Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "E"

 
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Earls, Doyle F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Doyle F. Earls (MCSN: 413605), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Howitzer Gunner of Battery K, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Unhesitatingly volunteering to assist in evacuating casualties of an infantry assault company who were lying within the enemy's position, Sergeant Earls fearlessly proceeded to the area through intense hostile small-arms, machine gun and mortar fire. Painfully wounded while administering aid to the fallen Marines, he staunchly refused to submit to medical attention and doggedly continued his efforts until all casualties had been removed from the line of fire. By his daring initiative, determination and grave concern for others at great personal risk, Sergeant Earls was responsible for saving his fellow Marines from the imminent danger of further wounds or capture by the enemy. His courageous actions throughout reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Born: Philadelphia, Tennessee. Home Town: Knoxville, Tennessee.

Early, Harry

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Harry Early (MCSN: 650548), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Wireman of Headquarters and Service Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Observing a wounded Marine fall in an exposed area to the front of a hostile position during an enemy penetration of a section of the hill defended by his company, Corporal Early, accompanied by another Marine, fearlessly exposed himself to the intense shellfire to run up the ice-coated hill and attempt a rescue. Subjected to a volley of small arms fire from approximately twelve of the enemy upon reaching a point within twenty yards of the casualty, he fought furiously against the outnumbering force, killing six of them before his companion was seriously wounded. Withdrawing from his position and assisting his comrade to the company aid station, Corporal Early returned to the area and, with the assistance of another Marine, succeeded in effecting the evacuation. Painfully burned by bursting enemy white phosphorous mortar shells while assisting in installing wire communications to an assault platoon during a subsequent attack by an adjacent company against a hostile position, he courageously refused to submit to evacuation and, despite intense pain from using his severely burned hands in the bitter sub-zero temperatures, continued his valiant efforts until the mission was completed. His daring initiative, unrelenting determination and cool courage served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Early and the United States Naval Service. Born: Riverside, California. Home Town: Paguate, New Mexico.

Earnest, George Reid

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant George Reid Earnest (MCSN: 0-49337), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 9 December 1950. When his company commander became a casualty during an assault against strong hostile positions south of Koto-ri, First Lieutenant Earnest immediately assumed command and, with his troops reduced by casualties to approximately seventy percent of their original fighting strength, effected a reorganization and proceeded with the mission of securing two more ridges to the front which were heavily defended by enemy forces in well dug in positions. Although pinned down by machine-gun and other automatic weapons fire during the action, he personally led the assault elements, inspiring his men and directing their advance in overrunning and securing the objectives. With elements of his company again hit by automatic weapons fire from the flank, he quickly organized a small force and led a brilliantly executed attack against the position. By his forceful and determined leadership, in the face of heavy odds, First Lieutenant Earnest contributed materially to the accomplishment of the mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: May 3, 1926 at Atlanta, Georgia. Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia. Death: January 16, 1992.

Eastman, Theodore

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Theodore Eastman (MCSN: 1241810), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Rein), in Korea, on 9 April 1953. Serving as a machine gun squad leader, Private First Class Eastman displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He was a member of a unit defending a vital outpost far forward of the main line of resistance when it was subjected to a savage enemy assault. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he courageously assisted his section leader in delivering a deadly hail of fire on the hostile troops. Although suffering intense pain as a result of wounds, he gallantly remained at his position despite the devastating enemy mortar, artillery and small arms fire falling around him. When the enemy penetrated the outpost perimeter and began to move in on the position, he dauntlessly removed the weapon from its tripod and fired from the hip, delivering such a large volume of murderous fire that the enemy was driven from his position. Private First Class Eastman's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: LaPush, Washington. Home Town: LaPush, Washington.

Eaton, Herbert R.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Staff Sergeant [then Private First Class] Herbert R. Eaton (MCSN: 654479), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company E, Second Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the period 29 November 1950 to 4 December 1950. His actions contributed materially to the successful break-through of United Nations forces in the Chosin Reservoir area and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 66 (December 15, 1950). Entered Service From Oklahoma.

Echtle, George

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Electrician's Mate George L. Echtle (NSN: 7350775), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry in action and outstanding devotion to duty as a member of the rescue party which entered the demolished living compartments on the U.S.S. Walke (DD-723) when that ship was heavily damaged due to enemy action on the morning of 12 June 1951. Knowing that a large number of wounded men were trapped in the debris and wreckage in the damaged area he voluntarily entered on of the compartments to find and rescue them. With complete disregard for his own safety, he made his way through the wreckage, and in almost complete darkness, sought out the wounded men trapped there. He helped to extricate them from the wreckage and bring them to safety. He remained in that compartment until all of the wounded had been rescued and all of the dead who could be extricated had been recovered. His personal courage, determination and devotion to duty saved the lives of several men who would otherwise have perished, and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1676 (October 18, 1951).

Edenbo, John W.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 149 - 2 6 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain John W. Edenbo, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 19 July 1950, in Korea, by pressing home a bombing attack on the west railroad bridge at Seoul, Korea. As the lone bomber aircraft was committed to the bomb run it was subjected to repeated and determined attacks by enemy fighters attempting to defend the target, an important link in the supply routes of the aggressor forces. On the third of these attacks, an enemy YAK-9 inflicted damage on the B-29 and wounded Captain Edenbo. Although bleeding profusely about the face, neck and hands, he refused a sedative for relief of his pain and directed the bombardier to continue the bomb run. Thirty seconds from the bomb release point, anti-aircraft fire was encountered. In spite of the strong defense by the enemy and without regard for his own wounds, Captain Edenbo persisted in the attack which resulted in direct hits on the bridge. The gallantry and courage of Captain Edenbo in the face of determined resistance and despite his painful wounds, reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Edgar, Kenneth Russell (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 210 - 28 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Kenneth Russell Edgar (ASN: US-55077443), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company H, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 17 August 1951 in the vicinity of Chukp'O Dong, Korea. On that date, Company F had the supporting fire from Company H's machine gun sections. The two forces were defending the treacherous mountain Hill 600. At 0900 hours the enemy attack came in superior numbers with mortar support, heavy automatic weapons, small arms, and grenades. Private Edgar was gunner on a machine gun in the forward element of the defense. The enemy started overrunning the positions of the machine gun section when orders were given to withdraw to the main line of defense. Private Edgar, completely disregarding his own safety, remained with his weapon so the section could withdraw with cover fire. While his comrades withdrew to the main line of defense, Private Edgar was severely wounded by the intense enemy automatic weapons fire. He continued to fire the machine gun wounding or killing the enemy in large numbers. After exhausting his supply of ammunition, he was ordered to rejoin the main force. During his perilous trek up the steep mountain, Private Edgar was fatally wounded by the intense enemy fire. His courage in facing overwhelming odds, thinking only of his comrade's safety, was a manifestation of courage and daring. The extraordinary heroism in action and self-sacrificing spirit displayed by Private Edgar will live forever in the hearts of his comrades..  Hometown: Sioux City, Iowa.

Edson, Edsel E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Edsel E. Edson (MCSN: 1052564), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 27 - 28 October 1950. Although sustaining multiple wounds from the first burst of fire when the company was subjected to close range small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire during a night attack, Sergeant Edson refused to be evacuated and continued to expose himself to the hostile fire to direct his squad in the delivery of covering fire for the maneuver of the other squads and for the evacuation of the wounded. By his exceptional fortitude, daring initiative and indomitable fighting spirit despite painful wounds, Sergeant Edson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. Born: Saranac, Michigan. Home Town: Tucson, Arizona.

Edwards, Charles L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Charles L. Edwards (MCSN: 1205565), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to the First Air and Naval Gunfire Company, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, and serving as a Naval Gunfire Spotter with a Shore Fire Control Party of the East Coast Island Defense Unit in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1953. Although painfully wounded by flying shrapnel when a direct hit was received on the observation post, causing four other casualties and destroying all communications, Sergeant Edwards carried the most seriously wounded to cover and administered first aid. Realizing one of the casualties required immediate medical treatment, he fearlessly ran approximately 600 yards through enemy fire to a friendly bunker and re-established communications with his headquarters, arranging for the evacuation of his wounded comrade. Despite the intense enemy fire, he remained at his radio throughout the bombardment to keep his commander fully informed of the situation. By his fortitude, courageous initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Sergeant Edwards contributed immeasurably to the saving of the life of the wounded Marine and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Edwards, Ollie W.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 261 - 14 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry), [then Master Sergeant] Ollie W. Edwards (ASN: 0-2212000), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near the Kum River, Korea, on 16 July 1950. His battalion was defending the Kum River line against fanatic attacks by the numerically superior enemy. After the battle had raged for several hours it became evident that the battalion was in grave danger of being surrounded. Lieutenant Edwards volunteered to make contact with the adjacent unit or his battalion headquarters to determine the overall plan in order that he might best place his section of heavy machine guns to cover the withdrawal of the battalion. With utter disregard for personal safety, he made his way, through exposed areas, covered by a heavy concentration of machine gun and small arms fire and returned with vital information concerning the movement. During the withdrawal when the enemy occupied positions along the route, he voluntarily organized and led groups in taking the enemy positions under fire. His fearless actions aided materially in the battalion's successful withdrawal as well as causing heavy casualties among the enemy force. Lieutenant Edwards' gallant example and devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Columbus, Georgia.

Eggenburg, Vernon A. (posthumously)

Sergeant First Class Vernon A. Eggenburg, Infantry, U.S. Army, is awarded the Silver Star (Posthumously) for gallantry in action while serving with Company G, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Norundau, Korea, on 9 March 1951. On that date, he was a section leader of a 60-mm mortar section of an infantry company which had the mission of furnishing close support to a friendly platoon. After firing a few supporting rounds, the section began to receive enemy mortar fire, and Sergeant Eggenburg, realizing the danger to his section, immediately moved them to more secure positions in cuts and ditches. In so doing, he was forced to expose himself in order to supervise the fire of his mortar section. With total disregard for his personal safety, he went from position to position directing and adjusting the fire of his section. While he was doing so, an enemy mortar round mortally wounded him. The gallant conduct of Sergeant Eggenburg on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Iowa City, Iowa.

[KWE Note: Sergeant Eggenburg was previously wounded in action during World War II and twice more in Korea.]

Eichholz, Walter R. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Walter R. Eichholz (MCSN: 1285295), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 8 - 9 July 1953. With his unit sustaining numerous casualties when an overwhelming enemy force launched a murderous artillery and mortar barrage on the forward outpost, followed by wave after wave of assaulting infantrymen, Private First Class Eichholz fearlessly delivered deadly fire upon the onrushing enemy and, when his weapon was destroyed, proceeded to supervise and assist in the expeditious evacuation of the wounded to rear area medical facilities. Despite the devastating hostile fire which blanketed the area, he gallantly traversed the entire company sector to administer aid to his stricken comrades and, on several occasions, courageously moved forward of friendly lines to assist the wounded. Informed that ammunition was urgently needed on the outpost position, he carried out several trips forward of the company supply point in the face of withering enemy fire to deliver the critically needed ammunition to the outpost. Mortally wounded by an enemy shell while performing these heroic acts, Private First Class Eichholz, by his aggressive fighting spirit, outstanding courage and inspiring efforts in behalf of others, was instrumental in the saving of many lives and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Rochester, New York. Home Town: Rochester, New York. Death: KIA: July 9, 1953.

Eisele, Harold A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Harold A. Eisele (MCSN: 0-7985), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane and Executive Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Twelve (VMF-212) in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, from 20 September to 10 December 1950. Assuming the operational and administrative responsibilities of the squadron when his commanding officer was evacuated early in the battle of Seoul, Major Eisele personally led his squadron in aerial combat during the severe fighting in the Kimpo, Wonsan and Yonp'o areas. Undeterred b y the hazards of heavy enemy ground fire, marginal weather and dangerous terrain, he repeatedly spearheaded his flight in detecting hostile positions and pressing home vigorous attacks. After leading his squadron in close support of the Fifth Marines at Yudam-ni, he voluntarily remained on station and, despite fierce enemy fire, provided artillery spot and tactical air coordination services to friendly forces within that critical area. His marked courage, devotion to duty and outstanding skill as an airman and administrator were contributing factors in the success of his squadron, thereby reflecting the highest credit upon Major Eisele and the United States Naval Service. Born: Fowlerville, Michigan. Home Town: Fowlerville, Michigan.

Eldirdge, Gasper

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Gasper Eldirdge (MCSN: 1076114), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1951. Observing a wounded Marine lying in an exposed position during a vicious enemy mortar and artillery barrage directed against his platoon's defensive sector, Private First Class Eldirdge unhesitatingly charged forward through the intense hostile fire to reach the wounded man. Although painfully wounded by shrapnel and literally surrounded by bursting shells, he courageously continued to advance and, reaching the casualty, quickly administered first aid and carried him to safety. By his daring initiative, valiant determination and selfless devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Private First Class Eldirdge was instrumental in saving the wounded man's life and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tucson, Arizona. Home Town: Tucson, Arizona.

Elkins, Jim T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Jim T. Elkins (MCSN: 0-55880), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 October 1952. With his platoon engaged in defending an outpost forward of the main line of resistance when it was assaulted by a numerically superior enemy force, Second Lieutenant Elkins skillfully directed his men in delivering deadly fire on the attackers. When the enemy diverted its force upon his unit, he personally led one squad forward of his defense perimeter to establish contact with an adjacent squad and, with the enemy launching an intense mortar and artillery barrage on his position, quickly moved his men to another side of the hill and away from the hostile fire. Although suffering serious concussion when an artillery round landed near him, he fearlessly exposed himself to heavy grenade, small-arms and automatic weapons fire to regroup his men and form a new defensive perimeter. When the combined fire power of his platoon and the outpost personnel inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy and forced them to withdraw, he proceeded to carry two wounded men at a time to a more protected area and, upon finding that his Corpsman had been wounded, personally administered first aid to the casualties. Later, when his platoon was subjected to a strong enemy attack, he directed his depleted unit in sweeping the crest of the hill with devastating fire, forcing back another enemy attempt to overrun the outpost. By his inspiring leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Second Lieutenant Elkins contributed materially to the success of his platoon in defending the outpost and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: North Carolina. Entered Service From North Carolina.

Elliott, Bert L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Bert L. Elliott (MCSN: 291533), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 and 29 November 1950. Determined to hold the key terrain feature occupied by his twenty-eight men, the last remaining unit on the left flank of a hastily assembled defensive line, Technical Sergeant Elliott courageously moved up and down his line, exposing himself to vicious hostile mortar, small arms and grenade fire to rally and encourage his men. Personally supervising and directing the evacuation of wounded from the hill, he returned to his position to call for mortar fire, skillfully observing and assuring its placement on vital enemy positions. On the following night when his left flank was again exposed, he expertly called for and directed friendly mortar fire and, skillfully placing his own grenade fire, kept the enemy from occupying high ground to his front. By his inspiring leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of tremendous odds, Technical Sergeant Elliott was responsible for maintaining the fiercely contested position, and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ardmore, Oklahoma. Home Town: Brownfield, Texas.

Emerson, Henry Everett

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 121 - 6 March 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant] Henry Everett Emerson (ASN: 0-50868), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company A, 5th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of Sobuk-san, Korea, from 23 August to 11 September 1950. When his company commander and all other officers in the company had been killed during an attack near Sobuk Mountain, Captain Emerson assumed command, reorganized the company and coolly reported the situation to the battalion commander. When ordered to continue the attack, he led the depleted unit up the rugged slopes of the towering mountain and secured his objective. After repelling several vicious counterattacks, the company exhausted their ammunition, but Captain Emerson refused to give up his position until he reported the facts and received permission to withdraw. By his forceful leadership and tactical skill, he succeeded breaking contact with the enemy and withdrew to a more secure position. The following day Captain Emerson renewed the attack and seized his objective, which he organized and secured under heavy enemy fire. Thereafter and until 11 September, the enemy made twenty-seven savage, slashing, determined efforts to retake the position but without success. On four of these days Captain Emerson was the only officer present in the company, his platoon leaders being wounded faster than they could be replaced. However, by his determination and personal example of daring and heroism, in laying wire and mine fields, resupplying ammunition and deploying his steadily dwindling force and their weapons, he so inspired his men that never once did they yield ground to the enemy. He constantly exposed himself to enemy machine-gun, small-arms, mortar, artillery and grenade fire. Several times he was knocked down by the force of explosions from enemy mortars or artillery, but he never lost control of his unit and moved from position to position frequently encouraging his men and directing their fire. His aggressive leadership was a deciding factor in holding the vital position. The gallantry displayed by Captain Emerson reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Emery, Edward J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Edward J. Emery, Jr., United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to a Marine Artillery Battery of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 2 December 1950. At approximately 0100, a provisional platoon consisting of infantry and artillery personnel, to which Hospital Corpsman Third Class Emery was attached and serving as a Corpsman, was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. During the attack, which lasted about five hours, he continually moved among the casualties and skillfully administered first aid. Fearlessly and heedless of his own personal safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire to search for and aid the casualties. Although he received painful wounds and was forced to crawl among the casualties, he courageously continued to administer first aid until all the casualties had been cared for. Suffering from frozen limbs, he placed a wounded Marine on his back and crawled to the rear area to obtain medical attention. His display of courage and initiative were an inspiration to all members of his platoon. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Emery's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Emils, Arnold L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Arnold L. Emils (MCSN: 0-20680), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 October 1950. With his company driving forward in an assault against a high, barren ridge defended by deeply entrenched hostile forces, Captain Emils was quick to act when the enemy opened fire with small arms, machine guns and hand grenades as his company approached the summit of the ridge and, with casualties mounting and radio communications with his platoons severed under repeated counterattacks launched against his units, boldly rushed forward to personally conduct the assault. Finding his front line units disorganized and depleted by heavy casualties, he fearlessly maneuvered from position to position, skillfully organizing and directing his men to covered areas before calling for a friendly air strike against the fanatical attackers. Tying a bright red marker to a stick, he waved it back and forth along the ridgeline to mark his troops' positions for friendly aircraft. Seriously wounded while standing exposed to enemy observation and fire, he refused evacuation until the emplacements had been partially neutralized by the strike, and then supervised his company in carrying out a brilliantly executed attack to destroy the remaining enemy. By his aggressive and determined leadership, daring combat tactics and inspiring courage in the face of tremendous odds, Captain Emils was directly instrumental in the seizure of his company's assigned objective, and his heroic actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Henryetta, Oklahoma. Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Endsley, Wendall Charles (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Wendall Charles Endsley (MCSN: 0-50019), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader in Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 - 29 November 1950. When his company was attacked by a strong hostile force in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri, Second Lieutenant Endsley repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire to direct the fire of his platoon. Faced with a numerically superior hostile force which was penetrating the right flank of his platoon's position, he immediately requested and received supporting mortar fire which appreciably retarded the enemy's infiltration. Fatally wounded while moving from position to position to re-deploy his platoon and to adjust close-range mortar fire on the enemy, Second Lieutenant Endsley, by his courageous actions, inspired others of his group to heroic endeavor toward repulsing the hostile attack. His outstanding leadership, fortitude and initiative were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Home Town: Peoria, Illinois. Death: KIA: November 29, 1950.

Engberg, Robert W.

Citation not yet found.

"Robert W. Engberg, 28, son of Dr. and Mrs. E.J. Engberg, Faribault (MN), was recently awarded the Silver Star for heroism with the United Nations forces in Korea, according to information received here by his parents." - Austin Daily Herald (MN) - 11 February 1952

Engelhardt, Lloyd J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Lloyd J. Engelhardt (MCSN: 0-38231), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6) in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 and 5 October 1950. Undeterred by the personal danger involved in landing deep inside enemy territory during a voluntary mission on 3 October, First Lieutenant Engelhardt flew to the aid of a Marine fighter pilot who had been shot down approximately thirty miles behind hostile lines and, covered by fighter planes advising him of known enemy anti-aircraft positions while en route, successfully landed at the scene of the crash and picked up the downed airman. On 5 October, he volunteered to rescue a United States Air Force pilot and, effecting a landing under the same conditions as on the previous occasion, returned the flyer to a rear area. His outstanding courage and indomitable devotion to duty served to inspire all the members of his squadron and were contributing factors in saving the lives of both pilots. By his skilled airmanship and unselfish consideration of others, First Lieutenant Engelhardt upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana.

Engen, Millard O. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 65 - 24 March 1951

The First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Major Millard O. Engen, 01291609, (then Captain), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters, 1st Battalion, (then Headquarters, 2d Battalion), 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 7 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changyong, Korea. Major Engen, Battalion S3, was observing the attack of a rifle company upon enemy-held positions. During the assault, realizing the necessity of quick and coordinated action, he left the safety of the company command post and moved forward under enemy small arms fire to the leading assault elements. From this position, he directed the capture of the objective with an efficiency which resulted in a minimum of casualties. His voluntary presence with the attacking unit was a source of great inspiration to the officers and men of the rifle unit and his calm efficiency under fire assisted them greatly in the success of the attack. Only after the company had consolidated its newly-won position did he return to the command post. The gallantry and inspirational leadership demonstrated by Major Engen reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from California. Home of record: Devils Lake, North Dakota.

Engen, Millard O. (2nd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 160 - 16 June 1951

The Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Major Millard O. Engen,  01291609, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters, 1 Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Chipyong-ni, Korea, on 13-14 February 1951. During the night of that date, he was a member of an infantry battalion which was part of the regimental perimeter during an attack by an enemy force estimated to be four divisions. During the initial stages of the attack, the enemy directed 120mm mortar fire into the battalion command post, exploding the fuel tank of a parked vehicle, setting fire to adjacent buildings and vehicles, and killing or wounding five men of the battalion command group, During this action Major Engen was knocked down and stunned by the sudden heavy blast of fire. The enemy continued their heavy fire on the command post, using the burning vehicles and buildings as targets. Regaining a degree of consciousness sufficient to realize the dangerous situation of the battalion command post, Major Engen, with complete disregard for his personal safety, moved in turn to each of the wounded men and moved them to a safer position, where he administered first aid to each. His heroic action were instrumental in saving several lives that otherwise might have been lost. The gallant conduct of Major Engen on this occasion reflected great credit upon him and upon the military service. Entered the military service from California. Home of record: Devils Lake, North Dakota.

Enger, Albert H. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 105 - 12 May 1951

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Private Albert H. Enger, RA16329684, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company G, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 15 February 1951 in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea. On the night of 14 February 1951 Company G was attacked by numerically superior enemy forces employing mortar, self propelled artillery and automatic weapons fire. At 0330 hours on 15 February 1951 the company, having suffered severe casualties, was forced to begin a withdrawal under heavy enemy pressure. Private Enger, voluntarily and with utter disregard for his personal safety, took over an abandoned machine gun and, engaging the rapidly advancing enemy raked them with bursts of fire. His covering fire inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy and delayed their advance until the company had withdrawn to new defensive positions. When the company later counterattacked and regained the lost ground, Private Enger was found dead beside his destroyed machine gun. The gallantry and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Private Enger reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Nashwauk, Minnesota.

England, Harold

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Harold England (MCSN: 662194), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. Advancing with the foremost elements of the assault unit during his platoon's attack against a numerically superior enemy force occupying a strongly defended hill, Corporal England single-handedly charged and neutralized a hostile machine gun nest. Quickly taking advantage of the situation, he bravely rushed forward in the face of intense enemy fire and led his fire team in a vigorous assault through the enemy's main line of defense and over the crest of the hill. Surprising a large group of hostile troops on the reverse slope assembling for a counterattack, he personally killed our of the enemy in the ensuing fight and, despite a painful wound sustained in the final phase of the attack, aided his unit in routing the opposition and seizing the objective. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and zealous devotion to duty, Corporal England served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chatsworth, Georgia. Home Town: Chatsworth, Georgia.

England, Oscar M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Oscar M. England (MCSN: 1151440), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 September 1951. With his own squad placed in a comparatively inactive sector of the battalion perimeter, Corporal England volunteered to assume command of a squad which had lost its leader while bearing the brunt of a series of furious enemy attacks. When he reached the new squad and found it receiving fire from three sides and virtually isolated, Corporal England effected a reorganization of the group and bravely held his ground throughout the remainder of the night, despite repeated hostile attempts to overrun the position. The following morning, he was one of four members of a section originally numbering sixteen who had not been killed or wounded. By his outstanding courage, exemplary leadership and inspiring determination, Corporal England contributed materially to the successful defense of the position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Clayton, Wisconsin. Home Town: Clayton, Wisconsin.

Englehart, Donald (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Donald Englehart (MCSN: 600572), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman in Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1950. When his company was subjected to a strong night attack by numerically superior enemy forces which succeeded in overrunning the machine gun and supporting positions on the flank, Private First Class Englehart remained in his unprotected position and delivered accurate and effective fire upon the onrushing enemy troops, shouting words of encouragement to the other members of his squad until he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his courageous actions, he served to inspire all who observed him to heroic endeavor toward the successful repulse of the enemy attack. His outstanding fortitude, initiative and aggressive fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Englehart and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 5, 1929. Home Town: Reading, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: October 27, 1950.

English, James (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain James English (MCSN: 0-13525), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy while serving as leader of a flight of four aircraft attached to Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Fourteen (VMF-214), aboard the U.S.S. Sicily (CVE-118) on 31 August 1950 over the Pohangdong area. Leading his four-plane flight in close air support of friendly forces attempting to repel an attack by a determined and numerically superior enemy, Captain English located the hostile troops massing in a staging area. Despite accurate and intense small arms anti-aircraft fire, he led his flight in repeated rocket, bombing and strafing attacks. Personally scoring direct, killing hits with his bomb and rockets, Captain English set an outstanding example of daring, cool courage and expert airmanship, inspiring the other pilots of his flight to follow his lead in pressing home perilous tree-top level attacks through a hail of return fire in support of our beleaguered ground forces. Sustaining a direct hit from enemy fire during his last rocket attack, he crashed to his death in the midst of the disrupted hostile troops. By his aggressive fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, Captain English was instrumental in saving many of his comrades in the ground troops, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Home Town: Lawrence, Massachusetts. Death: KIA: August 31, 1950 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Enick, Frank Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Frank Enick, Jr. (MCSN: 566238), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Runner in Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 6 November to 10 December 1950. Consistently alert and aggressive throughout this period of intensive combat, Private First Class Enick fearlessly risked his life while making repeated trips through intense enemy fire and bitter sub-zero temperatures to carry vital messages to the company command post. With his company engaged in action with the enemy the night of 27 November, he boldly advanced over difficult terrain swept by heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire and, wading waist-deep through a stream to carry out his mission, made three successful trips to the battalion command post to deliver vitally needed signal supplies and information which proved of inestimable value to his company in its operations against the aggressors. By his daring initiative, cool courage in the face of grave peril and staunch devotion to duty, Private First Class Enick served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hammond, Indiana. Home Town: Lansing, Illinois.

Enos, Leonard F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Leonard F. Enos (MCSN: 1137357), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. When the enemy launched a savage attack against the company's defensive perimeter, Corporal Enos was blown out of his foxhole by an exploding grenade and sustained multiple wounds. Despite the intense pain and loss of blood, he returned to his position and began to direct accurate automatic rifle fire against the fanatically attacking enemy. Ordered to the rear for treatment, he remained there only long enough to receive medical aid and returned to the battle, carrying ammunition for the forward machine guns. By his outstanding courage, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Corporal Enos served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Niles, California. Home Town: Pescadero, California.

Enyart, John W.

General Orders No. 105 - 12 March 1951

First Lieutenant John W. Enyart, United States Air Force. Lieutenant Enyart distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy on 26 November 1950. While piloting an unarmed T-6 type aircraft on reconnaissance over enemy territory in the vicinity of Tokchon, Korea, Lieutenant Enyart received an emergency call for air evacuation of a United Nations Ground Controller and his party who were completely surrounded by a superior number of enemy troops. Though visibility was greatly restricted by haze and smoke, and identification was difficult, Lieutenant Enyart skillfully directed a number of fighter type aircraft to the spot. These planes succeeded in temporarily halting the enemy's advance. In response to a plea from the Ground Controller that an Air Evacuation Rescue Team be sent immediately to the area, Lieutenant Enyart, with complete disregard for his personal safety, landed his aircraft on a hazardous dirt strip located at the bottom of a steep valley. Exposed to heavy ground fire from the enemy, he successfully evacuated one member of the United Nations Forces, and immediately prepared to return for another. Despite almost zero visibility, and at great risk of his own life, Lieutenant Enyart approached the strip a second time but was prevented from landing by the enemy who had occupied it. The courage displayed by Lieutenant Enyart in the face of great danger was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Epperley, PFC Frankie L.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 439 - 18 September 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Frankie L. Epperley, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action near Sinmak, Korea, on 30 April 1951. Private Epperley, aeronautical medical crew member with Detachment 1, 3d Air Rescue Squadron, FIFTH Air Force, accompanied a highly vulnerable helicopter in a flight over enemy held territory to assist in the rescue of a South African Air Force pilot who had bailed out of his aircraft. When the helicopter reached the area, Private Epperley noticed that the pilot was injured. As the helicopter hovered before landing, it met a burst of small arms fire. Private Epperley realized a trap had been set. Fully aware of the danger, he leaped from the aircraft the instant it touched the ground and ran to the pilot. Two enemy soldiers started toward the helicopter but were killed by the strafing fire of friendly fighter aircraft flying cover. Private Epperley assisted the wounded pilot into the aircraft and administered first aid during [the] return flight. Through his courage, skill and devotion to duty, Private Epperley sustained the tradition of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Epperson, Robert J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert J. Epperson (MCSN: 0-46983), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a 60-mm. Mortar Section Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. With his section occupying a night defense position when a numerically superior hostile force launched a fierce attack forcing the outpost well in front of the company's lines to withdraw, First Lieutenant Epperson, voluntarily rallying his men, redeployed his group and led a successful counterattack in the face of devastating machine gun, small arms, grenade and mortar fire. Although stunned by a close enemy mortar blast after securing the high ground to his front, he inspired his men to set up effective defense positions. By his outstanding leadership and sound tactical knowledge, he was directly instrumental in keeping the outpost intact and in inflicting at least 38 casualties upon the hostile force, thereby protecting the company from a serious enemy threat. His valiant fighting spirit and courage reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Epperson and the United States Naval Service. Born: Salt Lake City, Utah. Home Town: Salt Lake City, Utah.

Eppler, Sergeant Clarence K.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 255 (3 July 1951)

Sergeant Clarence K. Eppler, ER16249563, (then Private First Class), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company G, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 17 May 1951 in the vicinity of Chik-tong, Korea.  On that date, Sergeant Eppler was a member of a rifle platoon which was moving up in support of other troops.  Upon receipt of orders to advance, Sergeant Eppler volunteered to lead the platoon through a draw covered with mines and trip flares.  He was the leading scout of the platoon and always well out in the front.  As he was advancing up the draw, he had to cross an open field and expose himself to intense fire from the enemy.  Sergeant Eppler, disregarding his own safety, continued to advance under the intense fire until he was ordered to withdraw.  Firmly controlling his men while leading them over the rugged terrain and open fields, he returned them to friendly lines with few casualties.  The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Eppler reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Michigan.

Erwin, Robert H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert H. Erwin (MCSN: 1180016), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 April 1953. Although painfully wounded when the combat patrol in which he was participating was ambushed by a numerically superior hostile force far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Erwin unhesitatingly picked up a stricken comrade's automatic weapon and, delivering deadly accurate fire upon the assaulting enemy, thwarted their attempt to capture a wounded Marine. With his patrol leader and fire team leader mortally wounded, he courageously moved bout to reorganize the remnants of his fire team and to direct their fire. Immediately after the hostile force had withdrawn, he inched his way through the darkness to find a radio with which he transmitted a complete and accurate account of the situation in his sector. Refusing medical treatment for his wounds, he returned to his comrades where he established a defense, attended the wounded and directed their evacuation. Despite the seriousness of his wounds, he chose to walk back to the front lines to permit the use of a stretcher for the more critically wounded. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Erwin served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Aurora, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Eschenburg, Emil P.

Citation not yet found.

"Col. Emil P. Eschenburg, son-in-law of Milton Gunn, Helena Attorney, has been awarded the Silver Star in gallantry in action in Korea, where he is regimental commander of the 35th Infantry.  A former Michigan resident, colonel Eschenburg served with the first Special Service force, which trained at Fort Harrison during the early years of World War II.  Colonel Eschenburg was cited for bravery under enemy fire two months ago.  A general order was issued awarding him with the bronze star, but this was rescinded and the Silver Star, which requires presidential approval, was substituted.  The citation said that when Eschenburg found defenses at one command outpost below standard, he personally supervised its improvement as the enemy prepared for attack.  When the advance started, he returned to the outpost, exposing himself to direct enemy fire on several occasions as he assisted the company commander in directing a successful counterattack." - Independent Record, 20 August 1953

Escribano-Aponte, Angel

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 347 - 10 August 1951

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Angel Escribano Aponte (0-1685755), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 4 June 1951, near Sanjan-ni, Korea, the enemy launched a strong counterattack, supported by mortar and machine gun fire against defensive positions being occupied by Company E. The First Platoon, commanded by Lieutenant Escribano Aponte, in forward positions approximately 200 yards in front of the main line of resistance, was virtually surrounded by the assaulting hostile troops. Lieutenant Escribano Aponte, to keep from being completely cut-off, ordered his unit to fight their way back to the company perimeter. After the majority of the platoon had reached the company area, Lieutenant Escribano Aponte and a small group of enlisted men still in the original positions were savagely attacked by the foe. Carefully utilizing their dwindling supply of ammunition, the valiant officer and his men held, stubbornly refusing to be overcome by the enemy. Deciding to attempt an escape, Lieutenant Escribano Aponte and his small band, after killing a number of hostile soldiers with a volley of hand grenades and forcing others to retreat, moved out toward their company's positions. They had gone only a short distance when 4 enemy soldiers attacked Lieutenant Escribano Aponte with knives. Fighting back, he killed two of them with the butt of a disabled automatic rifle, while his men eliminated the last two. Lieutenant Escribano Aponte's courageous and inspiring gallantry enabled him and his men to make a successful withdrawal and reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Estavillo, Peter A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 258 - 12 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Peter A. Estavillo (ASN: RA-19349165), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chinju, Korea, on 31 July to 1 August 1950. Private Estavillo, with three other men, volunteered to hold a roadblock forward of the 19th Infantry Regiment to insure the use of the road by the regiment in a planned attack. The block had been prepared for demolition and its destruction would have seriously imperiled the attack. Although fully aware of heavy enemy infiltration in and around the roadblock, he gallantly insisted upon holding the position. During the night enemy infiltration caused the attack to be short lives, although leading elements were able to proceed past the roadblock before withdrawing. In the action that followed the position was overrun and Private Estavillo was wounded. His fearless action in holding this vital position against overwhelming odds reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Engineer Corps.

Estes, Bennie H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 195 - 22 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Bennie H. Estes (ASN: RA-18343654), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 6th Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division in action against the enemy near Songju, Korea, on 24 September 1950. During an attack, the leading platoon of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, which he was supporting, was held up by intense mortar, anti-tank and machine gun fire from an enemy strong point. Observing the enemy positions, he advanced his tank into the withering fire, disabled the enemy's machine guns and anti-tank weapons, and overran the position. Sergeant Estes' fearless actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Army. Home Town: Waco, Texas.

Estrada, Armand E. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Armand E. Estrada (NSN: 9894198), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 April 1953. Serving as Company Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Estrada displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He was a member of a unit that conducted a raid on a strongly fortified enemy position far forward of the main line of resistance. Approximately 200 yards from the objective, the raiding party was subjected to a devastating hail of hostile small arms and mortar fire. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he refused evacuation and courageously moved among his injured comrades in order to administer medical aid. Although painfully wounded, he refused to remain behind and fearlessly continued toward the objective. When approaching the enemy installation, he was again wounded and rendered unable to walk. Although suffering intense pain as a result of his multiple wounds, he competently directed the removal of the other stricken men before allowing himself to be evacuated. Later, as a result of his wounds, he died gallantly giving his life for his country. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Estrada's intrepid and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 20504 (June 14, 1953). Born: April 12, 1932. Home Town: Richmond, California. Death: DOW: April 16, 1953.

Estrada, Mario

General Orders No. 72

First Lieutenant Mario Estrada, 02033790, Infantry, United States Army, Company E, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 4 February 1951 near Chayang-ni, Korea.  Lieutenant Estrada and his platoon were under orders to attack and seize Hill 30.  As the platoon advanced upon their objective, the enemy opened fire on them with machine guns and small arms.  Lieutenant Estrada immediately ordered his platoon to attack and placed his machine gun where it would provide the most effective overhead fire.  He then assumed the lead position, inspiring and encouraging his men to such an extent that the enemy was routed from his positions with heavy casualties.  After the positions had been secured, the enemy immediately launched an overwhelming counter-attack which momentarily set Lieutenant Estrada's platoon back.  Lieutenant Estrada again, without any regard for his personal safety, led his platoon against the enemy, personally killing four enemy soldiers with hand grenades.  By his actions, the platoon successfully beat off the enemy attack, and the hill was secured.  Lieutenant Estrada's performance of duty with gallantry set a very high example for his men and inspired them to such an extent that this difficult mission was accomplished even in the face of overwhelming enemy numbers.  His gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered federal service from California.

Eubanks, Fred F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Fred F. Eubanks, Jr. (MCSN: 0-36407), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Acting Platoon Leader in Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces during the landing and assault at Inch'on, Korea, on 15 September 1950. Shortly after landing with the assault waves, First Lieutenant Eubanks assumed command of a platoon which was disorganized by the loss of its commander and, in addition, was pinned down by intense direct and enfilading fire from well-entrenched hostile positions. Determined to destroy the hostile resistance ahead in order to permit the platoon to reorganize and continue its mission, he picked up the weapon of a flame- thrower operator who had been wounded while attempting to destroy the enemy emplacement and, skillfully employing hand grenades s well as the flame-thrower, succeeded in neutralizing the hostile defense. After evacuating the casualty, he led his platoon in an effective attack which resulted in the destruction of enemy machine guns firing from strategic positions on the left bank and disrupting our landing operations. By his strategic ability, cool leadership and indomitable devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Eubanks contributed materially to the advance of all friendly forces across Beach RED 1, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Mart, Texas. Home Town: Port Lavaca, Texas.

Eum, Timothy T.S. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 8th EUSAK
General Orders No. 340 - 24 May 1951

First Lieutenant Timothy T.S. Eum, 0951841, Artillery, United States Army.  Lieutenant Eum, while a member of Battery A, 674th Airborne Field Artillery Battalion, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Samdung, Korea.  On 1 December 1950, Lieutenant Eum was given the mission of establishing an observation post with one squad of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon of the 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team for the purpose of adjusting artillery fire on enemy occupied positions.  When the patrol had progressed approximately 2,000 yards, enemy sniper fire was received from all sides and an estimated 20 enemy troops armed with automatic weapons launched an attack against the squad.  Lieutenant Eum immediately adjusted artillery fire on the enemy and the patrol withdrew under cover of the artillery without a casualty.  In addition to casualties inflicted by the artillery, the patrol killed an estimated five enemy with small-arms fire.  As the patrol withdrew, it encountered fire from a group of enemy entrenched on a nearby hill.  Leading an assault on the hill, Lieutenant Eum shot and wounded one enemy soldier, taking him prisoner.  The prisoner later gave valuable information regarding the location and concentration of enemy troops in the area.  The fearless leadership and outstanding courage of Lieutenant Eum enabled him to accomplish his mission of adjusting artillery fire on the enemy and to lead his ambushed squad back to friendly lines without the loss of a single man.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Eum reflected great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the federal service from the Territory of Hawaii.

Evans, Andrew H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Andrew H. Evans (NSN: 4168782), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 - 16 September 1952. Serving as Senior Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Evans displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He voluntarily accompanied a night reconnaissance patrol forward of the main line of resistance. When one of the patrol members accidentally set off an enemy land mine and although painfully wounded himself, he administered immediate medical assistance to five wounded Marines. Hampered by total darkness and the enemy forces entrenched nearby, he skillfully prepared the casualties for evacuation and personally assisted a seriously wounded Marine in the difficult and exhausting return trip through flooded rice paddies to friendly lines. Upon returning to the company aid station, he continued his duties, refusing medical aid for himself until the other casualties had been treated. His indomitable spirit, courage and selfless devotion to duty were instrumental in saving the lives of at least two of his comrades. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Evans' gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 38017 (December 13, 1952).

Evans, Carl Arthur

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Carl A. Evans (MCSN: 412348), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. The first to observe a strong hostile force approaching in a concentrated attack against his company's defense perimeter, Sergeant Evans immediately put his machine guns into action and reported the presence of the enemy to the company commander. Painfully wounded in his left arm by hostile small arms fire during the ensuing action, he staunchly refused to be evacuated and, despite the severe pain and the bitter sub-zero temperatures which had frozen the blood beneath his clothing, continued to direct and control the accurate and effective fire of his section to account for approximately forty casualties in the enemy's ranks. Spotting several hostile mortar emplacements forward of the front lines and located where he could not engage them with his machine guns while observing from his exposed position, he made an accurate report on the positions to supporting weapons and, continuing his valiant efforts until the attack had been repulsed, remained with his section throughout the withdrawal from Hagaru-ri to Majon-dong. By his superb leadership, outstanding courage and aggressive determination in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Evans contributed to the successful defense of his company's perimeter, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Carlinville, Illinois. Home Town: Carlinville, Illinois.

Evans, Daniel R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Daniel R. Evans (MCSN: 0-43052), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 June 1951. With his company assigned the mission of seizing a heavily fortified enemy hill position, First Lieutenant Evans, although painfully wounded on the previous day, bravely moved forward with the assault element and skillfully employed his platoons and supporting arms in the attack. When a devastating hail of hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire threatened to halt the assault, he boldly made his way to a completely exposed knoll to adjust accurate mortar fire on the enemy emplacements and, although again seriously wounded by hostile fire, continued to control his platoons effectively until relieved by his executive officer, thereby greatly aiding his company in rapidly seizing the objective. Shouting words of encouragement to his men as he was borne to the rear on a stretcher, First Lieutenant Evans, by his courageous leadership, marked fortitude and aggressive fighting spirit, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brookfield, Ohio. Home Town: Sharon, Pennsylvania.

Evans, Donald L. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Donald L. Evans, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49491), United States Marine Corps, for The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Donald L. Evans, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49491), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. During the crossing of the Han River, First Lieutenant Evans personally organized scattered units of the company and delivered effective fire upon a well-fortified enemy position, thereby enabling other units to make a successful crossing. When he observed one of his men lying wounded in a completely exposed area, First Lieutenant Evans unhesitatingly charged forward through hostile fire and carried the man to a covered position from which he could be evacuated. By his exemplary leadership, outstanding courage and gallant devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Altoona, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Altoona, Pennsylvania.

Evans, Harold L. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 160 - 17 September 1950

Sergeant Harold L. Evans, RA20619886, Infantry, Company H, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 27 July 1950 near Yongdong, Korea, Sergeant Evans' company was being harassed by intense sniper fire which was interfering with preparation of defensive positions.  The numerically superior enemy threatened penetration of the lines.  Gaining a vantage point from which he had a clear view of the terrain but where he was a conspicuous target for hostile action, Sergeant Evans calmly sought out the source of hostile fire.  After 25 minutes of reconnaissance, he was able to direct effective machine gun fire on the snipers.  Though killed during the ensuing action, he had contributed vitally to the defense of the unit.  Sergeant Evans' selfless and gallant devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of the soldier.  Entered the military service from Illinoiss.

Evans, Kenneth Ormand (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Kenneth Ormand Evans (MCSN: 1092846), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman in Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1950. When his company was subjected to intense hostile small arms, machine gun and hand grenade fire during a night action, Private First Class Evans assumed a firing position at point-blank range of hostile guns and delivered accurate and effective fire upon the enemy so that the many casualties could be evacuated and the rest of the company could maneuver into firing positions. Maintaining his perilous position until all the wounded were evacuated and he himself was mortally wounded, Private First Class Evans, by his outstanding courage, initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, served to inspire others of his group to heroic endeavor toward repulsing the enemy attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Camden, New Jersey. Death: KIA: October 27, 1950.

Evans, Thomas W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Thomas W. Evans (MCSN: 0-57103), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 27 to 30 March 1953. When his platoon was subjected to devastating and incessant hostile machine gun, mortar and artillery fire almost immediately after crossing the line of departure on an assigned mission to counterattack a well-defended enemy combat outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Evans continued to advance in the foremost position of his platoon until reaching a position approximately seventy-five yards from the objective and, although his unit sustained heavy casualties, remained in position for three hours while under continuous hostile fire. Painfully wounded during this action, he refused evacuation in order to continue with his group and, assisting the other casualties and encouraging the remaining seven men of his platoon, was instrumental in holding the ground, in the face of a seemingly impossible situation, until ordered back to the main line of resistance. Returning to duty after receiving treatment for his wounds, he assumed command of his reorganized platoon and skillfully directed the unit in defending a combat outpost, again exposing himself to heavy enemy fire to move from man to man, offering encouragement and advice. By his aggressive leadership, outstanding initiative and zealous devotion to duty throughout, Second Lieutenant Evans served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by his platoon, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Garden City, New York.

Eversole, Edwin A.

Sergeant First Class Edwin A. Eversole, RA18058730, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery A, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 5 July 1950 near Osan, Korea. Without hesitation, and in complete disregard for his own safety, SFC Eversole conducted rocket fire on enemy tanks from distances often as little as fifteen yards. He supervised the firing of four 105 millimeter howitzers at point blank range on enemy tanks for a period of about six hours. Seeing a group of wounded men, he crossed open terrain under enemy fire to rescue them and return them to safety. Due to his actions, eight enemy tanks were destroyed. SFC Eversole acted as an inspirations to all around him and due to his example, the unit’s efficiency was maintained at a high point throughout the engagement. GO 82, 10 Aug 1950. Entered service from San Antonio, TX.

Evosovich, Emil W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Emil W. Evosovich (MCSN: 584365), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 - 28 October 1952. During an attack to restore a sector of the main line of resistance which had been previously overrun by the enemy, Sergeant Evosovich fearlessly led his men through devastating hostile mortar, artillery and small arms fire. Observing that other machine gun squads were leaderless or without functional weapons during the initial stages of the assault, he skillfully reorganized the men into effective fighting teams and directed their activity in the action. Repeatedly exposing himself to the intense enemy fire, he supervised the evacuation of wounded Marines in his vicinity and personally carried several of the casualties to safe positions. When the objective was recaptured, he employed his weapons to protect the bitterly contested terrain and, throughout the entire night, moved from one position to another, offering words of encouragement to his gunners and to the sounded Marines awaiting evacuation. By his able leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Sergeant Evosovich served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kingsford, Michigan. Home Town: Royal Oak, Michigan.

Ewen, Edward Coyle

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Rear Admiral Edward Coyle Ewen (NSN: 0-57030), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as Commander, Carrier Division ONE, Joint Task Force Seven, United Nations Command. Rear Admiral Ewen distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry in action in the Inchon-Seoul operation during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Military Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army Korea, General Orders No. 49 (October 27, 1950). Born: May 26, 1897 at at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Home Town: Dorchester, Massachusetts. Death: August 13, 1959.

Ewers, Norman Glen

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Norman Glen Ewers (MCSN: 0-28152), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy, while serving as a Helicopter Pilot in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6) during the rescue of a downed airman in enemy-held territory in Korea on 18 May 1951. Although keenly aware of the grave hazards involved, Captain Ewers volunteered to fly an unarmed, extremely vulnerable helicopter into a front-line area infested with enemy troop concentrations in a daring attempt to effect a rescue. Despite damage to his radio by intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire during the approach to the area of operation, he boldly continued the search without the means of communication until the downed pilot was located. With the enemy within 100 yards of the doomed airman, Captain Ewers bravely flew his helicopter directly into the midst of the hostile troops and, while under continuous fire, skillfully effected the rescue. By his marked courage, brilliant airmanship and selfless efforts in behalf of a fellow pilot, Captain Ewers upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Los Angeles, California. Home Town: Tujungai, California.

Ewert, Marvin H.

Private First Class Marvin H. Ewert, US55078424, Infantry, US Army, a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by courageous action near Pangdang-dong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. As his squad attacked an enemy-held objective, Private Ewert exposed himself constantly to devastating enemy fire as he gave supporting fire to the assaulting elements. While contributing supporting fire to two of his comrades as they routed the enemy from reinforced bunkers, he received serious wounds. Despite the intense pain, he continued advancing up the steep, rugged slope, fighting with indomitable aggressiveness, until the objective was secured. Private Ewert's courageous action, unswerving determination and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Anamoose, ND.

Ewing, James H.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James H. Ewing, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a member of Medical Company, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action on 2 August 1950 near Kumchon, Korea. Although his normal duties were at the battalion aid station in the rear, Sergeant Ewing, realizing the need for assistance in treating and evacuation of the wounded, voluntarily, and under constant enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, went forward in enemy territory to render emergency medical treatment to the wounded and assist in returning them to safety. Sergeant Ewing’s actions in completing treatment and evacuation of the wounded greatly contributed to the success of the withdrawal which had been ordered due to the enemy’s tremendous numerical superiority. Sergeant Ewing’s extreme courage, conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the intensity of the fighting was responsible for saving the lives of many of the wounded and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. General Orders: General Orders number 154, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division, 14 November 1950. Home of Record: Kansas.

Ewing, John D. (posthumous)

Private First Class John D. Ewing, RA17254987, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company D, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry division, is awarded the Silver Star posthumously for gallantry in action on 10 July 1950 near Chonui, Korea. PFC Ewing had returned from Chochiwon to the 1st Battalion Motor Pool in his truck loaded with mortar and machinegun ammunition. He was aware that the enemy had penetrated forward positions and had set up a road block between the Battalion motor pool and his company. Realizing the hazard of running a road block with live ammunition and in spite of the fact that his immediate superior informed him that he did not have to go forward, PFC Ewing, knowing the desperate need for ammunition by his unit volunteered to drive his truck loaded with ammunition to the front lines. In his attempt to do so he was killed. PFC Ewing’s display of courage, fortitude and valor reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army. GO 71, 6 Aug 1950. Entered service from Kirksville, MO.

Ewing, Troy G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Troy G. Ewing (NSN: 6315892), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Rifle Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Ewing was advancing with the company at about 2200 when it was hit by withering small arms, machine gun and grenade fire. Heedless of the danger, he continually exposed himself as he moved through fire-swept areas searching out and treating wounded Marines. When he, himself, suffered a severe wound, he refused evacuation, and returned again and again to within hand grenade range of the enemy to carry the wounded to safety. He continued to display these outstanding qualities of courage and devotion to duty until 0300 the next morning, when his company commander ordered him to the rear for treatment of his wounds. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Ewing's courageous actions were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 60174 (November 30, 1951).

Exley, James F. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 270 - 19 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Infantry) James F. Exley (ASN: 0-61166), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company I, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Paechon, Korea, on 13 October 1950. His company was assigned the mission of destroying an enemy force which had ambushed a friendly unit. When he arrived at the scene the enemy had pinned down the friendly troops and was inflicting many casualties. With utter disregard for his own safety Lieutenant Exley led his platoon in an assault on the enemy's positions. The advance was short lived, however, as the enemy turned his intense fire from the beleaguered friendly troops to Lieutenant Exley's platoon. Determined to press the attack he made a one man assault and his men inspired by his gallant example joined him and overran the position and routed the enemy with heavy casualties. Lieutenant Exley's courageous actions, complete devotion to duty and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Ridgeland, South Carolina.

Eyler, George H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal George H. Eyler (MCSN: 1192477), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 November 1952. Although painfully wounded while leading his unit in a night assault on a well-entrenched enemy position, Corporal Eyler fearlessly continued to maneuver his men through intense hostile mortar and small arms fire, shouting words of encouragement to his comrades as he moved from one position to another, directing their fire. Despite the intense pain of his wounds, he refused medical aid or evacuation and skillfully controlled the withdrawal of his squad and the evacuation of other casualties to the rear of the main line of resistance. By his outstanding courage, fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Eyler served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Emigsville, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Emigsville, Pennsylvania.

 

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