Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "D"

 
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Dahn, Robert C.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 130 - 10 May 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Robert C. Dahn (ASN: RA-44077810), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in Korea. On 24 March 1951, near Uijongbu, Korea, Sergeant Dahn's unit had the mission of attacking and seizing a hill. After crossing through approximately two hundred yards of rice paddies, completely exposed to enemy mortar and small arms fire, his squad reached the base of the hill. Working their way up the hill, Sergeant Dahn and his squad were pinned down by an automatic weapon which was holding up the advance of the entire platoon. Sergeant Dahn immediately grabbed a hand grenade and fearlessly moved forward to destroy this enemy automatic weapon. Within ten yards of the emplacement, an enemy soldier from his left tossed a grenade at him. Immediately grabbing the grenade, he threw it back at the enemy and killed him. Advancing on the emplacement once more, although exposed to very intense fire, he threw his grenade at the automatic weapon emplacement and killed three enemy soldiers. As a result of his courageous actions an automatic weapon and two mortars were captured and the platoon's advance was made possible. The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Dahn reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Home town: Muscogee, GA.

Dahnke, Earl W. (MIA - posthumous)

Private Earl W. Dahnke, RA16318823, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company D, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 10 July 1950 near Chonui, Korea. Private Dahnke had returned from Chochiwon to the 1st Battalion Motor Pool in his truck loaded with mortar and machinegun ammunition. He was aware that the enemy had penetrated forward positions and had set up a road block between the Battalion motor pool and his company. Realizing the hazard of running a road block with live ammunition and in spite of the fact that his immediate superior informed him that he did not have to go forward, Private Dahnke, knowing the desperate need for ammunition by his unit volunteered to drive his truck loaded with ammunition to the front lines. In his attempt to do so he was killed. Private Dahnke’s display of courage, fortitude and valor reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army. GO 71, 6 Aug 1950. Entered service from Roseville, MI. (Earl Dahnke remains listed as missing in action.)

Daigle, Roland J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 7 - 4 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Roland J. Daigle (ASN: 0-2262741), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Hongjong-Nyong, Korea, on 4 June 1951. Serving as Platoon Leader, he led his men up a cliff to attack well dug-in enemy forces. The route, wide enough for only one man to pass through at a time, was guarded by a strategically placed enemy machine gun. Lieutenant Daigle flanked the position and single-handedly destroyed it. He then pinned down other enemy soldiers with grenade and carbine fire, thus enabling his men to advance and ultimately reach the top of the objective, forcing the enemy off the hill. Lieutenant Daigle, with complete disregard for his own safety, exposed himself to the enemy's return fire to lead mopping up operations. He personally accounted for four enemy dead, two of whom fell off the side of the cliff in an attempt to escape him. Lieutenant Daigle's courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless performance of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Carlsbad, New Mexico.

Daley, James M. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 17 - 9 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class James M. Daley (ASN: RA-11145909), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 19 October 1951. Following an air strike to soften up the enemy, his platoon moved forward to take an intermediate objective necessary for the launching of a Battalion attack. As the friendly troops started up the hill they were subjected to an intense small arms and grenade fire from inaccessible enemy positions. Private Daley, Automatic Rifleman, unhesitatingly advanced ahead of his comrades. Reaching an advantageous position, he poured debasingly accurate streams of fire into the enemy bunkers. The platoon again advanced but met with intense grenade barrages. This fire stopped the unit's advance and the men began to fall back. Private Daley remained alone in his position continuing his heavy concentrated fire, and finally forced the enemy hordes to retreat in wild confusion. He then called back to his comrades, telling them to charge up the hill. As the friendly troops made their way up the hill, Private Daley was mortally wounded by a burst of fire from the fleeing enemy. Private Daley's courageous action, tenacious determination and self-sacrificing devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Daley, Richard Forsythe

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Richard Forsythe Daley (MCSN: 0-56483), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, from 24 to 27 July 1953. Serving as a Platoon Commander, Second Lieutenant Daley displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the enemy launched vicious attacks on friendly positions, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety by moving from one position to another in order to check the condition and welfare of his men. Despite devastating hostile mortar and artillery barrages, he gallantly continued to shout words of encouragement to his men and aid in the evacuation of the wounded. One night, he courageously led his men in a daring counterattack on a portion of friendly lines held by hostile troops. Exhibiting remarkable resourcefulness during the fierce encounter, he personally killed ten enemy and inflicted considerable damage on hostile equipment. When wire communications were severed by murderous enemy mortar and artillery barrages, he skillfully directed friendly mortar fire upon enemy installations and troop concentrations by using radio communications. The extremely well directed fire caused severe casualties and damage to hostile positions. His intrepid efforts aided immeasurably in repelling the large-scale enemy attacks against the position. Second Lieutenant Daley's indomitable spirit combined with his gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Madison, Wisconsin. Home Town: Dodgeville, Wisconsin.

Daly, Charles U.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Charles U. Daly (MCSN: 0-50418), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Leader of a Rifle Platoon of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. Assigned the mission of driving a strong enemy force from well-entrenched positions on a high knob north of Inje, First Lieutenant Daly boldly led his men up a narrow spine, completely devoid of cover and concealment, and carried out a successful assault against the hostile strong points in the face of fierce automatic-weapons and small-arms fire, killing many of the enemy and forcing the remainder to retreat in disorder. Quickly reorganizing his unit, he pursued the fleeing hostile troops and overran an enemy regimental command post, capturing many valuable documents and prisoners. By his marked courage, skilled leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Daly served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Dublin, Ireland. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.

Daly, John K.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 52 - 25 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) John K. Daly (ASN: 0-1339703), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, (then Commanding Officer of Company F, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division), near Sangsan-ni, Korea, on 19 October 1951. His company had the mission of taking and securing Objective KING, a mountainous terrain feature. The First Platoon went into the assault but sustained heavy casualties in the fight against the numerically superior enemy force. The Third Platoon, on the opposite side of the same peak, had fought its way to within 100 yards of the hostile positions before being pinned down by terrific enemy automatic weapons fire. When Lieutenant Daly, who was with this platoon, saw the enemy preparing to counterattack, he realized the danger to the crippled First Platoon. Picking up an automatic rifle and a magazine belt, he shouted for his men to follow him and charged up the slope. Advancing through grenades, withering automatic weapons and small arms fire, he reached the enemy position and trenches well ahead of his men and became engaged in fierce fire fights. So furious was his attack that the enemy desperately rushed to the defense of that side of the hill, thereby allowing the First Platoon to withdraw and evacuate its casualties. Then, with devastatingly accurate fire, he killed four enemy soldiers and wounded many others and remained to cover his platoon's withdrawal. He then safely made his way down from the enemy-held peak and rejoined his men. Lieutenant Daly's courageous action, exemplary leadership, and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Jersey City, New Jersey.

Daly, Joseph F.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 528 - 13 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Joseph F. Daly, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy on 9 August 1951 as a Tactical Reconnaissance Pilot. Captain Daly volunteered to fly deep into enemy held territory, unescorted and unarmed in an RF-80 type aircraft to acquire much needed photographs of a communications line and other targets which were located only a few miles from a large enemy air base. Captain Daly flew to his targets and started his first photographic run over the communications line; several runs were necessary to complete coverage of all the targets. Another RF-80 type aircraft circling nearer the enemy base warned Captain Daly that two enemy aircraft were taking off. With complete disregard for his own safety, Captain Daly elected to remain in the area and pursued his mission until the enemy jet aircraft made their attack. Captain Daly's aircraft was hit in the right wing by a 37-mm. shell, which completely destroyed one fuel tank. A 23-mm. shell hit the right side of the fuselage, and three fragments pierced the canopy. Violent evasive action followed, and through Captain Daly's skill in flying and his understanding of the enemy's capabilities, he was able to evade the enemy aircraft in the ensuing fight in which the enemy made at least five firing passes. He then flew his crippled aircraft twenty minutes under instrument conditions and returned to a friendly base two hundred and thirty miles away and with information needed on the enemy's activities. Captain Daly's gallantry, skill and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Dammer, Herman W.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 123 - 6 May 1951

Lieutenant Colonel Herman W. Dammer, 030634, Infantry, Battalion Commander, 2nd Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 19 February 1951, near Kodong-ni, Korea, the 2nd Battalion, 65th Infantry, was attacking well defended enemy positions. During the six hour attack on the heavily defended, steep mountain, Colonel Dammer on numerous occasions, with complete disregard for his own safety, exposed himself to enemy small arms, automatic weapons, mortar, and artillery fire. Assuming a position with the leading rifle company in the attack, he effectively coordinated the fire and maneuver of his entire command. On one occasion, exposing himself to a heavy mortar and artillery barrage, he called effective counter battery fire upon the enemy positions. Colonel Dammer's gallantry, outstanding leadership, and aggressive actions were an inspiration to the officers and men whom he led and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Damon, Robert Vincent (USMCR) (posthumous)

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine infantry company in Korea on 10 April 1951.  Serving as a guide of a rifle platoon, Sergeant Damon was moving with a squad in the platoon attack of a strongly defended enemy hill position when the unit was subjected to intense and accurate enemy automatic weapons fire from an enemy bunker, and was temporarily unable to advance.  Realizing that the successful accomplishment of the platoon's mission depended on the rapid advance of the squad, he fearlessly and with complete disregard for his personal safety charged forward through the heavy enemy fire in a furious assault of the position.  When he had expended all his rifle ammunition, he continued forward, courageously firing his pistol into the aperture of the bunker until he fell mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country.  His great personal bravery and outstanding devotion to duty so inspired his comrades that they swept forward and rapidly secured the objective.  Sergeant Damon's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."  Born: Seattle, Washington. Home Town: Seattle, Washington. Death: KIA: April 10, 1951.

Daniel, Derrill McCullough (7th award)

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 121 - March 18, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in addition to a previously awarded Silver Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Seventh Award of the Silver Star to Brigadier General Derrill McCullough Daniel (ASN: 0-235096), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in connection with military operations against the enemy while serving with the 7th Infantry Division, in action near Kungmal, Korea, on 6 and 7 March 1953.

Daniels, Charles L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Charles L. Daniels (MCSN: 287181), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. When his platoon was pinned down under intense hostile small-arms and machine-gun fire during a flanking movement, Staff Sergeant Daniels courageously exposed himself to the enemy fire in order to deploy his men and, moving from position to position, skillfully directed their fire. Despite severe pain and loss of blood due to two wounds suffered in the engagement, he continued his direction and initiated action to evacuate the other casualties in the platoon. By his daring initiative, inspiring leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Staff Sergeant Daniels upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Port St. Joe, Florida. Home Town: Moore Haven, Florida.

Danner, Oscar F.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Armor) Oscar F. Danner (ASN: 0-60905), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy), attached to the 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 22 September 1950 near Naktong-ni, Korea. Lieutenant Danner's platoon was the leading armored element of Task Force Lynch. Their mission was to seize and secure a river crossing in the vicinity of Naktong-ni. Lieutenant Danner, in the lead tank, observed a column of enemy soldiers marching along the road in the same direction of the task force. Realizing that surprise would be a decided advantage, he instructed his platoon to hold their fire until further orders. Fearlessly leading his tanks within very close range of the enemy, he then ordered his platoon to open fire. With complete disregard of his own safety, he moved his tank forward, through the panic stricken enemy, and fired his first round into an enemy ammunition truck, causing it to explode. Although ammunition was exploding and the enemy small arms fire was most hazardous, he completely exposed himself in order to give accurate fire directions to his platoon, causing 500 enemy casualties. During the bitter conflict with the enemy infantry, it became apparent that his tank was in danger of catching fire from the bursting and exploding ammunition truck. With great risk of his own life, Lieutenant Danner voluntarily dismounted from his tank and, while under direct fire of the enemy and withstanding the blistering heat from the burning truck, directed his vehicle to a safer position. By his calm, forceful leadership and undying devotion to duty, his platoon captured and destroyed much enemy equipment. Lieutenant Danner's gallant actions reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Darby, Wilbur S. (posthumous)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 660 - 31 December 1952

Captain Wilbur S. Darby, 12895A, United States Air Force (posthumously).  Captain Darby distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Forward Air Controller, 6147th Tactical Control Group, Fifth Air Force, on 7 October 1952.  At the start of a combat operation near Chorwon, Korea, Captain Darby established his Tactical Air Control Party in a forward bunker.  During the entire period of the battle this area was subjected to heavy enemy bombardment.  On 7 October 1952 the remote system which had been established from the radio jeeps to the bunker failed.  At this time, voluntarily and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain Darby stationed himself in an exposed radio jeep, and for three days, with the battle at the height of its intensity, continued to direct close air support strikes from his exposed position.  By his high personal courage in the face of enemy fire and his exemplary devotion to duty, Captain Darby was instrumental in the success of United Nations operations in that area, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Darnell, Donald F.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 413 - 25 November 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant Donald F. Darnell, Infantry, Company C, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 20 September 1950 during an attack on enemy positions located on a hill near Chingdong-ni, Korea, Lieutenant Darnell courageously braved the constant hostile barrage of grenades, small arms, and mortar fire to lead his company. Although wounded in the arm by grenade fragments, he remained with the forward elements of his company to encourage his men and control the fire of his unit until the objective was taken.  Lieutenant Darnell's outstanding courage and exemplary leadership reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Nebraska.  *Darnell was moved from 7th ID to HQ and HQ 1st Ban 27th IR August 13 1950.

Daugherty, Edward N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Edward N. Daugherty (MCSN: 268635), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Member of a Provisional Rifle Platoon, attached to Anti-Tank Company, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1950. When a numerically superior hostile force attacked his company's defense perimeter overlooking Chosin Reservoir, Staff Sergeant Daugherty exposed himself to direct enemy fire to move among his men, lending words of encouragement, redeploying the men to better strengthen the lines and adding his own effective fire in support. Realizing the strain upon his men resulting from the blend of the white-clothed hostile troops against the ice and snow-white-clothed hostile troops against the ice and snow-covered terrain, he continued to move among his men and, as the intensity of the battle increased, he personally guided eight reinforcements into the defense area and redistributed ammunition to all positions in his sector. Receiving further support from a friendly machine-gun section, he skillfully placed the guns in positions whereby their accurate and effective fire prevented an enemy breakthrough and forestalled a number of casualties to his unit on the right flank. By his outstanding leadership, cool courage and aggressive fighting spirit throughout, Staff Sergeant Daugherty served to inspire all members of his platoon and contributed materially to the successful repulse of the hostile attacks, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Warren, Ohio. Home Town: Warren, Ohio.

Daujat, John

Headquarters, EUSAK
General Orders No. 186 - April 04, 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Major John Daujat, 0456188, Infantry, United States Army.  Major Daujat, as a member of the United States Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Tongduchon-ni, Korea.  On 1 January 1951, a numerically superior enemy force launched an attack against the 19th Regiment, 6th Republic of Korea Division, sending great numbers of troops against the friendly positions.  Major Daujat, senior advisor to the regiment, moved from position to position across exposed, fire-swept areas, giving encouragement to the friendly troops.  By his example of courageousness and intrepidity he instilled in the Republic of Korea forces the will to hold their positions at all costs and inspired them to the supreme effort despite the overwhelming odds against them.  Fully aware that the units on both flanks were being beaten back and that positions of his unit were exposed, he continued to encourage the men to hold and was last seen directing the fire of a small group of soldiers against the enemy.  His heroic actions and gallant devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the federal service from Texas.

Dauster, Elmer Lee

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Elmer L. Dauster (MCSN: 621546), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of an Artillery Forward Observer Team of Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. When a large enemy force attacked the defense position during the hours of darkness and succeeded in penetrating an adjacent friendly unit, Private First Class Dauster bravely exposed himself to intense hostile automatic-weapons and small-arms fire to man an abandoned machine-gun post in line with the enemy's main assault. Although seriously wounded early in the engagement, he continued to deliver withering fire upon the advancing hostile forces until evacuated for medical attention. By his exceptional courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Dauster served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Louis, Missouri. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri.

Davenport, Howard C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Howard C. Davenport, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 October 1952. When his patrol was ambushed by a numerically superior enemy force, Private First Class Davenport, in covering the evacuation of the many casualties, continually exposed himself to hostile fire in moving across open terrain to resupply arms and ammunition, in order to keep the rear-guard action effective. Through his outstanding courage and determined efforts, he was greatly instrumental in preventing further casualties to his patrol. His heroic and inspiring devotion to duty throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: December 25, 1931 at Gastonia, North Carolina. Home Town: Gastonia, North Carolina.

Davenport, Leslie L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Leslie L. Davenport (MCSN: 0-34222), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Communications Officer of the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 2 to 4 November 1950. When the enemy launched a fanatical attack against the battalion command post area, First Lieutenant Davenport quickly organized his communications personnel into a provisional rifle platoon and personally placed them in defensive positions around the command post. Repeatedly exposing himself to the heavy barrage, he directed and controlled the effective fire of his men and, by his observation of muzzle blasts on one occasion, was able to direct accurate fire which destroyed a machine-gun position. Voluntarily leading a patrol to seek and destroy a hostile sniper nest later in the engagement, he succeeded in expeditiously carrying out his mission with no casualties. Observing an enemy machine-gun position firing into the battalion command post, he found an abandoned 60-mm mortar with ammunition close by while en route to attack the hostile emplacement and personally fired the weapon, destroying the enemy gun and all troops surrounding the position. By his forceful and determined leadership, bold tactics and heroic fighting spirit in the face of tremendous odds, First Lieutenant Davenport served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Guthrie, Oklahoma. Home Town: Crystal Lake, Illinois.

Davidson, Charlie B. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Charlie B. Davidson, Jr. (MCSN: 874232), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 28 November 1950. When his left flank machine gun was partially disabled by hostile small-arms fire during an overwhelming attack against his company's defense perimeter by a numerically superior enemy force, Sergeant Davidson fearlessly exposed himself to the intense barrage to deliver accurate counterfire and succeeded in killing six and in routing the remaining assailants. Observing two Marines of the left flank gun crew wounded by grenade fragments, he continued to man his gun until his ammunition was exhausted and then began to throw grenades. Preparing to throw a grenade when an enemy grenade landed in his position, he hurled the missile back and, leaping from his position with a fixed bayonet, killed the last remaining attacker in hand-to-hand combat. By his daring initiative, bold tactics and valiant fighting spirit in the face of great personal risk, Sergeant Davidson saved the machine gun and prevented further casualties among his fellow Marines, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Goodlett, Texas. Home Town: Petrolia, Texas.

Davidson, Leslie

Sgt. Leslie Davidson of Moose Lake Awarded Silver Star Medal for Bravery

The following release was sent to the Star-Gazette by the Public Information Office from Headquarters Office from Headquarters of the 1st Cavalry Division, San Francisco, California.

With the First Cavalry Division in Korea - A Moose Lake soldier has been awarded the Silver Star Medal for exposing himself to intense enemy fire to neutralize a strong fortified enemy position which delayed friendly troops in their advance.  He is Sergeant First Class Leslie H. Davidson, son of Mrs. Ida L. Davidson, who resides at Route 2, Moose Lake, Minnesota.

Sergeant Davidson was awarded the United States' third highest decoration for gallantry in action against the enemy on October 15, 1950 near Nanchon-jon, Korea, while a member of the U.S. First Cavalry Division.  As a combined tank-infantry attack was moving forward in an attack of which Sergeant Davidson was a member, according to the citation accompanying the decoration, its advance was suddenly halted by an enemy road block.  "Mounting the open and exposed deck of one of the tanks, Sergeant Davidson persuaded the tank commander to attempt to run the block and destroy it.  As they moved toward the enemy position he, in his exposed and vulnerable position, manned the tank's machine gun, and directed its deadly fire toward the block," the citation read in part.  The citation tells of how Sergeant Davidson disregarded the massed fire directed at him and remained firing the machine gun until the road block was overrun and neutralized.  "His outstanding courage and aggressive action," states the citation, "destroyed a strong enemy position and personally accounted for over eight enemy dead, and made possible the rapid and successful continuance of his unit's attack.  "Sergeant Davidson's gallant actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service," the citation concluded.

Davies, Albert C.

Headquarters, 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 326 - 25 October 1952

Major Albert C. Davies, 038916, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 19 July 1952, Company "C" was assigned the mission of assaulting and securing Hill 167 near Chokko-Ri, Korea. They had completed their mission and began occupying their newly acquired positions when the area was suddenly subjected to an intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage, causing several friendly casualties and disorganizing the friendly soldiers. Realizing the gravity of the situation the order was given to withdraw. Fearlessly, Major Davies, the battalion commander, left his position of comparative safety to direct the withdrawal of the friendly force and to aid in the evacuation of the wounded. With complete disregard for his personal safety, and completely oblivious to the lethal barrage, Major Davies continued exposing himself until he was assured of the withdrawal of all friendly troops and the safe evacuation of the wounded. Major DAVIES outstanding heroism and selfless actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Virginia.

Davies, Henry E. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Henry E. Davies, Jr. (NSN: 0-478746), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Executive Officer of the U.S.S. Pirate (AM-275) during minesweeping operations in densely mined areas off Wonsan, Korea, on 12 October 1950. After his ship had struck a mine and having been ordered over the side by his Commanding Officer, he observed our men in the water all of whom were either wounded or dazed. Despite the fact that the vessel's list was increasing rapidly and danger of her capsizing was imminent he towed them clear and assisted them in reaching a life raft. Then, with complete disregard for the enemy gunfire and his own personal safety, he boarded a passing boat to aid in the evacuation of wounded men from a stricken sister ship. His courageous actions minimized the loss of life and contributed materially to the successful clearance of mine free channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan. His loyalty and steadfast devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 316 (March 2, 1951).

Davis, Charlie J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charlie J. Davis (MCSN: 1246774), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 - 15 1953. Serving as point of a combat patrol advancing within ten yards of a strongly defended enemy position when his patrol leader fell mortally wounded, Private First Class Davis, although painfully wounded himself, unhesitatingly crawled forward through the intense hostile automatic-weapons and grenade fire in an attempt to recover his fallen leader. Braving the heavy enemy barrage, he set up effective covering fire for the withdrawal of other wounded Marines and remained in an exposed position until his weapon was blown from his hands by a hostile grenade. Although wounded a second time, he refused evacuation to assist in removing his wounded comrades to a covered position. Upon the arrival of a corpsman, he remained in the devastated area until all the casualties had been evacuated and subsequently walked back to the main line without any assistance. By his outstanding courage, initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Private First Class Davis served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fort Valley, Georgia. Home Town: Fort Valley, Georgia.

Davis, Corbin J. (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, Eighth Army
General Orders No. 142 - March 14, 1951

The First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Captain Corbin J. Davis, 028570, Infantry, U.S. Army. Captain Davis, Commanding Officer of Company L, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Yongin, Korea. On 29 January 1951, Captain Davis was leading his company in an attack upon a determined enemy strongly entrenched on Hill 381, the dominating terrain feature in the battalion zone of attack. Heavy mortar, small arms, and automatic weapons fire were being placed on his company, causing many casualties. When only a portion of the objective had been secured, the attack faltered due to intense enemy fire and the rapidly dwindling ammunition supply. The numerically superior enemy took advantage of this to launch a counterattack on the left flank of the company. Captain Davis, disregarding his personal safety, moved to the flank and, while facing a fanatical charge, killed five enemy soldiers with his carbine, thereby inspiring his men not only to hold the flank but to attack. Captain Davis then led his men forward in a bayonet charge, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and routing them from their well-entrenched positions to secure Hill 381. When ordered to withdraw to positions more favorable for a night defense, he personally evacuated many of the wounded and dead, although under constant heavy fire. He then skillfully established a perimeter defense, ably directing his men until he was wounded by mortar fire which fractured both arms, necessitating his evacuation. The courageous leadership of Captain Davis reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Plattsmouth, Nebraska.

Davis, Daniel Hill (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Major Daniel Hill Davis (MCSN: 0-8678), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMF-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the withdrawal from Hagaru-ri in December 1950. Informed that the Airborne Control Center had not reported on station, Major Davis voluntarily assumed control of all aircraft assigned to carry out close air support missions in this area. Although handicapped by extremely difficult combat conditions and constantly subjected to enemy fire, he efficiently coordinated the movements of these aircraft during a most critical period in the campaign, thereby contributing materially to the success of the evacuation operation at Hagaru-ri. His outstanding courage, professional skill and unswerving devotion to duty throughout reflect the highest credit upon Major Davis and the United States Naval Service. Born: April 8, 1921. Home Town: Itta Bena, Mississippi. Death: KIA: February 24, 1951.

Davis, Earl L.

25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 286 - 3 November 1950

Award of the Silver Star - By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43 1918) and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following named enlisted man:

Sergeant First Class Earl L Davis, RA6959126, Infantry, Company __, 5th Infantry, United States Army.  While leading a reconnaissance patrol in the vicinity of Sobuk San, Korea on 30 August 1950,l Sergeant First Class Davis noticed that one of the members of his patrol had been wounded and was unable to rejoin the patrol.  Despite the intense enemy fire concentrated on the area, Sergeant First Class Davis made his way through barbed wire entanglements and an unmarked mine field to the casualty, and carried him to a position of safety.  Sergeant First Class Davis' selfless devotion to duty and to his comrade reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Kansas.

Davis, George A. Jr. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster) (posthumous)

General Headquarters Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 3 - 4 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Major George Andrew Davis, Jr. (AFSN: 671514/13035A), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy on 30 November 1951 while leading a formation of eight F-86 aircraft on a combat aerial patrol in the Sinuiju-Yalu River area in Korea. Shortly after arriving in the target area, Major Davis sighted a formation of approximately 12 enemy TU-2 type bomber aircraft escorted by large numbers of enemy MIG-15 and LA-9 type fighter aircraft. In spite of the overwhelming odds against him, Major Davis immediately maneuvered his Squadron into position to press home his attack. With outstanding airmanship, he led his formation on the initial pass on the bombers, scoring numerous strikes on the first box of three. While maneuvering for an immediate second attack on the bombers, his wingman became separated and was unable to rejoin him. Major Davis, disregarding his own safety, returned to the attack, although alone and without knowledge of friendly forces in the area. Despite the intense fire from the enemy bomber formation, he pressed home four more attacks with such effectiveness that he personally destroyed three enemy bombers. Major Davis was forced to withdraw after expending nearly all his ammunition and running critically low on fuel. While proceeding southward toward friendly territory, Major Davis heard a distress call from the element leader of his Flight. Although fully aware that he had less than the minimum amount of fuel remaining to insure safe return to a friendly base, Major Davis altered course 180 degrees and proceeded at full power to the location of the pilot. When he arrived he found his pilot's aircraft disabled by enemy fire and in imminent danger of being destroyed by MIG-15s, which were forming for a final attack on the damaged F-86. Major Davis immediately brought accurate fire on the enemy, destroyed one MIG-15, dispersed the remaining, forcing them to break off their attack. He escorted the disabled aircraft out of the danger zone, into friendly territory. When he finally landed, he had less than five gallons of fuel remaining. Through his skill, Major Davis saved the life of a fellow pilot and caused the destruction of four enemy aircraft, bringing his total score to six destroyed and two probably destroyed. Major Davis' outstanding airmanship and gallantry reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Davis, George A. Jr. (2nd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster) (posthumous)

General Headquarters Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 135 - 19 March 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Major George Andrew Davis, Jr. (ASN: 0-671514/13035A), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Squadron Commander, 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in the Sinanju-Anju area of North Korea on 13 December 1951. On that date, Major Davis was leader of a squadron of eight F-86 aircraft on a counter-air mission, when he observed a flight of ten MIG-15 enemy aircraft. He immediately initiated a coordinated attack and led his forces into the engagement. The vicious assault was relentlessly pressed and resulted in five MIG-15s destroyed and a sixth probably destroyed by the members of Major Davis' squadron. Major Davis was personally responsible for the destruction of two MIG-15 aircraft. None of his squadron sustained damage in achieving this victory over the enemy. The personal courage and outstanding qualities of leadership exhibited by major Davis contributed immeasurably to the greatest defeat inflicted upon the enemy in a single jet-to-jet engagement. As a result of his gallantry, leadership and brilliant tactical skill, Major Davis reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Davis, Howard J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 776 - 27 November 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class Howard J. Davis, US55067981, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 38 Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 28 August 1951 in the vicinity of Taeusan, Korea. On that date a numerically superior enemy force launched an assault on Company L’s positions. In the initial phase of the enemy attack the crew of a friendly machine gun became casualties. Private Davis, immediately volunteered to operate the important weapon, advanced through the intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire to the emplacement and commenced firing. During the ensuing assault by the enemy the machine gun position was overrun at times, but completely disregarding his own safety, Private Davis remained in his position and employed a steady hail of fire upon the attacking force. At daybreak when the enemy attack was repulsed, many dead hostile soldiers were found around Private Davis’ emplacement. The gallantry in action displayed by Private Davis on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Polk County, Iowa.

Davis, Isaac S.

25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 286 - 3 November 1950

Award of the Silver Star - By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43 1918) and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following named enlisted man:

Sergeant Isaac S. Davis, RA18007070, Infantry, Company M, 5th Infantry, United States Army.  On 2 September 1950, near Noylon, Korea, when his battalion was subjected to an attack by numerically superior hostile forces, Sergeant Davis manned a machine gun when its gunner was killed, and delivered withering fire at the enemy until the weapon was destroyed by a hostile hand grenade.  Seizing his rifle, he continued to provide covering fire for the withdrawal of the unit until all troops had reached the new position.  Sergeant Davis' courageous devotion to duty reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army. Entered the military service from Texas.

Davis, James P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James P. Davis (MCSN: 1043276), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 April 1951. While advancing up a small hill during a mission to secure the hill in order to protect the flank of the platoon in the attack, the squad was subjected to intense hostile automatic-weapons and small-arms fire from enemy troops in well-concealed positions and suffered numerous casualties. With virtually no cover for his squad, and realizing that the platoon's success depended on the rapid seizure of the position, he charged forward through the devastating hostile fire, encouraging his men to follow. Although sustaining serious wounds as he ran up the hill, Private First Class Davis, by his heroic actions, so inspired all his men that they swept forward and completely routed the enemy. His outstanding courage, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chattanooga, Tennessee. Home Town: Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Davis, James Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal James Davis, Jr. (MCSN: 1194211), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. Volunteering to act as a stretcher bearer for another company engaged in an attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Corporal Davis left the main line of resistance and bravely advanced far forward of friendly lines, completing several trips out and back to carry wounded Marines to the forward aid station. On one occasion, realizing the vital need for corpsmen within the platoons, he dashed from the evacuation station to the front line of action through a vicious hail of enemy fire and following the instructions of a wounded corpsman, administered aid to the other wounded men. Although seriously wounded himself while going to the assistance of a comrade, Corporal Davis continued on until he reached the stricken man, rendered treatment for his wounds and aided in carrying him back to the main line of resistance. By his indomitable fortitude, valorous initiative and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of others, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Jenkins, Kentucky. Home Town: Logan, West Virginia.

Davis, Julius

Citation not yet found.

"Cpl. Julius J. Davis of Shreveport, La. is living proof that some Chinese Communist propaganda is a lot of bunk.  Sometime last winter an enemy artillery shell landed among UN troops dug in on a frozen ridge.  But instead of exploding with shrapnel it had a paper charge of propaganda leaflets.  One-half of the leaflet was a picture of a beautiful gal with a very lonely and unhappy look about her.  the other half contained a small picture of a dead GI lying prone on a battlefield, above a letter supposed to have been taken from the body.  The GI in the picture is identified as Julius J. Davis.  His outfit and serial number are also stated.  The letter is a very tearful, emotional message from Davis' wife or girlfriend.  The apparent intent of the message is to make all GIs who see it begin to think about loved ones back home and how they might die, too, and thereby wreck their morale.  Whatever effect it actually had on UN troops who saw it, it is now giving Davis a big laugh.  The leaflet has his name, serial number and outfit--the 15th Regiment of the 3rd Division--right, but that is all.  He never saw the letter, and has no idea how the Commies got his name and the other information.  When the leaflet finally got back to him through Army and Pentagon channels he had been rotated out of Korea back to Camp Chaffee, Ark.  He gets out soon and plans to become a school teacher.  He is single and a graduate of Xavier University in New Orleans.  The picture supposed to be of Davis on the leaflet is really not too ridiculous, however.  While in Korea he did suffer from frostbite, he explains, because he couldn't get a shoepack big enough for his size 12 feet.  He also participated in 14 dangerous patrols into enemy lines.  On one of these missions he performed so gallantly he won the Silver Star.  He personally broke up and disorganized an enemy outfit with his rifle and grenades.  He then saved the life of his squad leader who had been wounded and brought his own outfit back to safety." - The Daily Inter Lake - 12 June 1953

Davis, Lowell M.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 204 - 24 June 1953

First Lieutenant Lowell M. Davis, 065394, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 16 May 1953, Lieutenant Davis was directing his company in the defense of Outpost "Harry" against a numerically superior hostile attack in the vicinity of Songnae-dong, Korea. The enemy began shelling the area with artillery and mortar concentrations. Soon after, the hostile troops began their attack with small arms fire and grenades. Lieutenant DAVIS immediately took control of the situation and began planning operations to strengthen the defense of the outpost. He moved through the platoon areas that were subjected to intense mortar, artillery and small arms fire to observe the attack and keep well informed of the enemy's action. He exposed himself to the enemy fire to rally his men and direct their fire at the oncoming foe. As a result of his courage and inspirational leadership, his men repelled the attack. Lieutenant DAVIS' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from South Dakota.

Davis, Merle L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Merle L. Davis (MCSN: 1132825), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 April 1951. When the unit was subjected to intense and accurate hostile automatic-weapons and small-arms fire which caused numerous casualties during an assault against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Private First Class Davis, despite the pain from severe leg wounds sustained during the attack, fearlessly charged forward through the heavy fire. Inspiring his comrades to follow him in a vicious assault on the hostile position, he greatly aided in routing the entrenched enemy and contributed materially to the success achieved by the company. By his outstanding and courageous leadership, exceptional fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty in the face of intense hostile fire, Private First Class Davis served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Holdenville, Oklahoma. Home Town: Holdenville, Oklahoma.

Davis, Murrit H.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 591 - 14 December 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Murrit H. Davis, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Squadron Commander, 39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 18th Fighter-Bomber Group, FIFTH Air Force, on 14 August 1951. On that date, Major Davis led a flight of 12 F-51 type aircraft on a mission over Korea. Major Davis displayed outstanding airmanship and exceptional heroism by leading his Squadron over the heavily defended city of Pyongyang, capital of North Korea, where a devastating low level napalm attack was made against supply warehouses in that city. Two of his pilots were shot down by enemy fire and his own aircraft was heavily damaged. Despite the intensity of enemy opposition, Major Davis pulled away from his Squadron and circled the target area repeatedly attempting to locate the downed pilots. After an exhaustive search, he reassembled his squadron over the designated rendezvous point and led them toward home base. Approximately tem minutes after leaving the target area, his aircraft engine failed. Major Davis jettisoned his canopy. His aircraft was then seen to enter a spiral to the left, crash into the ground and explode. Major Davis' inspiring leadership, personal courage and devotion to duty, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Davis, Octavius C.

Headquarters, 40th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 121

Lieutenant Colonel Octavius C. Davis, 0384319, artillery, United States Army, 980th Field Artillery Battalion, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Satae-Ri, Korea on 28 October 1952.  When Colonel Davis' unit occupied a new sector, the forward elements were subjected to devastating artillery and mortar fire.  Realizing the critical situation, Colonel Davis left a place of comparative safety and with total disregard for his personal safety, courageously exposed himself to enemy machine gun, artillery and mortar fire over open terrain, often drawing direct machine gun fire upon himself, to reach vantage observation posts from which he could personally assist forward observers in locating enemy gun positions.  While virtually all the observation posts he visited were being subjected to intense artillery and mortar fire, Colonel Davis steadfastly, in open defiance of the enemy, pursued his course of action to completion.  By his inspiring leadership and courageous example of personal bravery and self-sacrifice, Colonel Davis succeeded in personally directing effective counter-fire and encouraged his forward observer to outstanding achievements in silencing numerous enemy machine gun and artillery pieces.  Colonel Davis' decisive action and complete disregard for his personal safety was instrumental in saving many lives and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the Federal service from Oklahoma.

Davis, Ralph L.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 550- 26 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Ralph L. Davis, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action while serving as an aero-medical specialist, Detachment 1, 3d Air Rescue Squadron, Fifth Air Force, in action near Korang-pori, Korea, on 19 May 1951. Private Davis voluntarily made a flight fifty miles into enemy held territory to effect the rescue of a United Nations pilot who had been unable to return to friendly territory in his battle damaged aircraft. Upon approaching the locale of the pilot, the helicopter was subjected to a barrage of enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire and forced to circle the area while friendly aircraft strafed the enemy positions. When it appeared hostile fire had been neutralized, the helicopter pilot descended, only to meet again a fusillade of small arms fire which struck the helicopter. Private Davis, with utter disregard for his safety, returned fire from the helicopter until a landing had been made. Still under concentrated fire, he helped the injured pilot aboard as the aircraft escaped to safety. The gallantry, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty displayed by Private Davis reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Davis, Raymond Gilbert (1st award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Colonel Raymond Gilbert Davis (MCSN: 0-5831), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy in Korea during the period 2 November to 8 November 1950. Lieutenant Colonel Davis was serving as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division on 3 November 1950. At about 0130, 3 November the enemy conducted a fierce, coordinated night attack against the First Battalion, Seventh Marines. Lieutenant Colonel Davis moved from point to point on the line wherever there was danger of the enemy breaking through, continually exposing himself to heavy enemy small arms and mortar fire without personal regard for his own safety. His display of leadership, initiative and courage was a constant inspiration to the officers and men about him. It was through his actions that the lines held and the enemy was repulsed. During the daylight hours of 3 November Lieutenant Colonel Davis maneuvered elements of his command in such a manner as to route the enemy. Once again Lieutenant Colonel Davis' display of leadership and courage acted as an inspiration to the officers and men of his command. It was a direct result of Lieutenant Colonel Davis' actions that the First Battalion was able to break through and continue the attack in its zone of action. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 25 (February 10, 1950).  Born: January 13, 1915 at Fitzgerald, Georgia. Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia. Death: September 3, 2003 - Buried at: Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens - College Park, Georgia.

Davis, Raymond Gilbert (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Raymond Gilbert Davis (MCSN: 0-5831), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 September 1950. Assigned the task of seizing two hills located at the southern end of the Seoul-Uijongbu corridor, Lieutenant Colonel Davis boldly led his battalion against a well-entrenched enemy force in the face of hostile small-arms, automatic-weapons and mortar fire. Keenly aware that the unit had been assembled and organized only six weeks previously and that this was its first attack, he advanced with the assault elements and, moving from platoon to platoon to encourage the men, inspired his battalion to rout the enemy and capture its objective quickly. By his marked courage, brilliant leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel Davis upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: January 13, 1915 at Fitzgerald, Georgia. Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia. Death: September 3, 2003 - Buried at: Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens - College Park, Georgia.

Davis, William C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade (MC) William C. Davis (NSN: 0-473368), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry while serving as a Medical Officer attached to a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. Serving as Assistant Battalion Surgeon, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Davis displayed outstanding courage and professional ability when the Battalion Command Group was subjected to an intense and accurate enemy mortar barrage. Although he was painfully wounded in the leg, he courageously refused to submit to medical treatment, and moved through the heavy enemy fire, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, to render aid to casualties. Although the mortar barrage increased in intensity, he remained constantly in the open, rendering first aid and carrying wounded to covered positions. His unswerving devotion to duty was an inspiration to all who observed him, and aided materially in the saving of many lives which would have been lost without prompt medical attention. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Davis' heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 60174 (November 30, 1951).

Davis, William J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William J. Davis (MCSN: 0-49480), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving a 60-mm. Mortar Section Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 and 3 November 1950. Quick to act when his company was subjected to a strong hostile counterattack, First Lieutenant Davis immediately advanced to a forward position under intense enemy machine-gun, mortar and artillery fire and, remaining in his exposed position, called and adjusted accurate and effective mortar fire until the aggressors were repulsed thirty hours later. By his aggressive and determined leadership, fortitude and cool courage in the face of heavy odds, First Lieutenant Davis served as an inspiration to all who observed him, and his steadfast devotion to duty throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Division, Serial 10643. Born: Stoneham, Massachusetts. Home Town: Stoneham, Massachusetts. Death: December 21, 2009.

Davis, William M.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 15 - 28 April 1965

First Lieutenant William M. Davis, Infantry (then Second Lieutenant), United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 10 February 1951, in Korea.  when the 2d Battalion of the 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, was ordered to attack a previously unassailable enemy stronghold in a hill mass located twenty-five kilometers southeast of Seoul, Lieutenant Davis' platoon was placed in the lead position of F Company's column.  After a strenuous march across frozen rice paddies and up very steep slopes while exposed to enemy gunfire, the platoon was pinned down temporarily upon reaching the military crest of the hill as the enemy gunfire became concentrated on this position.  Sensing the need for drastic action to reach the close objective, Lieutenant Davis jumped to his feet, dashed the few remaining yards, fired into enemy foxholes, and urged his men to follow.  Although seriously wounded by an enemy grenade during the fierce fight that ensued, he continued to support the attack by directing the actions of his men.  Inspired by his fortitude, courageous actions, and determination, the men of F Company surged through the enemy position, capturing twenty-two, annihilating one hundred, and chasing the remaining enemy troops as they fled to the north.  Lieutenant Davis' conspicuous gallantry is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Leflore City, MS.

Davis, William T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal William T. Davis (MCSN: 1044729), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. Wounded in the arm when his platoon was pinned down by intense accurate enemy small-arms and machine-gun fire during an attack on Yongdungp'o, Corporal Davis refused medical aid for himself and remained steadfast in position to deliver fire upon the enemy and cover the evacuation of the dead and wounded. Despite increasing weakness from extreme pain and loss of blood, he continued his fire until he collapsed and had to be carried to the aid station. By his courage, fortitude and heroic devotion to duty, Corporal Davis upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hobbs, New Mexico. Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Davison, Robert Dwight (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Robert Dwight Davison (MCSN: 1109804), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 July 1951. When the lead elements of the platoon suffered a number of casualties while crossing an enemy mine field during a reconnaissance mission near Yanggu, Corporal Davison bravely entered the mined area to administer first aid to the wounded. Despite the grave hazards involved, he continued his heroic efforts until he himself was mortally wounded by an exploding mine. By his marked courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, corporal Davison served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his company. Born: Rockford, Illinois. Home Town: Rockford, Illinois. Death: KIA: July 15, 1951.

Davisson, Leonard B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Leonard B. Davisson (MCSN: 1173484), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Patrol Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 October 1952. When the patrol leader was killed and several other members of the unit were seriously wounded by an exploding enemy mine nine hundred yards forward of the main line of resistance. Corporal Davisson assumed command of the unit and directed the evacuation of the wounded. Although painfully wounded himself, when another mine exploded almost immediately, killing two more men and seriously wounding the remaining members of the patrol, he sent two of the walking wounded back to the company for assistance, set up a perimeter of defense and, crawling from one man to another, and dragged the other wounded Marines into the protective perimeter. After skillfully connecting a sound power phone to a line leading back to the company area, he informed the company commander of the critical situation and directed the subsequent rescue efforts with effective covering mortar fire. Upon the arrival of the rescue unit, he refused medical aid until his wounded comrades had been treated. By his courageous leadership, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Corporal Davisson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Vallizo, California. Home Town: Reno, Nevada.

Dawson, Robert H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 113 - 30 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Field Artillery) Robert H. Dawson (ASN: 0-269466), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Battery, 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, on 8 July 1950, near Chonan, Korea. A large force of enemy infiltrated into Chonan and completely cut off an infantry battalion which was supported by the 63d Field Artillery Battalion. Colonel Dawson, as Commanding Officer of the Field Artillery, proceeded approximately five miles forward of his Battalion Command Post in order to establish communication and to place artillery fire on the enemy to relieve pressure on the infantry. Under intense enemy fire he maneuvered his radio to a position where fire missions could be relayed from the forward observers. In spite of inadequate communication and enemy fire, he inspired the forward observers under his command to continue fire missions against the enemy until an orderly withdrawal of the infantry could be effected. In this position it was necessary for him to cover himself and his radio operator using his carbine against enemy foot soldiers. When ordered to withdraw his battalion, he skillfully conducted a movement under cover of darkness over a hazardous route which was materially responsible for saving many lives and much material of the 34th Regimental Combat Team. His cool and daring leadership when faced with danger reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Home Town: Greenville, Mississippi.

Day, James Lewis (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant James Lewis Day (MCSN: 0-56003), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 January 1953. Skillfully leading his patrol deep into hostile territory to attack an enemy-held position from the rear, Second Lieutenant Day immediately proceeded to the head of the unit after contact was established, to control the action more effectively. After killing one hostile soldier and capturing another, he ordered his men to hold their fire until the enemy force had approached to within twenty yards of the patrol's position. Although painfully wounded during the ensuing firefight, he bravely directed the efforts of his men until the hostile force had been eliminated and steadfastly refused medical treatment until his patrol and the prisoner had withdrawn from the area. Throughout the disengagement, he remained with the rear guard to ensure the unit's safe return to the main line of resistance. By his courageous leadership, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Day contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: October 5, 1925 at East St. Louis, Illinois Home Town: East St. Louis, Illinois. Death: October 28, 1998 - Buried at: Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery - San Diego, California.

Day, James Lewis (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel [then Second Lieutenant] James Lewis Day (MCSN: 0-56003), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine reconnaissance company in Korea on 26 October 1952. Leading a patrol of four men in front of the main line of resistance, Colonel (then Second Lieutenant) Day displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When contact was established with the advance element of a major enemy force his patrol killed ten of the enemy and captured two. Breaking off contact he returned to friendly lines with the two prisoners and continued to fight the enemy force beside the Marines on the front lines. He personally killed two of the enemy with his trench knife and directed the defense of the position after the platoon leader was killed. He continued his heroic defense action until relieved by friendly forces. Colonel Day's gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. Born: October 5, 1925 at East St. Louis, Illinois Home Town: East St. Louis, Illinois. Death: October 28, 1998 - Buried at: Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery - San Diego, California.

Day, Oma Dudley Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Oma Dudley Day, Jr. (MCSN: 578746), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Platoon Sergeant, 2d Platoon, Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea. On 14 January 1953, the platoon was attacked by a superior enemy force. While directing the platoon's fire against the enemy, Master Sergeant Day went to the aid of some exhausted and wounded Marines who were under enemy fire. He drew the enemy fire to himself and fearlessly attacked and killed the enemy. Although painfully wounded a second time, exposing himself to enemy fire and the danger of exploding ammunition, Master Sergeant Day without regard for his own safety entered the burning bunker and evacuated the wounded, shouting words of encouragement to his men. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership in the face of heavy enemy fire, and total dedication to duty, Master Sergeant Day reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. Home Town: San Antonio, Texas.

Dean, William Harold (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant William Harold Dean (MCSN: 0-39505), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 December 1950. Encountering a hail of intense, hostile automatic-weapons and small-arms fire from strongly entrenched and well-concealed enemy positions while moving up a ridge south of Yudam-ni with his platoon, First Lieutenant Dean bravely exposed himself to the hostile fire and proceeded to lead his men in a vigorous assault against the enemy. Mortally wounded while spearheading a final assault on the hostile positions, First Lieutenant Dean, by his outstanding leadership,, aggressive fighting spirit and unflinching devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the successful seizure of the assigned objective. His courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Lexington, Kentucky. Home Town: Louisville, Kentucky. Death: KIA: December 1, 1950.

DeBoer, Arend (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 866 - 19 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to CORPORAL Arenf DeBoer,ER17257204, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company C, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action during the period from 31 August to 2 September 1951 in the vicinity of Taeusan, Korea. On these dates, Corporal DeBoer, during his company’s attack on an enemy-held hill, demonstrated outstanding leadership and courage. In the initial phase of the attack his squad’s advance was halted by intense enemy fire. Without hesitation Corporal DeBoer picked up an automatic rifle, rushed forward and placed maximum fire on the enemy position. His fire forced the enemy to leave their positions and withdraw, enabling the squad to continue their assault. On 2 September 1951, Corporal DeBoer, continuing to inspire the members of his squad with his bravery, was fatally wounded by enemy fire. The gallantry in action displayed by Corporal DeBoer reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Ogilvie, Minnesota.

DeChow, George H.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 190 - 25 September 1950

Major George H. DeChow, 024553, Infantry, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  Major DeChow commanded the rear elements of the 1st Battalion in an attack 18 miles into enemy territory near Chindong-ni, Korea on 2 August 1950.  Although constantly exposed to harassing hostile fire, Major DeChow moved among elements of the column directing defense and elimination of many of the enemy.  When the column turned around, he led the withdrawal with equal effectiveness and courage.  At one point his skillful supervision of the repair of an impassable road greatly facilitated the battalion movement.  Major DeChow's gallant leadership, calm courage under fire and notable tactical ability served as an inspiration to all his men and officers and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Maryland.

Decker, Elza A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Elza A. Decker (MCSN: 1195602), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1952. When his unit was attacked by an overwhelming enemy force under cover of darkness while occupying an important outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, Corporal Decker quickly placed his men in position and skillfully directed them in delivering deadly fire on the attackers. With many of his men becoming casualties when a devastating hostile mortar and artillery barrage hit the outpost, he assured that the wounded were moved to a covered position and fearlessly placing himself at the entrance to protect the casualties, delivered intense rifle fire on the enemy, killing three and wounding several others. During a lull in the action when the enemy was forced to withdraw and organize for another assault, Corporal Decker moved about the trench line to insure that all of the wounded were in protected areas. When the second enemy assault was launched, he courageously engaged the hostile troops in hand-to-hand combat until forced by the numerically superior enemy to withdraw to the outpost tunnel works where he again assumed a position at the entrance to prevent the enemy from entering. After an artillery barrage was lifted from the position, he fearlessly exposed himself to hostile fire to search the trench lines for wounded and to gather enemy weapons and ammunition. Sighting three of the enemy in a collapsed bunker, he quickly annihilated the position with grenades. By his indomitable fighting spirit, outstanding courage and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Decker contributed in large measure to the successful defense of the outpost and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Newcastle, Wyoming. Home Town: Big Piney, Wyoming.

Decker, Forest D. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 862 - 16 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Sergeant Forest D. Decker, RA7335558, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company I, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 8 October 1951 in the vicinity of Hang-Hyong, Korea. On this date, Company I was assigned the mission of attacking and securing a vital hill position defended by a well entrenched hostile force. As the unit neared its objective, heavy concentrations of enemy mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire pinned down the leading elements. Sergeant Decker, with complete disregard for his personal safety, advanced toward the hostile positions and, firing the machine gun from his hip, succeeded in inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy and destroyed several of his emplacements. Inspired by his courageous action, the remaining friendly troops followed him and successfully routed the hostile forces from their positions. The gallantry in action displayed by Sergeant Decker on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Des Moines, Iowa.

[KWE Note: Sergeant Decker was killed in action eleven days later. He was 18 years old.]

Deeds, Robert D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert D. Deeds (MCSN: 670763), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Seoul, Korea, on 23 September 1950. When the right flank position was pinned down by intense enemy small-arms and machine-gun fire while his company was advancing in the attack on Seoul, corporal Deeds voluntarily moved forward alone and, with his rifle fire and hand grenades, personally destroyed two hostile emplacements, thus enabling his fire team to advance and destroy the remaining enemy right flank positions with well-directed fire and grenades. By his exceptional courage, initiative and fighting spirit, Corporal Deeds was instrumental in regaining his platoon's fire superiority to continue the attack thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Burwyn, Nebraska. Home Town: Grand Island, Nebraska.

Deegan, Melvin H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Melvin H. Deegan (MCSN: 1206836), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 and 7 September 1952. When the forward outpost was brought under an intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage and was attacked by a numerically superior hostile force, Private First Class Deegan, though painfully wounded in the arm during the initial barrage, continued to man his weapon, inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy and keeping his sector of the perimeter secure. Wounded a second time and forced to leave his weapon, Private First Class Deegan steadfastly remained at his position, although in considerable pain from his wounds and under intense fire, directed a rifleman in firing the machine gun so that the weapon would remain in action. His exceptional courage, initiative and unyielding devotion to duty served to inspire all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Saginaw, Michigan. Home Town: Saginaw, Michigan.

DeFazio, Ernest L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Ernest L. DeFazio (MCSN: 284645), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 September 1950. As a voluntary member of a thirteen-man patrol led by his company commander, Technical Sergeant DeFazio swam across the Han River to participate in a hazardous reconnaissance mission in enemy territory. When discover of their movement brought them under intense hostile small-arms and mortar fire and wounded the patrol leader, Technical Sergeant DeFazio bravely rallied the men and led them back across the river to safety. The information obtained and reported as a result of this dangerous assignment prevented a probable ambush of the main landing force and, by his outstanding leadership, Technical Sergeant DeFazio contributed materially to the overall success of the operations. His marked courage, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Athol, Massachusetts. Home Town: Athol, Massachusetts.

DeForest, Don C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Commander Don C. DeForest (NSN: 0-83052), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Task Group 95.6 while engaged in operations in enemy mined waters and in areas subjected to enemy gunfire during the period 10 to 31 October 1950. When a minesweeper was mined in an adjacent area he took personal charge of a rescue boat and proceeded into heavily mined waters and effected the rescue of all surviving personnel. At a later date he proceeded alone into an area not cleared of enemy snipers and obtained intelligence information essential to the operations then being conducted. His inspiring leadership and professional competence contributed directly to the successful accomplishment of the mission of the Task Group and to the successful clearance of mine free channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan, Korea. His loyalty and steadfast devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1204 (December 13, 1950).

DeFrance, Charles M. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 74 - 27 February 1952
Amended by General Orders No. 98 - 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Charles M. DeFrance (ASN: RA-14348430), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, during the night of 7 - 8 November 1951. His platoon, holding a defensive position, was savagely attacked shortly before midnight by a large number of fanatical enemy troops. Private DeFrance, an Automatic Rifleman, repeatedly exposed himself to answer the thick enemy fire with deadly accurate bursts from his own weapon. During the raging conflict, the automatic rifleman protecting the platoon's right flank was put out of action by wounds. Realizing the danger of an enemy breakthrough in that sector, Private DeFrance unhesitatingly crawled through a nearby impenetrable blanket of enemy fire to the vacated position and resumed firing into the onrushing enemy hordes with such devastating effect that he broke up their charge. His magnificent one-man defense, however, soon made him the focus of heavy machine gun fire. In the ensuing duel, he was seriously wounded twice but, with complete disregard for his own welfare, continued firing, killing several enemy soldiers, until he died from the injuries he received. Private DeFrance's gallant actions, indomitable spirit and self-sacrificing devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the successful repulsion of the enemy and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: April 25, 1932. Home Town: Pell City, Alabama. Death: KIA: November 8, 1951 - Buried at: Oak Ridge Cemetery - Pell City, Alabama.

Degernes, Mayhlon L. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Mayhlon L. Degernes, Jr. (MCSN: 0-50038), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 and 29 November 1950. During a vicious attack by a numerically superior enemy force at Hagaru-ri, Second Lieutenant Degernes courageously exposed himself to intense hostile fire in order to move from flank to flank of his platoon, checking his men's positions, directing their fire and offering them encouragement. On one occasion, observing the flash from two enemy machine guns, he immediately left his covered position and, under heavy fire, moved approximately 100 yards to the left flank where a 75-mm recoilless rifle was located. Personally firing tracers from a machine gun, he pointed out the targets to the recoilless rifle crew, enabling them to destroy the hostile machine-gun emplacements. Later upon observing enemy mortar flashes, he again proceeded to the recoilless rifle crew, directing their fire until the mortar was destroyed. Although painfully wounded in the chin when an enemy mortar shell exploded within ten feet of his position, he went to the aid of another more seriously wounded Marine and assisted in the man's evacuation. By his inspiring leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Second Lieutenant Degernes upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bagley, Minnesota. Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Delamater, Benjamin Franklin III

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 45 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Benjamin Franklin Delamater, III (ASN: 0-23305), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 15 October 1951. While with the forward elements of his battalion near an enemy occupied hill, Colonel Delamater observed a platoon well out in front of all other friendly units that was under heavy enemy small arms and mortar fire. Using his field glasses from his position in the front lines, he noticed that the men appeared to be disorganized and without a leader. With complete disregard for his own safety, he began working his way forward to the group. Enemy machine gunners swept his immediate area with devastating bursts but he continued to advance. An enemy mortar round exploded nearby and its concussion knocked him off his feet. Then his helmet was knocked off by small arms fire. But, undaunted he continued to move forward and, by alternately creeping and crawling, succeeded in reaching the isolated platoon. There he learned that the platoon was a unit from an adjacent battalion, and that their platoon leader had been seriously wounded. Still under heavy enemy mortar and machine gun fire, Colonel Delamater reorganized the group and, assuring himself that no wounded were left behind, led the platoon back to friendly lines. Once back in friendly territory, he skillfully directed mortar and artillery fire on the enemy positions which had fired on him during his rescue mission, destroying many of them. Colonel Delamater's courageous action, outstanding leadership and aggressive initiative reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: Texas. Home Town: Caldwell, Texas. Death: November 19, 2000.

Delaney, Leo T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade (MC) Leo T. Delaney (NSN: 0-497692), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Medical Officer attached to a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Delaney displayed outstanding professional skill and courage in the performance of his duties as Battalion Surgeon. While he was organizing the vehicular evacuation of numerous wounded of the battalion, the convoy was subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage, and as he fearlessly exposed himself to treat a seriously wounded man, he was painfully wounded in the leg. As the vehicles began to move down the road, the driver of the lead jeep was critically wounded, and the progress of the entire convoy stalled. Again braving the flying shrapnel all about him, he rushed down the line, procured another driver for the jeep, and after getting the convoy started, remained behind with the wounded man to administer emergency treatment. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Delaney's courageous actions and unselfish devotion to duty in remaining at his post until all casualties had been safely evacuated, despite his own painful wound, were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 39944 (October 18, 1951).

Del Giudice, Felix

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Felix Del Giudice (MCSN: 648459), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Light Machine Gun Section of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. With his sector under vicious attack by a numerically superior hostile force employing machine guns, mortars, automatic weapons, and small arms, Corporal Del Giudice promptly maneuvered his unit into position to attack and, skillfully directing its fire, succeeded in annihilating all hostile troops to his immediate front. Observing the machine gun on his right flank out of action after moving his own weapon to another position to bring fire to bear on other targets, he unhesitatingly charged across the open fire-swept area and repaired the malfunction under the enemy's direct fire and, after placing the gun back into action, personally manned it throughout a bitter action to repulse the attackers. By his daring initiative, gallant fighting spirit and heroic actions in the face of heavy odds served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Del Giudice and the United States Naval Service. Born: New Haven, Connecticut. Home Town: New Haven, Connecticut.

Delisle, Leo A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Leo A. Delisle (MCSN: 663848), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Machine Gunner of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. With three members of the squad wounded when a numerically superior enemy force penetrated his sector during an attack under cover of darkness on the company defensive perimeter, Private First Class Delisle unhesitatingly continued to man his machine gun although the enemy had bypassed his weapon and completely surrounded his position. Delivering accurate and effective fire, he succeeded in disrupting the enemy's assault, thereby enabling other elements of the company to repulse the attackers. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Delisle was instrumental and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lewiston, Maine. Home Town: Lewiston, Maine.

DeLong, Earl R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Earl R. DeLong (MCSN: 0-292910), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of the Antitank Company, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 November 1950. Quickly organizing an untrained crew for a 75-mm. recoilless rifle upon receiving word that enemy forces had ambushed a friendly convoy, First Lieutenant DeLong fearlessly proceeded to the site of the ambush under intense hostile small-arms and machine-gun fire and, expertly directing the fire of his gun against the well-entrenched positions, destroyed all of the enemy's machine gun emplacements. Continuing his valiant efforts, he immediately took charge of the convoy and led it through the enemy-infested area and, after loading a vehicle with casualties, returned through additional sniper fire to the regimental aid station. By his daring initiative, fearless and aggressive leadership and dauntless courage throughout the furious action, First Lieutenant DeLong served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bristol, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Havertown, Pennsylvania.

DeLong, Phillip Cunliffe

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Phillip Cunliffe DeLong (MCSN: 0-16434), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Section Leader and Pilot in Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMF-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Taedong-Gang Estuary, Korea, on 21 April 1951. Suddenly attacked from above by four enemy fighter aircraft while leading his section on a reconnaissance mission and carrying a full load of bombs, rockets and ammunition, Captain DeLong immediately jettisoned his external load and, although his plane was damaged during the initial aerial assault, effectively organized his flight to assume the offensive. Quickly attaining the advantage, he skillfully pressed an attack and, within a period of approximately three minutes, shot down two hostile planes. As a result of his skilled airmanship and tactical ability, his flight destroyed three of the enemy aircraft and severely damaged the fourth. By his marked courage, brilliant airmanship and steadfast devotion to duty, Captain DeLong upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Jackson, Michigan. Home Town: Jackson, Michigan.

DelToro, Isaac (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Isaac DelToro (MCSN: 1226847), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 October 1953. With his squad pinned down by hostile machine-gun fire during an assault on an enemy-held position far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class DelToro, armed with only a rifle and hand grenades, unhesitatingly charged the objective. Although painfully wounded by the heavy enemy fire, he continued to advance until he silenced the hostile emplacement, remaining with the assault forces until he fell to the ground unable to continue. Mortally wounded by enemy fire while being evacuated, Private First Class DelToro, by his daring initiative, outstanding courage and zealous devotion to duty, inspired all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: El Paso, Texas. Home Town: El Paso, Texas. Death: KIA: October 3, 1952.

Demara, Raymond M.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 71 - 29 December 1955

Sergeant First Class Raymond M. Demara, Artillery, (then Infantry), United States Army, a member of Company I, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry in action at the repeated risk of his life on 7 January 1952.  Sergeant Demara was a member of a combat reconnaissance patrol operating in the vicinity of Hill 871 near Nae-dong, Korea.  The patrol, caught in heavy small arms cross fire and under observed mortar fire, suffered heavy casualties and was ordered to withdraw.  Sergeant Demara, oblivious to the danger to himself, refused to leave.  He stayed with the seriously wounded men, doing what he could for them although constantly exposed to enemy fire.  Despite being wounded, Sergeant Demara stayed with the wounded men until assistance arrived and the men could be evacuated.  After the wounded men were evacuated Sergeant Demara remained behind and attempted to destroy all abandoned equipment.  Sergeant Demara's conspicuous gallantry and devotion to his men reflect the utmost credit on himself and the military service.

DeMasi, Anthony J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Anthony J. DeMasi (MCSN: 1036973), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Assigned the mission of assaulting a strongly defended enemy hill position, Sergeant DeMasi skillfully maneuvered his men in a flanking attack. When the unit was subjected to withering hostile automatic-weapons fire from a concealed bunker, he single-handedly charged forward to assault the emplacement and succeeded in silencing the enemy weapon, thereby permitting his squad to continue the advance. Later, when the platoon sergeant became a casualty, he quickly assumed command and courageously led the foremost squad in the successful seizure of the enemy position. By his skilled leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, Sergeant DeMasi contributed materially to the success achieved by the company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bayonne, New Jersey. Home Town: Bayonne, New Jersey.

DeMeo, Anthony Frank (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Anthony Frank DeMeo (MCSN: 664428), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When his company was subjected to a vicious night attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Corporal DeMeo skillfully displaced his men into a position from which they could fire into the area of the enemy's main effort and, despite hostile small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, placed himself forward of the squad in order to observe and direct their fire to best advantage. Although painfully wounded during one fierce enemy assault, he retrieved an automatic rifle from a fallen comrade and added its fire to that of his machine guns, steadfastly remaining at his post throughout two additional assaults until he fell, mortally wounded. By his inspiring leadership, valiant determination and courageous devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Corporal DeMeo contributed materially to the successful repulse of the hostile attack and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Deming, Angus

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Angus Deming (MCSN: 0-49595), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. Participating in the attack on a strongly defended enemy hill position, First Lieutenant Deming fearlessly led his men up the steep slope through withering enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons and hand-grenade fire. Observing a wounded man lying in an exposed position, he rushed to the side of the stricken Marine and removed him to a covered area. Expertly maneuvering his men forward through the heavy fire, he shouted words of encouragement to them and effectively directed their fire, succeeding in rapidly routing the entrenched enemy. By his inspiring leadership, aggressive fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Deming contributed materially to the success achieved by the company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Demski, Bernard Andrew (POW/MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Bernard Andrew Demski (MCSN: 1329771), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 April 1953. When the patrol was subjected to a murderous hail of a small-arms, machine gun and mortar fire during an engagement with the enemy far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Demski courageously held his position and maintained a continuous covering fire for the point element of the patrol. Although painfully wounded, he steadfastly refused to leave his post as the numerically superior enemy force attempted to overrun the patrol, and fearlessly exposed himself to the heavy fire to effectively control and direct his team and to hurl grenades at the attackers. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked fortitude and unyielding devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Demski was instrumental in repelling the fanatical attack and in permitting the evacuation of his wounded comrades, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Rome, New York. Home Town: Rome, New York. Death: MIA as a Prisoner of War (Korean War).

Denham, Ernest D.

Sergeant First Class Ernest D. Denham, while a member of Battery D, 15th AA AW Bn. (SP), distinguished himself by gallantry in action near the Chosin Reservoir in Korea on 29 November 1950. On this date, the platoon of which Sergeant Denham was a member was providing close support fires to protect nearby infantry and field artillery elements. Between the hours 01 0030 and 0730, the enemy attempted to pierce the perimeter defense around the position by grouping in and near an abandoned house under cover of heavy automatic weapons and small-arms fire provided by other enemy elements. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant Denham voluntarily exposed himself to fire for a long period of time by mounting the side of his tank in order that he might better direct its fire accurately and avoid hitting our own troops who were located in the line of fire near the house occupied by the enemy force. As a result of his personal daring, all enemy troops in the house were killed, others in the sector were forced to abandon the attack, and the position was saved from penetration. Sergeant Denham's display of gallantry on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Illinois.

Dennen, Phillip C.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade (MC) Phillip C. Dennen (NSN: 0-497748), United States Navy, for gallantry in action against the enemy near Uijongbu, Korea, on 24 March 1951. On this date, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Dennen, a Medical Officer accompanying a tank-engineer task force, voluntarily sprinted a distance of approximately eight hundred yards over a mined area through intense enemy fire to go to the aid of an engineer who received shrapnel wounds during an enemy mortar barrage. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, and despite the increasing intensity of hostile fire, Lieutenant Dennen rendered valuable medical assistance and did much to alleviate the discomfort of the wounded soldier, who was subsequently evacuated in a tank to safety. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Dennen's gallant actions and selfless devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and exemplify the high traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, I Corps, General Orders No. 79 (June 18, 1951). Entered Service From New York.

Dennis, Edward G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Edward G. Dennis (MCSN: 1023840), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of the Supply Company, First Service Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hagaru-ri, Korea, on the night of 28 - 29 November 1950. Although suffering from pain and loss of blood from serious wounds sustained when the enemy overran the hill on which his outpost was located, Private First Class Dennis carried a more severely wounded comrade down precipitous slopes, through the hostile encirclement and into the friendly defensive perimeter. By his courageous actions, he was responsible for obtaining medical attention for the casualty more quickly than would otherwise have been possible and thereby undoubtedly saved the life of his comrade. His unselfishness in risking his life to save another reflects great credit upon Private First Class Dennis and the United States Naval Service. Born: Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Royal Oak, Michigan.

Dennis, Marvin John (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Marvin John Dennis (MCSN: 1200476), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Crew Member of a Flame Tank of Headquarters Company, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. When his tank sustained three direct hits, two of which penetrated the vehicle, killing the platoon leader and seriously wounding the remainder of the crew, while engaged in burning enemy trenches, Corporal Dennis, despite his multiple wounds, bravely remained within the vehicle after the other wounded men had vacated it and single-handedly engaged the hostile troops at point-blank range. Although suffering intense pain from his wounds, he raised himself to a position in which he could fire his pistol at the enemy troops swarming around the tank and, in a daring effort to confuse the hostile force, fired the machine gun to convey the impression that the crew were still aboard and in fighting condition, continuing to engage the enemy until the crew member of another vehicle drove the damaged tank to the safety of the main lines. Mortally wounded during the intensive action, Corporal Dennis, by his outstanding courage, marked fortitude and aggressive fighting spirit, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Anthom County, Michigan. Home Town: Goshen, Indiana. Death: DOW: February 4, 1953.

Dennis, Saweren J. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Staff Sergeant Saweren J. Dennis (MCSN: 637145), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongsan, Korea, on 3 September 1950. On this date, Sergeant Dennis was a squad leader of a squad engaged in laying an anti-tank mine field in front of the First Battalion, Fifth Marines area in the Yongsan sector. Sergeant Dennis was charged with the responsibility of laying an antitank mine field along the main road leading into the heart of enemy held territory. Although he was continuously exposed to enemy automatic and small arms fire he courageously supervised the laying of the antitank mine field setting an example of efficiency and bravery for his squad. After completion of his assigned task he, alone, regardless of danger from enemy fire, scouted the area along the main road to his front for possible enemy laid antitank mine fields. He discovered such field, killed an enemy soldier in the process, and removed then enemy antitank mines from the field. This act undoubtedly saved the lives of friendly troops and tanks during their advance the following morning. It also afforded the engineers of the Brigade with their first example of enemy antitank mines for study and comparison. Again on the third and fourth of September, he was in charge of a mine detection squad. Working under enemy sniper fire he was instrumental in removing thirty additional enemy antitank mines from fields obstructing the Battalion's advance. On the morning of 5 September he sighted an enemy vehicle hidden in a village in the path of leading attack units of friendly troops. Moving forward rapidly, heedless of danger to himself, he killed the driver and captured the vehicle. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Dennis reflects great credit on himself and the naval service. Headquarters, 8th U.S. Army Korea (EUSAK), General Orders (November 1, 1950)  Born: Iron Mountain, Michigan. Home Town: Iron Mountain, Michigan.

Dennis, Saweren J. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Saweren J. Dennis (MCSN: 637145), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Demolition Team of Company A, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 20 to 27 September 1950. Assigned the mission of clearing mine fields in the path of the infantry regiment and its supporting tanks, Staff Sergeant Dennis courageously led his four-man team in an operation which resulted in the removal of approximately one hundred and seventy-five antitank mines which were impeding the advance. When enemy fire was heaviest, he directed his team to take cover while he went on alone in front of the friendly tanks, pulling out mines and clearing an approach route. Although on many occasions the infantry assault units were pinned down by intense hostile fire, he voluntarily moved forward to breach enemy mine fields and to point out targets for the tank gunners. By his daring initiative, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Staff Sergeant Dennis upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Iron Mountain, Michigan. Home Town: Iron Mountain, Michigan.

Dentale, Patsy J.

Headquarters, 2ID
General Orders No. 462

Corporal Patsy J.  Dentale, ER12269479, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company D, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 26 July 1951 in the vicinity of Chajakchong, Korea.  On this date Company A was attacking enemy-held positions and was temporarily pinned down by intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire.  Corporal Dentale, as a forward observer for Company A, voluntarily exposed himself to enemy observation and fire in order to direct mortar fire into enemy positions.  With complete disregard for his personal safety, he continued to direct fire, destroying several enemy bunkers.  His action enabled the members of friendly units to advance and ultimately accomplish their mission.  The gallantry in action demonstrated by Corporal Dentale on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New York.

Deptula, Edwin A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Edwin A. Deptula (MCSN: 0-49893), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 September 1950. Assigned the mission of seizing a road junction while the remainder of the company attacked Kimpo Airfield, Second Lieutenant Deptula moved his platoon out under cover of darkness and quickly secured his objective. Unable to contact the company when communications failed, he established a perimeter of defense and, by skillful fire control and maneuver, successfully withstood a violent enemy attack on his position, fearlessly exposing himself to heavy fire to move among his men and direct the defense. Shortly after the attack was repulsed, he heard enemy tanks nearby and, aware that he had no antitank weapons and could not withstand a tank attack, executed an orderly withdrawal, locating his company despite the darkness and providing valuable information which enabled the company to repulse the enemy attack a short time later By his inspiring leadership, marked courage and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Deptula contributed materially to the success of the company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cleveland, Ohio. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio.

Desjardins, Albert E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Albert E. Desjardins (MCSN: 1199931), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Forward Observer of Weapons Company, First battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 November 1952. After voluntarily proceeding to a combat outpost forward of the main line of resistance in an attempt to direct friendly fire on enemy mortar positions, Private First Class Desjardins, upon reaching the outpost, realized the need for better observation and bravely advanced further into the devastated area to a position from which he could more effectively observe and call friendly fire upon the hostile emplacements. Although painfully wounded by the concussion from enemy shells landing near his position, he steadfastly refused to withdraw from the exposed area until the hostile mortars had been destroyed. By his outstanding courage, initiative and resolute determination, Private First Class Desjardins served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lewiston, Maine. Home Town: Lewiston, Maine.

Dethloff, Harvey F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Harvey F. Dethloff, Jr. (MCSN: 1153547), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 24-25 July 1953. Although painfully wounded during the early stages of an attack by a numerically superior enemy force on the main line of resistance, Private First Class Dethloff remained at his position, delivering devastating fire upon the advancing enemy and shouting words of encouragement to his comrades. When his machine gun was put out of action by hostile mortar fire, he moved to another position in the trench line and hurled hand grenades to assist in repelling the onrushing enemy forces. Wounded a second time while engaged in the fierce encounter, he refused evacuation and maintained his position until assured that the company's sector of the lines was secure. By his aggressive fighting spirit, fortitude and steadfast devotion to duty, Private First Class Dethloff served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Plymouth, Michigan. Home Town: Plymouth, Michigan.

Devasher, Billy G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Billy G. Devasher, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with operations against the enemy while serving as Machine Gun Squad Leader, Company F, 2d Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division in Korea from 26 November to 2 December 1950. The company was tasked with securing the Toktong Pass and providing security along the road between Hagaru-ri and Yudam-ni. Over the course of five days and six nights of bitter cold sub-zero weather, Corporal Devasher displayed outstanding courage and initiative in the performance of his duties. During the night of 26 November, the company was repeatedly attacked by a large enemy force of Chinese Army soldiers. Exposing himself, without regard for his personal safety, to devastating enemy automatic weapons, hand grenades, and small arms fire, he fearlessly moved through the position during the attacks to encourage his men and direct their fire. When the enemy reached within yards of his positions, Corporal Devasher courageously remained in an exposed position to beat them back, employing hand grenades and his rifle with telling effect. Throughout the night-long attack, he refused to seek safety for himself, continuing to direct the fire of his gun and routing the enemy with heavy losses. On one occasion, he provided flank security and saved the life of a fellow Marine during actions to capture an enemy sniper located in front of their defensive position. By his extraordinary heroism in the face of extreme danger, Corporal Devasher reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Deville, Mark A.

Private First Class Mark A. Deville, United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for exceptional valor and gallantry in action while serving with the Joint Security Force Company, United Nations Command Security Force at Panmunjom, Korea, on 23 November 1984. In reaction to thirty attacking North Korean soldiers in pursuit of a Soviet defector, Private Deville's aggressive actions were instrumental in defeating the enemy. Throughout the intense firefight, Private Deville displayed a complete disregard for his own personal safety while accomplishing his mission. Private First Class Deville's bravery and aggressive performance of duty under extremely hazardous circumstances are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect great credit upon him, the United Nations Command and the United States Army.

Devine, Francis J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Francis J. Devine (MCSN: 637250), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner in a Rocket Section, Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Although suffering from a painful shoulder wound inflicted by an enemy hand grenade during heavy street fighting earlier in the day, Private First Class Devine remained with his company which had assumed a defensive position along an elevated road bed. When his company was subjected to heavy and accurate point blank fire during night attacks on four separate occasions by a numerically superior hostile force supported by five T-34 tanks which closed to within twenty yards of the positions, he voluntarily left his foxhole, moved to a fully exposed position on top of the road bed and brought his 3.5-inch rocket launcher to bear on the enemy tanks. With cool precision, he scored a direct hit on one tank and, during subsequent firing, scored hits on two additional tanks, thereby causing them to withdraw. By his bold and aggressive actions, Private First Class Devine contributed directly to the successful repulse of the four enemy attacks. His outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: La Crosse, Wisconsin. Home Town: La Crosse, Wisconsin.

DeVirgilio, John Nicholas (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal John Nicholas DeVirgilio (MCSN: 1162979), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Leader of a Machine Gun Squad in Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 25 July 1953. When the company's sector of the main line of resistance was subjected to intense enemy mortar and artillery fire, followed closely by an attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Corporal DeVirgilio fearlessly exposed himself to the heavy barrage as he moved his machine gun into position and delivered a deadly hail of fire upon the assaulting force. Observing that several wounded comrades were in an adjacent trench line and that the enemy was able to fire into the trench and prevent the evacuation of the wounded, he immediately picked up his weapon and, courageously moving through a deadly barrage of hostile fire, single-handedly held off the enemy troops while friendly forces evacuated the wounded Marines. Returning to another portion of his squad's sector, he encountered an enemy assault being hurled at friendly lines. Placing his machine gun into position, he continued to fire upon the enemy until he fell, mortally wounded. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and steadfast devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Corporal DeVirgilio served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

DeWitt, Jack J.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 87 -  5 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Jack J. DeWitt (ASN: US-16260232), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 15 September 1950 in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea. On this date enemy forces had infiltrated through and behind the lines of one of our rifle companies. Since this company was holding an important hill position at the time, it was vitally important that it be re-supplied with ammunition. Private DeWitt, who was a Chaplain's Assistant, volunteered to take ammunition to the beleaguered company. Under continuous enemy fire, and without concern for his personal safety, he delivered a 1/4 ton truck and trailer load of ammunition to the company's position and, on the return trip, he evacuated several of our wounded. This action materially aided the rifle company in the successful accomplishment of its mission. The cool courage and gallantry displayed by Private DeWitt on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.

Dias, Antone J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Antone J. Dias (MCSN: 1137702), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 July 1953. When the platoon leader became a casualty during a vicious assault to regain possession of a vital friendly combat outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, Staff Sergeant Dias immediately assumed command of the unit to lead the men in destroying the hostile forces, personally accounting for two enemy killed during the action. Exposing himself to the murderous hostile mortar and artillery fire, he gallantly moved about the outpost to insure the integrity of his defenses and to administer medical aid to his comrades. Although critically wounded, he refused to leave the position and, shouting words of encouragement to his men, called for supplies and replacements. After the replacements had arrived, he continued to direct supporting fire upon the enemy and to treat the wounded Marines, consenting to evacuation only when assured that the situation was well under control. By his indomitable fighting spirit, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Dias served to inspire all who observed him and contributed directly to the success achieved by his platoon. His outstanding courage and exceptional fortitude reflect great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Bedford, Massachusetts. Home Town: Nantucket, Massachusetts.

Diaz, Fernando

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 293 - 18 July 1951

Sergeant First Class Fernando Diaz, RA30432468, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 18 December 1950, near Hamhung, Korea, during a night engagement with the enemy, Sergeant Diaz braved enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire to re-establish communications between Regimental Headquarters and one of the battalions. When some of the members of his crew seemed reluctant to advance into the face of enemy fire, Sergeant Diaz unhesitatingly moved alone and examined approximately 200 yards of wire until the break was discovered. Still subjected to intense hostile fire, he calmly repaired the damage and placed test calls to the regimental and battalion switchboards before returning to the safety of the friendly lines. Sergeant Diaz's gallant devotion to duty ensured the success of the unit's mission and reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Diaz, Robert

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert Diaz (MCSN: 652150), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Weapons Company, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as an ammunition carrier of an infantry company, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. Although seriously wounded from a burst of enemy machine-gun fire, Corporal Diaz fearlessly crossed an area swept by intense hostile small-arms, mortar, grenade and machine-gun fire and succeeded in replenishing his squad's ammunition, thereby enabling the attack to continue. Steadfastly remaining in his exposed, dangerous position, he delivered effective carbine fire to provide cover for his wounded comrades. Undaunted by the intense enemy fire and despite the severe pain of his own wounds, he assisted the other casualties to a safer position and rendered first aid, refusing medical treatment to alleviate his own suffering. When ordered to withdraw, he persisted in his refusal for assistance in order that other wounded might receive medical care until he finally collapsed from loss of blood. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Corporal Diaz served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Vega Baja, Puerto Rico. Home Town: New York, New York.

Digiacco, Joseph Jr.

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 100 - 12 December 1950

Corporal Joseph Digiacco, Jr., RA12285244, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against an armed enemy.  Near Majon-ni, Korea, on 21 November 1950, Corporal Digiacco was a radio repairman accompanying a convoy on a combat patrol when the patrol was ambushed.  Corporal Digiacco immediately took up a firing position near a jeep mounted .50 caliber machine gun to provide protection for the gunner.  Constantly exposed to heavy automatic fire, with no thought of his own personal safety, he moved to successive positions around the jeep to fire on the enemy to the flank and the rear.  In the initial exchange of fire Corporal Digiacco was wounded several times, but remained at his position until he eventually was forced to withdraw. Corporal Digiacco's spirit of determination and utter disregard for his own safety in the face of enemy fire inspired the other members of the convoy to accomplishments beyond their normal capacity.  The gallantry displayed by Corporal Digiacco on this occasion reflects credit upon himself and upon the military service.

Dill, Harold E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
Amended by General Orders 91 - 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Harold E. Dill (ASN: 0-2204159), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. On 5 July 1950, near Osan, Korea, Lieutenant Dill organized and covered the withdrawal of part of Company C from a hill to new positions. The withdrawal was forced by the attack of vastly superior numbers of enemy. He found himself cut off from his new position by intense small arms and artillery fire. Discovering a group of wounded and others still with him in the old position, he organized and led them for six days behind enemy lines until the group finally reached friendly positions. The success of this group of survivors in reaching friendly lines was due, in large measure, to the heroism, daring and ability of Lieutenant Dill, acting as group leader. By his acts, Lieutenant Dill brought credit to himself and the United States Army.

Dimaio, Joseph J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Joseph J. Dimaio (MCSN: 0-49424), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 June 1951. Assigned the mission of assaulting an enemy-held ridge occupied by an estimated force of battalion strength, First Lieutenant Dimaio led his platoon up the narrow, exposed ridge line through a withering hail of hostile automatic-weapons and small-arms fire. Skillfully positioning his squads for the final assault he then charged forward over the fire-swept ground with fixed bayonet to inspire his men to follow and to engage the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. Routing the hostile force and rapidly securing the objective, First Lieutenant Dimaio, by his aggressive leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and courageous initiative, served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by the company. His unwavering devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Highland Park, New Jersey. Home Town: Highland Park, New Jersey.

Dingeman, Robert Edward

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 291 - May 23, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Field Artillery) Robert Edward Dingeman (ASN: 0-27380), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 8th Field Artillery Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, in Korea. During the early morning hours of 27 November 1950, Captain Dingeman's Battery was alerted for an imminent hostile attack. Although under the direct observation and fire of the enemy, he made a detailed reconnaissance of a nearby hill to establish an outpost line. When the infiltrating enemy emplaced a machine gun on a commanding ridge, he repeatedly exposed himself to the deadly fire to encourage his men and to direct more effectively the perimeter defense. By skillfully coordinating the action of the supporting infantry with that of his own command, he enabled friendly forces to regain the initiative and drive the foe to flight. Captain Dingeman's inspirational leadership, military ability and staunch devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

DiPreta, Vincent R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Vincent R. DiPreta (MCSN: 1204247), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a an Automatic Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 May 1952. With his patrol encountering heavy artillery and mortar fire during a bitter fire fight with the enemy deep in hostile territory, Private First Class DiPreta, although painfully wounded in the face by an enemy grenade, steadfastly refused medical aid and insisted on remaining at his position to deliver effective covering fire for the remainder of his fire team. Although partially blinded, he bravely moved out into the open when his fire team leader was wounded and kept the enemy pinned down with hand grenades and automatic-rifle fire while removing his comrade to a covered position where medical treatment could be rendered. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Private First Class DiPreta served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Bronx, New York.

Dirga, Andrew

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Andrew Dirga (MCSN: 668775), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 March 1951. With one of his men seriously wounded during an attack against heavily fortified, deeply entrenched enemy positions on the top of a steep ridge, Private First Class Dirga fearlessly left his covered position and braved direct small-arms, mortar and machine-gun fire to attempt a rescue. After carrying the stricken Marine to a sheltered area and administering first aid, he bravely led his squad in a brilliantly executed maneuver to overrun the positions and put the enemy to rout. By his bold tactics, inspiring leadership and dauntless perseverance, Private First Class Dirga contributed materially to the success achieved by his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Granville, New York. Home Town: South Granville, New York.

Distel, Gerald L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Gerald L. Distel (MCSN: 661210), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with an Intelligence Section attached to Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 March 1951. Volunteering to act as a radioman for the assaulting platoon during an attack on a strongly defended enemy position, Corporal Distel fearlessly advanced with the heavy radio over precipitous terrain swept by withering enemy automatic-weapons and small-arms fire to reach the platoon. Remaining in an exposed position, he calmly transmitted vital messages to the company commander and directed the fire of supporting arms. Observing a wounded Marine lying in an exposed position, he unhesitatingly rushed forward, still carrying his radio, through heavy enemy fire to assist in removing the stricken man to safety. By his inspiring initiative, marked courage and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Distel contributed materially to the successful seizure of the position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cincinnati, Ohio. Home Town: Cincinnati, Ohio.

Dively, Richard L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Richard L. Dively (MCSN: 0-46100), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 March 1951. When approximately 30 of the enemy attempted to infiltrate the company position during a heavy snow storm, throwing hand grenades and laying down small-arms fire, First Lieutenant Dively, hearing the cries of Marines wounded by the stealthy enemy, rushed from the command post to investigate the situation, and although immediately subjected to intense hostile fire, moved forward over the treacherous ice-covered terrain until he located a group of the enemy hiding behind a large boulder. Killing the nest of infiltrators with a burst from his sub-machine gun, he continued along the icy ridge to seek out the enemy and, despite constant automatic-weapons and hand grenade fire, succeeded in killing many others, borrowing a rifle when his sub-machine gun failed to operate. By his aggressive fighting spirit, daring initiative and valiant actions in the face of grave danger, First Lieutenant Dively aided immeasurably in routing the enemy from the position and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Altoona, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Altoona, Pennsylvania.

Dixon, Douglas O.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 46 - 20 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class [then Private] Douglas O. Dixon (ASN: RA-14400411), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Medical Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Ori-Dong, Korea, on 5 November 1951. His platoon was returning from a combat patrol, which had taken it 2,000 yards into enemy territory without incident, when its members were suddenly pinned down by intensely concentrated enemy machine gun and mortar fire. Then the numerically superior enemy forces launched a savage attack against the small group firing automatic weapons and small arms. Seeing that his comrades needed help, Private Dixon, Medical Aidman attached to the platoon left his position of cover and, with complete disregard for his own safety, advanced into the withering fire. Although completely exposed, he moved from one position to another, giving aid to wounded men. Inspired by his fearlessness, his comrades fought with increased fury and repulsed the attack. As the friendly troops withdrew from the trap, an enemy force was observed attempting to outflank them. Private Dixon voluntarily remained behind to cover the rear of his comrades. He engaged the hostile soldiers at close range, killing two of them and wounding several others before the attack was repelled. Private Dixon's courageous action, fearless aggressiveness and selfless performance of tasks far above the call of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army Medical Service. Home Town: Nashville, Tennessee.

Dobbs, Byron A.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 372 - 29 July 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Byron A. Dobbs, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 8th Bombardment Squadron (LNI), 3d Bombardment Group (L), FIFTH Air Force, on the night of 18 February 1952. While performing armed reconnaissance along one of the enemy's main supply routes in North Korea, his crew sighted a large convoy of enemy vehicles. Captain Dobbs called at once for a flare ship to illuminate his target. During the ensuing bombing and strafing attack his aircraft was subjected to intense and accurate ground fire, but Captain Dobbs continued to press his attack under the flares. Receiving multiple hits throughout the aircraft as he pulled off the target, Captain Dobbs informed the flare ship that he was leaving the area. Fire broke out as he departed and he gave the order to bail out. With cool airmanship and utter disregard for personal safety, Captain Dobbs righted his stricken ship long enough for his crew to get clear. Captain Dobbs courage and selfless heroism in the face of enemy fire were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Dodd, Carl Henry

Headquarters, Eighth United States Army Korea (EUSAK)
General Orders No. 160, 13 November 1950

Master Sergeant Carl Henry Dodd, RA35873574, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Chingdong-ni, Korea, on 7 August 1950.  On this date, when it was discovered that his platoon leader was missing after the platoon had been overrun, he immediately reorganized the twelve remaining men and reoccupied the position and held out until the enemy struck from all sides.  Sensing the danger of being overrun, he ordered the men to withdraw under his covering fire.  He found that two men were missing.  He personally and with utter disregard for his own safety, exposed himself to heavy machinegun and small arms fire and assisted them to withdraw under his covering fire, thereby undoubtedly saving their lives.  Upon arrival in the company area he was in such an exhausted state that he had to be evacuated himself.  His heroic actions and inspiring words of encouragement were directly responsible for the splendid showing of his platoon and greatly assisted them in retaining their area of responsibility until they were driven off by a superior enemy force.  He was further responsible for the safe evacuation of all known casualties from the platoon position.  He checked the area to determine whether or not any had been overlooked before he withdrew and was the last man to leave the position.  The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Dodd reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Kentucky.

Dodge, Leroy W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Leroy W. Dodge, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea while serving as a Platoon Sergeant, attached to Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division, on 24 September 1950. Assuming command of the right flank of the company when his company commander became a casualty while assaulting Hill 90, Technical Sergeant (then Staff Sergeant) Dodge aggressively led his men against a heavily armed, well dug-in enemy force, while shouting commands and words of encouragement to his small unit. Under his courageous leadership in the face of intense fire from three sides, heavy losses were inflicted upon the enemy and an entrance into Seoul from the northwest was made possible. By his quick initiative and heroic actions throughout, Technical Sergeant Dodge upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: December 20, 1925 at Rhineland, Wisconsin. Home Town: Sneed's Ferry, North Carolina.

Doerr, Charles William (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Charles William Doerr (NSN: 3655505), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company A, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 6 October 1952. Volunteering to accompany a rifle squad on a mission to reinforce an infantry platoon during an attack on a strongly defended enemy outpost, Hospitalman Doerr unhesitatingly exposed himself to an intense mortar and artillery barrage to administer first aid to the numerous casualties struck down by the initial burst of fire. Mortally wounded by fragments from a bursting enemy shell while attending a wounded Marine, Hospitalman Doerr, by his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Authority: Board of Awards: Serial 15 (January 12, 1953). Born: September 24, 1930. Home Town: Ebensburg, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: October 6, 1952.

Dohse, Gunther

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Gunther Dohse (MCSN: 1118135), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 30 November - December 1950. Occupying a foxhole when fifteen of the enemy approached his position during a night attack against his company's sector by a force of estimated regiment strength, Private First Class Dohse held his fire to prevent a premature disclosure of his position while the intense small-arms, grenade, automatic weapons and machine-gun barrage continued. As the enemy closed in front of him, he suddenly opened fire with deadly accuracy, killing several and dispersing the others. With his weapon inoperative as the foe persisted in the onslaught, Private First Class Dohse hurled hand grenades to account for two more hostile soldiers as the bullets from an automatic weapon sprayed his position, wounding him and killing a Marine rifleman nearby. Fighting unconsciousness as the enemy moved closer, he feigned death as they felt the bullet hole in the top of his helmet, examined his blood-stained face and hands and removed his weapon and cartridge belt. After seven agonizing hours during which he remained perfectly still while the enemy, still believing him to be dead, occupied his foxhole, he surveyed the situation and made contact with an adjacent Marine unit after a friendly counterattack finally forced them to withdraw. His indomitable courage, fortitude and grim determination in the face of extreme peril reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Dohse and the United States Naval Service. Born: Los Angeles, California. Home Town: Seattle, Washington.

Dolan, James H.

Headquarters, 24ID
General Orders No. 3 - 2 January 1951

By direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action, is awarded to First Lieutenant James H. Dolan, 0955079, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company K, 19th Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Anju, Korea, on 5 November 1950. A numerically superior enemy force attacked his battalion’s position and succeeded in penetrating the line on Lieutenant Dolan’s flank. Refusing to withdraw or change positions, he ejected the enemy from his position and completely repelled the attack. His calm, cool actions and utter disregard for safety were an inspiration to his men, who, time after time, repulsed strong attacks and maintained the company’s position. As a result of his successful stand against overwhelming odds, the flank unit was enabled to regroup and successfully counterattacked to regain its former positions. Lieutenant Dolan’s fearless actions and outstanding leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered service from Green, Iowa.

Dolsak, Donald F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Donald F. Dolsak (MCSN: 1346826), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radioman of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 16 - 17 July 1953. When the reconnaissance patrol was ambushed by a numerically superior enemy force far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Dolsak immediately called for mortar fire support and an evacuation team for the wounded. With his patrol leader killed during the fierce encounter, he remained at the position under intense enemy grenade and small-arms fire and, without assistance or guidance, continued to call for and adjust supporting mortar fire which resulted in three determined enemy attacks being repulsed at a time when the patrol's supply of ammunition was seriously depleted. When hostile soldiers attempted to capture him, he fearlessly engaged the enemy in bitter hand-to-hand combat, striking down one of the enemy with his rifle butt and killing another with gun fire. Although severely wounded, he refused evacuation and continued to operate his radio to inform the company commander of the situation, thereby materially aiding in the relief of the patrol. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and steadfast devotion to duty, Private First Class Dolsak served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cleveland, Ohio. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio.

Dolvin, Welborn Griffin (2nd award)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal to Welborn Griffin Dolvin (0-21980), Lieutenant Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with the 89th Medium Tank Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy near Chinju, Korea, during the period 25 September to 29 September 1950. On this date, Colonel Dolvin was placed in command of a task force consisting of a tank and infantry team with supporting service units and assigned the mission of crossing the Nam River in the vicinity of Chinju, Korea, and attacking along the axis of advance to Kunsan. On the morning of 25 September 1950, lead elements of the task force moved out and established contact with another task force which was attacking north toward Chinju. When reports indicated that a bridge was damaged, Colonel Dolvin made a personal reconnaissance to locate a crossing site for heavy equipment. He found a site and directed the crossing. He then led the task force in a rapid advance, repeatedly exposing himself to hostile fire to direct elimination of pockets of enemy resistance. By late in the day of 25 September the entire task force had completed the crossing of the Nam River. On the morning of 26 September 1950, Colonel Dolvin again led the task force in a rapid advance toward the primary objective, negotiating numerous enemy mine fields, strongpoints, and natural barriers. Relentlessly pursuing the retreating foe, the task force continued its advance on 27 September and 28 September 1950, capturing many prisoners and large amounts of enemy material. On 29 September 1950 the task force had successfully completed its mission, having covered one hundred and thirty-eight miles in four days. Throughout the period 25 September to 29 September 1950, Colonel Dolvin, although frequently subjected to hostile fire, remained with the lead elements of the task force by his courage, physical stamina, and leadership. The gallantry displayed by Colonel Dolvin reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Dolvin, Welborn Griffin (3rd award)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star Medal to Welborn Griffin Dolvin (0-21980), Lieutenant Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as Commanding Officer of the 89th Medium Tank Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy near Ipsok, Korea, from 26 to 27 November 1950. On 25 November Colonel Dolvin directed Task Force DOLVIN in an attack north of Ipsok and drove the enemy forces back some five thousand yards. During this attack, he maintained a tactical command post within five hundred yards of the leading elements, and was continually present with his forward units under direct enemy fire. On the night of 25 - 26 November, the enemy forces were heavily reinforced, and his Task Force became part of Task Force WILSON. Task Force WILSON consolidated positions captured with Task Force DOLVIN, but Colonel Dolvin continued to command the lead units of the combined Task Force. During the night of 26 - 27 November, Task Force WILSON was attacked by elements of the 39th Chinese Communist Army in overwhelming strength. The enemy attack was in sufficient strength to envelop Task Force WILSON and reached as far back as the artillery positions. Two enemy battalions attacked to the front, one battalion slashed at the vital Command Post area, and another battalion attacked the reserve battalion of Task Force WILSON some one thousand yards in the rear of the Command Post. Colonel Dolvin personally conducted the fighting against the front line and against the envelopment of the command Post throughout the night. He maneuvered his elements skillfully, encouraged them by personal example and finally stopped the attack against the Command Post at daylight , at which time it had reached within one hundred yards of the area. Shortly after daylight, Task Force WILSON was ordered to withdraw. In order to accomplish this withdrawal without undue loss of men and equipment, it was necessary for Colonel Dolvin to hold the forward positions for eight hours against heavy enemy pressure in order to sustain.

Dolvin, Welborn Griffin (4th award)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Silver Star Medal to Welborn Griffin Dolvin (0-21980), Lieutenant Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as Commanding Officer of the 89th Medium Tank Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy from 6 to 11 February 1951. During that period, Lieutenant Colonel Dolvin's Task Force launched a series of determined assaults on strong hostile positions north of Anyang, Korea. On one occasion, when the advance was blocked by a mine field, he advanced through the obstacle, directed its neutralization and led the force forward to renew the attack. Although consistently exposed to heavy enemy fire, he remained with the attack elements and supervised the tactical deployment and fire of the force so effectively that the enemy were driven into a virtual rout. Lieutenant Colonel Dolvin's calm demeanor, aggressive spirit and unremitting devotion to duty were an inspiration to his men and are in keeping with the high traditions of the United States Army.

Donahue, James Keefe

First Lieutenant James K Donahue (then Second Lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company F, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action on 24 December, 1951 in Kumgong-ni, Korea. On that date, Lieutenant Donahue, a platoon leader was given the mission to lead his unit in an assault on a key terrain feature held by a determined hostile force. In the ensuing action fanatical enemy resistance from several bunkers temporarily stalled the advance of the friendly elements. Lieutenant Donahue, realizing the seriousness of the situation, moved out alone and advanced fearlessly toward the foe's emplacement, firing his weapon with deadly accuracy, inflicting numerous casualties on the foe. Inspired by this example of bravery under fire, his men rose as one and resumed their attack until the objective was secured. The foe then launched a heavy concentration of mortar fire on the friendly elements in their newly won positions but as a result of Lieutenant Donahue's direction and encouragement his men tenaciously maintained their emplacements. Lieutenant Donahue's initiative and aggressive leadership were major factors in the successful completion of the mission. The gallantry in action displayed by Lieutenant Donahue on this occasion reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Donahue, John J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant John J. Donahue (MCSN: 0-53619), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. Leading his platoon in a determined attack against a well-fortified enemy hill position, Second Lieutenant Donahue bravely made his way up a slope covered with barbed wire, mines and booby traps and expertly directed his squads in a devastating assault on the trenches and bunkers. Repeatedly exposing himself to a wall of hostile machine-gun and hand-grenade fire, he courageously led his men in routing the hostile forces from the hill, personally accounting for at least five enemy dead. When he observed a wounded man lying in an exposed area as the platoon was returning to a defensive position, Second Lieutenant Donahue, aggressively firing his pistol point-blank at the enemy, fearlessly dashed through a murderous hail of hostile machine-gun fire, aided the stricken Marine and carried him back up the hill to the defensive perimeter. Although seriously wounded and weak from loss of blood as the position was subjected to heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire, he dauntlessly moved about the area, emplacing and encouraging his men and supervising the evacuation of casualties. Steadfastly refusing evacuation until all other wounded had been evacuated and his men were well emplaced, Second Lieutenant Donahue, by his outstanding courage, exemplary leadership and indomitable fighting spirit, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Donnell, Samuel G. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Samuel G. Donnell, Jr. (MCSN: 1069792), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 September 1951. When the company was subjected to a fierce counterattack immediately upon seizing a strategic hostile position and two of his gunners became casualties during the initial stages of the action, Sergeant Donnell leaped to his feet and delivered devastating fire upon the onrushing enemy at point-blank range, killing three of them and forcing the remainder to retreat. By his exceptional courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Donnell served to inspire all who observed him and greatly aided his company in consolidating its position, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Englewood, New Jersey. Home Town: Englewood, New Jersey.

Doody, John J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 269 - 19 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) John J. Doody (ASN: 0-57630), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, Company B, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. During the assault crossing of the Naktong River his company was subjected to intense mortar, machine gun and small arms fire. As the boats neared the enemy shore they became intermingled and their occupants disorganized. Utterly disregarding his own safety Captain Doody moved fearlessly among his men directing them to positions on the shore. Following the landing he set up a base of fire with his mortars and led a small group of his men in an assault on two enemy machine guns, destroying both guns and crew. Returning to the beach he organized a large body of his troops and fearlessly led the attack against the strongly entrenched enemy. Pressing the attack he continued to lead his men far into enemy territory inflicting heavy casualties, destroying much equipment and securing a beachhead which permitted the continued crossing of the river by succeeding assault troops. Captain Doody's courageous actions, devotion to duty and inspiring leadership served well to inspire his men in their gallant assault and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Jersey City, New Jersey.

Dooley, Dennis Dean

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Dennis Dean Dooley (MCSN: 1198206), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Combat Patrol of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 October 1952. Observing a fellow Marine caught on barbed wire when the patrol withdrew to the base of the hill after it was subjected to intense enemy machine-gun fire, Private First Class Dooley unhesitatingly returned to the entangled man's position directly in front of a hostile machine gun, pulled him free and continued to expose himself to the heavy fire to assist the Marine to safety. By his courageous initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Private First Class Dooley served to inspire all who observed him and was instrumental in saving the life of his comrade, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Thief River Falls, Minnesota. Home Town: Winnebago, Minnesota.

Dooley, James W.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 263 - 23 July 1953

Sergeant James W. Dooley, US55225201, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 9 June 1953, Sergeant Dooley was a member of the assault element of a patrol which closed with the enemy in an attack on Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. Sergeant Dooley exposed himself to hostile fire at the apertures of enemy occupied caves on the hill to hurl grenades which inflicted numerous casualties and neutralized the hostile fire. As six enemy soldiers charged from their bunker in an assault, he exposed himself to their fire and mortally wounded the soldiers. When a comrade fell seriously wounded on the upper slope of the hill, he immediately made his way up the steep face of the slope under intense enemy fire. Upon arriving beside the wounded comrade, the enemy hurled a grenade in the area. Sergeant Dooley threw himself on top of the wounded man to afford him protection. As a result of this action, Sergeant Dooley suffered wounds. With the protection of covering fire from the other members of the patrol, he then made the descent, carrying the casualty under full enemy observation and fire and returned the man to safety. The patrol then effected a successful retrograde movement to friendly lines. Sergeant Dooley's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Michigan.

Dooley, Orin W. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Orin W. Dooley, Jr. (MCSN: 1168653), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 March 1953. When the platoon's outpost position forward of the main line of resistance was subjected to intense artillery and mortar fire followed immediately by a savage hostile attack, Sergeant Dooley fearlessly moved about the position to organize the left flank after a partial enemy breakthrough and, although the target of a large volume of small-arms and mortar fire, personally brought accurate fire on the hostile force until additional men were positioned to reinforce the flank area. Unhesitatingly assuming command when the platoon commander became a casualty, he directed supporting fire on key hostile targets and then called in friendly artillery fire on the position, jeopardizing his own safety to move through the area, warning and positioning the Marines for the forthcoming fire. When the friendly artillery fire had ceased, he led his men in an attack on the overrun center positions of the outpost and completely routed the hostile forces. By his exemplary leadership, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, Sergeant Dooley served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the defense of the outpost, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Atlanta, Georgia. Home Town: Hyattsville, Maryland.

Doriot, William F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William F. Doriot, Jr. (MCSN: 666599), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. With his unit subjected to a fierce, night-long enemy attack, Private First Class Doriot observed a stock pile of exposed 81-mm. mortar ammunition slightly to the rear of his position and, carrying out repeated trips in the face of concentrated enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire, succeeded in removing the ammunition to the reverse slope of the ridge. After completing the mission, he returned to his squad and again exposed himself to hostile fire to rally his men in the defense of a physical enemy onslaught. Quickly taking over the operation of an unmanned machine gun, he delivered effective fire upon the attackers and, although painfully wounded, refused evacuation, continuing to fire his weapon until the attack was repulsed. By his courageous initiative, aggressive fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty, Private First Class Doriot served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Oak Park, Illinois. Home Town: Denver, Colorado.

Dorshefski, Joseph R.

Ex-Red PW MP Receives Korea Medal
European Stars and Stripes
Monday, May 18, 1953, Heidelberg, Germany

Two soldiers assigned to ?? HQ Area Command have been awarded medals for gallantry in action in Korea. The awards were presented to CPL Joseph R. Dorshefski, (RA43044894, 38 Infantry Regiment, captured near Hoengsong 12 Feb 1951. Former POW Willy Freeman knew him as “Butterbean.”)

Dorshefski was awarded the Silver Star for distinguished action on Feb. 24, 1951, as a member of a detachment of wounded prisoners of war attempting to reach friendly lines. While the groups was resting in a farmhouse immediately to the rear of the Chinese lines, it was discovered that the three Communist guides who were to take them to friendly lines had (deserted?) and the group, fearing discovery by the enemy or an attack by friendly planes, had to leave at daybreak. Dorshefski, disregarding the extreme danger, willingly remained behind in the jeopardized position to aid a comrade who was weak from his wounds and unable to walk. Later in the day, when his comrade was stronger from rest, Dorshefski assisted him across the river to friendly lines under fire from both enemy and friendly troops.

[Note from researcher Merry Helm: "I went searching for this citation after reading Warrior, By Choice, By Chance by Sgt. Jack M Anderson – HQ S-3 section, 1st Battalion, 38th Regt. Jack was the weak POW, and it was Jack who put Dorshefski in for the award. The third person was MSGT William E. Mashburn, who Anderson also put in for the SS."

Dosen, Donald O.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 424 - 10 Nvoember 1952

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class Donald O. Dosen, US55143408, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company H, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 21 September 1952 in the vicinity of Sadmak, North Korea. On that date his machine gun squad was attached to elements of the 2d Battalion whose mission was to assault Hill 266 (Old Baldy), in an effort to retake it from the enemy forces. During that assault, Private Dosen’s squad was temporarily halted by two enemy machine gun nests which were delivering a devastating hail of fire upon them. With complete disregard for personal safety, he began an assault on the enemy emplacements in the face of the lethal cross fire from the enemy. Although wounded immediately, he continued his advance until forced to return to his squad’s position by further wounds. This courageous assault succeeded in drawing the enemy’s attention and fire long enough to allow his squad sufficient time to place their own machine guns in action and deliver return fire which aided materially in the success of the mission. Private Dosen’s extraordinary gallantry in the face of overwhelming odds reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Minnesota.

Doss, Clarence Thomas Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Clarence Thomas Doss, Jr. (NSN: 0-73538), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commander LSR Division Eleven, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, during the amphibious assault against Inch'on on 15 September 1950. Successfully navigating the extremely hazardous and difficult approaches to Inch'on, Commander Doss directed the bombing operations of his unit while under close-range fire from enemy shore batteries. An able and aggressive leader, he maintained his ships on their assigned stations and effectively carried out a devastating bombardment attack against enemy shore installations in support of friendly landing forces, thereby contributing materially to the success of his Division in inflicting heavy damage upon the enemy and in facilitating the landing of assault troops. His outstanding leadership, professional skill and steadfast devotion to duty throughout reflect the highest credit upon Commander Doss and the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1282 (December 28, 1950). Born: January 15, 1913. Death: January 6, 1982.

Doswell, James T. II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain James T. Doswell, II (MCSN: 0-37810), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 November 1951. Observing an enemy train in the immediate vicinity of Sinmak during the early morning hours, Captain Doswell directed the accompanying flare-dropping aircraft to illuminate the area and immediately executed a series of napalm, bombing and strafing attacks at minimum safe altitude despite haze and smoke conditions, resulting in the complete destruction of the locomotive and twelve boxcars. On the night of the same date, he located and destroyed five loaded trucks and, when directed to search for another train which had been sighted, soon discovered the reported target. Despite intense hostile anti-aircraft fire, he carried out damaging strafing attacks against the enemy locomotive until his remaining ammunition was expended. By his superb airmanship, daring initiative and gallant devotion to duty in the face of extreme hazards, Captain Doswell upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana.

Doucette, Lawrence Joseph (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Lawrence Joseph Doucette (NSN: 7527779), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Navy Medical Company attached to the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Serving as a Medical Corpsman, Hospitalman Doucette was returning from the front lines with an ambulance load of casualties when his vehicle was subjected to withering enemy automatic weapons fire from a cleverly concealed position. Quickly removing the wounded men under his care to a covered position, he then fearlessly and with complete disregard for his own personal safety assaulted the enemy position single-handedly, killing four of the enemy with well-placed rounds from his carbine. His great personal bravery and courageous devotion to duty saved his comrades from further injury or death. Hospitalman Doucette's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 35137 (October 31, 1951). Born: June 29, 1929. Home Town: Reading, Massachusetts. Death: KIA: September 24, 1950.

Dougherty, William Joseph (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class William Joseph Dougherty (MCSN: 660400), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Ammunition Carrier of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. With his crew pinned down by enemy machine gun fire during an assault by his company against Hill 56, Private First Class Dougherty promptly went into action and, charging the position single-handedly, destroyed the machine gun and annihilated the crew with hand grenades, thereby enabling his gun crew to continue firing. By his daring initiative, inspiring courage and fortitude at great risk to his own life, Private First Class Dougherty contributed materially to the successful assault against a vital objective and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois. Death: KIA: December 3, 1950.

Dowd, Marvin T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Marvin T. Dowd (MCSN: 1113121), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Mortar Squad Leader in Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. With elements of his company subjected to intense hostile mortar and automatic weapons fire while acting as rear guard for the battalion, Corporal Dowd bravely remained to assist the numerous casualties. Undaunted by a hail of fire from the rapidly closing enemy, he boldly carried a wounded Marine across a hostile fire-swept valley to a sheltered position and immediately returned to the scene of action in search of more casualties. Menaced by the nearing enemy troops, he delivered effective rifle fire and forced them to seek cover before hurrying to assist in carrying another stricken man to safety. By his marked courage, devotion to duty and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Corporal Dowd upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Metter, Georgia. Home Town: Kissimmee, Florida.

Dowding, Fred Y.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Third Class Fred Y. Dowding, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 3 February 1953. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Dowding displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He volunteered to serve with a support and evacuation team directed to aid a company-size raiding party assigned the extremely hazardous mission of attacking a strongly fortified hostile position. As the platoon moved forward to a point at the base of the objective, casualties were sustained immediately. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he gallantly exposed himself to murderous enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire for a period of four hours in order to render medical aid to numerous seriously injured men. Exhibiting remarkable courage, he dauntlessly moved from one position to another traversing the entire hostile area locating wounded, treating casualties and skillfully supervising their evacuation. He worked tirelessly and courageously under the withering hostile fire in order to carry his stricken comrades to what little cover was available. His intrepid efforts did not cease until every wounded Marine had been evacuated from the devastated area and all of the dead had been recovered. After skillfully discharging his responsibilities which were instrumental in saving numerous lives, he was the last man to leave the area which was still being subjected to heavy enemy fire. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Dowding's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Dower, Frank J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 26 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Frank J. Dower (ASN: 0-956840), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Ch'ngn-yong, Korea, on 8 August 1950. During an attack his company was held up by intense small arms and mortar fire from a well dug in strong point. Seeing that his men were being disorganized by this fire he moved to the front and led the assault in person. The men, inspired by his example, overran the position forcing the enemy to retreat in confusion. Lieutenant Dower's fearless example reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii.

Dowling, Robert V. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 13 - 8 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Master Sergeant Robert V. Dowling (ASN: RA-15041931), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery B, 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in Korea on 8 April 1951. He volunteered to lead a party in the neutralization of a heavily mined area, which was of high importance to his organization in preparing and executing an attack upon the enemy. Several friendly infantrymen had been fatally wounded by mines in this area, but he unhesitatingly advanced into it to perform the most dangerous duty in clearing the mine field, placing himself well forward of his men to reconnoiter the land. With complete disregard for his own well-being and with full knowledge that his undertaking was of an extremely dangerous nature, he deployed his men to the rear for their safety and subjected himself to danger by personally operating the mine detecting equipment. As he was searching through some underbrush, a mine exploded and mortally wounded him. Sergeant Dowling's courageous actions and willingness to perform dangerous assignments fare beyond the call of duty reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the United States Artillery. Born: 1912. Home Town: Birmingham, Alabama. Death: KIA: April 8, 1951.

Downie, George E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 242 - 2 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) George E. Downie (ASN: 0-2212072), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chin-nampo, Korea, on 18 October 1950. During the night advance of his company towards the city he observed an enemy vehicle approaching the flank of the column. Deploying his men he attempted to capture the vehicle, when other enemy vehicles approached and commenced a vicious fire fight. He remained in an exposed position until his men had gained the relative safety of the far side of the road. Lieutenant Downie directed the fire of his weapons from his exposed position in spite of the enemy's concentration of all weapons in the immediate area. His directed fire was so effective that the enemy was soon routed with heavy casualties and the loss of much equipment. Lieutenant Downie's gallant action secured the flank of the column, permitted its continued advance and reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry.  Home Town: Brunswick, Georgia.

Downey, William R. II

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William R. Downey II, First Lieutenant (Medical Corps), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medical Officer with the 223d Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of the Punch Bowl, Korea on 23 December 1952. First Lieutenant Downey was the Battalion Medical Officer serving at the Battalion Aid Station. Upon receiving word that a patrol from a company was in a fire fight with the enemy, Lieutenant Downey unhesitatingly and with total disregard for his own personal safety, left the Battalion Aid Station and went to the main line of resistance. Upon arriving at the scene of the fire fight, Lieutenant Downey organized litter teams of the men in the area and personally directed and supervised the evacuation of the wounded and dead. Throughout the operation, Lieutenant Downey gave directions and shouted words of encouragement to the men. Lieutenant Downey's undaunted courage under intense enemy small arms and mortar fire, his ability to organize and direct under adverse conditions and his quick and timely thinking was responsible for saving the lives of many of the wounded and served as a great inspiration to the entire group. Lieutenant Downey's courage, determination and selfless devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Downs, Morgan Leo (posthumously)

Sergeant First Class Morgan Leo Downs, RA06570224, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division is awarded the Silver Star Posthumously for gallantry in action on 8 July 1950 near Chonan, Korea. During an enemy tank attack on the town of Chonan two squads of friendly troops were pinned down by their fire. SFC Downs, with complete disregard of his own safety volunteered to act as gunner of a 2.36 rocket launcher after the original gunner became frightened. Although exposed from all directions to small arms and tank fire he got in position to begin firing the rocket launcher. The first three rounds fired by SFC Downs were direct hits. At this point his position became more hazardous as the tanks had picked out the position from which he was firing and had started to swing their guns into position to fire on him. He again fired the launcher and scored a direct hit on one of the tanks. The four hits scored on the enemy tanks did not destroy or damage them to any extent due to their heavy armor plating. This courageous act and devotion to duty on the part of SFC Downs gave the two squads of men enough time to seek cover and a place of safety. After SFC Downs had fired the fourth round at the enemy tanks he was killed by a direct hit from one of the thanks. This gallant act and supreme sacrifice made on the part of SFC Downs reflects the greatest credit on himself and the military service. GO 67, 5 Aug 1950Entered service from Onalaska, WA.

Dowsett, Frederick Richard

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Richard Dowsett (MCSN: 0-5284), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces north of Seoul, Korea, on 27 September 1950. With the attacking battalions temporarily pinned down by intense hostile fire, Lieutenant Colonel Dowsett boldly advanced into the fire-swept area and, calmly moving among his troops under vicious machine-gun and sniper fire, instilled in his officers and men the will and determination to drive forward. Although communications were often tenuous because of distance and the rugged nature of the terrain, he unhesitatingly braved enemy machine-gun, mortar, small-arms and anti-tank gun fire to ensure the rapid advance of front line units, fighting gallantly on until the enemy had been routed from their fortified positions in a subsequent assault. By his thorough knowledge of the tactical situation, superb professional skill and inspiring leadership, Lieutenant Colonel Dowsett contributed materially to the success achieved by his regiment, and his courageous and determined efforts reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Born: October 13, 1911 at Battle Creek, Michigan. Home Town: Battle Creek, Michigan. Death: December 5, 1986.

Doyle, James Henry

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Rear Admiral James Henry Doyle (NSN: 0-20455), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commander, Attack Force, Joint Task Force Seven, United Nations Command, in action in the Inchon-Seoul operation during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army Korea, General Orders No. 49 (October 27, 1950). Death: February 1, 1981.

Drake, Horace J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Horace J. Drake (MCSN: 1172295), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 July 1953. With a number of enemy troops infiltrating a portion of friendly lines during the night and occupying a position of the main line of resistance, Corporal Drake voluntarily participated in a detail to rout the enemy and skillfully organized his men for the attack. When a grenade dropped from the hand of a nearby wounded Marine who was preparing to throw the missile into the enemy-held position, he rushed through a hail of enemy small arms and artillery fire to the side of his fallen comrade, picked up the grenade and quickly hurled it out of the position, thereby saving the life of the stricken Marine. After removing the casualty to a first aid station, he returned to his fighting position and, although painfully wounded, refused medical treatment until the enemy was driven from the trench line. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and gallant devotion to duty, Corporal Drake served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Goodlettsville, Tennessee. Home Town: Old Hickory, Tennessee.

Draper, Harold R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Harold R. Draper (MCSN: 1118501), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Headquarters and Service Company, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When his unit was subjected to repeated attacks by fanatical enemy forces, Private First Class Draper constantly exposed himself to hostile small arms and machine gun fire to carry ammunition up steep and mountainous terrain to the front line platoons. On one occasion, while in the platoon area, he observed that the casualty ridden unit was unable to provide covering fire for the evacuation of seriously wounded Marines through an exposed fire-swept area. Assuming command of the men who were with him, he moved three un-manned machine guns into a position vulnerable to enemy small arms and grenade fire and put the weapons into action to provide effective covering fire for the evacuation of the wounded. By his daring initiative, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Draper served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ferndale, Michigan. Home Town: Holland, Michigan.

Draper, James A.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 154 - June 15, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class [then Private] James A. Draper (ASN: RA-13351655), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company A, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy near Chipyong-ni, Korea, on 15 February 1951. On that date he was a gunner in a machine gun squad of an infantry company which was under attack by a numerically superior enemy force. During this attack two men from a nearby machine gun squad were seriously wounded, and with no thought for his personal safety, Private Draper volunteered to operate the weapon. He fearlessly exposed himself to enemy small arms fire in order to lay a devastating base of fire upon the advancing enemy. His actions were instrumental in repulsing the enemy and in inflicting heavy casualties upon him. The gallant conduct displayed by Private Draper reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Draper, William H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William H. Draper (MCSN: 0-44299), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. With his battalion fighting its way out of an area encircled by numerically superior hostile forces when movement was halted by devastating enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire from high ground paralleling the road, First Lieutenant Draper unhesitatingly ran through the hail of plunging fire to three supporting tanks in the center of the open area. Contacting one of the tank commanders by tank-infantry phone, he rapidly outlined the situation and gave him a fire mission. Although knocked down and dazed by the muzzle blast of the tank cannon's first round, he regained his feet and, while remaining completely exposed to the heavy hostile fire, coolly adjusted the fire of all three tanks on the enemy-held ridge, inflicting numerous casualties and temporarily silencing the hostile fire. He then moved with a provisional reinforced platoon further along the road to a vantage point where he skillfully directed covering fire against the ridge, enabling the major elements of his battalion to complete a successful withdrawal into friendly lines. By his outstanding professional skill, courage and resolute determination, First Lieutenant Draper contributed materially to the success of his battalion's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Holland, Michigan.

Dressler, William E. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 107 - 22 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Major (Field Artillery) William E. Dressler (ASN: 0-451624), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of the 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 14 July 1950, at the Kuegang River, north of Taejon, Korea. During the day of 14 July 1950, the battalion was engaged in a firing mission on the enemy across the Kum-gang River. At approximately 1430, Headquarters Battery was surprised by an attack from three sided by enemy infantry. Major Dressler, then Battalion Executive Officer displayed complete disregard for his personal safety and directed the action of the Battalion Command Post and Headquarters Battery. Although there was heavy machine gun and mortar fire in the Command Post area, Major Dressler went from one section to the other encouraging and directing fire on the enemy. He started an orderly withdrawal and destruction of all equipment that could not be withdrawn. He was last seen aiding the wounded and directing stragglers to safety when the Battalion Command Post area was completely overrun by the enemy. This conspicuous act of gallantry on the part of Major Dressler reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. Born: October 11, 1915. Home Town: Covington, Virginia.

Drumright, William C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant William C. Drumright (MCSN: 0-54442), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of the Anti-tank Company, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1952. When two of his men were wounded and unable to move after the platoon was subjected to an intense barrage of hostile mortar fire while constructing bunkers on the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Drumright immediately ordered the remainder of his unit to take cover in a nearby bunker and raced down the forward slope through intense enemy fire to rescue the stricken Marines. After carrying one of the casualties up the steep hill, he returned to pick up the other man and proceeded up the slope. Seriously wounded and knocked to the ground by enemy mortar fire, he quickly remained his feet, picked up the bleeding and nearly unconscious Marine and fought his way to the safety of a trench where another mortar round struck, lifting him off the ground and battering him against the wall of the trench. Although stunned and exhausted, he gallantly continued forward until one of his men ran down the hill to assist him. By his courageous initiative, resolute determination and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Second Lieutenant Drumright served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: College Grove, Tennessee. Home Town: Madison, Tennessee.

Dudrey, John A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John A. Dudrey (MCSN: 0-35180), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of the Anti-tank Company, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 December 1950. With his unit halted by an attack from numerically superior enemy forces during the movement from Koto-ri to Hamhung, First Lieutenant Dudrey continually exposed himself to intense hostile automatic weapons, mortar and small arms fire to assist in organizing a defensive perimeter. His timely action and skillful tactics were contributing factors in the successful defense of the position with heavy casualties to the enemy. By his marked courage, expert leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Dudrey served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Addy, Washington. Home Town: Bend, Oregon.

Duff, Peter H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Peter H. Duff (MCSN: 657942), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. With his fire team assigned the mission of defending the right flank of the company defense sector during a night attack by numerically superior enemy forces at Hagaru-ri, Private First Class Duff continually exposed himself to accurate hostile machine gun, hand grenade and small arms fire to move from positions to position, directing his unit's accurate fire on the attackers and bravely made his way across the fire-swept terrain to obtain further supplies of ammunition. When the enemy approached to within twenty-five yards of a friendly tank in an attempt to destroy it with hand grenades, he immediately moved his fire team around the threatened vehicle and supplied vitally needed physical support. By his marked courage, aggressive leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, Private First Class Duff served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Libertyville, Illinois. Home Town: Libertyville, Illinois.

Duffin, James Robert (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman James Robert Duffin (NSN: 3028923), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Company Corpsman, attached to Company E, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces near Koto-ri, Korea on 29 November 1950. When his company was subjected to a strong attack by a numerically superior enemy force, Hospitalman Duffin repeatedly exposed himself to heavy hostile small-arms, machine-gun and mortar fire to administer aid to the many wounded Marines. Moving from position to position, he carried two wounded Marines to a protected area and rendered medical assistance. While crossing an open, enemy fire-swept area to aid a third casualty, he was mortally wounded by hostile automatic weapons fire. By his courageous actions in saving others at the cost of his own life, Hospitalman Duffin served to inspire all members of his unit. His fortitude, daring initiative and steadfast devotion to duty throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Authority: Board of Awards: Serial 618 (June 11, 1951). Born: August 2, 1931. Home Town: Paxton, Illinois. Death: Killed in Action.

Duffy, Gilman D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Gilman D. Duffy, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 April 1953. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Duffy displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He was a member of a unit that was effecting a relief of a vital combat outpost position located far forward of the main line of resistance. During the relief, an enemy mortar round landed causing several casualties. Although critically wounded, he courageously began applying first aid to the wounds of his injured comrades. Expressing complete disregard for his personal condition, he refused medical attention and continued administering aid until he was again painfully wounded and rendered unconscious. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Duffy's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 28226 (August 18, 1953).

DuFrain, Theodore B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Theodore B. DuFrain (MCSN: 631930), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 March 1951. When the enemy unleashed a devastating barrage of hand grenades after he had maneuvered his fire team to within twenty-five yards of an enemy emplacement during an assault by the company on a strongly defended ridge, Corporal DuFrain crawled across the fire-swept terrain to the position and quickly hurled several hand grenades into the midst of the defenders. Leaping to his feet, he led his men in a savage bayonet attack which killed several of the enemy and completely routed the remainder. By his exceptional courage, daring initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, Corporal DuFrain served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Billings, Montana. Home Town: Sacramento, California.

Dugan, William A.

Headquarters 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 27 - January 13, 1952

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William A. Dugan, RA33439811, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Dugan distinguished himself by heroic action near Pangdangdong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. During its attack against well dug-in enemy forces, his company was subjected to devastating enemy fire and one platoon became pinned down by intense machine gun fire. Sergeant Dugan, Platoon Sergeant, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved into a forward and exposed position from which he directed his men and urged them forward in their assault. During the raging conflict, he received serious shrapnel wounds but refused to be evacuated and continued to lead the fighting. As a result of his tactical skill and fearless leadership, his men were able to secure their objective, inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy. Sergeant Dugan's heroic action and selfless devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

Duke, Frederick B.

Private First Class Frederick B. Duke, Battery D, 21st AAA AW Battalion (SP). On the morning of 16 February 1951, while supporting an infantry assault near Naegong-ni, Korea, the gunner on Private First Class Duke's half-track received a severe wound which necessitated evacuation. While two of the crew assisted the injured man, Private First Class Duke and a comrade operated the turret to maintain a heavy volume of effective fire, When devastating machine gun fire impeded the advance, he ran to a nearby tank and used its machine gun to point out the emplacement to the crew.  By thus directing the destruction of the main hostile strong-point he enabled friendly forces to secure the objective and drive the enemy into disorganized retreat. Private First Class Duke's courage, initiative and selfless devotion to duty are in keeping with the great traditions of the service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Duke, William E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant William E. Duke (MCSN: 397933), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Acting Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 21 October to 29 November 1950. With his company subjected to a series of concentrated attacks by numerically superior hostile forces south of Yudam-ni, Sergeant Duke constantly exposed himself to the intense small arms and automatic weapons fire to organize a hasty defense. Fearlessly moving among his men, he directed their accurate and effective fire and supervised the evacuation of casualties and the securing of replacements for the wounded. Seriously wounded himself, in later action, Sergeant Duke refused to be evacuated and continued leading brilliantly executed attacks to inflict heavy casualties among the aggressors and contribute to the repulsing of the enemy in each encounter. His daring and aggressive leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring courage throughout this period of intensive combat were essential factors in the success achieved by his unit and reflect the highest credit upon Sergeant Duke and the United States Naval Service. Born: Xenia, Illinois. Home Town: Rockford, Illinois.

Dulles, Allen M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Allen M. Dulles (MCSN: 0-53864), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 - 15 November 1952. With the forward outpost subjected to continuous hostile sniper fire, Second Lieutenant Dulles fearlessly moved out into the trenches with his squad leader in an effort to silence the guns. Refusing medical aid when he and his squad leader sustained painful wounds, he assisted in evacuating the wounded man and continued to engage the enemy at close range until he received further wounds when his weapon was shot from his hand. On the following day, in an attempt to bring accurate mortar fire onto the area in which the enemy snipers were located, he crawled out of the trench line and down the forward slope in the face of intense enemy fire and, locating the hostile position, effectively directed a mortar barrage to destroy it. Although painfully wounded a third time, he continued to direct the defense of the area until he fell unconscious from his wounds and was subsequently evacuated. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and gallant devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Dulles served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York.

Dumas, James H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 151 - 27 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James H. Dumas (ASN: RA-16308159), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 17 August 1950, in the vicinity of O'hang Hill, Korea. Stopped from continuing on to the company's objective by intense enemy fire and with the left flank of his platoon threatened, Private Dumas with total disregard for his own safety moved forward to an exposed position, and effectively destroyed an enemy machine gun with a grenade. Rushing forward and firing as he advanced he destroyed the remaining enemy personnel in the machine gun emplacement. By his gallant action he was able to dislodge the enemy holding up the advance of the left flank of the company objective. The courageous actions of Private Dumas and his unhesitant devotion to duty served well as an inspiration to the men of his company as well as reflecting the highest credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Dummermuth, Robert

Citation not yet found.

Military Funeral For Dummermuth
WEST UNION (Special)

Memorial services for Pfc. Robert Dummermuth, 24, who met death on the battlefields of Korea, will be conducted at 2 p. m. Friday from Bethel Presbyterian church, with Rev. G. W. Ukena officiating. Interment will be in West Union cemetery. The body, under military escort by an army sergeant, arrives at Fayette Wednesday, and will be met by the Burnham Funeral home ambulance.

Bob, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Emory Dummermuth, entered the army Jan. 9, 1951, and after basic training and leadership instruction at Fort Riley, Kans., left the States July 31, 1951, and advanced to front lines soon after his arrival in Korea. His death Oct. 10, 1951, was reported by telegram to his wife, the former Patricia Bostrom, West Union, the last of October. He was with the first division of the 7th Cavalry Regiment which suffered heavy losses when overrun and cut to pieces by the Communists in a surprise attack early in October. He was in charge of a machine gun outpost on the Western Korean front.

Robert was born in West Union Nov. 14, 1927, and lived his entire life in this community. He attended country school in his neighborhood and graduated from West Union High school in 1947. He attended Iowa State college at Ames for a year. He assisted his father in farm operations until his induction. His marriage to Miss Bostrom, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Bostrom, West Union, occurred on Dec. 31, 1950. In addition to his wife and parents, he is survived by his only sister, Janita, a West Union High school student.

The Purple Heart and Silver Star medals had been awarded to Pfc. Dummermuth." (Oelwein Daily Register, Jan 23, 1951)

Dunaway, William G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant William G. Dunaway (MCSN: 591169), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. When the last elements of the company sustained numerous casualties from intense and accurate enemy mortar fire during the attack to break out of an enemy encirclement, Sergeant Dunaway fearlessly remained exposed to devastating hostile fire to assist in evacuating the wounded. Moving to the side of one fallen comrade, he helped to carry the wounded man through a hail of enemy fire to the safety of a tank, and then assisted in removing another casualty across an open, fire-swept valley and up the steep face of a hill to a safe position. By his marked courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Sergeant Dunaway materially aided in saving the lives of several wounded Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Dallas, Texas. Home Town: El Paso, Texas.

Dunbar, Michael J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Michael J. Dunbar (MCSN: 0-41497), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 September 1950. When a fire fight started while he was assisting in the deployment of one of the rifle platoons, First Lieutenant Dunbar immediately organized the right flank of the platoon and boldly moved along the line while directing and controlling friendly fire. Although receiving a serious eye wound as the fire fight progressed and became more intense, he persisted in supervising the platoon's effective fire until the action subsided. En route to the Battalion Aid Station when the fire fight again increased in intensity, he returned to the platoon and continued to direct and control its fire until the enemy assault was successfully repulsed. His unflinching fortitude, outstanding leadership and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Dunbar and the United States Naval Service. Born: Jacksonville, Florida. Home Town: Jacksonville, Florida.

Duncan, Edward F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Edward F. Duncan (MCSN: 0-49622), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 August 1950. When his platoon was attacked by numerically superior enemy forces while the unit was engaged in protecting the right flank of the regiment, Second Lieutenant Duncan fearlessly exposed himself to intense hostile fire to direct the fire of his men and constantly moved from one position to another throughout the action to encourage the men in holding the vital terrain. When the enemy threatened to overrun his sector, he bravely led his men in a determined counterattack which completely repelled the hostile force, thereby contributing immeasurably to the success of his platoon and to the safety of the entire regiment. By his courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Duncan served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Myrick, Oregon. Home Town: Dunsmuir, California.

Duncan, James C. (MIA - later released from captivity)

Private James C. Duncan, while a member of 8attery D, 15th AA AW Battalion (SP), distinguished himself by gallantry in action against on armed enemy near the Chosin Reservoir in Korea on 28 November 1950. On this date, the command post of the 1st platoon of Battery D was taken under heavy attack by the enemy, and the personnel at the command post were in grave danger of being overrun by the enemy. When the battery commander called for volunteers to join a patrol to go to the assistance of the platoon command post, Private Duncan unhesitatingly volunteered. While crossing open ground in the attack on the enemy force, the patrol was pinned down by intense enemy fire from one of the flanks. Private Duncan, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, immediately ran toward the strong point from which the enemy was firing, and with his carbine and a hand grenade neutralized it. As a result of his gallant act, the patrol continued the attack on the enemy and succeeded in killing or driving off all those who remained. The personnel in the platoon command post were thus rescued. Private Duncan's outstanding display of gallantry on this occasion was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Kentucky.

Duncan, Robert L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert L. Duncan (MCSN: 649345), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Machine Gun Squad of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1950. When his company became pinned down by heavy enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire during a regimental attack against a hostile roadblock, Private First Class Duncan, in company with the only other surviving member of his squad, put his machine gun into action. Despite extremely mountainous terrain, the heavy enemy fire directed at his area and his dead and wounded comrades lying about him, he returned accurate and effective fire against the attackers and, when the ammunition was expended, moved through intense fire, grabbed a box of ammunition from another position and returned to man his weapon. While most of the unit was seeking cover, he again braved fire to obtain additional ammunition and continued to manipulate his weapon effectively against the attackers until his gun crew had gained fire superiority and eliminated the fierce opposition. By his courage in the face of grave danger, Private First Class Duncan served as an inspiration to his comrades and contributed to the success of his company's assault against the hostile position. His heroic efforts were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Luray, Virginia. Home Town: Luray, Virginia.

Dunn, Carlisle L.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 272 - 4 June 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Carlisle L. Dunn, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as a member of the 1st Shoran Beacon Squadron on the night of 19 December 1951. When his Radar site was attacked by armed guerrillas and subjected to intense small arms fire, Sergeant Dunn quickly deployed his men to defensive positions. Organizing a three man patrol, he led a charge to the enemy point of attack, using hand grenades and automatic weapons. After an intense fight, Sergeant Dunn and his patrol were successful in completely routing the enemy which outnumbered them ten to one, and inflicting heavy losses upon their number. During this action, Sergeant Dunn was wounded but refused medical aid until his site had been secured. Through his outstanding act of bravery, Sergeant Dunn is credited with saving a station vital to United Nations operations. Sergeant Dunn's cool appraisal of the situation and his selfless courage and leadership against an armed enemy reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Dunn, J.T. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 240 - 2 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Master Sergeant J T Dunn (ASN: RA-06261192), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company E, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Yonil, Korea, on 11 September 1950. His company was attacking enemy hill-side positions when the assault platoon was subjected to heavy rifle fire and suffered some casualties. One of the wounded fell in an exposed position and was unable to move. Even though he was fully aware that the wounded man was in a position being covered by enemy fire, Sergeant Dunn unhesitatingly advanced and reached his fallen comrade. In his gallant effort to evacuate the wounded man Sergeant Dunn was killed. His fearless action and complete devotion to his comrade, without regard for his own safety reflect the greatest credit on himself and the united States Infantry. Home Town: Bell County, Texas.

[KWE Note: M/Sergeant Dunn was born on November 20, 1912 and was killed in action on September 11, 1950.  He is buried at City Cemetery, Belton, TX.]

Dunn, Robert C. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 45th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 7 - 3 January 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Robert C. Dunn (ASN: RA-6938322), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company L, 3d Battalion, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy near Taebanggok, Korea. On the night of 17 November 1952, a patrol under the leadership of Sergeant Dunn moved out from advanced outpost positions with the assigned mission of contacting the enemy. As the unit maneuvered through the darkness into enemy territory, they were suddenly ambushed. The hostile force sprayed the patrol with small-arms fire and inflicted several casualties. After ordering his men to withdraw and directing his automatic riflemen to lay a base of covering fire, Sergeant Dunn single-handedly charged the enemy positions. By exposing himself and drawing enemy fire away from the patrol, Sergeant Dunn enabled the members of his unit to evacuate casualties with speed and safety. As he moved toward the foe, firing his weapon, Sergeant Dunn was fatally wounded. His gallantry in offering his life for the safety of his comrades reflects the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.

Dunn, Sidney C.

Master Sergeant Sidney C. Dunn, RA6886841, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 11 July 1950 near Chonui, Korea. On the morning of 11 July 1950 the enemy advanced to within 25 yards of the command post of Company K. with several platoons running out of ammunition, Master Sergeant Dunn under heavy enemy fire organized and directed an ammunition detail. During the attack the enemy set up a machine gun in a forward position. Master Sergeant Dunn crept forward and succeeded in knocking out the machine gun. At this time an order to withdraw was issued and Master Sergeant without regard for his own safety, collected men and withdrew them with a minimum of casualties. During the withdrawal the enemy set up another machine fun which brought fire on Master Sergeant Dunn and his group. He again crept forward and succeeded in knocking out this machine gun. This courageous action on the the part of Master Sergeant Dunn is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army. GO 95, 16 Aug 1950. He entered the service from Childowie, VA.

Dunne, Charles Shelby (1st award) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Charles Shelby Dunne (MCSN: 0-43895), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 June 1951. Courageously refusing to seek medical attention for painful wounds sustained during the early part of an intense enemy mortar attack on the infantry company to which he was attached as an artillery forward observer, First Lieutenant Dunne fearlessly advanced through the hostile barrage to an exposed observation post from which he could ascertain the location of the enemy mortars. Remaining steadfast in his hazardous position, he called in and adjusted accurate artillery fire, thereby aiding in silencing the weapons and in permitting the company to continue its mission. His aggressive skill, personal courage and loyal devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk reflect great credit upon First Lieutenant Dunne and the United States Naval Service.

Dunne, Charles Shelby (2nd award) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Charles Shelby Dunne (MCSN: 0-43895), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Artillery Forward Observer of Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 September 1951. When the leader of an adjacent platoon was wounded and evacuated during an enemy counterattack and the unit became temporarily disorganized, First Lieutenant Dunne immediately left his position of comparative safety to assume command and, skillfully reorganizing the group, led a successful defense maneuver while continuing to call in supporting fires. Mortally wounded by hostile fire during the fierce engagement, First Lieutenant Dunne, by his marked courage, daring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, had served to inspire his men to heroic efforts in repulsing the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Yuma, Arizona. Home Town: Los Angeles, California. Death: KIA: September 14, 1951.

Dunne, John F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John F. Dunne (MCSN: 1078464), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. When his company was pinned down by heavy enemy machine gun and rifle fire during the attack on Seoul, Private First Class Dunne unhesitatingly exposed himself to intense hostile fire to stand in an open street firing his rifle and throwing hand grenades to cover the evacuation of ten wounded Marines. By his exceptional courage and devotion to duty, he enabled the casualties to receive prompt medical attention and contributed to the success of the evacuation without further casualties, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Entered Service From New York.

Dunning, James W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant James W. Dunning (MCSN: 0-39514), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Leader of a Provisional Rifle Platoon of Company A, Seventh Motor Transport Battalion, Service Command, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. With his platoon, consisting of drivers and mechanics, assigned to assist a provisional rifle company in retaking a strategic hill at Hagaru-ri, First Lieutenant Dunning courageously led his men forward through heavy enemy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire in a bold and determined attack against a heavily fortified, deeply entrenched hostile force. Shouting orders and words of encouragement to his men, he contributed materially to the recapture of the position and immediately assisted in organizing a hasty defense of the hill, which subsequently repulsed all hostile counterattacks. By his forceful and determined leadership, cool courage under fire and daring tactics at great risk to his own life, First Lieutenant Dunning aided immeasurably in recapturing a vital objective, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Greenfield, Tennessee. Home Town: Greenfield, Tennessee.

Dupras, Edward P. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Edward P. Dupras, Jr. (MCSN: 0-7927), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Landing Force Commander in a Special Operations Group of Amphibious Group ONE, Pacific Fleet, which conducted a series of successful night demolition raids and beach reconnaissance missions in the coastal waters of enemy-held Korea during the period from 12 to 25 August 1950. Expertly planning, and skillfully organizing and indoctrinating his landing forces for this operation, Major Dupras personally led the landing parties ashore and conducted his command with skill and courage. Under his forceful leadership, the raiding parties completed their missions in three night demolition raids with resultant damage to enemy lines of supply and communications, and night reconnaissance of three beaches were also conducted despite the heavy enemy opposition encountered on the last night which forced the landing party to withdraw under fire. By his professional ability, initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Major Dupras contributed to the success of these hazardous operations and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Providence, Rhode Island. Home Town: Providence, Rhode Island.

Duquesne, Roger L.R.

Headquarters, Eighth United States Army Korea (EUSAK)
General Orders No. 160 - 13 November 1950

Corporal Roger L.R. Duquesne, RA12315061, Armor, United States Army, a member of Company A, 89th Medium Tank Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Heirin-ri, Korea, on 3 September 1950.  Corporal Duquesne was serving as a tank crewman with an assault force which had been assigned the mission of eliminating an enemy roadblock and a concentration of hostile troops located in a pass near Heirin-ri, Korea.  As the force moved forward they encountered a much larger number of enemy than had been anticipated and were subjected to intense hostile fire from commanding positions to the front and on the flanks.  Due to the nature of the terrain, the tanks were unable to leave the road and the tank machineguns could not be used without endangering friendly troops, Corporal Duquesne removed the machinegun from its mount and proceeded to high ground one hundred yards to the right rear of the tank's position from which point he delivered withering fire on the enemy.  Corporal Duquesne continued to deliver effective fire on the enemy for a period of three hours enabling the unit to withdraw safely when the position became untenable.  Corporal Duquesne's dauntless courage and staunch devotion to duty reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New Jersey.

Duran, 1st Lt. John A.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 525 - 20 December 1953

First Lieutenant (then Second Lieutenant) John A. Duran, 01919467, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the night of 7 June and early morning hours of 8 June 1953, in the vicinity of Saagimak, Korea, Lieutenant Duran led a patrol on a reconnaissance mission to enemy-held Hill "412". After having made contact with the enemy through a brief fire fight, the unit was moving back toward the main line of resistance when it encountered a large minefield which obstructed the return route. Aware that delay might enable the enemy to attack the patrol, Lieutenant Duran courageously advanced into the minefield to find a safe passage. With complete disregard for his personal welfare, he guided his men deep into the mined area until enemy mortar fire began falling in the immediate proximity. Lieutenant Duran immediately contacted the support element and directed accurate covering fire upon the enemy positions until the patrol had passed through the hazardous area. He was greatly responsible for the successful return of the unit with a minimum of casualties. Lieutenant Duran's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Georgia.

Durant, Charles E. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles E. Durant, Jr. (MCSN: 1071150), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Ammunition Carrier of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 September 1950. With his gun crew pinned down by enemy machine gun fire during an attack by his company against a strong hostile position, Private First Class Durant fearlessly exposed himself to the direct enemy fire and, single-handedly rushing the position, succeeded in destroying the gun with a hand grenade. Returning to his gun and manning it himself, he placed accurate and effective fire on the enemy, pinning them down and aiding the advance of his company toward the objective. By his daring initiative, courage and fortitude at great risk to his own life, Private First Class Durant served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Lansdowne, Pennsylvania.

Durborow, Edward F. (MIA - died while missing July 07, 1954)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 383 - 8 September 1953

Corporal Edward F. Durborow, US51171960, Infantry, Medical Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 6 July 1953, in the vicinity of Haduch'on, Korea, Company "K" began an attack on enemy held Hill "250". Although the assault squads were soon subjected to intense automatic weapons and grenade fire, Corporal Durborow, a medical aidman, moved up and down the skirmish line administering aid to the wounded. Later, the attacking force suffered a number of casualties which required immediate evacuation. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he took up a position on the second crest of the hill where he could see the wounded and effectively directed the litter bearers in their operations. In the ensuing action, many members of the first assault squad became casualties when subjected to an intense artillery and mortar barrage. Despite the enemy fire, he immediately moved to the aid of his wounded comrades and was last seen attempting to reach a friendly casualty lying in an exposed forward area. Corporal Durborow's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from New Jersey.

Durham, Kenneth P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Kenneth P. Durham (MCSN: 1175109), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 June 1952. Volunteering to move forward and aid a Marine rifle squad which had been pinned down by enemy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire, Private First Class Durham advanced through intense hostile fire to reach the casualties and courageously crawled back for a distance of two hundred yards with a seriously wounded man on his back, stopping several times to administer first aid to his comrade and, in so doing, exposing himself to more hostile fire. Though physically exhausted, he carried the casualty steadily for over two hours and, upon reaching a defiladed position, placed the wounded man on a stretcher and helped carry him the remaining one thousand yards to an ambulance. By his outstanding courage, initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Private First Class Durham served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Slidell, Texas. Home Town: Lake Dallas, Texas.

Durham, Robert S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert S. Durham (MCSN: 1324098), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 - 27 March 1953. When the company was subjected to intense hostile small arms, mortar and artillery fire while advancing in a counterattack against a vital enemy-held outpost, Private First Class Durham was the first man to reach the intermediate objective and, when the enemy charged under cover of the barrage, courageously stood up, exposing himself to the hostile fire to bring devastating counterfire to bear on them which accounted for many enemy dead and wounded. With the action becoming more intense, he fearlessly continued to expose himself to the hostile fire, delivering accurate fire and hurling grenades and, when ordered to withdraw, took up a position at the rear of his unit to cover the evacuation of the many casualties. By his gallant fighting spirit, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Durham served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Springfield, Tennessee. Home Town: Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

Dusablom, Walter D. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 60 - 25 July 1950

Private Walter D. Dusablom, Infantry, RA1116678, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star (posthumously) for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950, near Taip-yong-ni, Korea. The enemy succeeded in killing a tank crew of an American tank that had been supporting Company B’s position along the Kum River. After killing the crew the enemy then proceeded to use the tank against the position of Company B. At this time, Private Dusablom and two comrades took a 3.5 rocket launcher, while under cross machine gun and rifle fire, carried it 400 yards to a position about 50 yards from the American tank. Even though all these men were wounded when they reached this position they succeeded in knocking out the tank and denying its use to the enemy. Private Dusablom’s outstanding courage and his devotion to duty reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service.

(Private Dusablom was killed in action. See also: PFC James M. Carter and Merlin H. Johnson, both of whom were also killed in action and should be listed as posthumous awards.) Home or county of record: Worcester, MA.

Dushkin, 1st Lt. Myron

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 216 - June 22, 1951

First Lieutenant Myron Duskin, 01284682, Infantry, Tank Company, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 19 April 1951, near Yum-hyon, Korea, Lieutenant Dushkin was on a tank retrieving mission with his company. After they had reached the area of the disabled vehicles and had been working for some time, the retrieving party and the forward half of the armored column were attacked by the enemy with severe small arms and mortar fire. Immediately maneuvering his tanks into position to bring fire upon the foe in his sector, Lieutenant Dushkin, heedless of his own safety, stood exposed in the turret of his tank and fearlessly designated targets with his heavy machine gun. When his tank ran out of machine gun ammunition and the radio failed, he boldly dismounted from the vehicle and going from tank to tank directed their fire from outside by means of the telephone mounted on the rear. Then, re-supplying his own tank with ammunition from a second vehicle he continued to guide the fire against the enemy until their positions were neutralized. The bold and gallant achievements of Lieutenant Dushkin reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of California.

Dutremaine, William A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal William A. Dutremaine (MCSN: 652160), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 August 1952. When his squad was subjected to intense and accurate enemy fire during an attack on a strongly defended position far forward of the main line of resistance, Corporal Dutremaine skillfully maneuvered his men to a vantage point and directed them in delivering devastating fire upon the enemy. Although he sustained painful wounds from the intense hostile fire and his unit was completely isolated form adjacent squads, he set up an effective perimeter of defense and succeeded in holding the position, continually moving about the area to administer first aid to the wounded and to redistribute ammunition to his squad. Refusing to be evacuated, he assisted a Corpsman in establishing a covered position for the casualties and, after receiving treatment for his wounds at a forward aid station, unhesitatingly returned to his squad's position. By his marked fortitude, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Corporal Dutremaine served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bronxville, New York. Home Town: Ozone Park, New York.

Dworshak, Michael A. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 151 - November 11, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Michael A. Dworshak (ASN: RA-37548030), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company B, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 24 July 1950 near Yongdong, Korea. Private Dworshak was one of a group of men riding on tanks which were going forward into intense enemy mortar and small arms fire to break up a roadblock. Seeing an enemy machine gun nest to the rear, Private Dworshak, displaying great presence of mind, swung his automatic rifle around and, at the same time, shoved one man off the tank to keep him from getting hit by the machine gun's fire. With utter disregard for his life, Private Dworshak stood fully exposed and exchanged fire with the enemy machine gun until he killed every enemy crewman manning the machine gun. Private Dworshak's gallantry saved the lives of his comrades riding on top of the tanks and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.

Dyer, Delmar J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 173 - 16 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant Delmar J. Dyer, RA17170716, (then Corporal), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 25 May 1951 in the vicinity of Kosoktul, Korea. Company L was flushing the enemy from high ground when the company was suddenly subjected to small arms fire and an intense mortar barrage by enemy forces entrenched on a high hill, forcing the company to withdraw hurriedly from the area. Sergeant Dyer, with complete disregard for his own safety and totally indifferent to the heavy mortar barrage falling in the area, remained behind to render first aid to the other members of his squad, all of whom had been wounded. He then dragged his comrades to safety, thus saving them from possible death or capture by the enemy. The gallantry and loyal devotion to his comrades displayed by Sergeant Dyer reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Dykes, Grady D.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Grady D. Dykes, United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company B, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 2 September 1950, in Korea. His actions, without regard for his own safety, reflect great credit on himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.

 

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