1953

Second Lieutenant Robert H. Coldren, 01925891, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 9 June 1953, as patrol leader of a five man daylight reconnaissance patrol to Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, Lieutenant Coldren crawled within twenty yards of enemy positions, securing vital information which served as tactical intelligence for subsequent offensive action. Returning to the main line of resistance under a devastating mortar bombardment when the mission had been accomplished, he immediately volunteered to lead the support element in an attack on that position the same afternoon. The patrol departed friendly lines and set up on the position from which supporting fire would dominate the enemy stronghold. He directed a base of fire in close support of the assault group. On one occasion, while twenty-five enemy soldiers attempted to flank the assault element, he exposed himself to hostile fire to neutralize the enemy action. After an intense fire fight in which twenty enemy soldiers were mortally wounded, Lieutenant Coldren remained, the last man on the position, covering the retrograde movement of friendly forces under heavy fire. Lieutenant Coldren's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Ohio.

Coldren, Robert H. (2nd citation)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 347 - 17 August 1953

Second Lieutenant Robert H. Coldren, 01925891, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June 1953, Company "E" conducted a raid on Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. Lieutenant Coldren was platoon leader of one of the assault platoons during the attack. Immediately after reaching the objective, his platoon became victim to intense raking machine gun and artillery fire. Lieutenant Coldren inspired his men to drive forward to the enemy positions, although heavy casualties were suffered. As he entered the trenches of the enemy, he rose to an exposed position, and mortally wounded two enemy soldiers. Shortly thereafter, Lieutenant Coldren was wounded by a burst of fire from an enemy automatic weapon and refused to be evacuated until his mission had been accomplished and his platoon returned to safety. Lieutenant Coldren's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Ohio.

Cole, Charles H. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to Corporal Charles H. Cole, RA13318844, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company I, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Saemal, Korea. On that date, Company I was defending part of its battalion perimeter. Friendly units to the front had with withdrawn through the lines and a large enemy force was attempting to penetrate the battalion perimeter. Some of the units passing through the line left behind weapons that were inoperable. Many of these were left on damaged vehicles along the road. Corporal Cole, the unit mail clerk, realized that many of these weapons could be repaired and used to assist the defense of the battalion perimeter. Running to the area where these weapons were, Corporal Cole secured a number of them and returned to the company command post were he assumed the task of repairing them. While engaged in that task, he was continually exposed to the intense enemy fire falling throughout the company area. Finally he had five or six guns in operating order and they were placed in the defensive area around the command post. Even then Corporal Cole continued to move from weapon to weapon, making repairs and carrying ammunition to his comrades. When the battalion later withdrew through the hostile fire block, Corporal Cole manned a machine gun for the protection of the vehicular column. Courageously firing his weapon, he fell mortally wounded. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Cole at the sacrifice of his own life reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Virginia.

Cole, Doyle H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Doyle H. Cole (MCSN: 0-20941), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three (VMF-323) during action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 August 1950. Participating in a close support strike which intercepted and routed a mechanized column of enemy troops, Second Lieutenant Cole made several bold strafing and rocket runs in the face of intense hostile fire, aiding materially in the destruction of thirty hostile vehicles and hundreds of the enemy. With his plane hit during the action and losing oil rapidly, he elected to remain with his section leader when his plane was also struck and forced to crash-land in enemy territory. Furnishing cover for the downed pilot, he stood ready to make strafing runs to prevent the hostile troops from capturing the pilot, resolutely maintaining this position until another fighter plane and a rescue helicopter arrived on the scene to relieve him. Finally making his way back to safety, he skillfully guided his crippled aircraft to friendly lines and, just as his engine failed due to lack of oil, crash-landed in the sea at the edge of the beach line. Second Lieutenant Cole's superb airmanship, outstanding courage and selfless devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Keota, Oklahoma. Home Town: Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

Cole, J. Frank

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel J. Frank Cole (MCSN: 0-6231), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMF-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Korean Area from 16 September to 15 December 1950. Utilizing professional ability and comprehensive knowledge of aerial combat operations in welding his group into a highly efficient fighting team, Lieutenant Colonel Cole contributed materially to the success of his squadron in furnishing close air support to friendly forces despite intense hostile ground fire, hazardous terrain, adverse weather conditions and personnel and logistical difficulties. Personally conducting attacks on the enemy in the face of dangerous terrain and marginal weather, he braved hostile fire to locate and lead his squadron in the destruction of enemy positions, thereby permitting the advance of our ground forces. A skilled airman and inspiring leader, Lieutenant Colonel Cole, by his courage and unwavering devotion to duty, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Aurora, Nebraska. Home Town: Aurora, Nebraska.

Cole, Walter E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Walter E. Cole, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 November 1950. Suddenly confronted by an enemy tank while advancing as fire team leader at the point of a motorized patrol, Private First Class Cole bravely climbed onto the hostile vehicle in an attempt to open the hatch and deposit a hand grenade within. Unable to open the cover, he knocked down the periscope and thereby allowed another Marine to drop a grenade into the aperture. When the tank moved a few yards and stopped, Private First Class Cole again mounted it to make a second attempt to disable it and, by his daring initiative, succeeded in destroying the tank's firing power. By his marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit, and loyal devotion to duty, Private First Class Cole reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Coleman, Charles W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Ensign Charles W. Cole (NSN: 0-393932), United States Navy, for gallantry and intrepidity in the rescue of personnel and in damage control work on board U.S.S. Brush (DD-745) on 26 September 1950, when the BRUSH struck an enemy mine in North Korean waters. Ensign Cole displayed exceptional courage in entering smoke and fume filled compartments to determine the extent of damage and in aiding to his utmost the evacuation of personal casualties. He displayed exceptional tenacity at the scene of the fire until it was extinguished, combating the most adverse conditions; and in the control of flooding, which, if unchecked, may have resulted in the loss of the ship. He remained in the damaged area for a period of two days. His valorous actions directly contributed to the prompt medical attention received by wounded men and to the effective control of the damage sustained. His conduct throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 4898 (May 20, 1951).

Coleman, George E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal George E. Coleman (MCSN: 657072), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Headquarters Battery, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. After advancing through an enemy ambush north of Hagaru-ri, Corporal Coleman observed a Marine attempting to recover an abandoned tractor and a 155-mm. howitzer from a ditch and immediately volunteered to assist in recovering the equipment although neither he nor the other Marine had any previous experience as tractor operators. With the road bank too steep to extricate the vehicle and the only route from which it could be removed at a point back toward the ambush area, he volunteered to ride the tractor as guard, taking a five gallon can of diesel fuel for use in another tractor which was out of fuel in the ambush area. By his daring initiative, inspiring courage and heroic efforts while under continuous enemy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire, Corporal Coleman contributed to saving both pieces of equipment for further operations against the enemy, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Saco, Montana. Home Town: Spokane, Washington.

Coleman, Nolan J.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 245 - 26 October 1950

Corporal (then Private First Class) Nolan J. Coleman, RA19296430, Infantry, Company H, 24th Infantry, United States Army.  When the company to which his machine gun section was attached was subjected to an intense attack by numerically superior enemy forces near Haman, Korea on 6 September 1950, Corporal Coleman remained at his machine gun and continued to fire at the onrushing enemy despite having suffered a wound himself during the initial phase of the attack.  His effective fire greatly assisted the company to defeat the attackers.  Corporal Coleman's courageous devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from California.

Coley, Jack N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Jack N. Coley (MCSN: 570255), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Ammunition Carrier in Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces on the outskirts of Seoul, Korea, on 26 September 1950. Although seriously wounded while voluntarily manning a machine gun after its gunner had been fatally wounded during a company attack on strong hostile positions, Private First Class Coley staunchly continued to remain at his post and, despite severe pain from his wounds, delivered accurate and effective fire on the enemy until flanking patrols overran the hostile emplacements. By his courageous initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty, Private First Class Coley upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Birmingham, Alabama. Home Town: Chickasaw, Alabama.

Collenette, Richard W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Richard W. Collenette (MCSN: 1112456), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. With his platoon brought under intense enemy machine gun fire during an assault against a strongly fortified and well-camouflaged hill position, Corporal Collenette fearlessly moved forward to an exposed position and delivered accurate fire to silence the enemy. Award of the importance of quick action when he realized that his fire had failed to dispose of the gun's crew, he promptly hurled two grenades into the emplacement and, when they failed to explode, bravely charged the position, killing one of the enemy, wounding another and possibly a third who fled from the position in panic. Undaunted, he spearheaded his platoon's drive to the objective, killing many of the aggressors and contributing to the successful seizure of the key terrain. His daring and aggressive leadership, bold tactics and indomitable fighting spirit in the face of heavy odds reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Collenette and the United States Naval Service. Born: Sharon, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Sharon, Pennsylvania.

Colleran, Martin C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Martin C. Colleran (MCSN: 670051), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Squad Leader of a Rifle Platoon of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces north of Chinhung-ni, Korea, on 6 November 1950. Charged with the mission of dislodging the enemy from well-entrenched positions along the ridge crest, and of protecting his company's flank during a raid against an estimated hostile force of two-company strength, reinforced with heavy machine guns, Sergeant Colleran promptly led his squad forward under heavy and accurate enemy small arms and machine gun fire, expertly directing and controlling the squad's fire during the advance. With casualties mounting in his ranks, he deployed his squad through extremely rugged terrain and succeeded in annihilating the enemy outposts. Employing the remnants of his squad in a hasty defense, he resisted two flanking attacks in force, killing over twenty enemy soldiers and maintaining his position, despite heavy hostile mortar, machine gun, grenade and small arms fire, until ordered to rejoin the raiding force. Subsequently providing effective protection for his company's rear elements, Sergeant Colleran, by his inspiring and aggressive leadership, cool courage and heroic efforts, contributed materially to the success attained by the raiding party. His staunch devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Augusta, Georgia. Home Town: Bluffton, South Carolina.

Collingsworth, Raymond E.

Private First Class Raymond E. Collingsworth, RA15412586, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950, near the Kum River, Korea. The 19th Regimental Combat Team, to which the 52nd Field Artillery Battalion was attached, had been overrun by overwhelmingly large enemy forces. the enemy had also succeeded in placing a road-block between the withdrawing American units and safety. Several attempts had been make to clear the block. Private Collingsworth approached the senior officer present and volunteered to undertake any duty assigned to him. In the face of withering enemy fire, he assisted in rallying drivers, in overturning wrecked vehicles blocking the road, and in moving unattended vehicles that were impeding progress. He assisted in lading the wounded on operable vehicles and volunteered to man a machine gun that was mounted on one of them. With the approach of dusk, it was determined that a last effort should be made to clear the road block since, at that time, enemy fire would be less accurate. Just before the signal to move was given, the driver of a quarter-ton truck abandoned his vehicle, thus blocking all behind him. Private Collingsworth coolly took over. He secured and automatic rifleman and a rifleman to assist himself and the convoy started. Private Collingsworth drove skillfully and courageously, refusing to stop even when other vehicles did so. He drove through three islands of enemy resistance in his break for safety. By this daring coolness and gallantry, Private Collingsworth assisted materially in extricating a group of completely surrounded men from certain annihilation. His actions brought high credit to himself and to the military service. GO 88, 13 August 1950. He entered the military service from Dayton, OH.

Collins, Donald P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Pipefitter Second Class Donald P. Collins (NSN: 3829057), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry in action and outstanding devotion to duty as a member of the rescue party which entered the demolished living compartments on the U.S.S. Walke (DD-723) when that ship was heavily damaged due to enemy action on the morning of 12 June 1951. Knowing that a large number of wounded men were trapped in the debris and wreckage in the damaged area he voluntarily entered on of the compartments to find and rescue them. With complete disregard for his own safety, he made his way through the wreckage, and in almost complete darkness, sought out the wounded men trapped there. He helped to extricate them from the wreckage and bring them to safety. He remained in that compartment until all of the wounded had been rescued and all of the dead who could be extricated had been recovered. His personal courage, determination and devotion to duty saved the lives of several men who would otherwise have perished, and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1676 (October 18, 1951).

Collins, James R. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 733 - 18 November 1951

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Corporal James R. Collins, RA17264805, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company B, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 1 September 1951 in the vicinity of Mandae-ri, Korea. On this date during an attack on a strategic hill heavily defended by a well entrenched enemy force, Corporal Collins’ squad was suddenly subjected to intense  automatic weapons and machine gun fire. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Corporal Collins, completely disregarding his own safety, placed himself in an exposed position in order to draw hostile fire while his comrades sought cover. Despite the intense hostile fire directed at him, Corporal Collins remained in his position, inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy and enabling his unit to maneuver into position to prepare for a new attack. During the ensuing action he was fatally wounded by enemy fire but as a result of his self sacrificing devotion to his comrades, friendly units were able to accomplish their mission successfully. The gallantry in action displayed by Corporal Collins on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Collins, James M.

Headquarters, EUSAK
General Orders 186 - April 4, 1951

Captain James M. Collins, 01106066, Corps of Engineers, United States Army.  Captain Collins, Company B, 65th Engineer Combat Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Taesan-Myon, Korea.  On 14 September 1950, Captain Collins led his company in an attack against the enemy who were strongly entrenched on a heavily fortified hill.  During a critical phase of the attack when heavy fire halted friendly troops, Captain Collins, although injured by the blast of an enemy concussion grenade, singlehandedly charged several of the enemy, driving them from their positions.  His valiant and fearless action inspired his men to defeat the enemy and take the objective.  The gallantry and intrepidity of Captain Collins reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the federal service from Oklahoma.

Collins, Jeremiah J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Jeremiah J. Collins, Jr. (MCSN: 297305), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. When his squad leader became a casualty during an attempt by the enemy to infiltrate his sector, Private First Class Collins unhesitatingly assumed command and, after quickly reorganizing the remaining members of his squad, moved to a new position where he led his group in hand-to-hand combat with the enemy. Jumped by two hostile soldiers during the furious action, he killed one with the butt of his rifle and critically wounded the other. Continuing his daring tactics, he led and directed his men in repelling the onslaught until seriously wounded and forced to submit to evacuation. By his determined and inspiring leadership, courageous initiative and heroic efforts against heavy odds, Private First Class Collins contributed to the success of his company in holding its defensive lines against the enemy, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Norwood, Massachusetts. Home Town: Norwood, Massachusetts.

Collins, Lynwood E.

Corporal Lynwood E. Collins, Battery C, 21st AAA AW Battalion (SP). On 16 February 1951, near Yongdongpo, Korea, Corporal Collins' half-track was suddenly attacked by a hostile patrol which was attempting to cross the Han River. Although the entire crew was forced to seek cover in the initial onslaught, he made his way bock through the encircling foe. mounted the blazing driving compartment and moved the vehicle into firing position. He then assisted in manning the machine-gun mount to inflict heavy casualties on the enemy and drive the remainder to flight. Corporal Collins' valorous initiative and selfless devotion to duty are worthy of emulation. Entered the military service from Georgia.

Collins, Vernie L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Vernie L. Collins (MCSN: 1163914), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company G, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. While fearlessly leading his fire team forward in the face of intense hostile fire during a company attack against strongly fortified enemy positions, Private First Class Collins personally charged and destroyed one hostile bunker. Although suffering intense pain from a serious wound sustained in this action, he continued to advance and led his men in a vicious assault until three enemy positions were overrun and the area was secured. By his outstanding courage, determined leadership and indomitable devotion to duty, Private First Class Collins served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Decatur, Texas. Home Town: Fort Worth, Texas.

Collins, Warren J.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Warren J. Collins, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Medical Company, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division against the enemy on 27 September 1950 at Hambung-ni, Korea. Captain Collins was serving as medical officer for Task Force Lynch when it was attacked by ten enemy tanks, supported by infantry, in the town of Hambung-ni. Captain Collins, with complete disregard for his own safety, personally assisted in evacuation of wounded from the town while under heavy enemy tank cannon and machine gun fire at ranges from 50 to 200 yards. On three occasions the enemy tanks assaulted and forced the withdrawal of Captain Collin’ aid station. On each occasion he was the last man to withdraw. By his foresight in loading the wounded on vehicles as soon as they were treated, Captain Collins saved many of the wounded who otherwise would have been run over by the tanks. Captain Collins’ gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. General Orders: General Order number 149, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division, 10 November 1950. Home of Record: Washington.

Colon-Fonseca, Candido
From the Home of Heroes Website

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 121- 6 May 1952

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Candido Colon-Fonseca, RA10405562, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 12 December 1950, Sergeant Colon-Fonseca was sent with the second platoon of Company L, as platoon sergeant, to take the village of Haton-ni Korea, about four miles from the company command post. When Sergeant Colon-Fonseca and his platoon crossed the river just in front of the village, they were met with an extremely heavy fire from small arms, machine guns, mortars in the hands of a numerically superior, well entrenched enemy. Receiving an order to withdraw, Sergeant Colon-Fonseca, without regard for his own personal safety, took an exposed position and, with two other men, kept delivering fire on the enemy to cover the platoon's withdrawal. After dark he was able to neutralize the enemy machine guns with his rifle and hand grenades. During the battle one of his two companions, a Republic of Korea soldier, was wounded and Sergeant Colon-Fonseca, after giving him first aid, carried him more than four miles to safety. Sergeant Colon-Fonseca's gallantry, personal courage, and disregard for his own safety reflect grant credit upon himself and the military service.

Colvin, Atlee B.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 12 - 8 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Atlee B. Colvin (ASN: US-52092653), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Pangdangdong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. As his platoon attacked strongly reinforced enemy positions, it was subjected to devastating enemy mortar fire. During the early part of the assault, Private Colvin received serious shrapnel wounds but was not deterred in his mission. He continued with the assaulting unit and played a vital part in destroying several key enemy bunkers. With complete disregard for his own safety, he unhesitatingly exposed himself to intense enemy fire to assist in the evacuation of his wounded Platoon Leader. His daring initiative was a great inspiration to his comrades and aided immeasurably in the successful accomplishment of the mission. Private Colvin's courageous action, unwavering determination and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Nokesville, Virginia.

Comiskey, John A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John A. Comiskey (MCSN: 1208067), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 September 1952. Participating in the defense of a strategic hill, Private First Class Comiskey fearlessly moved his machine gun to an exposed area on the top of a bunker to direct more effective fire against the enemy and prevent them from overrunning the position. With the unit subjected to an intense hostile artillery and mortar barrage and an attack by a large enemy force, he steadfastly refused evacuation when he sustained painful wounds and bravely remained at his position to direct another man in firing his gun. By his marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and resolute determination, Private First Class Comiskey greatly aided in inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cerrillos, New Mexico. Home Town: Madrid, New Mexico.

Compoly, Stephen P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Stephen P. Compoly (MCSN: 293644), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Ordnance Chief of the First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 and 24 April 1951. Assigned to a machine gun squad to reinforce the defensive fires of the battalion, Technical Sergeant Compoly skillfully delivered effective fire from his weapon against a numerically superior enemy attempting to break through an extremely vulnerable sector of the battalion perimeter of defense. Despite devastating hostile fire, he remained continuously at his machine gun and repelled repeated enemy attacks throughout the night. Although painfully wounded by enemy automatic weapons fire on the following day during an extremely critical stage in the operation while voluntarily directing the fire of the lead tank in a column moving to break out of an enemy encirclement, he continued to direct the fire of the tank until he was relieved and ordered to fall back for medical treatment. By his outstanding courage, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Technical Sergeant Compoly contributed materially to the success of his battalion and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Perth Amboy, New York. Home Town: Newburgh, New York.

Compton, Floyd Emmerson (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Master Sergeant Floyd Emmerson Compton (MCSN: 626065), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Fourteen (VMF-214), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 April 1951. Fully aware that it would be necessary to fly through bad weather at low altitude over two hundred miles of rugged terrain in order to reach the objective area, Master Sergeant Compton unhesitatingly volunteered to execute a hazardous strike flight against the enemy in support of friendly ground forces. Despite extremely low visibility and heavy hostile anti-aircraft fire, he skillfully pressed through to the objective to attack a ridge well-entrenched with enemy troops who seriously threatened the advance of our ground forces. While carrying out his attack, he received a direct hit from a large anti-aircraft projectile which caused him to crash to his death. By his superb courage, indomitable fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, Master Sergeant Compton upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 19, 1923 at St. Joseph, Missouri. Home Town: St. Joseph, Missouri. Death: KIA: April 5, 1951 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, VA.

Conatser, Major Max C.

Headquarters Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 228 - 10 May 1952

Major Conatser distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an enemy in the vicinity of Pyongyang, Korea, while commanding a Signal Construction Detachment in advance support of the Fifth Air Force. When evacuation was necessary, Major Conatser voluntarily remained at Pyongyang to destroy communication facilities in order to prevent their use by the enemy. On 3 December 1950, while preparing to evacuate his detachment, his convoy was bombed and strafed by the enemy and eight of ten trucks were immobilized. When a nearby ambulance caught fire and was knocked into a gasoline dump, Major Conatser, realizing the danger of explosion, and with total disregard for personal safety, rushed to the vehicle and removed it from the area. Major Conatser further exposed himself to danger by entering an abandoned ordnance depot and removing parts from bobby-trapped vehicles, enabling his men to quickly repair six vehicles and safely evacuate themselves. The exceptional courage and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Major Conatser were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Condon, John W.

By direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to Second Lieutenant John W. Condon, 02209121, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Kumsong, Korea, on 8 December 1951. The First Platoon, of which he was leader, was deployed a defensive perimeter about Hill 424. Shortly after midnight, its positions were subjected to devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire. Under cover of this intense barrage, the enemy soon launched a savage attack. Lieutenant Condon, by running from position to position, skillfully organized his men and directed their actions so successfully that the first two onslaughts were repulsed. The enemy hordes tried a third time, hurling themselves at friendly lines with such fanaticism that the platoon was forced to withdraw to more tenable positions. The hostile troops followed relentlessly, and hand to hand fighting ensued. Lieutenant Condon, standing on top of his bunker directing fire, noticed an enemy soldier running toward him and killed him just as the man threw a grenade. The grenade exploded, hitting Lieutenant Condon in the back but, undaunted, he continued fighting with indomitable aggressiveness, directing friendly artillery and mortar fire by radio at the same time. Under his inspiring leadership, his men fought furiously, finally routing the greatly decimated enemy troops. Although suffering intense pain from wounds, Lieutenant Condon made a thorough check of all positions and gave aid to the wounded. Only after all his men had received medical attention did he allow himself to be treated. His courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless performance of duty contributed to his unit’s defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Iowa City, Iowa.

Conlin, Henry J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Henry J. Conlin (MCSN: 0-53541), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Section Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 July 1952. When enemy troops penetrated the outpost position forward of the main line of resistance during a night attack supported by artillery, mortar and heavy machine gun fire, Second Lieutenant Conlin aggressively led his men in repelling the assault with close-range grenade and small arms fire, personally accounting for two of the estimated twenty-eight enemy dead, and directed mortar and artillery fire in close support of the surrounding outpost, thereby preventing the enemy from reorganizing for a second assault. Informed that a portion of his position had been overrun, he immediately moved to the endangered area in the face of hostile fire and quickly reorganized his force, leading his Corpsman back over the exposed sector to care for the wounded. By his expert leadership, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Conlin served to inspire the men under his command and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Independence, Missouri.

Conmy, Joseph Bartholomew Jr.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 482 - 6 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) Joseph Bartholomew Conmy, Jr. (ASN: 0-25645), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Popso-ri, Korea. On 22 May 1951, while all three companies of the 1st Battalion were actively engaged in separate actions on three hills, communications between the units were disrupted. Major Conmy, cognizant of the serious situation and aware of the possibility of the battalion being encircled by the enemy, immediately commandeered a light vehicle and moved toward the positions of Company A. During the trip, the driver was wounded by enemy gunfire, and after administering first aid, Major Conmy continued on. Reaching the company's position, he immediately directed the unit into new defensive positions and reorganized the forces. He then returned to the battalion aid station and left the wounded man and continued on toward Company B. Due to the intense enemy artillery fire, he was forced to abandon the vehicle and continue on foot. Locating Company B, he moved it into new positions and proceeded to Company C, where he repeated the process and insured that the battalion was physically tied in across the front. The aggressive leadership, initiative and complete disregard for personal safety demonstrated by Major Conmy enabled the battalion to successfully complete its mission without danger of an enemy encirclement. The gallantry displayed by Major Conmy reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Infantry.

BORN: St. Paul, MN and entered service from USMA.

Conn, Jack L. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Jack L. Conn (ASN: 0-66143), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action near Chorwon, Korea. On 24 - 25 March 1953, Lieutenant Conn organized his company for an attack against positions recently occupied by the enemy. Under heavy enemy artillery, mortar, and small arms fire, Lieutenant Conn, shouting words of encouragement to his men, placed himself at the had of his company and daringly led his men toward the objective. During the assault, Lieutenant Conn personally directed effective supporting fire. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Conn reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Connell, Robert Thomas Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Robert Thomas Connell, Jr. (MCSN: 1222435), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 May 1952. While providing flank security for a combat patrol when his main body of that group became engaged in vicious hand-to-hand combat with the enemy, Corporal Connell along with three other members of the security team, surprised a group of seventeen of the enemy preparing to counterattack. Despite a virtual hail of intense enemy fire, he moved forward and fired his weapon with devastating effect, disrupting the counterattack and causing the enemy to retire in confusion. Mortally wounded by enemy fire while engaged in this action, Corporal Connell, by his daring initiative, inspiring courage and selfless devotion to duty, contributed materially to the success of the patrol and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Richmond Heights, Missouri. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri. Death: KIA: May 27, 1952.

Connelly, Charles R. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles R. Connelly, Jr. (MCSN: 1186450), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1952. When a fellow Marine was seriously wounded during an enemy night attack on the outpost forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Connelly unhesitatingly left his covered position to aid his stricken comrade and carried him an estimated forty yards through intense hostile fire to the center of the squad's position. Voluntarily assuming the point position as the unit withdrew, he observed two of the enemy near the protective wire of friendly lines and fearlessly charged forward with his bayonet, accounting for two enemy dead. Reconnoitering the area, he hurled grenades into suspected hostile positions and continued on as point until the squad was safely inside the main line of resistance. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Connelly was instrumental in saving the life of a fellow Marine and contributed materially to the orderly withdrawal of the squad, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Willimantic, Connecticut.

Connelly, Joseph P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Joseph P. Connelly (MCSN: 556636), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. Participating in the company attack on strong enemy positions, Sergeant Connelly assumed a position with the lead machine gun section and repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to select targets and control the fire of his guns. When one of the assaulting riflemen was seriously wounded and fell in an exposed area, Sergeant Connelly immediately rushed forward and proceeded to carry his comrade to safety. Although painfully wounded by heavy enemy fire, he refused medical attention and, returning to his section, again exposed himself to hostile fire to move along the line for three and one half hours and encourage his men before he submitted to evacuation. By his skilled leadership, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Connelly served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Waterbury, Connecticut. Home Town: Naugatuck, Connecticut.

Connelly, Louis B. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 242 - 29 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Corporal Louis B. Connelly, ER57505313, Corps of Engineers, Army of the United States, a member of Company B, 2d Engineer Combat Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action on 28 May 1951 near Ipyong, Korea. His unit was in an armored convoy when ambushed by enemy forces. Heavy casualties were suffered. Corporal Connelly applied his knowledge of first aid in treating the wounded and went under heavy fire to rescue men in exposed positions. He also fired a .50 caliber machine gun and silenced a sniper who had the unit pinned down. Then, attempting to gain contact with supporting infantry, he was killed by enemy fire. This gallantry displayed by Corporal Connelly reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Spalding, Nebraska.

Connolly, Howard J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Howard J. Connolly (MCSN: 0-44276), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 and 13 August 1952. Assigned the mission of freeing a beleaguered company isolated on a forward outpost and under heavy enemy bombardment, Captain Connolly led his unit to the position through intense hostile small arms, artillery and mortar fire and, despite increasing darkness, quickly reorganized his company and established a sound perimeter defense. With a numerically superior enemy force estimated at regiment strength hurling a fanatical series of assaults at the outpost, he skillfully directed his men in delivering effective counterfire and, although the hostile troops succeeded in penetrating the perimeter several times, continued the defensive action for a period of over eight hours. When the enemy finally began to withdraw in defeat, he again reorganized the company and dispatched strong patrols forward to sweep the remaining hostile survivors from the ridge. By his valiant fighting spirit, determined leadership and unswerving devotion to duty while under constant enemy fire, Captain Connolly served to inspire all who observed him and was greatly instrumental in the success of the mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York.

Connor, John P. (2nd award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 76 - 27 February 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Colonel (Infantry), [then Lieutenant Colonel] John P. Connor (ASN: 0-20860), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer of the 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Soum-ni, Korea, during the night of 7 - 8 November 1951. The First Battalion, holding defensive positions, was savagely attacked in the hours of darkness by a numerically superior enemy force. During the ensuing conflict, two companies became isolated from the units on the main line of resistance. Realizing this, Colonel Connor, displaying far greater concern for the welfare of his men than for his personal safety, advanced to aid the fighting infantrymen. Undaunted by the intense concentration of small arms, mortar and artillery fire with which the enemy was blasting the entire area, he made his way up the treacherously steep slope to the scene of thickest action. Immediately sizing up the situation, he moved from position to position, shouting words of encouragement and instruction to the men around him. Inspired by his fearlessness and cool, skillful leadership, the riflemen fought with renewed aggressiveness and soon sent the greatly decimated enemy hordes fleeing in panicky confusion. Colonel Connor's gallant action, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of the Battalion's defenses and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered Service From New York.

Connor, Joseph H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Joseph H. Connor (NSN: 4227737), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 February 1953. Serving as a Platoon Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Connor displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. As the unit of which he was a member commenced a raiding action against a strongly fortified position, he was painfully wounded but refused treatment and continued with the assault to the objective area. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he fearlessly moved about in the face of intense enemy mortar, grenade, machine gun and small arms fire in order to locate, treat and evacuate casualties. During the action, he was wounded a second time but again refused medical aid and continued rendering assistance to his fallen comrades. After withdrawing to friendly lines, he personally insured that each casualty had been treated before permitting himself to be evacuated. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Connor's indomitable spirit and gallant and courageous actions served s an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 16576 (May 18, 1953).

Connor, Ollie D.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 204 - 26 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Ollie D. Connor (ASNL 0-2204170), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Osan, Korea, on 5 July 1950. During the defense of the high ground north of the town he observed a long enemy tank column approaching his company's position. Armed only with a 2.36-inch rocket launcher he advanced, through a hail of withering tank fire, to a position adjacent to the road in order to bring fire upon the column. With utter disregard for his own safety, he fired on the passing tanks with such effect that four were damaged to the extent that they were later destroyed. Lieutenant Conner's courageous actions assisted materially in slowing the enemy advance, permitted his company to hold its positions for a considerable period against overwhelming odds and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. nHome Town: Tupelo, Mississippi.

Conrad, Robert G.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 139 - 8 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Captain Robert G. Conrad, 027545, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. The 15th Field Artillery Battalion was brought under intense attack by the enemy who had broken through the lines of the supporting infantry. The firing batteries were completely surrounded by the enemy forces who were pouring extremely intense fire into the area. Captain Conrad, noting a firing vehicle sitting inactive, left his position and went to the vehicle. He discovered that the crew chief had been killed and the crew demoralized. By moving on foot ahead of the vehicle, he directed it to a position where effective fire could be placed upon the enemy. Remaining in an exposed position, Captain Conrad directed the fire until the enemy was forced to withdraw. Returning to the assembly area, he discovered that as a result of the intensity of the attacks, few of the howitzers were still in action. With complete disregard for his own safety, Captain Conrad organized the heterogeneous personnel in the area and personally directed their fire upon the enemy until the ammunition was expended. He then organized these personnel into a perimeter defense until the order to withdraw was given. The gallantry displayed by Captain Conrad throughout the entire action reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from New York.

Constantine, Edward L.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Edward L. Constantine (MCSN: 0-44992), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Headquarters, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea. On 29 November 1950, the enemy attacked in battalion strength with one company in the assault against his platoon. Lieutenant Constantine's adjacent platoon was partially overrun. The enemy was actually in physical contact with the forward positions of his plat one. Lieutenant Constantine, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, moved among his fire teams and squads to supervise and direct their fire. By his own heroic efforts, the attack against his position was repulsed with terrific loss to the enemy in men and material. The gallantry displayed on this occasion by Lieutenant Constantine reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 73 (April 13, 1951)

Constantine, Stephan L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Stephan L. Constantine (MCSN: 1151296), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 and 7 September 1952. When a friendly outpost was brought under heavy enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire followed by an attack by a numerically superior enemy force, Sergeant Constantine courageously exposed himself to the hostile fire by positioning himself on top of one of the few remaining bunkers to deliver more effective fire upon the enemy and, although knocked unconscious by concussion during the first assault, remained at his position. Buried alive under an avalanche of rubble during the second assault, he dug himself out and continued to deliver accurate and effective fire throughout the attacks, passing vital ammunition and grenades to other Marines who were away from the main supply. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Constantine served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Milford, Connecticut.

Conti, Pasquale Jr.


Pasquale Conti Jr.
(Click picture for a larger view)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 121 - 25 March 1952

First Lieutenant Pasquale J. Conti, 0133993, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 23 December 1951, the Second Platoon of Company "F", led by Lieutenant Conti, was assigned the mission to provide supporting fire for Company "G" in an assault on enemy held Hill 200 near Sangnyon-Myon, Korea, with a secondary mission of assaulting the hill. Due to the intense hostile fire, the assault unit was effectively pinned down and unable to advance further. Upon the order to throw his platoon into the assault, Lieutenant Conti promptly moved his men forward. Almost immediately subjected to concentrated hostile automatic-weapons, small-arms, and grenade fire, he fearlessly placed himself at the front of his platoon and by his outstanding leadership, his brilliant scheme of maneuver, and his daring initiative he inspired his men to accomplish their mission. Although wounded during the course of the vicious battle he refused to be evacuated for medical attention and continued to direct the fire of his men. When the fanatical foe regrouped for a counterattack Lieutenant Conti accurately directed friendly artillery fire on the massed troops and effectively disrupted the enemy threat. When the order came to withdraw he successfully covered the withdrawal of his unit, although suffering from the loss of blood. Lieutenant Conti's gallant and unwavering determination reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from New York.

Contreras, Narcisco R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Narcisco R. Contreras (MCSN: 667186), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. With his company holding fast during an attack on a series of hostile bunkers on rugged mountain terrain and, when a deadly hand grenade duel ensued, Private First Class Contreras raced through the hail of missiles and, hurling a hand grenade into one of the bunkers, succeeded in killing the occupants. Skillfully clearing his jammed rifle when subjected to attack from other hostile positions, he engaged the enemy with accurate fire until his squad advanced to overrun the objective. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Omaha, Nebraska. Home Town: Omaha, Nebraska.

Conway, Walter E.

Headquarters, 24 Infantry Division
General Orders No. 270 - 19 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Walter E. Conway (ASN: 0-1292309), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Pohang, Korea, on 12 September 1950. His battalion had launched an attack against a key hill. Shortly after his company had started the ascent it was met by intense fire from a large enemy force which was positioned in bunker-type emplacements. His company was subsequently ordered to make a slight withdrawal to occupy defensive positions during the night. With utter disregard for his own safety Captain Conway moved through the area making certain that all his men including the wounded had withdrawn. Unable to locate one of his men he advanced to the former position in an effort to find this man. Although subjected to intense automatic weapons and small arms fire he moved through the area, recovered the body of his Sergeant who had fallen in the earlier action. Captain Conway's gallant action reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Loma Linda, California.

Conyngham, John N. III

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant John N. Conyngham, III (MCSN: 0-51311), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. Participating in the company attack against a heavily fortified enemy hill position, Second Lieutenant Conyngham skillfully directed a mortar barrage on the objective and then led his platoon forward through heavy enemy fire. When the intense hostile fire temporarily halted the attack, he fearlessly advanced to direct rifle grenade fire on the enemy positions, and led his men in a daring bayonet charge which completely disorganized the enemy and enabled his men to rapidly secure the strategic ground. By his inspiring leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Second Lieutenant Conyngham contributed materially to the success of his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.

Cook, James L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James L. Cook (MCSN: 1082581), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Carrier of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. When ammunition supplies became critically low during a vicious night attack against his company by a numerically superior enemy force, Private First Class Cook braved intense cold, icy terrain and heavy hostile fire to make repeated trips from the supply point to the front lines. Although seriously wounded during one of these trips, he steadfastly refused to seek medical aid and resolutely continued to carry ammunition to the men on the line and to assist in the removal of casualties to rear areas. By his aggressive determination and heroic actions, he contributed materially to the repulse of the enemy and served to inspire all who observed him. Private First Class Cook's valiant devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: LaFayette, Indiana. Home Town: LaFayette, Indiana.

Cook, John W.

Major John W. Cook, 034294, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, displayed gallantry in action near Taepyong-ni, Korea on 16 July 1950.  During an attack the enemy had penetrated the front lines and had the Battalion Command Post under intense small arms fire.  Major Cook organized the men at the Command Post and led them in a Counter-attack.  He was instrumental in knocking out several automatic weapons by the use of hand grenades.  He engaged the enemy at close quarters, killing one with his pistol and bayoneting another.  In his gallant action Major Cook was killed.  The military skill and aggressive leadership displayed on this occasion by Major Cook reflects high credit on himself and the military service of his country.

Cook, Kenneth O.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Kenneth O. Cook (MCSN: 0-41165), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. With his company positions overrun by a numerically superior hostile force, First Lieutenant Cook, although suffering severe pain from frozen feet, staunchly remained on the hill until he had supervised the evacuation of all casualties. Although barely able to walk, he organized a composite platoon and personally led them in an assault against the hill, consistently exposing himself to the intense hostile fire to direct and control the fire of his men until he had succeeded in establishing a hasty defense and in halting the enemy's advance. By his aggressive and inspiring leadership, fortitude and superb combat tactics, First Lieutenant Cook contributed materially to the successful defense of his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hagler, Arkansas. Home Town: Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

Cook, Lee C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Lee C. Cook (MCSN: 0-54356), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 October 1952. Under cover of darkness, Second Lieutenant Cook skillfully led a small group of men to an outpost position forward of the main line of resistance in preparation for a reconnaissance patrol into enemy territory. Although painfully wounded by the initial burst of an intense hostile mortar and artillery barrage which was delivered on his unit and the outpost, inflicting numerous casualties, he unhesitatingly rushed forward with the remaining members of his group to assist the defenders of the outpost when an enemy ground attack was imminent. Finding that the officer-in-charge and all the noncommissioned officers were casualties, he immediately assumed command, quickly reorganized the surviving men, repositioned the undamaged weapons and prepared for the expected assault, Effectively adjusting supporting fires, he materially aided his outpost. Throughout the remainder of the night, he arranged for the evacuation of the casualties and the reinforcement and re-supply of the position and, refusing personal evacuation, voluntarily remained on the outpost until dawn. By his inspiring leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Second Lieutenant Cook contributed materially to the successful defense of the outpost and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Lansdowne, Pennsylvania.

Cook, Roger H.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 434 - 15 September 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Roger H. Cook, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 7 January 1951 as pilot of a B-26 light bomber on a low-level attack against the heavily defended city of Suwon, Korea. Captain Cook flew his aircraft through sever storms to the target area, letting down in icing conditions through a six thousand foot overcast. He broke out just above the mountains, located the enemy and made two successful bomb runs, scoring direct hits on concentrated groups of enemy troops. During the runs his aircraft was damaged by flak and a fire started in the fuselage. Although the aircraft was filled with smoke, Captain Cook continued his low-level attacks with rockets, napalm and machine guns against the confused and disorganized enemy, killing and wounding many troops, destroying six buildings and leaving four more burning. The fire in his aircraft was eventually brought under control and he flew the damaged ship to home base. The skill, courage and devotion to duty displayed by Captain Cook were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Cooke, Kenneth J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Boatswain's Mate Third Class Kenneth J. Cooke (NSN: 3645125), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while attached to U.S.S. Henrico(APA-45), as Coxswain of an assault boat during the amphibious assault against Inchon on 15 September 1950, in an area subjected to enemy gunfire. After successfully discharging his troops and after backing clear of the beach, he observed that one or more of a small group of Marines near the seawall under heavy rifle and machine gun fire had been wounded. Without regard for personal danger, he again beached his boat, took on board the wounded Marine and transported him to safety and medical care. His heroic actions above and beyond the call of duty and his outstanding courage were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 375 (March 14, 1951).

Cooke, LeRoy Moore (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain LeRoy Moore Cooke (MCSN: 0-11422), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Company Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. When his company's defensive positions were attacked by a numerically superior enemy force which succeeded in overrunning the forward elements of the company, Captain Cooke repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy hostile fire in order to reorganize his company and lead a counterattack against the enemy. Moving among his men, he skillfully directed their fire, lending words of encouragement and rendering aid to the beleaguered troops. After the successful repulse of the hostile attack, he reorganized his company and, while reestablishing the defensive positions, was mortally wounded. By his outstanding leadership, courage and aggressive fighting spirit, Captain Cooke served to inspire all members of his company and contributed materially to the success of his company in repelling the enemy attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 18, 1927 at Georgetown, Delaware. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland. Death: KIA: November 27, 1950.

Cooney, Thomas E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Captain Thomas E. Cooney (MCSN: 0-32333), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while commanding a Marine Infantry Company of the Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 November 1950. Captain Cooney was directing the advance of his company in an approach march formation up the mountain road south of Koto-ri, North Korea. As the main body of his company rounded a turn on the tortuous road, the point and main body were taken under extremely heavy and accurate enemy machine gun and automatic weapons fire from cleverly camouflaged positions. Unmindful of his own personal safety, and with complete disregard of a painful hip wound sustained in the initial attack, Captain Cooney moved forward in the face of the heavy fire to observe the enemy dispositions. When he was informed that a tank was supporting the enemy, Captain Cooney personally led the rocket section forward to a position from which the tank was destroyed. While directing the fire of the rocket crew, Captain Cooney was again wounded as a machine gun bullet grazed his forearm. Refusing to be evacuated while his company was under fire, he directed the consolidation of his position, and coordinated the defenses. His dauntless personal bravery and courage served as an unforgettable inspiration to his men. Captain Cooney's courage, bravery, and intrepidity reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. General Orders: Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 40 (November 22, 1950).

Captain Cooney was the commanding officer of Company G, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division. He was killed by a sniper while checking to ensure none of his men were left behind during withdrawal from Hill 1425 near Yudam-ni, North Korea on November 27, 1950. His remains were not recovered.

Cooper, Charles Grafton

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Charles G. Cooper (0-50749), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 June 1951. Participating in an assault against an enemy hill position when his platoon was pinned down by devastating small-arms and automatic-weapons fire from a strongly entrenched hostile position, Second Lieutenant Cooper, after calling for and receiving a friendly air strike and artillery fire support, attempted to move his platoon forward but was again pinned down by fire from the same enemy position. With the advance of the entire company halted, he unhesitatingly charged through the hail of bullets and grenades with one other Marine and, upon reaching the enemy emplacement, hurled grenades through the embrasure, killing the occupants and silencing the fire. Severely wounded while engaged in this hazardous undertaking, Second Lieutenant Cooper, by his outstanding bravery and daring initiative, was directly instrumental in the seizure of the company's objective and served to inspire all who observed him. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Cooper, Curtis

Major Curtis Cooper, O403436, Infantry, 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 9 July 1950 at Noechan-ri, Korea. The First Battalion had been under heavy artillery and mortar fire for several hours, which was followed by a full scale attack of an enemy regiment supported by tanks, mortars and artillery. The enemy advance was being held from the front but a flank attack was threatening to cut off the only road to the rear. The Battalion Commander, unaware that a message had been sent to him, dispatched Major Cooper to contact his Regimental Commander to make known the situation. Major Cooper proceeded to Regiment in a jeep along a road covered by heavy mortar fire. He received instructions, then started his return to the Battalion Command Post only to find a road block about one mile from the Battalion Command Post manned by approximately a platoon of enemy using several machine guns. Some jeeps and one three-quarter ton truck had been knocked out and were being covered by the enemy machine gun fire. Major Cooper, leaving his jeep, went to the rear and brought forward a friendly tank which he rode directing its action in breaking through the road block and pushing the vehicles off the road that were obstructing passage. The enemy fire became so intense that he was forced to jump from the tank but he continued to direct its movements until the machine guns were knocked out and the enemy forced to withdraw. Major Cooper then continued his mission of delivering orders to the Battalion; also, that the road was cleared. All this time Major Cooper was under fire from the enemy weapons; however, in a calm, cool manner he performed his mission and exemplified a high devotion to duty that reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the Armed Forces. GO 64, 1 Aug 1950Entered service from Detroit, MI.

Cooper, Leon H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Leon H. Cooper (MCSN: 617603), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Rifle Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 October 1951. Leading his men on a daring patrol raid deep into enemy territory, Sergeant Cooper maneuvered his squad among strong hostile entrenchments in the face of devastating automatic weapons, small arms and grenade fire. Skillfully positioning his men to isolate a sector of the enemy's fortifications, he led a vigorous attack, personally killing ten of the enemy and wounding four others with accurate rifle and grenade fire. Effectively disengaging his unit, he succeeded in returning to friendly lines with only one minor casualty among his men. By his outstanding tactical ability, inspiring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Cooper materially aided his unit in annihilating an estimated sixty-five of the enemy, wounding thirteen others and destroying twenty-five hostile bunkers. His unswerving devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fort Payne, Arkansas. Home Town: Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Cooper, Oren S. (posthumous)

General Orders No. 31 - 5 February 1951

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to Sergeant First Class Oren S. Cooper, RA6869050, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 6 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea. In the early morning hours of that date, he was a platoon sergeant in a rifle company when it was attacked by a strong enemy force. During this attack he single-handedly covered a thirty-five yard front, while holding off the attacking enemy with rifle and grenade fire for a period of more than forty-five minutes. When reinforcements arrived from the mortar section, he continued to hold the area while these men were being placed in position. Just at daylight the enemy force withdrew. Later in the same day, he was killed by enemy mortar fire, during an attack on enemy-held positions. The gallant and inspiring conduct of Sergeant Cooper on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and fully upholds the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Carterville, Missouri.

Cooper, Roland E. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 477 - 5 December 1952

First Lieutenant Roland E. Cooper, 063946, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company "I", 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 26 October 1952 in the vicinity of Chorwon, North Korea.  On that date Lieutenant Cooper was leading a patrol into hostile territory with the mission of making contact with the enemy and taking prisoners.  As they neared the objective, the patrol was ambushed by a numerically superior enemy force and immediately subjected to a murderous cross fire.  Realizing the seriousness of the situation, he organized the patrol for a withdrawal and started to lead them back to friendly lines through intense enemy mortar and small arms fire.  Although painfully wounded during the action, Lieutenant Cooper refused medical attention, and with complete disregard for personal safety, continued to expose himself to enemy fire while giving words of encouragement to his men and directing their withdrawal.  As the patrol neared the friendly lines, he stepped on an enemy mine and was mortally wounded.  He made the supreme sacrifice in his sincere concern for the welfare of his men and his inspiring and courageous leadership was directly responsible for the patrol reaching friendly lines with a minimum of casualties.  The gallantry in action displayed by Lieutenant Cooper reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Indiana.

Coquat, Jewell Dwain (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Jewell Dwain Coquat (MCSN: 659662), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Platoon Sergeant of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 November 1950. With the forward elements of his platoon pinned down by enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire while conducting a patrol mission, Corporal Coquat unhesitatingly led the support and machine gun section through intense hostile fire to a favorable striking position and, directing an accurate and effective barrage against the attackers, succeeded in gaining fire superiority and in driving them from their positions. When his platoon commander was fatally struck down during a counterattack from the front and flank of his sector by a numerically superior enemy, he immediately reorganized the depleted units and led them in a brilliantly executed maneuver to hold off the overwhelming force. Mortally wounded during the furious action, Corporal Coquat, by his daring initiative, courageous leadership and unrelenting devotion to duty in the face of tremendous odds, inspired others to heroic efforts in substantially repelling the attack and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Oakville, Texas. Home Town: Three Rivers, Texas.

Corbett, Leroy V.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Leroy V. Corbett (MCSN: 0-34213), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 September 1951. When two of his men were wounded by enemy fire on the crest of a ridge while he was leading one of his platoons on a reconnaissance patrol well in advance of friendly lines, Captain Corbett bravely moved across the fire-swept terrain and successfully deployed his unit to avoid further casualties. Directing his men into fresh positions, he personally covered their movements with a steady stream of fire from his carbine. In a daring attempt to pin down the hostile force, he seized an automatic rifle, stood up amid a hail of enemy fire and delivered a devastating volume of counterfire which inflicted severe casualties on the hostile troops, enabling his men to move over the ridge to positions of safety. By his exceptional courage, outstanding leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Captain Corbett served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Atkinson, North Carolina. Home Town: Falson, North Carolina.

Corcoran, William L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Gunner's Second Class William L. Corcoran (NSN: 7615853), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Mount Captain of Mount Number One of the U.S.S. Mansfield (DD-728), on 30 September 1950, when the Mansfield struck an enemy mine in North Korean waters. Gunner's Mate Second Class Corcoran displayed outstanding courage and intrepidity in evacuating his wounded shipmates from the Chief Petty Officer's mess and lower handling room. In entering compartments filled with fumes, smoke and debris to rescue his wounded shipmates, Gunner's Mate Second Class Corcoran demonstrated outstanding courage. His tenacity and bold spirit were evidenced by his tireless efforts in engaging in the daring rescue until he collapsed from his own wounds. Gunner's Mate Second Class Corcoran well knew the dangers of entering these damaged compartments and voluntarily risked his own life in an area of possible holocaust in order to effect the rescue of his wounded men. His courage in the face of danger contributed to the timely medical attention that his men received so that none of the twenty-eight injured died of their wounds. Gunner's Mate Second Class Corcoran's fearless action and intrepid courage were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 839 (1951).

Cordero, Juan Cesar

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 303 - 23 September 1952

Colonel Juan C. Cordero, O222751, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 20 July 1952, Company "C" was attempting a withdrawal after completing a raiding mission on enemy positions near Chongdong, Korea. In the initial phases of the withdrawal the friendly troops were subjected to intense hostile automatic weapons, artillery and mortar fire from nearby enemy positions. Under the withering fire the men became disorganized and began to move in all directions. Realizing the necessity for the company to effect an orderly withdrawal and evacuate the wounded, Colonel Cordero, the Regimental Commander, continuously exposed himself to the hostile bombardment as he moved among the men, offering them words of encouragement and directing them through the heavy enemy fire. Inspired by his courage, the men assumed the initiative and continued to move toward friendly positions. At this time, the ridge line over which the withdrawal was to be made was subjected to heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire. Despite the urging of his executive officer that he seek a place of safety, Colonel Cordero refused to leave his men, and with complete disregard for his personal safety, braved the enemy fire to insure that all had reached safety and the wounded had been evacuated. Colonel Cordero's gallant and inspirational leadership was instrumental to the success of the withdrawal and reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Cordero-Cantino, Felipe (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Felipe Cordero-Cantino (MCSN: 1210569), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner in Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, 13-15 August 1952. Assigned the mission of providing protective covering fire while his unit was engaged in defending a vitally strategic position on “Bunker Hill”, Private First Class Cordero-Cantino bravely exposed himself to the heavy barrage of hostile artillery and mortar fire to guard a route of approach which was easily accessible to the enemy. Although blown from his position and stunned by the explosion of a hostile mortar shell, he unhesitatingly returned to his gun upon regaining consciousness and continued to deliver effective counter fire on the enemy until he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his outstanding courage, marked fortitude and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Cordero-Cantino served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of his company's assigned mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Ponce, Puerto Rico.

Cordes, Gilbert Marsh (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Gilbert Marsh Cordes (MCSN: 0-53229), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 8 - 9 April 1952. When his patrol was subjected to heavy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire from well-entrenched hostile forces during a night raid on an enemy position well in advance of friendly lines, Second Lieutenant Cordes bravely led his men forward in a daring assault on the objective. Mortally wounded during the intensive action, Second Lieutenant Cordes, by his courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and zealous devotion to duty, contributed immeasurably to the ultimate success of the mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: May 5, 1928 at Braintree, Massachusetts. Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia.

Cordova, Ernest J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Ernest J. Cordova (MCSN: 1095693), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces during a company assault up a large hill against strong and numerically superior hostile opposition in Korea on 3 December 1950. After an air strike and supporting fire from heavy ground weapons had permitted his company to move toward the objective, Private First Class Cordova crept forward in the face of enemy machine gun and small arms fire which had pinned down his squad and, pausing repeatedly to fire his automatic rifle, succeeded in advancing approximately thirty yards in front of the company's forward lines on the right flank. Moving to the left of the hostile position, he flanked an enemy machine gun, put it out of action by throwing two hand grenades into the emplacement and remained at his post to deliver accurate and effective fire on the retreating hostile troops. By his courageous initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, he contributed materially to the advance of his platoon and seizure of its assigned sector of the objective. His inspiring devotion to duty in the face of grave peril reflect great credit upon Private First Class Cordova and the United States Naval Service. Born: Dawson, New Mexico. Home Town: Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Corey, Johnny F.

Lieutenant Corey, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 26 November 1950 while flying on a pre-briefed mission over enemy territory in Korea. While flying as an observer on an unarmed T-6 type aircraft, Lieutenant Corey heard a plea for assistance from an injured forward ground controller who was completely surrounded by a large number of enemy troops. Lieutenant Corey immediately proceeded to the area from which the signal had emanated. However, due to excessive smoke and haze, visibility was greatly restricted and only through exceptional alertness did he succeed in locating the injured man near an unfinished airstrip. When the aircraft landed, Lieutenant Corey, in the face of intense enemy fire, quickly helped the wounded man aboard the aircraft. By the time the rescue was completed, enemy forces were rapidly closing in from all directions, concentrating their fire on the aircraft and its occupants. By his decisive and valorous action, Lieutenant Corey saved the life of a member of the United Nations Forces. His unfailing courage under fire, conspicuous gallantry and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the United Nations Forces and the United States Air Force. General Orders No. 127 (28 March 1951)

Corkill, Lee J. Jr. (3ID)

Excerpts from citation:

"During the morning hours of darkness on 26 August 1951, Company B, 15th Infantry, 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army, was occupying defensive positions on Hill 266, which was being used as a patrol base, when it was subjected to a hostile artillery barrage followed by an overwhelming hostile attack.  Having gained the high ground overlooking the company's positions, the foe sent two of his soldiers to a point from which they pinned down a platoon with lethal grenade fire.  Pfc. Corkill, on outpost duty in front of his unit, left his foxhole, crawled toward the two hostile grenade throwers and, undaunted by wounds received from grenade fragments, destroyed them with his rifle and bayonet, thus removing a serious threat to the defense hill.  Pfc. Corkill's audacious aggressiveness and gallantry reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service."

Corley, Clarence E. Jr. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Clarence E. Corley, Jr. (MCSN: 0-20003), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 28 and 29 November 1950. When a vastly out-numbering hostile force attacked his company's position and penetrated the center of the lines, Captain Corley fearlessly moved through intense small arms, mortar, artillery and machine gun fire while deploying his men and directing their fire to contain the breakthrough until reinforcements arrived from the battalion command post. Integrating the reinforcing troops with his own, he led a brilliantly executed counterattack against the aggressors and, although painfully wounded during the initial stages of the action, staunchly refused to be evacuated and remained to lead his men in a bitterly fought battle to rout the enemy and repulse the onslaught. His daring and aggressive leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and superb tactics in the face of heavy odds served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon Captain Corley and the United States Naval Service.

Corley, Clarence E. Jr. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Clarence E. Corley, Jr. (MCSN: 0-20003), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 March 1951. When his company was pinned down by intense enemy automatic weapons, mortar and small arms fire during an attempt to seize a strategic hostile strong point in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Captain Corley unhesitatingly made his way to the foremost position of the action to appraise the tactical situation. Learning that one of his assault platoon commanders had been wounded and evacuated, he elected to follow the assault unit and, during the bitterly contested seizure of the intermediate objective, skillfully directed the fire of a rocket launcher which neutralized a well-defended enemy emplacement. Undeterred by the intense hostile mortar fire, he bravely led his company in the attack on the main objective and succeeded in seizing the enemy strong point with minimum casualties to his unit. By his inspiring leadership, marked courage and unswerving devotion to duty, Captain Corley contributed materially to the success achieved by his battalion and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Alexandria, Louisiana. Home Town: Pineville, Louisiana.

Corley, John Thomas (6th award - first 5 earned in World War II)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 153 - 21 February 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Silver Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Sixth Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) John Thomas Corley (ASN: 0-21325), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer, 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, on 11 August 1950, near Wonson, Korea. On that date, Colonel Corley was leading his Battalion in an attack when the advance elements were subjected to devastating small arms and mortar fire. Despite exposure to the deadly barrage, he calmly deployed his men to maximum advantage and directed the forward observer to a favorable position. When one of the radio men was wounded by hostile fire, he advanced to the injured man, administered first aid and carried him back for evacuation. Colonel Corley's courageous leadership and selfless devotion to his men reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Corley, John Thomas (7th award)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 138 - 19 February 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in addition to a previously awarded Silver Oak Leaf Cluster lieu of a Seventh Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) John Thomas Corley (ASN: 0-21325), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer, 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, at Haman, Korea, on 16 September 1950. On that date, Colonel Corley's regiment launched a series of attacks against strong hostile positions. As his exhausted men organized for a final assault, he advanced to the line of departure to take personal command. Despite constant exposure to intense hostile fire, he rallied his men around him, led them in their successful assault and remained with the lead elements until recalled by the Division Commander. Colonel Corley's courageous leadership and selfless devotion to duty were an inspiration to his men and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.

Corley, John Thomas (8th award)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 48 - 23 March 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in addition to a previously awarded Silver Oak Leaf Cluster lieu of an Eighth Award of the Silver Star to Colonel (Infantry) John Thomas Corley (ASN: 0-21325), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer of the 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, near Pugwon, Korea, on 30 November 1950. On that date, strong hostile forces had penetrated friendly lines on the right flank of Colonel Corley's Regiment. Advancing on foot to clarify the situation, he reorganized adjacent Infantry elements in specifically assigned sectors and then proceeded to an important river crossing to ascertain if it was still in friendly hands. After reconnoitering the area without encountering hostile forces, he dispatched a platoon of tanks to reinforce his forward Battalion and remained at the crossing until assured that all friendly lines were finally re-secured. Colonel Corley's courageous leadership, tactical skill and selfless devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.

Corman, Otis W.S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Otis W. S. Corman (MCSN: 0-24745), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane and a Flight Leader of Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hagaru-ri, Korea on 7 December 1950. With the enemy occupying strategic machine gun and mortar positions covering a roadblock which impeded the advance of the FIRST Marine Division Convoy, Captain Corman executed vital close air support attacks over the mountainous terrain in a brave attempt to silence the hostile strong points. Advised of the hazardous conditions existing within the area by the control center operating from a radio jeep, he boldly let down through the low overcast to carry out four daring night assaults on the enemy, thereby exposing the targets to succeeding flights which attacked and neutralized the opposition. His marked courage, professional skill and unswerving devotion to duty were contributing factors in the ultimate success of the operation and reflect the highest credit upon Captain Corman and the United States Naval Service. Born: Schuyler County, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Cornely, Robert P.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Staff Sergeant Robert P. Cornely (MCSN: 351023), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on in action against an armed enemy during the period 29 November 1950 to 4 December 1950. His actions contributed materially to the successful break-through of United Nations troops in the Chosin Reservoir area and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Military Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 55 (December 16, 1950).

Corrigan, John P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class John P. Corrigan (NSN: 7524265), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 September 1950. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Corrigan acting as Company Corpsman, repeatedly and fearlessly exposed himself to intense enemy small arms and machine gun fire in order to aid and evacuate the many wounded. With utter disregard for his personal safety he refused to search for covered approaches to the wounded and moved directly from one casualty to the next through heavy enemy fire, administering aid. He courageously aided the wounded quickly and successfully and prepared them for evacuation to the aid station. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Corrigan's heroic actions and initiative were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 17583 (October 31, 1950).

Corwin, Mac Rockwell (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Master Sergeant Mac Rockwell Corwin (MCSN: 378827), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with the First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. Although suffering from painful enemy shrapnel wounds sustained earlier in the day, Master Sergeant Corwin bravely continued to perform his duties as truckmaster in a convoy carrying friendly troops from Koto-ri to Hagaru-ri and, despite hostile fire, boldly moved among the vehicles shouting words of encouragement to the drivers. Mortally wounded by the enemy while driving the leading vehicle through a hostile road-block, Master Sergeant Corwin, by his inspiring leadership, marked courage and steadfast devotion to duty, greatly aided in maintaining the security of the convoy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 8, 1918 at St. Paul, Minnesota. Home Town: Mexico, New York Death: KIA: November 29, 1950.

Costa, Albert J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 261 - 14 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Albert J. Costa (ASN: RA-12294049), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near O'Kchon, Korea, on 27 September 1950. During an attack his company was held up by heavy machine gun, small arms and tank fire. The fire from the tank was particularly devastating and Private Costa unhesitatingly determined to eliminate it. Leaving his position of relative safety he advanced to engage the tank with his recoilless rifle. Completely disregarding his own safety he moved through intense fire until he reached a position within 20 yards of the tank. From this position he fired with such accuracy that with one round he killed two of the crew and caused the remainder to abandon the tank. His fearless action greatly facilitated his company's continued advance and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Costa, James M.

General Orders No. 9 (April 15, 1982)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal James M. Costa, United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company F, 187th Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division, in Korea, on 19 July 1953. His actions, without regard for his own safety, reflect great credit on himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.

Costa, William A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 143 - 23 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William A. Costa (ASN: US-51098932), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company E, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Sangyong-dong, Korea, on 11 January 1952. Private Costa was a member of a reconnaissance patrol sent out by his company to scout strongly fortified enemy positions. The patrol had advanced over rocky, mountainous terrain to within fifty yards of the emplacements, when enemy fire became so intense they were forced to see cover. Without regard for the concentrated hail of automatic weapons, small arms and grenade fire, Private Costa charged the enemy bunker from which the extremely heavy fire was coming. He fired his weapon with such accuracy and rapidity and exhibited such outstanding aggressiveness that the enemy was completely taken by surprise and fled in confusion. As he advanced to the mouth of the enemy bunker, he threw two hand grenades into it and completely destroyed the fortification. As a result of his lone act of courage, the patrol successfully completed its mission. Private Costa's gallant action and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered Service From Massachusetts.

Costopoulos, Peter C.

Headquarters 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 562 - 3 October 1951

Master Sergeant Peter C. Costopoulos, ER31164360, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company B, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 28 July 1951 in the vicinity of Taeusan, Korea.  On this date, during an attack on a strongly fortified enemy-held hill, Sergeant Costopoulos took over a machine gun and with an assistant advanced up the hill with marching fire under intense enemy small arms and grenade fire.  When his assistant gunner was hit he advanced alone inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy, continuing in this manner until he ran out of ammunition.  He continued in action with his unit until seriously wounded by an enemy round and was ordered by his commanding officer to leave for medical attention, after he had previously refused.  The gallantry and devotion to duty demonstrated by Sergeant Costopoulos on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Massachusetts.

Cotton, James G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James G. Cotton (MCSN: 330481), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 March 1951. During the company's assault on well-entrenched enemy positions atop a steep ridge, Sergeant Cotton repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to deploy his men and lead them to within grenade range of the enemy position. When the entrenched enemy unleashed a fierce barrage of grenade and rifle fire, he rallied his men and led them in a bayonet charge which overran the position and routed the enemy. By his outstanding courage, aggressive leadership and indomitable fighting spirit, Sergeant Cotton served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Cotton, John D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John D. Cotton (MCSN: 0-32737), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of an unarmed light Observation Plane in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6) during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 September 1950. Informed that a barrage of enemy artillery fire was delaying the advance of friendly ground forces while he was flying an air spotting mission for a Marine Infantry Regiment, First Lieutenant Cotton immediately flew in over the front lines at low altitude to enable his observer and himself to spot enemy artillery positions and direct friendly artillery fire against them. After the effective and accurate counterbattery fire had accomplished its mission, he called for a cease fire on artillery and ordered an air strike to strafe and bomb the retreating enemy. Boldly diving his aircraft to within one hundred feet of the ground, he marked the target with smoke grenades to enable friendly fighter planes to see the target and, by his accurate spotting and courageous efforts, contributed to the destruction of eleven hostile artillery pieces and approximately two hundred of the enemy, thereby enabling the infantry regiment to continue its advance. His superb airmanship, fearless tactics and zealous devotion to duty in the face of grave danger reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Cotton and the United States Naval Service. Born: Troy, Alabama. Home Town: Chatom, Alabama.

Cotton, J. W.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 412 - 30 August 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain J. W. Cotton, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action as pilot of an unarmed T-6 aircraft with the 6149th Tactical Control Squadron, (Air), FIFTH Air Force, in Korea on 24 June 1951. While on a low altitude reconnaissance mission in search of enemy troops and supply concentrations, Captain Cotton's aircraft received a direct hit through the canopy from an enemy machine gun position. As a result, he received a head injury and was temporarily stunned. Despite the wound and damaged condition of the aircraft, Captain Cotton remained in the target area for a period of more than two hours to direct the fire of fighter aircraft which had reported in for his control. In addition, he made frequent low passes through intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire to direct the fighters against the best targets. Through skillful direction of the fire power of the fighters, Captain Cotton was instrumental in destroying two enemy machine gun positions, one heavy gun position, and inflicting an estimated one hundred casualty score on enemy troops. Captain Cotton's courage and devotion to duty, reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Coultard, Gale M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Gale M. Coultard (MCSN: 1185671), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 March 1953. Participating in the defense of a vital outpost far forward of the main line of resistance when he noticed that a comrade on his flank was subjected to a deadly concentration of enemy small arms and grenade fire, Private First Class Coultard shifted his fire in an effort to divert the hostile fire and, observing that the Marine failed to see an enemy grenade which had fallen near him, bravely dived over the deadly missile, protecting his comrade from the blast by knocking him down and covering him with his own body. After checking the man's wounds and finding them slight, Private First Class Coultard unhesitatingly returned to his fighting position and continued to engage the enemy, although he, himself, was stunned by the explosion of the grenade. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of another, he served to inspire all who observed him. His heroic actions and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Private First Class Coultard and the United States Naval Service. Born: Portland, Oregon. Home Town: Douglas, Arizona.

Cousans, John J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant John J. Cousans (MCSN: 369806), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. When his unit was suddenly subjected to devastating enemy small arms and grenade fire from a large bunker while he was moving with the platoon in an attack against a series of hostile strong points, Sergeant Cousans quickly gathered hand grenades from the men nearby and bravely charged forward through the heavy fire in a single-handed assault. Hurling the grenades through the apertures of the enemy bunker, he completely neutralized the hostile emplacement, enabling the platoon to advance and seize its objective. By his exceptional courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Cousans served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana.

Covella, Joseph Francis (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Joseph Francis Covella (MCSN: 1001220), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 20 September 1951. When a large enemy force succeeded in capturing high ground adjacent to and threatening the battalion sector, Sergeant Covella unhesitatingly volunteered to lead his squad in a counterattack to regain the vital terrain. Expertly briefing his men, he moved out in the attack and, courageously exposing himself to intense hostile small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, spearheaded the assault against successive enemy bunkers and emplacements, completely routing the numerically superior hostile force. When the objective had been captured, he remained in an exposed position, directing his men in the pursuit of the fleeing enemy and rapidly consolidating the critical ground. By his heroic initiative, inspiring leadership and unflagging devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Covella contributed materially to the maintenance of the battalion's integrity and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: October 17, 1928 at Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York. Death: KIA: January 3, 1966.

Covert, Bert R. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Bert R. Covert, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49836), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observer attached to Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Flying in an unarmed observation plane over enemy lines in support of advancing friendly troops, Second Lieutenant Covert succeeded in locating a hostile force of estimated division strength deeply entrenched on high ground and controlling the route of march. Realizing the importance of removing the threat after making an unsuccessful attempt to radio the ground units, he skillfully maneuvered near close support aircraft and, via arm and hand signals, communicated his findings to the striking planes. While his pilot dauntlessly executed low altitude dives despite the extreme danger, Second Lieutenant Covert accurately marked the emplacements by dropping smoke grenades as the enemy sent up heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire. Remaining over the target area, he expertly directed and coordinated the air strike until all of the strong points had been neutralized and the successful advance of friendly troops assured. His exceptional professional ability and cool courage in the face of grave peril reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Covert and the United States Naval Service. Born: Lakeside, Michigan. Home Town: Lakeside, Michigan.

Covert, Willard A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Willard A. Covert (MCSN: 1114609), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 - 25 July 1953. Although seriously wounded by hostile small arms fire while courageously leading a counterattack against a numerically superior enemy force that had gained access to the trench line during an attack on his company's sector of the main line of resistance, Staff Sergeant Covert refused evacuation and fearlessly engaged the opposing forces in bitter hand-to-hand fighting until the severity of his wounds forced him to desist. Unable to continue fighting in close combat, he remained with his men to direct their fire and encourage them, materially aiding his unit in forcing the enemy to withdraw from the position. By his indomitable fighting spirit, marked fortitude and unyielding devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Covert served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lakeside, Michigan. Home Town: Lakeside, Michigan.

Cowan, James H. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant James H. Cowan, Jr. (MCSN: 0-45223), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 December 1950. Assigned the mission of neutralizing strongly defended enemy positions which were delaying the advance of the company, First Lieutenant Cowan skillfully led his men forward in the face of intense and accurate enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire. Aggressively maneuvering his unit and taking full advantage of supporting arms, he directed heavy fire on the hostile positions and, leading his men in the final assault, engaged the enemy at close quarters with rifle and grenade fire. Although painfully wounded in the face during the bitter hand-to-hand fighting, he continued in the assault and, shouting words of encouragement to his men, inspired them to overrun the enemy, killing or capturing the crews of two machine guns and routing many of the enemy. By his indomitable fighting spirit, inspiring leadership and courageous initiative, First Lieutenant Cowan aided immeasurably in the success achieved by the company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Honolulu, Hawaii. Home Town: Hilo, Hawaii.

Cowart, Carey Shaw Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Carey Shaw Cowart, Jr. (MCSN: 0-50795), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Leader of a 60-mm. Mortar Section of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 March 1951. Participating in a company attack against a series of strongly defended hostile positions in difficult terrain when automatic weapons and small arms fire temporarily halted the advance, Second Lieutenant Cowart immediately placed his section in tactical positions to deliver supporting fire and boldly moved forward to direct the firing. With visibility limited by several small forest fires which were burning in the area, he advanced to the forward slope of a fire-swept ridge from which he could observe more effectively. Courageously refusing to seek cover, he remained in his exposed position and continued adjusting accurate fire until he fell mortally wounded. His cool leadership, tactical skill and indomitable courage were contributing factors in permitting the company to maneuver successfully and seized the hostile emplacements, thereby reflecting great credit upon Second Lieutenant Coward and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 23, 1922 at Tulsa, Oklahoma. Home Town: Tulsa, Oklahoma. Death: DOW: March 22, 1951.

Cowie, William H. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant William H. Cowie, Jr. (MCSN: 0-57121), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as a Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 26 July 1953. Ordered to reinforce friendly elements on the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Cowie skillfully led his platoon forward to deploy it in the reinforcing position and, despite an intense hostile mortar and artillery barrage, fearlessly moved from one position to another to direct his men in expediting the occupation of the new sector. On three occasions, he gallantly led a squad into enemy-held trenches and cleared the hostile troops from the positions in order to evacuate wounded Marines, personally accounting for six enemy dead during the extremely close-in fighting. Although painfully wounded, he refused evacuation and, later in the night, skillfully called friendly mortar fire upon the enemy which resulted in many casualties among the hostile force. By his courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Cowie served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bridgeport, Connecticut. Home Town: Flushing, New York.

Cowling, David S.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Second Lieutenant David S. Cowling (MCSN: 0-49804), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against an armed enemy on 12 August 1950 near Changallon, Korea. On 12 August 1950, Lieutenant Cowling was in command of the advance party of the battalion and led his platoon in an assault on a well organized and strongly defended enemy position, Despite intense automatic weapons and small arms fire, he led his platoon in overrunning the position. During this action Lieutenant Cowling was wounded but refused to be evacuated. Later, when the platoon was ordered to withdraw, Lieutenant Cowling, without regard for his own personal safety, remained in the position covering the withdrawal of his men until the last man had reached safety. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Cowling on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 72 (September 16, 1950). Entered Service From South Dakota.

Cox, Jansen Calvin (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 204 - 26 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Jansen Calvin Cox (ASN: 0-2202011), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Osan, Korea, on 5 July 1950. During an attack by an enemy tank column, he unhesitatingly organized several bazooka teams and personally led the attack. Reaching a vantage point adjacent to and overlooking the roadway, he successfully destroyed one of the tanks. Through the accuracy and volume of his team's fire, several tanks were disabled and the enemy partially disorganized. When encircled by the hostile forces, he successfully led his party back to the relative safety of their own lines. Although greatly outnumbered by the hard-pressing enemy, Lieutenant Cox continuously remained exposed to their fire; hauled vitally needed ammunition to the defending infantry positions and aided materially in directing of the effective friendly fire. Later, during the battalion's withdrawal to new tenable positions, he fearlessly manned a .50 caliber machine gun to assure the safety of his troops. His courage, gallantry and unhesitant devotion to duty assured a minimum of casualties to the troops and reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry.  Home Town: Carroll, Virginia. Death: MIA as a Prisoner of War (Korean War).

Cox, Mortimer West Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Mortimer West Cox, Jr. (MCSN: 0-36480), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Acting Executive Officer of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on the night of 24 - 25 July 1953. With his company split in two and sustaining numerous casualties while proceeding through the darkness well forward of the main line of resistance to reinforce another company which was under heavy enemy attack, Second Lieutenant Cox exercised unusual leadership and exceptional initiative in regaining control, restoring cohesion and renewing the company's forward movement. Upon arriving at the forward position, he immediately took charge of resupply for both companies. Undaunted by the unceasing hostile artillery and mortar fire concentrated in the supply area, he exposed himself repeatedly to the withering barrage throughout the night to direct the salvage and distribution of ammunition, weapons and medical items, thereby insuring a constant flow of supplies to the defenders. In addition, he was instrumental in saving numerous lives by leading parties forward into the trenches to carry the wounded to the rear. Struck by enemy fire and instantly killed while reconnoitering the forward positions during the morning mopping-up operations, Second Lieutenant Cox, by his great personal valor in the face of heavy odds, served to inspire all who observed him. His actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 16, 1928 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Sewell, New Jersey. Death: KIA: July 25, 1953.

Cox, Roy L.

Second Lieutenant Roy L. Cox, O969451, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 19 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. Lt. Cox established a battalion outpost approximately 2000 yards in front of his company’s positions. He maintained this outpost for three days, repelling three enemy attacks by numerically superior forces. The outpost was under continuous small arms, mortar and artillery fire. On one occasion he received the order to withdraw from his and at the same time his position was attacked by an enemy force estimated to be three companies. Disregarding the order to withdraw he repelled the attack inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy force, thus enabling his adjacent platoon to withdraw. On numerous occasions he exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to encourage his men to stay in their positions and fire on the enemy. By his superior leadership and devotion to duty he as later able to withdraw his outpost and rejoin the remainder of his company without suffering any causalities. The act of gallantry displayed by Lt. Cox reflects great credit on himself and the military service. GO 71, 6 Aug 1950. Entered service from Knoxville, TN.

Craig, Cletus

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 482 - November 17, 1953

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Cletus Craig, US55298359, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company K, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in Korea. During the early morning hours of 15 June 1953, in the vicinity of Chat-Kol, Korea, United Nations elements attempting to encircle an enemy force were detected and subjected to intense enemy artillery and mortar barrages. Many friendly casualties were sustained in the bombardment and Private Craig commenced to administer medical aid to the wounded and remove them to sheltered positions. Aware that the foe had infiltrated the nearby trenches, Private Craig courageously exposed himself to the enemy and directed accurate fire upon them to effectively cover the evacuation of a wounded comrade. His brave actions and disregard for his personal safety were instrumental in the successful removal of the man to an aid station. Private Craig's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Craig, Edward A.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Brigadier General Edward A. Craig (MCSN: 0-196), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Assistant Division Commander, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in the amphibious landing resulting in the capture of Inchon, Korea, on 15 September 1950 in the Inchon-Seoul operation. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 50 (October 27, 1950). Born: November 22, 1896 at Danbury, Connecticut. Home Town: Danbury, Connecticut.

Craig, Robert Cox (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Robert Cox Craig (MCSN: 0-56600), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 27 to 29 March 1953. When his platoon participated in a night counterattack against a vital enemy-held combat outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Craig bravely led his unit forward and, steadfastly refusing to withdraw when subjected to a devastating barrage of hostile mortar and artillery fire, moved about the area encouraging his men to hold the position. After his platoon had suffered overwhelming casualties and the remaining members were utilized as stretcher bearers, he advanced up the hill through murderous enemy fire in an attempt to join in the action. On the following night, he led his men approximately one mile forward of friendly lines, established a defense for supply trains carrying vitally needed supplies to the bitterly contested outpost and successfully covered the movement despite hostile fire directed on the area. Although he fell, mortally wounded while again leading his men in a later night counterattack, Second Lieutenant Craig, by his indomitable leadership, valiant fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Champaign, Illinois. Home Town: Jacksonville, Florida. Death: KIA: March 29, 1953.

Crain, Charles

Source: www.soldiermemories.com.  Major Charles Crain received the Silver Star from Maj. General George W. Smythe, 3rd Division Commander, for "courageous leadership" in a battle near Chong-dong, Korea, on August 21, 1952.  The citation reads:

"While occupying a position approximately two miles forward of the UN main line of resistance, Company F of the Major's command was subjected to an intense mortar barrage and sustained numerous casualties. Realizing the necessity for a quick evacuation of the injured, Maj. Crain left the comparative safety of his position to direct the operation. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved among his troops shouting words of encouragement and aiding in the evacuation. Inspired by their commander's courageous leadership, medical aidmen quickly moved the wounded to a position of safety.  Maj. Crain's inspirational leadership and outstanding gallantry reflect great credit upon himself and his unit and are in keeping with the high tradition of the U.S. Army."

Crain, John

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 20 September 1950

Corporal (then Private First Class) John Crane, RA12035182, Infantry, Heavy Mortar Company, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  In the early morning of 5 August 1950, the 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry near Masan, Korea was penetrated during a fanatic attack by enemy who held much of the commanding high ground.  Corporal Chase, who was attached to Company A, made his way through the deadly barrage of hostile fire to a place on a hill from which he could most effectively direct his mortars.  Although the few men who had been with him were cut down by withering machine gun action, he maintained his post until he had enabled the mortars to place such accurate hits that the enemy was repelled.  Corporal Crane's conspicuous valor and devotion to duty are in keeping with the noblest traditions of the American soldier.  Entered the military service from New York.

Cramer, 1LT Harry G.

Headquarters, 25 Infantry Division
General Orders No. 305 - 29 May 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Harry G. Cramer (ASN: 0-28409), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in Korea. On 28 March 1951, friendly forces launched an attack on strong hostile positions near Haeryong, Korea. When his platoon was halted by devastating fire just short of the crest, Lieutenant Cramer charged the emplacements with fixed bayonet to inflict numerous casualties on the entrenched foe. His bold action so inspired his men that they charged through the position to drive the remaining enemy fight. Lieutenant Cramer's valorous leadership reflects the highest credit on himself and the United States Armed Forces.

Craven, William A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William A. Craven (MCSN: 0-41500), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Leader of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. Assigned the mission of rescuing a platoon of Marine engineers who were surrounded and cut off by the enemy in Su-dong, Korea, First Lieutenant Craven deployed his platoon and personally led an assault on a commanding hill infested with more than 40 entrenched hostile soldiers. With at least six of the enemy killed and the remainder routed in disorder during the course of the ensuing action, he was able to bring more effective fire to bear on the enemy entrenched on adjacent hills. While the engineers were clearing the area, he skillfully deployed his platoon and succeeded in repelling a hostile counterattack. By his outstanding courage, determination and gallant devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Craven was greatly instrumental in permitting the isolated engineer platoon to move to safety with a minimum of casualties, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Waco, Texas. Home Town: Waco, Texas.

Crawford, Chester H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 269 - 19 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Chester H. Crawford (ASN: 0-1314449), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chaeryong, Korea, on 17 October 1950. During an advance his company was pinned down by the well placed mortar and machine gun fire of an enemy force estimated at battalion strength. With complete disregard for his own safety he advanced to an exposed position at the head of his company. Maneuvering his platoons so as to effect a three-sided encirclement of the enemy he aggressively led the assault. When one of his platoons was held up by intense machine gun fire he secured a machine gun and ammunition and moved, through a hail of fire, to a vantage point from which he placed a great volume of deadly fire on the enemy's positions. Destroying this source of the enemy's strength he rejoined the assault platoon and continued the attack, and the men, inspired by his fearless example overran the positions and drove the enemy off in complete disorder. Captain Crawford's courageous actions, complete devotion to duty and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Williamsburg, Pennsylvania.

Crawford, Lamar G. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Lamar G. Crawford, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49825), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces while proceeding with a motor convoy along the Wonsan Pyong-yang highway in Korea, on 7 November 1950. With the radio jeep damaged when the motor convoy was stopped by a roadblock and suddenly pinned down by a hail of machine gun, automatic weapons and small arms fire from well-entrenched enemy positions on the high ground, Second Lieutenant Crawford quickly obtained a 30-caliber machine gun and stationed himself beside the jeep to return the hostile fire. Standing in full view of the enemy with the weapon cradled in his left arm, he diverted the enemy barrage from the radio operators who were repairing their vehicle and, while thus engaged, was severely wounded in the left leg and fell to the ground. Undaunted by his painful wounds, he boldly continued to man his gun, directing accurate fire until friendly fire superiority was gained and the enemy withdrew. By his initiative, skill and indomitable courage, he contributed materially to the re-establishment of radio communications between the convoy and the regimental command post. His gallant devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming opposition reflects great credit upon Second Lieutenant Crawford and the United States Naval Service. Born: Spartanburg, South Carolina. Home Town: Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Crawford, Philip L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Philip L. Crawford (MCSN: 0-7004), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot and Commanding Officer of Marine Attack Squadron One Hundred Twenty-One (VMA-121), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 2 September 1952. As leader of a flight of twelve aircraft, Lieutenant Colonel Crawford was assigned a mission to attack and destroy a heavily defended concentration of enemy vehicles and supplies near Koksana, and to destroy the roads adjacent to that area. In the face of intense, hostile anti-aircraft and automatic weapons fire, he led his flight in a carefully planned and deftly executed dive-bombing attack, resulting in the destruction of the objective. By his skilled airmanship, cool courage, and effective leadership, Lieutenant Colonel Crawford contributed greatly to the success of this mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Geneva, Kentucky. Home Town: Pomona, California.

Crawford, Robert L.

Master Sergeant Robert L. Crawford, a member of Battery D, 82nd AAA AW Battalion (SP). 2nd Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against the enemy on 30 November 1950 in the vicinity of Kunu-ri, Korea. On the night of that date, he was riding in a convoy composed of the command group of the Division which was attempting to break through on enemy roadblock that was approximately five miles in depth. He rode the lost combat vehicle to clear the roadblock and directed the fire of his guns against all targets of opportunity. He rallied other units to proceed through the roadblock, even though it was necessary for him to dismount and expose himself to the intense enemy fire. Despite the heavy enemy fire, he stopped his vehicle on numerous occasions to pick up the wounded lying along the road who otherwise would not have been evacuated. After negotiating the roadblock Sergeant Crawford voluntarily returned to the area to assist other personnel to safety. The outstanding leadership and complete disregard for his personal safety displayed by Sergeant Crawford on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Alabama.

Crawford, Vernon Jesse (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Vernon Jesse Crawford (MCSN: 1200111), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 26 July 1953. When word was received that a friendly machine gun had been destroyed and a replacement was urgently needed, while his platoon was moving into position to effect the relief of another unit on the main line of resistance, Private First Class Crawford voluntarily carried his weapon across an open area under an extremely heavy mortar and artillery barrage to the position where the gun was required. Finding that the bunker formerly used for the machine gun was destroyed, he set his weapon on the top of the trench line in an exposed position and, in the face of intense enemy mortar fire, delivered a deadly hail of fire upon the onrushing hostile troops, inflicting heavy casualties on the attacking enemy. Mortally wounded while carrying out this heroic action, Private First Class Crawford, by his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, was greatly instrumental in repulsing the enemy attack and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 3, 1933 at La Grange, Maine. Home Town: Dover Foxcroft, Maine. Death: KIA: July 26, 1953.

Creighton, Richard D.

Headquarters, Far East Forces
General Orders No. 574 - 6 December 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Richard D. Creighton, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Commanding Officer, 336th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, FifthAir Force, on 16 October 1951. On that date, Major Creighton led a squadron of 16 F-86 planes on a combat aerial patrol in the Sinuiju-Yalu area in North Korea. Nearing minimum fuel, Major Creighton prepared to withdraw his forces from the area, when several formations of enemy MIG-15 jet aircraft were sighted on a southerly heading with obvious intent of attacking friendly fighter-bombers engaged in interdiction bombing below. At the same time another enemy formation was sighted on an interception course to engage Major Creighton's forces. Although faced with a critical fuel problem and outnumbered 100 to 16, Major Creighton unhesitatingly turned his formation to engage the enemy below, fully realizing that by doing so he would expose himself to the enemy formation above. During the ensuing battle, which covered an area from Simuiju 100 miles south the Pyongyang, Major Creighton's brilliant tactics and repeated vicious assaults thoroughly disrupted the enemy. When fuel and ammunition reached an extremely critical point and the safety of the friendly fighter-bombers was insured, Major Creighton directed his forces to withdraw. Major Creighton's squadron on this occasion destroyed four enemy MIG-15s and damaged three more. The conspicuous gallantry and inspiring leadership displayed by Major Creighton reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Crenshaw, Willie A.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Willie A. Crenshaw (MCSN: 1091559), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the period 29 November 1950 to 4 December 1950. His actions contributed materially to the successful break-through of United Nations troops in the Chosin reservoir area and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 66 (December 15, 1950).

Creson, Robert F.

First Lieutenant Robert F. Creson, 01341518, a member of Company "L", 187th Airborne Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Inje, Korea.  On 28 May 1951, Company "L" was attacking on a narrow road leading out of Inje, Korea.  The enemy was strongly dug-in on the hills overlooking the road used for the attack.  Company "L" was sustaining heavy casualties due to the intense mortar, machine gun, and small arms fire of the enemy on the company's precarious position.  At this time, Lieutenant Creson, Executive Officer for the company, moved forward to assault an enemy machine gun emplacement which had direct fire upon the column.  With complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Creson charged the emplacement and, with hand grenades, destroyed the machine gun and six enemy occupants.  He organized various members of the company to return down the road for medical supplies and ammunition.  Oblivious of the devastating enemy fire raking the area, they made the hazardous trip to the rear of the column, returning with vital supplies and ammunition.  During this action, Lieutenant Creson was painfully wounded, but continued on and was successful in getting the supplies through where Company "L" was trapped and suffering heavy casualties.  The company commander was wounded during this time and Lieutenant Creson assumed command of the company.  He valiantly led the remainder of the company in the attack until reinforcements arrived. His commendable actions under the most trying conditions saved the lives of many men and greatly facilitated the successful completion of the company's mission with untold losses to the enemy. The gallantry, superior leadership and dauntlessness displayed by Lieutenant Creson throughout this action reflect great credit upon himself and in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Cress, Clyde R.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 255 - 28 October 1950

Private First Class Clyde R. Cress, RA17259487, Infantry, Company F, 35th Infantry, United States Army. After a hostile attack near Naende, Korea on 1 September 1950 had been successfully repulsed by his platoon and one of a group of men had been wounded while retrieving enemy casualties, Private First Class Cress immediately left his position of relative safety and went to the assistance of his wounded comrade.  Although receiving a wound himself while en route, he continued onward, despite the heavy enemy fire, to recover the wounded soldier and return him to safety.  Private First Class Cress's heroic devotion to his fellow soldiers is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Wyoming.

Cribb, William J. Jr. (1st award)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 167 - 19 September 1950

First Lieutenant William J. Cribb, Jr., 060695, Infantry, Company M, 29th Infantry, United States Army.  On 27 July 1950 near Hadong, Korea, a numerically superior enemy force attacking from high ground with heavy fire power, threatened to cut off an infantry unit and had destroyed the supporting weapons of Company M.  Quickly organizing a platoon of riflemen, Lieutenant Cribb led them to a vantage point from which they could effectively fire on the hostile forces, divert fire and cover the withdrawal of the harassed company.  Inspiring his men by his personal example of courage and determination, Lieutenant Cribb maintained the position so that some 300 men could extricate themselves from the hazardous position.  Lieutenant Cribb's heroic leadership, initiative and determination reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Georgia.

Cribb, William J. Jr. (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 46 - 16 October 1956

Captain (then First Lieutenant) William J. Cribb, Jr., Chemical Corps, Company M, 3d Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment, attached to the 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Tabu Dong, Korea, on 17 August 1950.  Captain Cribb's company was supporting the battalion in defensive positions astride the regimental main supply route.  At 1500 hours, the outer boundary of the perimeter was subjected to heavy mortar concentrations followed by a merciless hail of small arms fire.  Captain Cribb observed that a reinforced hostile company had made a partial breakthrough and was attempting to cut off the vital supply route from commanding ground to the rear.  Unmindful of personal safety, he moved about the fire-swept impact area, reorganizing his command for maximum defense and directing a holding action.  He skillfully adjusted mortar fire to bear on the advancing foe and was instrumental in wiping out two hostile mortar positions and inflicting numerous casualties.  As enemy action increased in volume and intensity, he ran across open ground and organized adjacent machine guns and directed fields of fire.  He then organized and led a determined counterattack which resulted in routing the enemy from the key terrain with a toll of approximately 100 dead and wounded.  Captain Cribb's inspirational leadership and intrepid actions reflect utmost credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the military service.  Home of Record: Tallapoosa City, AL.

Crittenden, Charles J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Charles J. Crittenden, Jr. (MCSN: 0-42868), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Assistant to the Commanding Officer and subsequently as Commanding Officer of Headquarters and Service Company, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 26 November to 10 December 1950. Charged with the defense of the regimental command post when the company commander became a casualty, First Lieutenant Crittenden skillfully directed his unit in repelling many fanatical enemy attacks throughout a period of five days. Although frequently subjected to accurate hostile machine gun, mortar and small arms fire, he continually moved among his men to direct operations and, despite sub-zero temperatures, expertly deployed his company during the regiment's attack from Koto-ri to Sudong-ni, reaching his assigned objective with a minimum number of casualties. By his marked courage, bold leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Crittenden served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hubbard, Oregon. Home Town: San Bruno, California.

Crockett, Charles L. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles L. Crockett, Jr. (MCSN: 1070066), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. With the company physically pursuing the withdrawing enemy after the battalion had recaptured an important hill position, Private First Class Crockett, in company with two comrades, fearlessly moved forward well in advance of his platoon. When the enemy opened fire from hidden positions to the front, seriously wounding one of his companions, he assisted in carrying the stricken Marine to the safety of the only protected ground in the area. Aware that a stretcher was needed to evacuate the casualty, he rushed approximately two hundred yards through murderous enemy fire to acquire a litter and four native stretcher bearers. On the return trip, when the natives took cover form heavy enemy fire, he picked up the stretcher and, gallantly moving forward, inspired the bearers to follow, skillfully directing them in completing the evacuation of the wounded Marine. By his resourcefulness, exceptional courage and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Crockett was instrumental in saving the life of his wounded comrade and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Leavenworth, Oregon. Home Town: Portland, Oregon.

Crockett, Edward Painter

Headquarters 24th Division
General Orders No. 606 - 23 August 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Armor) Edward Painter Crockett (ASN: 0-62497), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a member of Tank Company, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Pisi-Gol, Korea, on 25 April 1951. Advance elements of a large enemy task force assaulted the First Battalion of the 5th Infantry Regiment and the 555th Field Artillery Battalion just as these units were withdrawing from a blocking position and forming a road column to head south. As the enemy opened up from high ground on both sides of the road, many vehicles were damaged and blocked the road. As friendly casualties mounted, the enemy began to deploy in an enveloping movement to annihilate the entire 5th Infantry Regiment and several other friendly units. These units were covering for the remainder of the Division, which had already been withdrawn to the south, and were assembling to the west of the enemy attack area. Lieutenant Crockett was ordered to attack south to relieve this pressure on the Infantry Battalion and the Field Artillery Battalion. He executed this maneuver with great skill and daring over the rough terrain he was forced to use due to the vehicles which blocked the road. Despite several enemy attempts to launch a general attack, Lieutenant Crockett, continuously exposed to intense fire as he lead the action from the turret of his tank, succeeded in knocking out several strategic enemy positions. Reaching the southern flank of friendly lines, he succeeded in directing intensely accurate fire on an enemy company which repeatedly tried to break through the lines. This enemy company was completely annihilated. The enemy's psychological advantage, gained through the devastating surprise of his initial attack was eliminated by Lieutenant Crockett's brilliant defensive leadership. Under the protective fire which he directed, the beleaguered units took care of their wounded and completely reorganized while the remainder of the 5th Infantry Regiment and other units withdrew over an alternate en route to the west. Once again, the enemy made a savage attack in an attempt to destroy the column. With utter disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Crockett directed his tanks in firing point-blank into the enemy and also in destroying the abandoned vehicles and equipment. Lieutenant Crockett's courageous actions and brilliant leadership enabled his regiment and other friendly units to withdraw safely from almost certain annihilation and inflicted severe casualties on the enemy. These actions reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Cronin, Angus J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Angus J. Cronin, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Headquarters Battery, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 - 4 December 1950. As Officer in Charge of vehicles and artillery equipment during the movement from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri, Major Cronin led his elements through snow and ice-covered roads, often swept by heavy enemy fire, and on one occasion forced a road block with his small force. In addition, his units continued to pick up many fallen and wounded comrades and added to their towed loads several ambulances and casualty-laden vehicles that had run out of fuel. Suddenly attacked by a well-organized and numerically superior enemy force after his units had negotiated a blown-out bridge, Major Cronin hastily built up defenses with his small number of troops and, in the face of intense hostile grenade and small arms fire, moved among his men to organize their fire and to lend words of encouragement. Through his courageous efforts, the enemy force was repulsed and the column was able to move forward into the perimeter at Hagaru-ri. Major Cronin's outstanding professional skill and resolute determination throughout were contributing factors in the saving of many wounded men. His inspiring actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lynn, Massachusetts. Home Town: Lynn, Massachusetts.

Cronin, Edward J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Edward J. Cronin, Jr. (MCSN: 0-48280), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 July 1951. With his platoon suffering numerous casualties from exploding mines when the lead elements unknowingly entered a hostile mine field while on a reconnaissance mission, First Lieutenant Cronin accidentally set off a mine and was severely wounded while attempting to prevent further movement on the part of his men. Although suffering from extreme pain and loss of blood, he directed a squad leader to set up an emergency defense against possible enemy attack, supervised the efforts of the corpsmen in the treatment and evacuation of the wounded and allowed himself to be carried out for evacuation only after all other casualties had been removed. By his outstanding courage, fortitude and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of others, First Lieutenant Cronin served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Norristown, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Norristown, Pennsylvania.

Cronin, Francis Jr.

First Lieutenant Francis J. Cronin, Jr., Battery D, 82d AAA AW Bn. (SP), 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy during the period 16 May to 29 May 1951 in the vicinity of Hongchon, Korea. During that period, Lieutenant Cronin initiated and maintained a communications system from his firing vehicles to his command post and to units he was supporting and to higher headquarters. He personally placed each vehicle so that its primary mission could be accomplished, while at the same time each vehicle could be an important part of the radio net. He visited each vehicle on the main line of resistance time and time again although it meant braving heavy artillery, mortar and small arms fire, and traveling many hours on the road to reach the vehicles to check on the welfare of the men and to coordinate the operation of the radio net. His action resulted in all units at all times knowing the developments as soon as they occurred in each sector. Due to this ready data, the field artillery knew of targets as soon as they appeared and the infantry knew where concentrations were building up so that countermeasures could be taken. The above actions aided materially in the halting of the enemy's third spring offensive. His actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New Jersey.

Cronin, James T. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant James T. Cronin (MCSN: 0-35789), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Realizing that his company would be forced to advance through direct frontal and flanking hostile fire during a maneuver to relieve another Marine company, First Lieutenant Cronin, with his company commander directing the attack on the enemy's flank, immediately organized the remainder of the company and moved forward. Although subjected to direct enemy machine gun and mortar fire throughout the furious engagement, he fearlessly remained at the observation post, working tirelessly and with superb courage in calling for and directing effective air support, in supervising the evacuation of wounded and in maintaining a steady flow of ammunition to fighting units. By his fearless and aggressive leadership, daring tactics and cool courage in the face of heavy odds, First Lieutenant Cronin served as an inspiration to all who observed him, and his staunch devotion to duty throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Irvington, New Jersey. Home Town: East Orange, New Jersey.

Cronin, James T. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant James T. Cronin (MCSN: 0-35789), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 April 1951. When a large hostile force threatened the entire battalion after penetrating positions of an adjacent friendly unit and seizing the area's critical terrain during a night attack, First Lieutenant Cronin skillfully led his company in successfully limiting the penetration and in counterattacking to regain the vital ground. Effectively deploying his men in complete darkness, he launched a vigorous assault against the opposition and, despite devastating enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire, aggressively pressed his attack to completely rout the numerically superior hostile force. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and zealous devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Cronin contributed materially to the success achieved by his battalion and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Irvington, New Jersey. Home Town: East Orange, New Jersey.

Cronin, Maynard A. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 40th Infantry Division
General Orders #79 - 2 March 1953

Sergeant Maynard A. Cronin, RA11009089, Medical Corps, United States Army, 224th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Satae-Ri, Korea on 1 December 1952.  Sergeant Cronin, upon learning that the medic and other members of a patrol had been wounded, immediately volunteered to go to the aid of the wounded patrol.  With great courage and utter disregard for his personal safety, Sergeant Cronin exposed himself to enemy observation and fire to cross a mine field, reaching the wounded as quickly as possible.  Although constantly under enemy small arms fire and mortar bombardment, Sergeant Cronin successfully administered first aid to prepare them for evacuation.  While kneeling over a wounded comrade, Sergeant Cronin was hit by enemy machine gun fire and mortally wounded.  The loyalty displayed by Sergeant Cronin was far above and beyond the call of duty.  The supreme sacrifice made by Sergeant Cronin to alleviate the suffering of others serves as a constant inspiration to all who follow.  The gallant actions and extreme self sacrifice of Sergeant Cronin reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the Federal service from Massachusetts.

Cronk, Welby W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Welby W. Cronk (MCSN: 0-28363), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 September 1950. Assigned the mission of leading the battalion column eastward through the streets of Seoul in continuation of the attack, Captain Cronk immediately reorganized his company in order to accelerate the advance and, despite a virtual hail of enemy small arms, machine gun and automatic weapons fire, moved into the center of the street and spearheaded a determined attack while simultaneously designating targets to his supporting tanks. Continuing the assault in the face of mounting heavy and intense hostile fire, he resolutely led his men through the opposing defenses and forced the enemy to retreat in complete disorder, thereby facilitating the subsequent seizure of the battalion's main objective. His outstanding courage, excellent leadership and daring initiative reflect the highest credit upon Captain Cronk and the United States Naval Service. Born: Bladwini, Michigan. Home Town: Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Cronkhite, Willis D. Jr.

Headquarters 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 194 - 18 June 1953

Captain Willis D. Cronkhite, Jr., 028269, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the morning of 28 October 1952, Company "F", commanded by Captain Cronkhite, attacked an enemy held position, "Jackson Heights", in the vicinity of Kangong-Ni, Korea. Captain Cronkhite's company came under intense hostile mortar and artillery fire, causing elements of the squads to become separated and intermingled. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved through the hale of fire and reorganized his company. He then continued to direct his company in the attack. As the company neared the crest of the hill, the mortar fire increased and enemy machine guns swept the approaches to the objective. Braving the enemy's concentrated fire, Captain Cronkhite personally led his men forward in the assault. In the ensuing action, Company "F" completely overran the enemy's positions and seized the objective. Although still harassed by small arms fire, he continued to move among his men, directing their effective reorganization on the position and overseeing the immediate re-supply ammunition. Captain Cronkhite's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from New Jersey.

Crowder, Donell O.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Donell O. Crowder (MCSN: 1260263), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 June 1952. Voluntarily leaving his combat outpost which was surrounded by hostile troops, Private First Class Crowder assisted a Corpsman in reaching three wounded Marines in a valley seven hundred yards away and, after directing the two walking wounded men to the outpost, aided the Corpsman in carrying the third Marine, who was severely wounded. Pinned down by enemy automatic weapons fire on four different occasions, he provided covering fire for the Corpsman and the wounded Marine and succeeded in reaching the outpost where he assisted the Corpsman in treating five casualties. By his exceptional courage and determination in the face of hostile fire, Private First Class Crowder served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Wellington, Alabama. Home Town: Irondale, Alabama.

Crowley, Richard Waldron

Headquarters, X Corps
General Orders No. 109 - June 12, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Richard Waldron Crowley (MCSN: 0-49332), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action on 28 November 1950. On that date, as Liaison Officer for a Regimental Headquarters of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), Lieutenant Crowley volunteered to deliver vital instructions to a Task Force attempting to clear a main supply route to Hagaru-ri, North Korea. Although the Task Force was engaged in an intense fire fight with an estimated two regiments of the enemy, and was completely surrounded, Lieutenant Crowley skillfully penetrated the enemy lines and delivered the message to the Task Force Commander. While returning to his unit, Lieutenant Crowley organized a group of stragglers and directed the fierce fighting necessary to enable them to return to Headquarters. Although seriously wounded during this action, Lieutenant Crowley continued to lead and encourage his men until the group successfully reached the safety of Regimental Headquarters. The courage, initiative, and leadership displayed by Lieutenant Crowley on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: February 26, 1927. Entered Service From Massachusetts. Death: February 24, 1994.

Crozier, Harry C.

Click HERE to view a copy of the actual citation

Csepp,  Jack J. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 204 - 26 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Jansen Calvin Cox (ASN: 0-2202011), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Osan, Korea, on 5 July 1950. During an attack by an enemy tank column, he unhesitatingly organized several bazooka teams and personally led the attack. Reaching a vantage point adjacent to and overlooking the roadway, he successfully destroyed one of the tanks. Through the accuracy and volume of his team's fire, several tanks were disabled and the enemy partially disorganized. When encircled by the hostile forces, he successfully led his party back to the relative safety of their own lines. Although greatly outnumbered by the hard-pressing enemy, Lieutenant Cox continuously remained exposed to their fire; hauled vitally needed ammunition to the defending infantry positions and aided materially in directing of the effective friendly fire. Later, during the battalion's withdrawal to new tenable positions, he fearlessly manned a .50 caliber machine gun to assure the safety of his troops. His courage, gallantry and unhesitant devotion to duty assured a minimum of casualties to the troops and reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Carroll, Virginia. Death: MIA as a Prisoner of War (Korean War)

Cullison, Ralliegh Dwane (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Ralliegh Dwane Cullison, United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company I, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in Korea. On 4 April 1951, while advancing on a commanding hill near Chudong-ni, Korea, Corporal Cullison's unit encountered heavy resistance from a strong hostile force. Although wounded at the beginning of the engagement, he moved his machine gun to an exposed vantage point to direct more effective fire at the onrushing foe. When his weapon developed a malfunctioin, he continued to fire single shots at the encircling enemy until he lapsed into unconsciousness from his wounds. Corporal Cullison's valorous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty were instrumental in repelling the attack and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the American Soldier.

Cullum, Billy R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Billy R. Cullum (MCSN: 1297201), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 April 1953. Acting as pointman in a five-man rescue party in search of a casualty-ridden patrol that had been operating far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Cullum skillfully located the stricken unit despite conflicting reports as to their whereabouts. Observing that nearly all of the patrol members were casualties, he immediately proceeded to administer first aid to them and, discovering that several Marines were missing, fearlessly searched out the surrounding area despite the risk of possible capture or death. After learning that the missing men were on their way back to the main line of resistance, he volunteered to search for a second rescue party that was unable to locate the stricken patrol, and gallantly moved alone through the darkness of no man's land to find the rescue party and guide them to the patrol. During the evacuation of the casualties, he assisted in carrying the wounded and their weapons. By his courageous initiative, resolute determination and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Cullum served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bakersfield, California. Home Town: Bauxite, Arkansas.

Culp, Arnold D.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 124 - 30 May 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant Arnold D. Culp, RA17117514, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 15 March 1951 in the vicinity of Much’on, Korea. Company L was attacking enemy positions and was receiving heavy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire from the enemy. The deadly fire of the enemy inflicted 100 percent casualties on a light machine gun crew. After evacuating the wounded, Sergeant Culp, only a company clerk, moved under heavy enemy machine gun and mortar fire, recovered the light machine gun, and placed it in action against the enemy, dispersing them and permitting the other members of the company to continue the attack. Placing the machine gun on a vehicle, Sergeant Culp acted as an ammunition bearer for a section of 60mm mortars. Though Sergeant Culp was neither a machine gunner nor an ammunition bearer, he unhesitatingly acted as both and thus rendered great help to Company L in capturing the enemy position. The gallant conduct displayed by Sergeant Culp reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Cummings, Barnard Jr. (posthumous)

Partial citation:

"Shortly after he had secured the objective (Hill 205), the friendly troops repulsed a series of five fanatical counterattacks, in which the enemy came to within grenade-throwing distance of the company perimeter. Throughout this action, Lieutenant Cummings, with utter fearlessness, constantly exposed himself to enemy fire as he left his position of relative safety to move about among his men, shouting words of encouragement and directing their fire. Despite the fact that the onrushing enemy were almost upon his position, Lieutenant Cummings refused to withdraw, and when last seen was providing covering fire for his men. The gallantry and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Cummings throughout this action reflect great credit on himself and the military service."

Cunningtubby, Clyde

Private First Class Clyde Cunningtubby, RA18273824, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 20 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. the city of Taejon had been surrounded by numerically superior enemy forces and the route of withdrawal had been cut off by enemy road blocks. Private First Class Cunningtubby was rendering first aid to those who were injured during the fighting in the city. On one occasion, under extremely heavy artillery, mortar and automatic weapons fired he worked for four hours to free four men who were pinned beneath a destroyed truck. He proceeded giving first aid to the wounded and carrying others to places of shelter where they would be comparatively safe from enemy fire. During the entire period he rendered first aid and cared for some thirty wounded men. The act of gallantry displayed by Private First Class Cunningtubby reflects great credit on himself and the military service. GO 91, 15 Aug 1950. He entered the service from Davis, OK.

Curley, John T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John T. Curley (MCSN: 1331353), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 26 - 27 March 1953. When his unit was pinned down by devastating hostile fire during a counterattack on a vital enemy-held outpost position, Private First Class Curley unhesitatingly raced to the forward elements to assist in gaining fire superiority over the enemy. Although his ammunition was exhausted several times, he quickly obtained new supplies from his wounded comrades and, during a period of five and one half hours, fearlessly exposed himself to intense enemy fire to deliver accurate fire upon the enemy. When his unit was relieved from the action, he remained to assist in the evacuation of the wounded and refused to leave the area until assured that all of his comrades had been removed to safety, withdrawing from the scene in the rear guard to cover the unit with his weapon. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Curley served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. Born: Boston, Massachusetts. Home Town: Roxbury, Massachusetts.

Curney, Kenneth H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Kenneth H. Curney (MCSN: 319985), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 25 - 26 August 1952. When the platoon was committed in an assault to re-establish the company's right flank, and the leader became a casualty, Technical Sergeant Curney unhesitatingly assumed command of the unit and, despite devastating enemy mortar, artillery and machine gun fire, rallied his men, assaulted the objective and restored the line. After skillfully reorganizing his platoon, he prepared a defense of the sector that successfully withstood a strong hostile counterattack which struck almost immediately. Although painfully wounded, Technical Sergeant Curney steadfastly refused evacuation for himself until the platoon was properly and completely relieved. By his outstanding courage, expert leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cleveland, Ohio. Home Town: Lyndhurst, Ohio.

Curpinski, Robert B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Robert B. Curpinski, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Engineer Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1950. Serving as a Medical Corpsman assigned to a platoon assisting in the defense of a strategic position. Hospitalman Curpinski displayed outstanding courage and initiative in the performance of his duties when the unit was attacked during hours of darkness by a numerically superior enemy force. Fearlessly and with complete disregard for his personal safety exposing himself to withering enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire, he courageously moved continuously through the position rendering aid to the casualties and removing them to covered positions. When the platoon was ordered to break contact with the enemy, he unhesitatingly returned to the area, despite the fact that the enemy had actually penetrated the positions, and aided in carrying two wounded comrades to safety. His great personal bravery and outstanding devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospitalman Curpinski's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 60174 (November 30, 1951).

Curran, William G. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant William G. Curran, Jr. (MCSN: 0-53752), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Patrol Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 October 1952. When a company patrol and supply train were ambushed and cut off from friendly forces by the enemy while en route to a combat outpost, Second Lieutenant Curran unhesitatingly volunteered to lead a patrol in an attempt to aid the beleaguered unit. Reaching the scene of action, he moved forward with one other Marine to draw the fire of a hostile machine gun and, when within range, threw hand grenades into the enemy position, silencing the gun. Although painfully burned when the hostile force threw out an impenetrable screen of concussion and white phosphorous grenades, he again assaulted the enemy machine gun position with hand grenades and silenced the gun which had been re-manned during the hostile barrage. When a severely wounded Marine in need of immediate evacuation was brought to the perimeter of the outpost, Second Lieutenant Curran directed his main force to return to friendly lines and, accompanying five men through the exposed area to the wounded man, assisted in carrying him to safety despite continuous sniper fire. By his valiant fighting spirit, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Grosse Point, Michigan.

Currin, John F.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade (MC) John F. Currin (NSN: 0-491741), United States Navy, for gallantry in action near Ajongdon, Korea, on 25 April 1951. At this time the 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, was suddenly attacked by a numerically superior enemy force and subjected to a withering barrage of small arms, automatic weapons, mortar and grenade fire. With utter disregard for his own personal safety, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Currin voluntarily exposed himself to the hail of enemy fire and established a forward aid station, ministered to the wounded and evacuated them to safety. He personally evacuated eleven stricken men under intense fire, carrying and shielding them with his own body. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Currin's gallantry, courage and outstanding devotion to duty reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, I Corps, General Orders No. 179 (November 4, 1951). Entered Service From New York.

Curtin, Clyde Alfred

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 402 - November 2, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Clyde Alfred Curtin (AFSN: AO-431127), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as Pilot of an F-86 type aircraft, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 19 July 1953. On that date, while on a combat air patrol along the Yalu River deep in enemy territory, Major CURTIN was notified by radar that enemy aircraft were approaching friendly fighter bombers under the cover of low lying thunderstorms. Major Curtin proceeded to the area of the reported enemy activity and conducted a low altitude search for the enemy despite rain, poor visibility, heavy turbulence, and intense enemy anti-aircraft artillery fire. At 7,000 feet, Major Curtin observed twelve enemy MiG-15s and as he positioned himself for an attack, enemy MiGs boxed him in at the left rear and right rear. The MiGs attacked, but Major Curtin, by a series of skillfully executed violent maneuvers, evaded the fire of the MiGs and despite the odds, counter-attacked the enemy force. Pressing his attack, Major Curtin positioned his aircraft behind one MiG, and with one long accurate burst of fire, destroyed the enemy aircraft, which was observed to burn and explode. Though his intrepidity in the face of the enemy, and by his outstanding airmanship and exemplary devotion to duty, Major Curtin reflected the highest credit upon himself and the military service. great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Curtin, Francis A.

Headquarters 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 111 - 30 August 1950

Second Lieutenant Francis A. Curtin, 02210265, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 5 August 1950 at Kogong, Korea. Lieutenant Curtin realized that Company C, 34th Infantry Regiment had been encircled by the enemy. Knowing that it would take the Medical Section of the First Battalion some time to arrive, he volunteered to return to Company C positions. While still under heavy fire and without regard for personal safety he administered to the needs of the wounded. He then proceeded to evacuate them and probably saved the lives of several men. Lieutenant Curtin’s selfless actions and devotion to duty reflect high credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the Medical Department. Entered the military service from Bellingham, Washington.

Curry, James G. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James G. Curry, Jr. (MCSN: 552270), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Quickly assuming command when his squad leader became a casualty during the attack against a heavily fortified hill position, Sergeant Curry braved withering hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire to lead his men forward in a vigorous assault which completely routed the entrenched enemy. Although painfully wounded by hostile fire while directing the organization of the defense, he steadfastly refused medical aid until assured that the squad was properly positioned to repel any counterattack. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, Sergeant Curry contributed materially to the success achieved by his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hinsdale, Illinois. Home Town: Kirksville, Missouri.

Curry, William Frierson (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant William Frierson Curry (MCSN: 0-49139), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commander of a Rifle Platoon of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. With his company subjected to a fierce attack by numerically superior enemy forces during the hours of darkness, First Lieutenant Curry boldly exposed himself to intense hostile automatic weapons, hand grenade and small arms fire to direct his platoon in defending its position. Despite a serious and painful bullet wound sustained early in the action, he refused to leave his post and, bravely moving through the heavy enemy fire, continued to encourage and direct his men until he was mortally wounded by a hostile hand grenade. By his marked courage, inspiring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, First Lieutenant Curry contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit in repulsing the enemy attack and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Memphis, Tennessee. Home Town: Memphis, Tennessee. Death: KIA: April 23, 1951.

Curtin, Francis A.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Medical Service Corps) Francis A. Curtin (ASN: 0-2210265), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Medical Officer with the Medical Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 5 August 1950 at Kogong, Korea. Lieutenant Curtin realized that Company C, 34th Infantry Regiment had been encircled by the enemy. Knowing that it would take the Medical Section of the First Battalion some time to arrive, he volunteered to return to Company C positions. While still under heavy fire and without regard for personal safety he administered to the needs of the wounded. He then proceeded to evacuate them and probably saved the lives of several men. Lieutenant Curtin's selfless actions and devotion to duty reflect high credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the Medical Department. General Orders: Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 111 (August 30, 1950). Home of Record: Bellingham, Washington.

Curtis, Gary J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Gary J. Curtis (MCSN: 1071810), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 24 to 27 July 1953. When the enemy launched savage attacks against friendly positions, Staff Sergeant Curtis unhesitatingly exposed himself to intense hostile fire to move among the positions, checking ammunition, assisting in the evacuation of the wounded and shouting words of encouragement to his comrades. During one severe night action, he fearlessly led his men in a daring counterattack on a portion of the lines temporarily in the possession of the enemy and succeeded in personally killing seven of the enemy and in inflicting extensive damage on hostile equipment, thereby materially aiding in restoring that sector of the line to friendly troops. Later, when vital wire communications were severed by the intense hostile barrage, he skillfully directed mortar fire upon troop concentrations and installations to inflict severe damage on the enemy. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and adroit leadership, Staff Sergeant Curtis contributed materially to the success of the company in repelling the large scale enemy attacks against the position. His unswerving devotion to duty throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Joliet, Illinois.

Curto, Domenico

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 527 - 12 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Domenico A. Curto, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy on 28 June 1951. Although hazardous weather conditions prevailed at his home base, Captain Curto directed his formation to a rendezvous over Korea and proceeded to the target area. The wingmen were inexperienced in low level attacks and were in the flight for the express purpose of observing correct procedure and technique for minimum altitude attacks on rail bridges and rail tunnels. After probable destruction of one double rail bridge, Captain Curto's aircraft was severely damaged. One aircraft of his flight was destroyed. Disregarding his own safety, Captain Curto continued the attack, destroying one railroad bridge, damaging one flak tower, damaging ten box cars, killing an undetermined number of enemy troops and probably destroying one other double rail bridge. Captain Curto's courage, superior airmanship, and determination to complete his assigned mission, was in keeping with the highest tradition of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Curyea, Stanley Debolt (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain Stanley Debolt Curyea (MCSN: 0-44286), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 4 October 1952 to 1 February 1953. A capable and inspiring officer, Captain Curyea maintained a high state of combat efficiency and readiness within his company while the battalion was in reserve. Later, when his unit was committed to the main line of resistance, he worked long, arduous hours, skillfully directing his men in defending the assigned sector which included the most critical terrain feature of the battalion area of defense. When elements of his combat patrol were pinned down by intense enemy mortar, small arms and machine gun fire on 1 February 1953, he unhesitatingly left the comparative safety of his post in an effort to assist the stricken group. Mortally wounded by enemy fire while advancing toward the patrol, Captain Curyea, by his outstanding leadership, resourceful initiative and marked courage, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 25, 1923 at Alta Vista, Kansas. Home Town: Topeka, Kansas. Death: KIA: February 1, 1953.

 

Close this window
 

2002-2016 Korean War Educator. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use of material is prohibited.

- Contact Webmaster with questions or comments related to web site layout.
- Contact Lynnita for Korean War questions or similar informational issues.
- Website address: www.koreanwar-educator.org
 

Hit Counter