Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "G"

 
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Gadke, William L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman First Class William L. Gadke, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, during the period 25 to 26 September 1950. Hospitalman First Class Gadke was serving as a corpsman when his battalion was attacking through the streets of Seoul, Korea, against a well-entrenched and concealed enemy force who were firing intense small arms and machine gun fire into the battalion zone of action. He repeatedly exposed himself to this fire, without regard for his own personal safety, as he courageously volunteered to evacuate wounded Marines wherever they were and administer to them vitally needed aid. When the enemy infantry commenced a determined counterattack in force that night supported by tanks and artillery, Hospitalman First Class Gadke continued with courageous disregard for his own personal safety by voluntarily forming a detail to carry much needed machine gun ammunition to a forward gun. He displayed a high degree of initiative and leadership as he adeptly and courageously led the detail through the heavy enemy fire. This action was above and beyond the call of duty as a Corpsman. Hospitalman First Class Gadke's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Gage, Fred W. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Fred W. Gage, Jr. (MCSN: 0-50085), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. Although painfully wounded when his sector of the company's perimeter was repeatedly attacked during the night by enemy forces employing intense automatic weapons, hand grenade and small arms fire, First Lieutenant Gage refused medical attention and fearlessly exposed himself to the devastating fire to move among his men, shouting words of encouragement and directing their fire. Despite the many casualties sustained by his platoon during the engagement, he expertly directed his unit in maintaining the defense of the perimeter and in routing the enemy with heavy losses, seeking medical aid for his wound only after the attack had been repulsed. By his inspiring leadership, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Gage upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Midland, Texas.

Gale, Robert

24th Infantry Division Headquarters
General Orders No. 181 - 1952

First Lieutenant Robert Gale, 01314126, Infantry, United States Army, Company L, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Tari-dong, Korea, on 3 August 1951.  His platoon had the mission of conducting a diversion assault on a highly fortified hill while the remainder of the company attacked another enemy-held objective.  Serving as platoon leader, Lieutenant Gale led his men to the base of the hill and exposed himself in a manner calculated to convince the hostile troops that they were being attacked.  The enemy developed a murderous concentration of mortar, small arms and machine gun fire, wounding two of his men.  Lieutenant Gale ordered his platoon to seek cover from the intense fire while he, personally, proceeded to evacuate his wounded comrades.  The platoon received orders to withdraw and rejoin the company but was unable to do so because of heavy mortar fire.  Lieutenant Gale ordered his men to set up a perimeter defense until they could move out under cover of their own protective fire.  He personally supervised this fire and did not leave until all his men had safely withdrawn.  His diversion was so effective in drawing enemy troops from the company objective that it was taken with comparative ease.  Although fighting in an area well separated from his company, and thus subjected to possible counter-attacks by the numerically superior enemy force, he fearlessly continued his aggressive moves toward the enemy positions without hesitation, until the mission was successfully completed.  Lieutenant Gale's gallant actions, intrepid leadership and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from Mansfield, Ohio.

Galinis, Alphonse M.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Alphonse M. Galinis (MCSN: 330749), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 1st Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Tumil-byong, Korea, on 12 June 1951. On that date, the squad of which Corporal Galinis was a member was participating in an assault on a heavily defended enemy position. When intense fire from an enemy machine gun forced the squad to seek cover, Corporal Galinis, attempting to move forward, was severely wounded by a grenade explosion. Disregarding the intense pain, he continued to advance. Approaching the enemy position, he quickly killed three of the gun crew and captured the heavy machine gun. His heroic action in eliminating a serious threat to his comrades permitted the squad to continue in the advance and seize its objective. The gallantry and outstanding devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Galinis on this occasion contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 178 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Michigan.

Gallagher, Raymond M.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 28 - 16 January 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel Raymond M. Gallagher, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 8th Fighter-Bomber Group, 8th Fighter-Bomber Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 29 August 1952. On that date, Colonel Gallagher led the group on three successive maximum effort strikes against the heavily defended enemy Capitol, Pyongyang, North Korea. Colonel Gallagher added the striking power of his group to the combined United Nations forces in carrying out the most devastating destruction ever accomplished in a single day up to that date in the Korean campaign. With complete disregard for the intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire, Colonel Gallagher, on three successive missions, made extremely daring and dangerously low dive bombing runs directly through the curtain of bursting shells. Displaying superior dive bombing proficiency, Colonel Gallagher scored direct hits on a power transmission station and two separate factories. Leaving the area on each mission only when certain that maximum destruction had been inflicted upon the target, Colonel Gallagher each time led his group safely back to their base. Under his competent direction, a total of one hundred and sixty-six effective sorties were accomplished without loss of personnel of aircraft, while the enemy's war potential in that area was dealt a devastating blow. Colonel Gallagher's aggressive leadership and disregard for his own safety by personally leading his group on all three missions was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Gallapo, John J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John J. Gallapo, Jr. (MCSN: 569682), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1950. With his platoon subjected to a heavy volume of small arms and machine gun fire from enemy positions on high ground overlooking three sides of the platoon's defensive perimeter, Private First Class Gallapo repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire in order to relay messages, distribute ammunition, assist in aiding the wounded and alert and encourage the exhausted men of the unit. When he observed a wounded comrade who was unable to move to shelter, he immediately leaped form his position of comparative safety and dashed approximately forty yards across open snow-covered ground to the side of the casualty. Carrying the wounded man in his arms, he started for the safety of cover when, within a few feet of his destination, he fell severely wounded by hostile fire. Despite extreme pain, he managed to crawl the remaining distance to cover, dragging his previously wounded companion along with him. By his great personal courage and valiant efforts in behalf of another at the risk of his own life, Private First Class Gallapo upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Gamache, Melvin Paul (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Melvin Paul Gamache (MCSN: 1137715), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Automatic Rifleman of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 February 1953. When his platoon was subjected to a deadly hail of automatic weapons fire from numerically superior enemy forces while setting up a perimeter defense around a group of tanks well forward of the main line of resistance, Private Gamache bravely exposed himself to the hostile barrage and delivered effective counterfire, greatly aiding in repulsing the enemy attack. Although his squad's position was again attacked and partially overrun, he fearlessly continued to fire his weapons and hurl hand grenades and, as the hostile troops approached within a few yards of either flank, Private Gamache dauntlessly fixed his bayonet and faced the advancing enemy at point-blank range until he fell, mortally wounded. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: May 7, 1933 at Lowell, Massachusetts. Home Town: Lowell, Massachusetts. Death: KIA: February 23, 1953.

Gamez, John

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John Gamez (ASN: RA-15417413), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 11 September 1950 in the vicinity of Sin-Dong-Yang, Korea. On that date the platoon in which Private Gamez was a rifleman was under heavy enemy attack. When the enemy closed to within 20 yards of the platoon's position Private Gamez was wounded. Although ordered to retire for medical treatment he chose to remain with his comrades and continued to engage the enemy in the firefight. A short time later he was again wounded by a grenade blast and was directed to the rear by his platoon leader. Realizing that every man and weapon was desperately needed in the line and although he was bleeding profusely he again refused to leave the firing line and moved to the right, protecting that flank by his rifle fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety he continued to deliver fire against the enemy until the attack had been repulsed with over 100 casualties inflicted upon the enemy. Only when the enemy had been driven off did Private Gamez allow himself to be evacuated to the rear for medical treatment. His intrepidity under fire and his devotion to his comrades reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Hometown: Gary, Indiana.

Garbade, Albert Martin Jr.

Headquarters 3D Infantry Division
General Orders #247 - 4 July 1951

First Lieutenant Albert M. Garbade Jr., 0537624, Infantry, Company "H", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 26 April 1951, near Ilbisang-ni, Korea, when Lieutenant Garbade's platoon was suddenly attacked by an overwhelming enemy force, he issued the order to withdraw. After checking the positions to insure that all of his men had safely withdrawn, Lieutenant Garbade, the last man to leave the hill, was descending when he suddenly encountered several enemy soldiers. Killing one and wounding another, his actions confused and delayed the enemy attack long enough to enable the friendly forces to reorganize. Assembling his platoon a short time later, Lieutenant Garbade led his men in a savage counterattack which resulted in the recapture of the hill and the restoration of the former platoon perimeter. The outstanding gallantry, initiative, and leadership displayed by Lieutenant Garbade reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Garcia, Eliseo

Sergeant First Class Eliseo Garcia, RA18 2 53274, (then Sergeant), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 14 February 1951 in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea.  Company L was sending a squad to the aid of a friendly unit which was under attack by numerically superior enemy forces.  Sergeant Garcia, an acting squad leader, was one of the first to volunteer to lead this squad, even though it was explained that the mission would be difficult and very dangerous.  While advancing toward the objective, the squad was pinned down by intense small arms and grenade fire.  Realizing the danger of remaining in this exposed position, he gave the signal to advance and led the squad forward, firing his weapon and charging the enemy positions in the face of a withering hail of enemy fire.  Upon reaching the crest of the hill, he and his squad engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat.  After the enemy had been routed from his position on the hill, the squad was subjected to an attack by a great number of enemy troops.  Sergeant Garcia remained in his exposed position and directed the fire of his squad upon the enemy.  The enemy was forced to flee in disorder.  The gallant conduct and inspiring leadership displayed by Sergeant Garcia reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New Mexico.

 Garcia, Jose Vicente

Headquarters 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 367 - 17 December 1952

Corporal Jose Vicente Garcia, US51113825, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. In the early morning hours of 20 July 1952, a platoon of Company "A", of which Corporal Vicente Garcia was a member was assigned the mission of making contact with the opposing forces in the vicinity of Chokko-ri, Korea. As the leading elements of the friendly unit neared their objective, they were brought under a hail of hostile small arms fire and the murderous fire of three enemy machine gun emplacements. During this initial hostile action, the platoon leader was mortally wounded and Corporal Vicente Garcia sustained severe wounds. Disregarding his intense pain and refusing medical aid and evacuation, Corporal Vicente Garcia assumed command of the platoon and set up a perimeter of defense. Oblivious to the hostile fire and disregarding his personal safety, he dashed about the fire swept terrain, shouting words of encouragement and lead a squad in destroying the nearest hostile machine gun emplacement. When the volume of enemy fire increased and forced the withdrawal of the friendly unit, he recovered the body of the mortally wounded platoon leader, acted as rear guard and directed the withdrawal of the friendly unit with its wounded, Corporal Vicente Garcia's aggressive leadership and gallantry were instrumental in saving the lives of his wounded comrades and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from New York.

Garcia, Rudy G.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Rudy G. Garcia (MCSN: 659652), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the First Ordnance Battalion, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in the Haktong River sector in Korea, on 3 September 1950. On this date, Private First Class Garcia, a Browning Automatic Rifleman, noticed a fire burning upon the forward part of a friendly tank. With complete disregard for his personal safety Private First Class Garcia exposed himself to heavy enemy sniper, machinegun, and anti-tank fire to warn the crew of the tank. While contacting the crew on the infantry phone in the rear of the tank, he was hit by enemy fire and wounded in the arm and hand. As a result of his heroic action the tank crew was able to extinguish the fire and the tank remained in action. The gallantry displayed by Private First Class Garcia reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, EUSAK, General Orders 162 (November 8, 1950). Entered Service From Missouri.

Garcia, Santiago Perez

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 565 - 16 December 1951

Private First Class Santiago Perez Garcia, US50102344, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 30 September 1951, the Third Platoon of Company "I", while attacking an enemy held hill near Chorwon, Korea, encountered overwhelming fire from enemy machine guns in heavy wooden bunkers. Although the platoon was halted and two advance scouts were wounded, Private Perez Garcia volunteered to go forward and wipe out the emplacements. Despite the intense fire spraying the area, he fearlessly advanced and, with grenades, successfully knocked out the hostile machine gun nests. This action proved decisive, permitting a central penetration of enemy defenses which forced them completely from the hill, leaving the original objective secure in friendly hands. The inspiring gallantry and courageous devotion to duty displayed by Private Perez Garcia reflect high credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Garcia-Morales, Ruben

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Ruben Garcia-Morales (MCSN: 1259946), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 January 1953. When his squad was pinned down by intense hostile automatic weapons and hand grenade fire before it reached the enemy trench line during an assault against a strongly defended hill position, Private First Class Garcia-Morales single-handedly advanced up the fire-swept slope. Although forced back repeatedly by hostile grenade fire, he eventually reached the trench line and succeeded in silencing an enemy machine gun with two grenades. Despite the persistent hostile fire, he remained in his extremely hazardous position to cover the squad's withdrawal from the hill. By his outstanding courage, quick initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Garcia-Morales undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fajardo, Puerto Rico. Home Town: Fajardo, Puerto Rico.

Gardenier, Charles K.

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July, 1918 (WD Bul. 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following named officer: Captain Charles K. Gardenier, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division for gallantry in action against the enemy 14 August 1950 near Wichandang, Korea. Captain Gardenier with two medical aid men, went forward to an advanced position to evacuate wounded men. The mission was coordinated with a group of light tanks operating in the vicinity to afford protection to the medical team. The tanks were forced to withdraw leaving Captain Gardenier exposed to heavy enemy small arms and machine gun fire. Without regard for his own safety, he continued his attempt to reach the wounded men but was prevented from doing so when he was attacked by a group of enemy soldiers firing automatic weapons. During this attack he was wounded seriously in the right arm and shoulder. In his gallant attempt to reach and aid wounded men, Captain Gardenier reflected great credit upon himself and the military service. General Orders: General Orders number 109, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division, 27 September 1950. Home of Record: New York.

Garman, Rawleigh Jr.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 347 - 17 August 1953

Private First Class Rawleigh Garman, Jr., RA17315694, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June 1953, Company "E" made an attack on Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. Private Garman, an automatic rifleman, was the lead man in the assault element of the force. As they departed from the friendly lines, the unit came under intense enemy mortar and artillery fire. As they approached the objective, raking enemy machine gun fire forced the unit to take cover. Realizing that the delay would endanger the entire company, Private Garman leaped up and assaulted the enemy alone until his comrades could leave their cover and follow him. In the initial burst of fire, he mortally wounded or rendered casualties six enemy soldiers as they attempted to lay a base of fire on the friendly unit. A short while later, an enemy mortar round struck in the immediate vicinity of Private Garman, seriously wounding him. Nevertheless, he continued his assault until his wounds rendered him unconscious. Private Garman's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Minnesota.

Garretson, 1st Lt. Kenneth C.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 367 - August 31, 1953

First Lieutenant Kenneth C. Garretson, 02028687, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 6 July 1953, elements of Company "K" moved forward to engage the enemy on Hill "250" in the vicinity of Honu-Chon, Korea. Lieutenant Garretson, commanding officer of Company "K", was in charge of the attack. His initial action was to accurately brief the assault platoon, the support platoon, and all other members of the company so that each element understood the mission to the last detail. Lieutenant Garretson moved forward with the assault platoon and directed their actions through the entire operation. He also maintained control over the various other components which enabled them to be constantly aware of their part in the mission. When the assault platoon closed with the enemy and received small arms and machinegun fire, Lieutenant Garretson courageously directed his men and quickly effected the destruction of the enemy positions. All elements of the riding party were under heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire, but he maintained control in his direction of the assaulting force. He bolstered the strength of his men by offering them encouragement and sustained their fighting spirit by giving orders and instructions in an aggressive and positive manner. His complete disregard for his personal safety, stamina under hazardous conditions, and accurate leadership, as well as his planning of the attack, brought about the successful accomplishment of the assigned mission. Lieutenant Garretson's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from California.

Garrett, Joseph T.

Sgt. Joseph T. Garrett, Battery C, 15th FA Bn, 2nd Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 November 1950 in the vicinity of Pugwon, Korea. On that date he was a member of a Forward Observer Party attached to a Rifle Company which had been assigned the mission of driving the enemy from commanding ground overlooking the division Main Supply Route. The advance of the rifle elements was halted by intense hostile mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire. During the enemy barrage the wire communications and the Forward Observer’s radio were destroyed. Sgt. Garrett, realizing the urgency of the situation, voluntarily left his place of cover, picked up a wounded infantryman and, disregarding the heavy enemy fire raking the entire area, carried him to safety of an aid station. He then secured a radio and delivered it to the Forward Observer who was thereby enabled to direct and adjust artillery fire. The artillery fire pinned down the enemy long enough to allow the rifle company to withdraw to more tenable positions. The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed by Sgt. Garrett on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the high traditions of the Military Service. He entered the Military Service from Alabama.

Garrett, Robert M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert M. Garrett (MCSN: 1298580), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. During a raid against strongly fortified enemy positions well forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Garrett was one of the first members of his unit to maneuver his way into the hostile trenches, and fearlessly cleared out several enemy fighting holes while under intense small arms and mortar fire. Displaying remarkable resourcefulness, he pulled on of the members of the raiding party out of the path of an enemy grenade, thereby saving his comrade from almost certain death. Later, when the platoon commander was wounded, he removed the stricken officer form an open area to a protected position and, returning to the action, deliberately stepped into the open to deliver covering fire while other members of the unit rescued two wounded Marines who were exposed to sniper fire. By his outstanding courage, initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Garrett was greatly responsible for the success of the mission and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: West Middlesex, Pennsylvania. Home Town: West Middlesex, Pennsylvania.

Garrett, Sterling L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Sterling L. Garrett (MCSN: 1099570), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 June 1951. Moving with his squad up a hill in hostile territory when leading elements of the unit were pinned down near the crest by intense and accurate enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire, Private First Class Garrett exposed himself to the deadly hostile fire to maneuver his fire team more efficiently and to place accurate fire on the concealed enemy, thereby allowing his comrades to carry the wounded to safety. Informed that two casualties were lying in exposed positions, he moved over the fire-swept ground to reach them. Although painfully wounded himself during this maneuver, he continued to fight a rear-guard action for his comrades, and then directed tank fire on the enemy positions. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, Private First Class Garrett upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Datto, Arkansas. Home Town: Imboden, Arkansas.

Garst, Marshall L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Marshall L. Garst (MCSN: 1101836), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tank Commander of Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 20 to 24 July 1953. Assigned the difficult and hazardous mission of firing supporting fire for two infantry companies that were attacking two vital outpost positions far forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Garst positioned his tank on the forward slope of a hill and delivered effective return fire on the enemy at point-blank range. When his tank sustained power battery failure, he unhesitatingly climbed out of the vehicle in the face of murderous enemy artillery fire and, cranking the tank's auxiliary generator by hand, succeeded in charging the vehicle's batteries and starting the engine, thereby maintaining communication and mobility. On another occasion, when one of several direct enemy hits knocked one of the tracks partially off the vehicle, he again dismounted under deadly hostile fire and, fully aware that the enemy had zeroed in on his vehicle, guided the tank back on its track. Although painfully wounded by enemy fire, he refused to be evacuated. With his tank disabled a third time, he requested the use of a retriever tank and moved it into firing position where he delivered a large volume of devastating fire upon the attacking enemy. Throughout the fierce action, he was instrumental in inflicting heavy casualties on the entrenched enemy on the outpost positions. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked courage and perseverance, Sergeant Garst served to inspire all w ho observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bridgewater, Virginia. Home Town: Mt. Crawford, Virginia.

Gary, Stanley Platt

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Stanley Platt Gary (NSN: 0-485174), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy during mine sweeping operations at Wonsan in the Korean Theater during the period 10 to 31 October 1950. As Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Mocking Bird (AMS-27), and while sweeping enemy mine fields in the face of heavy fire from enemy coast defense batteries, by his inspiring leadership and professional competence, he contributed directly to the efficient operation of his ship and the successful clearance of mine free channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1073 (November 17, 1950).

Gass, George H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal George H. Gass (MCSN: 1256257), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 - 27 March 1953. Although his helmet and weapon were blown away when the fire team was pinned down by devastating enemy small arms, mortar and artillery fire after the unit reached immediate hostile trenches en route to counterattack a vital enemy-held outpost, Corporal Gass courageously moved about the area evacuating his wounded comrades, hurling grenades at the enemy and shouting words of encouragement to his men. Continuing to move about the area, he skillfully directed the fire of his unit and, although painfully wounded during the action, steadfastly directed the evacuation of casualties until he was removed from the position. By his outstanding courage, leadership and indomitable fighting spirit, Corporal Gass served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bayonne, New Jersey. Home Town: Port Monmouth, New Jersey.

Gatz, Frank A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Frank A. Gatz (MCSN: 11501121), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tank Commander of Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 24 to 27 July 1953. When his tank was surrounded and physically assaulted by hostile troops during a fierce enemy attack on an important friendly position, Staff Sergeant Gatz unhesitatingly called fire upon his own position in an attempt to halt the savage assault. Gallantly holding his isolated post, he continued to deliver deadly fire upon the onrushing troops and aided immeasurably in repelling the tenacious enemy. Later, although fully aware that an enemy attack was impending, he volunteered to take his vehicle to the aid of two disabled tanks located on the same strategic ground where his vehicle had been assaulted two nights previously. Upon arrival at the position, he dismounted from his tank under a murderous hail of hostile mortar and artillery fire in order to attach towing cables to the disabled vehicles. After he had ground-guided the tanks to a position of safety, he moved his own tank into firing position and proceeded to deliver devastating fire upon the attackers. When the enemy again surrounded his tank, he skillfully directed friendly artillery and mortar fire, as well as flares and other tank fire, upon his own position. With the savagely assaulting troops attempting to climb inside his vehicle, he opened one of the hatches and hurled grenades, thereby dispersing the enemy. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and resolute determination in the face of heavy odds, Staff Sergeant Gatz contributed in large measure to the success of his unit in defending the vitally important hill position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Riverhead, New York. Home Town: Riverhead, New York.

Gau, James

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 51 - 25 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class James Gau (ASN: RA-20011021), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, near Pisi-gol, Korea, on 25 April 1951. Motorized elements of his Battalion, en route to new positions, were ambushed by a fanatical and numerically superior enemy force deploying intense mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire. Sergeant Gau, with complete disregard for his own safety, took the initiative and moved forward a truck mounted with a machine gun and poured devastatingly accurate fire into the onrushing enemy. Although subjected to a concentrated hail of enemy fire, he refused to leave his position until explicitly ordered to do so. After inflicting severe losses upon the enemy, he returned to help evacuate the wounded. He organized the men around him into an efficient carrying party and remained behind to engage the enemy so that he could furnish covering fire as they moved out with the wounded. Directly responsible for repulsing three enemy assaults, he saved the lives of many comrades and contributed immeasurably to the successful escape from the enemy trap. Sergeant Gau's courageous action, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Oahu, Hawaii.

Gavilan, Melquiades

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 145 - 12 April 1952

First Lieutenant Melquiades Gavilan, 0974369, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 11-12 December 1951, elements of Company "E" were assigned the mission of attacking Hill 168 near Toyon-ni, Korea, and securing prisoners. The objective of the Third Platoon, led by Lieutenant Gavilan, was a prominent point on the hill, which was firmly defended by a well-entrenched and heavily armed enemy force. Advancing through the continuous hail of hostile fire the platoon was pinned down approximately 50 yards from their objective by an intense volley of automatic weapons, small-arms and grenade fire. Realizing a flank attack was the only solution, Lieutenant Gavilan moved about the embattled terrain, shouting words of encouragement to the men and leading them in a new flank assault. Before reaching the objective he observed one of his men lying seriously wounded near an enemy bunker and in danger of being further wounded. With utter disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Gavilan fearlessly exposed himself to the lethal spray of enemy bullets to go to the side of his wounded comrade and, though receiving a bullet and shrapnel wound in his leg, he disregarded the intense pain and carried the wounded man to a place of comparative safety. Refusing medical attention, he remained with his men and vigorously pressed the assault until the enemy was forced to pull back to secondary positions. Lieutenant Gavilan's gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Florida.

Gavurnik, Andrew C.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 222 - 3 July 1953

Sergeant First Class Andrew C. Gavurnik, RA7070102, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 16 May 1953, Company "G", occupying outpost "Harry", in the vicinity of Surang-ni, Korea, was subjected to intense artillery and mortar shelling followed by an enemy attack. Sergeant Gavurnik, a platoon sergeant, having placed his men in the most desirable defensive positions, realized that to repel the attack most effectively, it was essential that his platoon be constantly informed of the enemy's movements. After having considered the imminent dangers involved in conducting this mission, he resolved personally to accomplish it. With complete disregard for his safety, he set out and advanced through open and exposed trenches to a forward observer bunker which was located within close proximity of the enemy. Upon arriving at his destination, he encountered heavy concentrations of enemy mortar and artillery fire. Nevertheless, he remained at his position, relaying vital information to his men until he was mortally wounded. His aggressiveness and courageous actions contributed materially to repulsing the enemy attack. Sergeant Gavurnik's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military serviced. Entered the Federal service from New York.

Gehr, James E.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 16 June 1951

Private First Class James E. Gehr, RA15298850, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Panmegi-ri, Korea.  On that date, when his company's positions were attacked by a numerically superior enemy force and the company was forced to withdraw, Private Gehr voluntarily remained behind to cover the withdrawal of his comrades.  Throughout this delaying action, Private Gehr was exposed to intense enemy fire.  His tenacious stand materially contributed to the successful restoration of the lines of his company with a minimum of losses.  The heroism in action demonstrated by Private Gehr on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Ohio.

Gelabert, Joseph L.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 185 - 12 June 1951

Private First Class Joseph L. Gelabert, RA57011048, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 23 March 1951, near Uijongbu, Korea, while attacking enemy positions on a commanding ridge, Company "I" was subjected to intense hostile small arms and machinegun fire which delayed the advance of the company. With no regard for his safety, Private Gelabert, accompanied by his squad leader, rushed over completely exposed terrain to within five yards of the emplacement. He courageously fired his automatic weapon while his squad leader threw grenades into the emplacement. Exhausting his supply of ammunition, Private Gelabert began throwing grenades until he was wounded by fragments from an exploding enemy grenade. His bold actions were an inspiration to his comrades. Private Gelabert's gallantry and outstanding courage reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Gelb, David R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class David R. Gelb (MCSN: 1059212), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. Although wounded in the eye by enemy grenade splinters during the company's attack against a heavily fortified hill position in the face of intense hostile automatic weapons, small arms and grenade fire, Private First Class Gelb bravely refused to seek medical aid in order to remain with his unit. Throughout a period of three hours of bitter fighting, he continually exposed himself to withering enemy fire and, despite severe casualties among his squad, remained in position until finally ordered to the rear for medical attention. By his outstanding courage, fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Gelb served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by his company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Spokane, Washington. Home Town: Spokane, Washington.

Gerding, Jules E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Jules E. Gerding (MCSN: 0-53250), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. When the company was engaged in the attack of a well-fortified enemy hill position, Second Lieutenant Gerding repeatedly exposed himself to withering hostile small arms and mortar fire as he moved about the platoon area to direct the fire of his men. Realizing that the enemy was registering fire on their own recently lost positions which his platoon was occupying, he dashed through the fire-swept area, selecting new positions and reorganizing his unit. Although wounded, Second Lieutenant Gerding refused treatment and continued to direct his platoon until all his men were in positions of safety. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty, he materially aided in saving the lives of many men and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Oak Park, Illinois. Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia.

Gerevics, Edward J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Edward J. Gerevics (MCSN: 1136720), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. Volunteering to man a machine gun whose crew had all become casualties when the unit was subjected to an intense hostile mortar barrage during the company's assault against a series of well-fortified enemy positions, Private First Class Gerevics exposed himself to the devastating hostile barrage during the ensuing action to deliver a large volume of accurate fire upon the enemy positions. Although painfully wounded in the hand, he refused medical attention and continued to pour heavy fire in support of the assaulting elements, pinning the enemy down and enabling his comrades to seize their objective with minimum friendly losses. Only after the successful completion of his mission did he seek medical treatment for his wound. By his outstanding courage, initiative and resolute determination, Private First Class Gerevics served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Buffalo, New York. Home Town: Buffalo, New York.

Gessner, Frederic a.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Frederic A. Gessner (MCSN: 0-48834), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Supply Company, First Service Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 - 29 November 1950. Assigned the mission of defending the north end of a hill overlooking the town on the east with a contingent of American Soldiers, Republic of Korea soldiers and United States Marines, First Lieutenant Gessner arrived at his position about dusk and, quickly organizing his defense, prepared to meet the imminent hostile attack. After giving his own carbine to a neighboring soldier whose weapon had jammed, First Lieutenant Gessner continued to direct the defense unarmed, until overwhelming pressure from the numerically superior enemy force made his position untenable. Although suffering intense pain from multiple shrapnel wounds and partially blinded in one eye, he organized and conducted an orderly withdrawal and evacuation of the wounded into the friendly perimeter. His cool leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and heroic devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk reflect great credit upon First Lieutenant Gessner and the United States Naval Service. Born: Minneapolis, Minnesota. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri.

Gettys, Richard H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Richard H. Gettys (MCSN: 668488), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Heavy Machine Gunner in Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. Refusing to be evacuated despite painful chest wounds sustained in the initial stage of a strong hostile attack against his sector, Private First Class Gettys boldly continued to deliver accurate and effective fire against the enemy until he lost consciousness. His skill, courage and indomitable fighting spirit were contributing factors in the successful repulse of the hostile attack and in preventing the enemy from overrunning his machine gun position, thereby reflecting great credit upon Private First Class Gettys and the United States Naval Service. Born: Danville, Virginia. Home Town: Rock Hill, South Carolina.

Gewin, Leonard (or Lennard) E. (posthumously)

First Lieutenant Leonard E Gewin (also shown as Lennard), O2000504, Armored Cavalry, United States Army, Company A, 78th Heavy Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 16 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. Lt. Gewin, Motor Officer of Co A, 78th Heavy Tank Battalion received word that one of the tanks had been abandoned due to enemy action. Without waiting for further instructions, Lt. Gewin voluntarily assembled his maintenance crew and went forward in an attempt to retrieve the tank. Coming under heavy artillery and mortar fire Lt. Gewin stopped the recovery vehicle and proceeded on foot. Finding it impossible to recover the abandoned tank, Lt. Gewin attempted to fight his way back through an enemy road block with the recovery vehicle. When last seen during this action, Lt. Gewin was seriously wounded and is reported as missing in action. His loyalty to duty, his courageous and fearless leadership reflects great credit on himself and the Military Service. (Gewin was classified killed in action on 18 July 1950.)  GO 64, 1 Aug 1950 Entered service from Monroe, LA.

Giaquinto, Raymond A.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Raymond A. Giaquinto (MCSN: 645853), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Fire Team Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against an armed enemy on 12 August 1950 near Kosang, Korea. On 12 August 1950 Corporal Giaquinto was the leader of the point of an advance party covering a regimental advance, when his fire team became engaged with a well organized enemy position, strongly manned with automatic weapons. Without regard for his own personal safety, he constantly exposed himself to enemy fire in coordinating and directing his unit in a determined and aggressive assault against the enemy position. His leadership and aggressiveness inspired his unit and they overran and destroyed three enemy machine gun positions before they could inflict casualties on his own unit. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Giaquinto on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 72 (September 16, 1950). Entered Service From California.

Gibbs, Cyrus L.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 196 - 17 June 1951

First Lieutenant Cyrus L. Gibbs, 01178162, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 19 February 1951, near Chomchon, Korea, while commanding the leading company of his battalion which was assaulting Hill 88, Lieutenant Gibbs continually exposed himself to small arms, mortar, and artillery fire in moving from place to place throughout the zone of action. When the leading platoon was pinned down by withering enemy fire, Lieutenant Gibbs unhesitatingly moved forward, reorganized the unit, and led an inspired assault on the enemy emplacements. Lieutenant Gibb's gallant and aggressive actions enabled his company to secure its objective and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Texas.

Giblin, Robert H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert H. Giblin (MCSN: 1201408), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 and 8 August 1952. When communications between a forward outpost and a friendly force assaulting an enemy-held hill position were interrupted, Private First Class Giblin volunteered to regain communication by acting as a runner in an area under concentrated enemy mortar and artillery fire. After successfully completing the mission, he volunteered to act as a stretcher bearer to evacuate wounded Marines to rear-area medical units. Later, while occupying a bunker with several other Marines during the night, an enemy direct hit killed four of the men and wounded several others, including himself. Despite intense pain, he assisted in aiding the more seriously wounded and carried one of his comrades from the outpost to the main line of resistance before accepting medical treatment. By his exceptional courage, initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Private First Class Giblin served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: July 5, 1931 at Springfield, Massachusetts. Home Town: Springfield, Massachusetts.  Death: 2003.

Gibson, Ralph Duane (1st award)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 407 - 25 August 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Ralph D. Gibson, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 18 June 1951 as leader of a flight of six F-86 aircraft of the 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, FIFTH Air Force, on combat air patrol in the Sinuiju-Yalu area of North Korea. Lieutenant Gibson demonstrated outstanding ability and courage in turning his element into a group of MIG-15 enemy fighters which were beginning an attack on his flight. As a result of his skill and daring he destroyed one enemy aircraft and repulsed the attack. Although his gun sight had become inoperative during this encounter, he led his element into another air battle in which the friendly aircraft were greatly outnumbered. The aggressiveness with which he maneuvered his element was of great assistance in disrupting the enemy attack. During the battle Lieutenant Gibson closed to an extremely short range and destroyed a second MIG-15 without the aid of a gun sight. Despite this handicap he continued to press the attack until the enemy was routed. Lieutenant Gibson's gallant performance was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Gibson, Ralph Duane (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarter, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 575 - 7 December 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Ralph D. Gibson, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Pilot, 335th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Fifth Air Force, on 9 September 1951. On that date, Captain Gibson led "Blue" flight, a formation of four F-86 aircraft on combat aerial patrol in the Sinuiju-Yalu River area in North Korea. Arriving in the target area, Captain Gibson's squadron was subjected to repeated attacks by superior forces of enemy MIG-15 jet aircraft. During these attacks Captain Gibson displayed extraordinary daring and skill as he sought the initiative. On two occasions Captain Gibson deliberately exposed himself to enemy fire in order to draw them from his squadron commander who was engaged in combat with other enemy fighters. As a result of Captain Gibson's aggressive maneuvers his flight became separated and Captain Gibson was alone. Although the usual policy was for single aircraft to withdraw from the area, Captain Gibson returned to the area of the raging dogfight. Sighting a superior force of enemy MIG-15 planes moving unopposed into the target area, Captain Gibson alone attacked this formation, although the enemy had the advantage of altitude. In the ensuing battle Captain Gibson dispersed the entire enemy formation, singled out the leader and destroyed him. Withdrawing from the area only when he was out of ammunition and low on fuel, Captain Gibson returned to his home base. The destruction of this enemy MIG-15 brought Captain Gibson's total score to five MIG-15s destroyed, one probably destroyed and two damaged making him one of the JET aces in the world. By his extraordinary heroism, his complete disregard for personal safety and his exemplary devotion to duty, Captain Gibson reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Giddings, Joseph A. Jr.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 23 - 29 April 1957

First Lieutenant Joseph A. Giddings, Jr., Artillery, United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action while serving as an artillery forward observer attached to Company B, 31st Infantry Regiment, during operations against the enemy in the vicinity of Koto-ri, North Korea, on the night of 29-30 November 1950.  When cut off by the enemy with a composite group of United States Army, United States Marines, British Marines, and Republic of Korea soldiers, Lieutenant Giddings, unable to perform his normal duties due to lack of communications, assisted his company commander in defensive operations against a determined enemy.  Lieutenant Giddings exhibited indomitable courage and outstanding leadership by his efforts in repeatedly repulsing enemy attacks.  He organized and defended a portion of the perimeter defense which was singled out by the enemy for his strongest attacks.  By his personal example, he served as an inspiration to the men around him.  He continually exposed himself to enemy fire in order to locate the enemy and intelligently direct the defense of his position.  Lieutenant Giddings' courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military services of his country.  Home of Record: Plainfield, NJ.

Giellis, John N.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 173 - 16 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class John N. Giellis, RA17281374, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Pungchon-ni, Korea. At about 0100 hours of that date, his company was counterattacking to seal off an enemy penetration of the defense line. Private Giellis, with complete disregard for his own safety, took a forward position during the assault and, completely ignoring the intense enemy small arms fire, personally led the attack. His inspiring example of courage was one of the main factors responsible for the rapid advance of his squad against the enemy and the success of the counterattack. The gallantry displayed by Private Giellis reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Giellis, John N. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 754 - 23 November 1951

The First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class John N. Giellis, RA17281374, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 30 July 1951 in the vicinity of Tausen, Korea. On that date during an attack on strategic enemy positions, Company K was pinned down by intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons, and grenade fire. Realizing the importance of the mission, Private Giellis, with complete disregard for his personal safety, left his position of cover and advanced toward the enemy position throwing hand grenades and firing his rifle. He succeeded in destroying the hostile emplacements that were delaying the advance of his unit and inflicted numerous casualties upon the enemy. As a result of his heroic action, friendly units were able to continue the advance with a minimum of casualties and successfully complete their mission. The gallantry in action displayed by Private Giellis on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Dubuque, Iowa.

Gifford, Allen J.

Headquarters 24th Division
General Orders No. 160 - 11 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Allen J. Gifford (ASN: RA-13282225), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Aidman of Medical Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action at Taejon, Korea, on 18 July 1950. During the withdrawal north of the city when a convoy of trucks was subjected to heavy small arms fire and suffered many casualties, Private First Class Gifford went forward to the aid of wounded soldiers on one of the trucks. When it became hopeless to continue in convoy, Private Gifford continued on foot carrying a wounded man. Seeing a group being held up by intense fire he again went to the aid of the wounded in the face of fire, and with utter disregard for his own safety administered first aid and endeavored to evacuate them singly to a safer position. Private First Class Gifford's gallant actions and selfless devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army Medical Services. (PFC Gifford was wounded and captured in this action. He was a survivor of the Sunchon Tunnel Massacre.) Home of record: Pemberton, New Jersey

Giglio, 1st Lt. Rudolph F.L.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 137 - 7 April 1952

First Lieutenant Rudolph F.L. Giglio, 063399, Infantry, Company "M", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 18 September 1951, the 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry was heavily engaged with the enemy in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea. During the course of this action Company "M" was subjected to extremely heavy artillery, mortar and small-arms fire, resulting in numerous friendly casualties. The Company Commander had been wounded and was evacuated, where upon Lieutenant Giglio assumed command of the Company. The intensity of the hostile barrage forced the friendly forces to withdraw and while moving to new positions many of the men became confused and disorganized. Quickly realizing the seriousness of the situation, Lieutenant Giglio moved about the embattled area, directing the men into new positions from where they could continue their support to the Battalion. After his unit was reorganized and again firing at the hostile forces, he continued to expose himself to the lethal enemy fire as he personally supervised the evacuation of the wounded and the recovery of equipment that had been left behind. When the order to withdraw was received, Lieutenant Giglio stayed behind to make sure that all wounded and equipment had been loaded on tanks, although by this time the enemy bombardment had increased. His courageous determination and untiring devotion to duty saved the lives of many of his comrades and prevented much valuable equipment from falling into the hands of the enemy. Lieutenant Giglio's gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from New York.

Gilbert, Edwin M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Edwin M. Gilbert (MCSN: 1100287), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Bulldozer Operator of Service Battery, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 October 1951. When enemy artillery ignited the regimental artillery dump, Corporal Gilbert voluntarily drove his bulldozer to the scene of the fire and, with intense artillery fire falling about him, courageously remained in an exposed position atop the machine, shoveling earth on the burning ammunition. Despite the additional hazard of overheated, exploding mortar shells, he drove his bulldozer over smoldering charges to reach the fires beyond. By his marked courage, inspiring initiative and selfless efforts under fire, Corporal Gilbert prevented the loss of the regimental supply dump and saved many of his comrades from possible death or injury, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Goose Creek, Texas. Home Town: Baytown, Texas.

Gilbert, Robert Henry (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Robert Henry Gilbert (MCSN: 1065871), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. With his fire team pinned down by fierce hostile machine gun, grenade and small arms fire while advancing with the company in the assault of Hill 676 near Yanggu, Corporal Gilbert unhesitatingly moved forward in a brave attempt to locate and destroy the camouflaged enemy strong point. Undeterred by a painful wound from an exploding hostile grenade, he continued to advance until he spotted the automatic weapon firing on his unit, charged into the objective and, although wounded a second time, succeeded in killing the enemy gunner. Mortally wounded when he was hit by hostile fire for the third time during the final hand-to-hand encounter, Corporal Gilbert, by his courageous leadership, fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 19, 1924 at Kent, Ohio. Home Town: Kent, Ohio. Death: KIA: June 10, 1951.

Gillaspie, Wayne B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Wayne B. Gillaspie (MCSN: 1132710), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 September 1951. Participating in the attack against heavily defended enemy hill positions when his squad was subjected to sudden and intense hostile small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire, inflicting several casualties, including the squad leader who had to be evacuated at once, Corporal Gillespie bravely moved from man to man through the fire-swept area to assume command of the unit. Reorganizing the squad, he skillfully led an assault to overrun the first objective and, after evacuating several wounded men, directed a final devastating attack to completely rout the enemy. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and stout-hearted devotion to duty, Corporal Gillaspie greatly aided the company in seizing its objective and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chehalis, Washington. Home Town: Rydewood, Washington.

Gillespie, Robert M.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 150 - 14 September 1950

Master Sergeant Robert M. Gillespie, RA36899371, Infantry, Company C, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 25 July 1950, while the Third Platoon, Company C was in position on the right flank of Company C, in the vicinity of Yongdong, Korea, Master Sergeant Gillespie, platoon leader, continually checked his squads despite intense enemy fire from a distance of less than 200 yards.  He continued to check the platoon positions until critically wounded.  Master Sergeant Gillespie's calm courageous actions, which were an inspiration to his men and were largely responsible for securing the right flank of the company, reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Michigan.

Gillikin, Earlie S. Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 13 - 8 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant [then Sergeant First Class] Earlie S. Gillikin, Jr. (ASN: RA-13306822), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, near Nungding, Korea, on 8 November 1951. Serving as a tank commander, he was assigned the mission of protecting the rear of his company which was occupying an outpost position. During the hours of darkness, the unit was attacked by a fanatical and numerically superior enemy force, deploying intense automatic weapons, mortar, small arms and grenade fire. As the attack intensified, the enemy, succeeding in infiltrating the company flanks, attempted to establish a mortar position to the rear of the friendly troops. Sergeant Gillikin, realizing the extreme danger of the situation, personally led his tank on foot through a hail of small arms fire to a position where it could fire on the enemy. When his tank was in position, he manned its machine gun, and with utter disregard for the small arms fire striking the tank and glancing off about him, he brought such effective fire upon the enemy hordes that they were forced to withdraw. As the enemy fled, he directed his tank to move in even closer while he fired directly into the enemy masses, turning their attack into a complete rout and inflicting staggering losses upon them. Sergeant Gillikin's courageous action, unhesitant devotion to duty and aggressive initiative contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Armor. Home Town: Norfolk, Virginia.

Gilliland, Charles E.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 49 - 24 February 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant Charles E. Gilliland, 01014653, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company H, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 7 January 1951 in the vicinity of Wonju, Korea. Early in the morning of that day his 81mm mortar platoon was attacked by a large group of enemy who had infiltrated through front-line rifle companies. Without regard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Gilliland quickly disposed his men and took up the fight against the enemy. By moving from man to man, although exposed to the hostile fire, he was able to control his platoon and repel the attack. When a nearby straw stack was fired by the enemy, he led his men to an alternate position where they could cover their mortars and inflict casualties on the enemy. When the fire had decreased, he moved his platoon back to their original positions where his men secured their mortars and equipment. Upon orders from his company commander, he then moved his platoon to another area where it continued its fire support mission for the battalion. Lieutenant Gilliland’s courage and superior leadership so inspired his men that they fought tenaciously and refused to move except on his direct order. His gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Gilliland, Harold H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Harold H. Gilliland (MCSN: 1117207), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Crew Chief of an Amphibian Tractor of Company A, First Amphibian Tractor Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 December 1950. Assigned the mission of evacuating military personnel and materiel from Pink Beach at Hungnam, Corporal Gilliland carried out his duties with skill and courage during the operation. Although severely wounded when an adjacent ammunition dump exploded, he removed four wounded Marines from several disabled tractors and evacuated them to a hospital ship, staunchly refusing treatment for his own wounds until he returned to his own organization. By his dauntless courage, heroic efforts and grave concern for others at great risk to his own life, Corporal Gilliland served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lambertsville, New Jersey. Home Town: Imlaystown, New Jersey.

Gillon, Daniel P. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Daniel P. Gillon, Jr. (MCSN: 0-31869), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 December 1952. When the pilot of an attack plane was forced to parachute into the icy waters of the Taedong estuary after his plane was struck by enemy anti-aircraft fire during an aerial assault against a major enemy supply installation, Captain Gillon immediately alerted rescue facilities, directed other friendly aircraft to the scene and established a high protective cover for the downed pilot. With a flight of hostile jet interceptors approaching at high speed to harass friendly helicopters and surface craft engaged in the rescue operation, he quickly maneuvered his plane to meet this threat and deliberately engaged the vastly superior fighters in head-on firing runs, successfully diverting the enemy attack on the defenseless helicopters. In the ensuing aerial duel, he aggressively participated with his fellow airmen to thwart repeated enemy attempts to interrupt the rescue, and assisted in forcing the hostile fighters to disengage. Subsequently, with the friendly surface craft subjected to intense enemy anti-aircraft and shore battery fire, he immediately carried out a low dive to strafe the weapons and, when his supply of ammunition was exhausted, continued simulated runs which effectively suppressed the hostile fire. Although his fuel reserve had reached a dangerously low level, he fearlessly continued his threatening attacks until other friendly aircraft arrived on the scene, and then safely returned to his carrier base. His indomitable fighting spirit, superb airmanship and courageous efforts in behalf of another reflect great credit upon Captain Gillon and the United States Naval Service. Born: Garwood, New Jersey. Home Town: Lancaster, New York.

Gilmore, Lawrence J. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 61 - 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Lawrence J. Gilmore (ASN: US-56084975), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 8 December 1951. His platoon, occupying defensive positions, was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. While sweeping the enemy hordes with devastatingly accurate fire, Private Gilmore, Automatic Rifleman, was seriously wounded in the head. His comrades carried him to an aid station, where he was given first aid and prepared for evacuation to the rear. Lying in the station awaiting transportation, he heard the frantic shouts of his comrades as they tried desperately to stem the enemy onslaught. Although having been cautioned against unnecessary moving, Private Gilmore, realizing the need for every available man in the fight, left the safety of his position and, on his own initiative, returned to his former position by the side of his comrades. Despite his extreme pain, he fought gallantly against overwhelming odds until he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. Private Gilmore's courageous action, magnificent fighting spirit and self-sacrificing devotion to duty reflect he highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the United States Infantry. Born: April 10, 1930. Home Town: Seattle, Washington. Death: KIA: December 8, 1951 - Buried at: Fern Hill Cemetery - Chehalis, Washington.

Gilwee, William J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William J. Gilwee, Jr. (MCSN: 0-53548), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 December 1952. Leading a twenty-man combat patrol far forward of the main line of resistance under cover of darkness when the group was ambushed by the enemy and subjected to a devastating barrage of hostile mortar and small arms fire, First Lieutenant Gilwee refused first aid for his painful arm wound and attempted to call down friendly supporting fires on the enemy weapons. Again severely wounded when the hostile fire intensified during the action, and with several of his men becoming casualties, he skillfully directed a tactical withdrawal under fire, steadfastly remaining behind until assured that all the group were on the way to the main lines. When the patrol reached the safety of the main line of resistance, he accepted medical aid for his own wounds only after all the other casualties had been given immediate assistance. By his outstanding leadership, exceptional fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Gilwee served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kansas City, Missouri. Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri.

Giordani, Paul R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Paul R. Giordani (MCSN: 0-56918), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 8 - 9 July 1953. Assigned the mission of relieving a friendly unit that sustained many casualties during the re-capture of a combat outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Giordani fearlessly led his platoon through a murderous enemy mortar and artillery barrage which was blanketing the entire area of approach. Upon reaching the outpost, he moved from one position to another to insure that the fighting positions were sufficiently reconstructed in order to ward off an imminent enemy counterattack. With the hostile troops launching a fierce attack on his sector following two hours of devastating preparatory fire, he called for friendly supporting fire and then dauntlessly moved among his men, directing their fire and shouting words of encouragement. When the enemy entered his position and engaged the friendly forces in hand-to-hand combat, he gallantly continued to direct the efforts of his men although personally confronted by several of the enemy who were subsequently killed. By his aggressive leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Giordani contributed in large measure to the success of his platoon in inflicting many casualties on the enemy and in repelling the overwhelming hostile force, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Vandergrift, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Vandergrift, Pennsylvania.

Girard, Adlore L.

Headquarters 25th Division
General Orders No. 301 - 5 November 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal Adlore L. Girard, Army Medical Service, Medical Company, 35th Infantry Regiment, United States Army.  On 3 September 1950 in the vicinity of Chuam, Korea, the company to which Corporal Girard was attached as medical aid man was attacked repeatedly by numerically superior enemy forces, and numerous casualties were sustained.  Despite the heavy barrage of enemy machine gun and mortar fire, Corporal Girard crawled about the position to administer first aid to the wounded personnel, and evacuating the seriously wounded casualties from the area.  By his professional skill and courageous devotion to duty, he was instrumental in saving numerous lives and assisted greatly to inspire the platoon to repel the enemy attack.  Corporal Girard's selfless devotion to his comrades is in keeping with the highest traditions of the Army Medical Service.  Entered the military service from Iowa.

Givens, Harry L. Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Major Harry L. Givens, Jr. (MCSN: 0-16143), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Commanding Officer of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kokchon, Korea, on 11 June 1951. During an attack on an enemy position, Major Givens learned that the command group had lost communication with the supporting tank unit. Without regard for his personal safety, he fearlessly crossed approximately two thousand yards of open, fire-swept terrain, to contact the tank commander and deliver instructions. He then moved forward to direct the withdrawal of a convoy which had been halted by an intense barrage of enemy mortar fire, and to aid in evacuating casualties. His courageous actions contributed immeasurably to the ultimate success of the mission. The gallantry, initiative, and high devotion to duty displayed by Major Givens on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 178 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Texas.

Gladu, John A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John A. Gladu (MCSN: 1224687), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 4 - 5 September 1952. When the combat outpost was subjected to intense hostile artillery and mortar fire, Private First Class Gladu bravely moved about the position, firing on the enemy and throwing hand grenades. Although positioned in full view of the assaulting troops, he succeeded in delivering effective covering fire which enabled a friendly listening post, cut off by the attack, to return to the perimeter of defense. As the hostile artillery and mortar barrages increased in intensity, he unhesitatingly crawled through the blanketing fire to help a critically wounded Marine, materially aiding in saving his comrade's life. By his outstanding courage, initiative and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Gladu served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lafayette, Louisiana. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Glascott, John A.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant John A. Glascott (MCSN: 0-49820), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces on 11 June 1951, in the vicinity of Yanggu, Korea. On that date, his platoon was ordered to advance northeast of the town of Yanggu, in order to support the Second Battalion in its attack on the enemy. Although the battalion area was being subjected to intense and accurate enemy mortar and artillery fire, Lieutenant Glascott moved his platoon through the fire-swept terrain and placed it in position. Due to the heavy enemy mortar fire, the platoon suffered numerous casualties. Although seriously wounded in the right arm, Lieutenant Glascott refused immediate medical attention and continued to organize and direct his platoon in the supporting fire for the assaulting companies of the battalion. Only after the enemy barrage had ceased, and his wounded men had been evacuated, did he allow himself to be treated and evacuated to the rear. The gallantry and outstanding leadership displayed by Lieutenant Glascott on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 225 (October 7, 1951). Entered Service From Pennsylvania.

Glasgow, James C.

Second Lieutenant James C. Glasgow, Battery D, 3d AAA AW Battalion (SP), 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 2 December 1950, near Huksuri, Korea, lieutenant Glasgow was assistant platoon leader in charge of an antiaircraft automatic weapon section, which was furnishing protection at the rear of a convoy. Lieutenant Glosgow found a portion of the rear elements cut off by an enemy road block, and the infantry pinned down by enemy automatic fire. Under continuous enemy fire and with complete disregard for his personal safety, he directed two infantry mortar squads to fire on an enemy position. He then instructed the squad leader of the antiaircraft weapon to lay fire on the enemy, at the same time instructing the mortar squad on the ground to continue firing on the enemy positions. Lieutenant Glasgow then directed the antiaircraft weapon and two mortar squads to move ahead in order to shield the medical corps men in a jeep ambulance, who went giving first aid to the wounded. Lieutenant Glasgow's actions resulted in either silencing or pinning down the enemy thus effecting a successful withdrawal of the infantry with very few casualties. Lieutenant Glasgow's outstanding initiative, fearless leadership and gallantry reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Mississippi.

Glatz, George J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant George J. Glatz, Jr. (MCSN: 557470), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 December 1950. Assigned the mission of assaulting and seizing a sector of commanding ground occupied by well-entrenched enemy forces who were inflicting numerous casualties upon friendly troops attempting to move through the Koto-ri pass, Sergeant Glatz led his men up the face of treacherous, snow-covered approaches while subjected to enemy grenade, rifle and machine gun fire. Although suffering ill effects from extreme cold and prolonged exposure under extremely adverse combat conditions, he repeatedly directed and led his depleted squad of only six men in attacks against the overwhelming hostile forces and, skillfully rallying and reorganizing his men after each assault, succeeded in seizing and destroying four heavy machine gun emplacements and in killing or capturing more than twenty-five of the enemy. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous leadership and resolute determination in the face of extremely heavy odds, Sergeant Glatz contributed materially to the successful seizure of the objective and to the safe withdrawal of the Division elements from the Koto-ri area, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sewickey, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Glenwillard, Pennsylvania.

Gleason, William

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 318 - 15 October 1952

Lieutenant Colonel William T. Gleason, 023956, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 16 April 1952, Companies "A" and "B" were occupying defensive positions near Majon-ni, Korea, when they were subjected to an intense hail of enemy artillery and mortar fire. In order to give counter fire directions, Colonel Gleason unhesitatingly left his position of comparative safety and moved among his men, shouting words of encouragement and directing friendly fire on suspected enemy observation points. As the enemy barrage increased in intensity the men became disorganized and ceased their firing. Colonel Gleason, completely oblivious to the deadly fire, remained in an exposed position, urging his men to fire on the enemy positions. Inspired by his fearless actions the men assumed the initiative and laid down a withering hail of automatic weapons and small arms fire which drove the enemy from their positions. Colonel Gleason's outstanding gallantry and unwavering determination reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Utah.

Goad, Everett A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 233 - 24 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Everett A. Goad (ASN: RA-18256045), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company M, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Pohang-Dong, Korea, on 8 September 1950. The company which he was supporting as a machine gunner, was pinned down, during an attack, by intense enemy cross fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, he voluntarily moved his gun forward to an exposed position from which he placed effective fire on enemy positions. Although subjected to a hail of withering fire he fired with such volume and accuracy that he destroyed two enemy machine guns. Although he was wounded in this gallant action Corporal Goad refused evacuation and remained at his post inflicting heavy casualties and assuring the eventual success of the attack. His courageous actions and devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Bradford, Arkansas.

Goff, Alexander P. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Alexander P. Goff, Jr. (MCSN: 1162038), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 February 1953. When the squad leader was wounded during a raid against a strongly defended enemy position, Corporal Goff immediately assumed command of the unit and moved about the area in the face of intense enemy fire, directing the fire and advance of the Marines until they reached the objective. Although painfully wounded during the action, he refused evacuation and continued to advance until all enemy personnel and fortifications had been destroyed. When ordered to disengage, he skillfully maneuvered the squad, recovered all casualties and returned to friendly lines. By his outstanding courage, leadership and selfless devotion to duty in the face of extreme peril, Corporal Goff served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Live Oak, Florida. Home Town: Live Oak, Florida.

Goff, Wallace E. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 244 - 26 October 1950

First Lieutenant Wallace E. Goff, 02208014, Infantry, Company A, 35th Infantry, United States Army.  During the early hours of 22 August 1950 a numerically superior enemy force penetrated the company perimeter near Haman, Korea and fiercely attacked the flank of Lieutenant Goff's platoon.  Leaving the safety of his foxhole, Lieutenant Goff moved about his platoon area under direct enemy fire, encouraging and inspiring his men, and directing their fire.  In the ensuing fire fight he increased the fire power of his platoon with the fire from his carbine by throwing hand grenades, inflicting numerous casualties and disrupting the enemy attack until he himself was mortally wounded.  Lieutenant Goff's outstanding leadership, personal courage, and daring reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces.  Entered the military service from Wisconsin.

Gogan, John P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John P. Gogan (MCSN: 1125923), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with a Machine Gun Squad of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 September 1951. When heavy enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire wounded the gunner and assistant gunner during a company attack against bitterly defended positions, Private First Class Gogan immediately placed a large quantity of ammunition beside the weapon and assumed position as gunner, skillfully and calmly pouring devastating fire upon the hostile troops. Subsequently the only main remaining in his squad, he effectively displaced his gun to a more strategic position and continued to employ his weapon for an estimated four hours, constantly harassing the enemy in support of his company. By his outstanding courage, marked fortitude and zealous devotion to duty, Private First Class Gogan served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Louisville, Kentucky. Home Town: Louisville, Kentucky.

Goggin, William F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William F. Goggin (MCSN: 0-44716), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 and 9 November 1950. When hostile forces were bitterly contesting the advance north from Chinhung-ni to Koto-ri, First Lieutenant Goggin voluntarily led a reconnaissance patrol around known enemy positions and deep into the enemy concentration facing the advance. Although fully aware of the extreme hazards involved, he skillfully guided his men over precipitous terrain and moved among enemy units for two days to determine the extent of the enemy force. Despite painful wounds sustained when his patrol was engaged in a fierce fire fight by a numerically superior enemy, he continued to carry out his assignment to its completion, succeeding in gaining vital information which permitted friendly forces to move rapidly forward to seize the objective. By his aggressive leadership, courageous initiative and resourcefulness, First Lieutenant Goggin contributed in large measure to the success of the operation and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Peabody, Massachusetts. Home Town: Peabody, Massachusetts.

Goldsby, James A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James A. Goldsby (MCSN: 566673), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 June 1951. When the unit was subjected to withering enemy automatic weapons fire and suffered numerous casualties, including the platoon commander, during an attack against a heavily fortified enemy hill position, Sergeant Goldsby unhesitatingly assumed command and, although painfully wounded, bravely reorganized the platoon and led the group forward through the heavy fire to rout the entrenched enemy. By his marked courage, inspiring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, he contributed materially to the success achieved by his company, and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Missoula, Montana. Home Town: Victor, Montana.

Golemi, Frank Anthony

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Frank Anthony Golemi (MCSN: 1022894), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 February 1951. With his platoon attacking a strongly defended enemy hill position, Sergeant Golemi skillfully maneuvered his squad across open ground in the face of withering hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire and succeeded in seizing his portion of the assigned objective. Aware that hostile fire from frontal positions jeopardized the remainder of the company, he voluntarily led his men across a level area under enemy fire to take up positions forward of the company line and, vigorously engaging the opposition, personally accounted for seven enemy casualties. Remaining in the danger area until seriously wounded, he refused evacuation and medical treatment until all other wounded had received aid, and insisted upon aiding in the establishment of the defense until carried from the position. By his marked courage, inspiring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Golemi contributed materially to the success achieved by the company. His zealous devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana.

Golosov, Robert E.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders #331 - 17 June 1953

First Lieutenant Robert E. Golosov, 02028462, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Chorwon, Korea.  On 25 March 1953, Lieutenant Golosov, the Battalion Adjutant, discovered that the forward elements of a friendly attacking force were encountering difficulties in obtaining ammunition.  Realizing the gravity of the situation, Lieutenant Golosov left the comparative safety of the command post, voluntarily assumed command of the ammunition-laden vehicles, and led them through an intense enemy artillery, mortar, and small-arms barrage.  Arriving at the outpost, Lieutenant Golosov manned the machine gun on the personnel carrier while his men unloaded the ammunition for the friendly troops.  Due to the excellent combat efficiency of Lieutenant Golosov, the ammunition was unloaded and handed to the friendly troops without a single casualty being incurred.  After the ammunition was completely unloaded, Lieutenant Golosov directed the evacuation of the friendly wounded and personally led several trips to and from the outpost.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Golosov reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Massachusetts.

Gombos, Nicholas N.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 57 - September 25, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Nicholas N. Gombos (ASN: 0-63100), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Headquarters Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 1 September 1950 at Am-Dong, Korea. On 1 September 1950, Lieutenant Gombos was at a Forward Observation Post directing operations and tactical maneuvering of his battalion, which was being attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. Perceiving that the sheer weight of the enemy onslaught was routing some of the troops in a disorganized manner, and was threatening the success of the initial defense, Lieutenant Gombos left the comparative safety of his position and intercepted the withdrawing troops. Reorganizing them, he then led them successfully in a counter-attack against the enemy. The troops under his command successfully manned their original positions and stemmed the tide of advance. Later on the same day, Lieutenant Gombos observed that one of his men was lying wounded in the line of enemy small arms and mortar fire. With complete disregard for personal safety and with devotion to a wounded comrade, he dashed forward through the intense enemy fire to assist the wounded soldier. A burst from an enemy machine gun struck Lieutenant Gombos in the head, rendering him unconscious. After treatment for his wounds at the aid station, Lieutenant Gombos, realizing the dire need for officers in his battalion, refused evacuation and returned to his duties, despite a painful wound. The gallantry and unremitting devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Gombos on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Gomez, Jesus V.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 453 - 1 December 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal (then Private First Class) Jesus V. Gomez, RA19343085, Infantry, Company D, 27th Infantry, United States Army. When the company to which his squad was attached was directed to displace, Corporal Gomez volunteered to remain at his machine gun to cover the movement. In the early morning hours of 3 September 1950, near Haman, Korea, the enemy assaulted the position and suffered numerous casualties from the intense machine gun fire. When all ammunition was exhausted, Corporal Gomez withdrew to the next ridge where he collected ammunition to delay further the attackers with his carbine. Upon reaching a friendly unit, he joined in a counterattack to retake the position. Corporal Gomez’s outstanding courage, initiative and exemplary devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from California.

Gomez, Robert R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert R. Gomez (MCSN: 1122474), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of an Infantry Company of the First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 October 1950. Painfully wounded during a vicious hostile counterattack near the crest of a hill, Private First Class Gomez steadfastly refused evacuation, courageously remaining to drag other wounded men to positions of cover and to encourage the platoon to continue in its assault. Although wounded a second time, he still refused to leave, remaining until the platoon had taken its objective and the enemy had been driven back. By his inspiring actions and selfless determination, he contributed materially to his platoon's success and, by his unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Private First Class Gomez upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Omaha, Nebraska. Home Town: Omaha, Nebraska.

Gomsrud, Orval E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Orval E. Gomsrud (MCSN: 1199467), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as a Radio Operator of an infantry company in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 October 1952. Participating in the defense of an outpost during a savage attack by an enemy force employing small arms, mortars and artillery, Private First Class Gomsrud voluntarily moved to an exposed position to direct friendly artillery fire against the attackers. When the hostile fire destroyed vital telephone lines, he again moved into the open to repair the damaged lines. Although severely wounded during his brave attempt to maintain communications, Private First Class Gomsrud dauntlessly returned to the team and assisted in rendering aid to the other wounded Marines. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and gallant devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Lawrence, South Dakota. Home Town: Lake Preston, South Dakota.

Gonzales, Florentino

Headquarters 24th Division
General Orders No. 51

Private First Class Florentino Gonzales, RA 12299298, Infantry, a member of Company "B", 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy near Chonan, Korea on 5 July 1950.  During an enemy attack which had been in progress for a period of seven hours and against overwhelming odds, Private First Class Gonzales' unit was ordered to withdraw as their ammunition was almost depleted.  With no regard to his own personal safety Private First Class Gonzales volunteered to stay at his position and continue to fire his machinegun to cover the withdrawal of his unit and protect his assistant machinegunner who had been seriously wounded.  His position was under intense small arms, machinegun and artillery fire.  While covering the withdrawal of his unit he was also wounded.  Undaunted by this wound he continued to deliver effective fire on the enemy inflicting heavy casualties.  Private First Class Gonzales was last seen to be firing his machinegun when his position was overrun by the enemy.  His fearless example reflects great credit on himself and the United States Army.

Gonzales, Jose Levi

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Jose Levi Gonzales (MCSN: 1192989), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 9 - 10 September 1952. When the forward element of his unit made contact with the enemy in a deep gap along a ridge, Sergeant Gonzales, realizing that the complexity of the terrain precluded the use of his machine gun, quickly instructed two men to remain with the weapon to establish rear security and rushed forward with the remainder of his squad to assist his beleaguered comrades. Bravely exposing himself to enemy automatic weapons fire from the surrounding hills, he climbed out of the gully and moved directly toward the hostile position while firing his weapon. Although severely wounded when struck down by a hail of enemy fire, Sergeant Gonzales quickly regained his feet and valiantly continued to fire upon the enemy until he again fell and later succumbed to his wounds. By his daring initiative, outstanding courage and selfless actions in behalf of his comrades, Sergeant Gonzales was directly instrumental in preventing the enemy from initiating a flank attack upon his unit, thereby saving the lives of many of his fellow Marines and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 9, 1931 at Miami, New Mexico. Home Town: Raton, New Mexico. Death: KIA: September 10, 1952.

Gonzales, Ray

Ray had five brothers, all in service--Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Airborne, and his father was classified 1-A. Ray enlisted in the paratroopers in 1944 when he was 18 years old. January 1945 he was sent as a replacement to Europe and served with the 80th AA and 82nd Airborne before being assigned to 155 AA Abn, 17th division. The war ended and volunteers were being sought for South Pacific with a 30-day furlough. Ray had a bad case of jaundice and after ten weeks in the hospital at Ft. Bragg, he rejoined the 80th in New York and played football on the division team. After his discharge he worked in an auto plant in Detroit and played semi-pro football for the Windsor (Ontario, Canada) Rockets.

Hostilities broke out in Korea. In 1950 Ray re-enlisted, got his shots and clothing at Ft. Knox, Kentucky, was given a 19-day delay en route, and then reported to Ft. Campbell, Kentucky.  He was assigned to G-Company 187th.  It had been five years since he jumped.  He made one jump after he reenlisted, and was sent to Korea. While in Korea, he received the DSC and Silver Star the same day.

Cpl. Ray Gonzales distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in the vicinity of Naigonggum, Korea. In January 1951, his patrol approached the village when a large enemy force opened fire. Ray and four comrades were cut off from their main body of the patrol. Before the enemy banzai the enemy threw two grenades. The first one landed about two feet from the BAR man.  Ray said not to worry--the pin was still half way in. The second one came in cooking, Ray yelled to the men to start shooting as soon as this one went off because the enemy was going to rush his group. Ray jumped up and was between the grenade and the BAR man.  His name was Sullivan. The grenade went off and the enemy came down the mountain. Ray felt the concussion behind him. He had to expose himself to see where they were coming from. They were trying to get behind us so Ray yelled to the BAR man to the right.  They were getting behind us. That kid was one hell of a BAR man.   Those suckers didn’t stand a chance. l He cut them right down. Ray received a head wound and his right elbow was shattered. Disregarding his wounds, he took command and deployed the men for effective fire on the enemy. When the enemy launched a “banzai” attack, Ray, firing his carbine with his left hand, personally killed two of them. They repulsed attacks until dark. Ray led them in a successful withdrawal. They had to go over steep snow-covered mountains in sub-zero temperatures. Ray was wounded, but helped carry another man wounded in the leg, and could not walk. Ray, by his insistent demands that the group keep moving, led them through the nights intense cold to arrive at company area at 0600 hours. All of his little group safely returned to the platoon head quarters.

Ray was recommended for the Medal of Honor but the recommendation was downgraded somewhere a long the line. After his discharge Ray went to work for Friden Calculator Co. which eventually changed to TRW. - Art Morneweck

Gonzales, Tony

Corporal Tony Gonzales, RAI9338536, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 82d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action on 1 September 1950 in the vicinity of Chongnyong, Korea. On this date he was a driver of an armored personnel carrier which was attached to a rifle company and assigned the mission of evacuating wounded men. He drove his vehicle two miles through enemy-held territory to the collecting station and safely delivered the wounded. He then tried to return to his unit but en route his vehicle was hit so repeatedly by enemy antitank fire and grenades that the vehicle was set afire. Despite the danger from the flames, he continued to drive until the vehicle could go no further. Despite heavy enemy small-arms fire, and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Corporal Gonzales attempted to remove from the blazing vehicle critical equipment and radio parts. After killing 14 of the enemy with his .50 caliber machine gun, he led his crew to safety. The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Gonzales on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Texas.

Gonzalez, Louis M.

[KWE Note: Louis Gonzalez retired as E-9 Sergeant Major after 24 years in the Army.  The following citation posting was submitted by Jim Anderson in honor of his father, Louis M. Gonzalez.  Along with the Silver Star, Louis received a Purple Heart in the Korean War.]

Citation (Silver Star, USA)


(Click picture for a larger view)

Master Sergeant Louis M. Gonzalez (then Sergeant First Class), RA20217702 Corps of Engineers, United States Army, a member of Company D, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy at the Walled City, Kasan, Korea from 4 September 1950 to 5 September 1950.  The second platoon of Company D was assigned the mission of taking and holding the hill within the fortified city on 4 September 1950.  When the attack was launched, the platoon leader was overcome with exhaustion.  In the face of heavy mortar and automatic weapons fire, Master Sergeant Gonzalez promptly assumed command of the platoon and, evacuating the officer, reorganized the unit and directed its entrenchment.  Throughout the enemy attacks which followed, without regard for his own safety, he personally directed the fire of his automatic weapons, repositioning them frequently to achieve maximum effectiveness.  When the enemy troops were overwhelmingly reinforced and his position because untenable, he skillfully withdrew the platoon with all the wounded and equipment through intense enemy fire to safety.  His prompt and vigorous action resulted in heavy casualties to the enemy and saved the platoon from annihilation.  Master Sergeant Gonzalez's heroic actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the federal service from New York.

Gonzalez, Rafael Leon

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 460 - 26 October 1953

First Lieutenant Rafael Leon Gonzalez, 01685766, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 28 September 1951, in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, elements of Company "I" were assaulting a strategically valuable enemy held hill. Although subjected to an intense enemy artillery, mortar and small arms barrage, Lieutenant Leon Gonzalez courageously guided his platoon up the slope, rapidly firing his automatic weapon. Moving to within 20 yards of the well-entrenched defenders, he aggressively led his group into the forward positions and bunkers, constantly giving clear instructions to the men. He then directed a final drive over the crest of the hill, forcing the enemy from the objective. Lieutenant Leon Gonzalez outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Puerto Rico.

Gonzalez, Ramon Delgado

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 4 - 5 January 1954

Private First Class Ramon Delgado Gonzalez, US29145588, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the morning and afternoon of 17 July 1953, in the vicinity of Sinmok-Tong, Korea, Company "B" assaulted enemy held Hill "433". In the action, many friendly casualties were sustained and volunteers were needed to retrieve and evacuate the wounded attackers. Although fully aware of the dangers involved, Private Delgado Gonzalez bravely volunteered for the mission and soon began moving up the fire swept slope toward a wounded United Nations soldier lying close to enemy fortifications. Despite the intense defensive fire, he courageously advanced toward the enemy and succeeded in reaching the casualty. Private Delgado Gonzalez then valiantly moved back down the slope with the casualty but was mortally wounded by an exploding enemy mortar round before he could reach shelter. Private Delgado Gonzalez' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Puerto Rico.

Good, Ronald C.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 76 - 14 February 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Ronald C. Good, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Helicopter Pilot, Detachment 1, 3d Air Rescue Squadron near Taegwany-ni, Korea on 27 October 1951. On that date Captain Good flew his unarmed and highly vulnerable helicopter 40 miles into enemy territory to rescue a United Nations pilot. Approaching the locale of the downed pilot, the helicopter was subjected to heavy flak and small arms fire. After four attempts to land were foiled by heavy automatic weapons fire, Captain Good faced the additional hazard of impending darkness. Determined to rescue the pilot, Captain Good directed friendly fighters to the area in an attempt to neutralize the enemy fire as he descended. Despite the concentrated enemy small arms fire, he continued his descent, hovered, and rescued the pilot from certain capture. The gallantry, disregard for personal safety, and devotion to duty displayed by Captain Good reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Good, William D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal William D. Good (MCSN: 1303862), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 - 28 March 1953. When his platoon was subjected to intensive artillery and mortar fire followed by a savage enemy attack, Corporal Good fearlessly advanced to a position where the hostile force was attempting to enter the trench line. Although with one exception all of the men of his squad became casualties, he moved into an exposed position and, in the face of heavy enemy fire, armed only with grenades, continued to hold his ground, inflicting numerous casualties on the onrushing hostile troops until reinforced by a friendly fire team. Leading his men in an attack through the trench, he was instrumental in routing the enemy who had entered from the other flank and, immediately reorganizing his group after the defeat of the hostile troops, directed the pursuit of the fleeing enemy. By his courageous leadership, gallant fighting spirit and zealous devotion to duty, Corporal Good served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the defense of the outpost, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bronx, New York. Home Town: Bronx, New York.

Goodall, Jack W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commissioned Warrant Officer Jack W. Goodall (MCSN: 0-19759), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as S-1 of the First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. Skillfully setting up a machine gun and automatic weapons in strategic positions from which an effective defense could be maintained against a hostile attempt to halt the battalion convoy with mortar, machine gun and small arms fire, Commissioned Warrant Officer Goodall continued to direct accurate fire on the enemy for over an hour. Fearlessly exposing himself to increasingly heavy and accurate hostile fire, he stationed himself in the open road to direct personnel to cover and to guide each vehicle over a partially demolished bridge. When the column had passed, he ordered his unit to withdraw and, remaining in the rear, covered their withdrawal with his fire until the entire group had reached comparative safety. His indomitable courage, aggressive leadership and staunch devotion to duty served to inspire all who observed him and reflect great credit upon Commissioned Warrant Officer Goodall and the United States Naval Service. Born: Sydney, Australia. Home Town: Los Gatos, California.

Gooden, Bennie M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Bennie M. Gooden (MCSN: 1177335), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 26 - 27 October 1952. When the right flank of the platoon was pinned down by devastating enemy machine-gun fire from a position on the high ground during a platoon counterattack against a strongly defended hill, Private First Class Gooden unhesitatingly left his position of comparative safety and, in company with another Marine, raced over seventy-five yards through the intense fire. Firing his automatic rifle with deadly effect as he advanced, he succeeded in accounting for one enemy dead and in routing the remaining hostile troops. Painfully wounded by enemy fire, Private First Class Gooden, by his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Holdenville, Oklahoma. Home Town: Weleetka, Oklahoma.

Goodwin, Dorris L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Dorris L. Goodwin (MCSN: 1172347), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 October 1952. Participating in the defense of an outpost well forward of the main line of resistance during a fanatical enemy assault, accompanied by a murderous barrage of mortar and artillery fire, Private First Class Goodwin realized that only he and one other Marine were left to defend the left flank and, bravely moving forward to an exposed area, expertly delivered deadly counterfire upon the advancing hostile forces. When the enemy entered the friendly trenches and attempted to move through the position, he unhesitatingly moved to more exposed areas and continued to deliver his fire upon the hostile troops, forcing them to abandon their assault. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and resolute determination, Private First Class Goodwin served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Dickson, Tennessee. Home Town: Rayon City, Tennessee.

Goodwin, Martin H. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 269 - 19 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Martin H. Goodwin (ASN: RA-35059145), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Anju, Korea, on 5 November 1950. The numerically superior enemy was attacking the company to which he was attached and inflicting many casualties. Completely disregarding his own safety he moved through intense fire ministering to the wounded. When the order to withdraw to more tenable positions was received a lone automatic rifleman remained in position covering the withdrawal. Seeing that this man had been wounded and had fallen in his forward position, Private Goodwin left his position of relative safety and rushed to his fallen comrade's side. While attempting to evacuate the wounded man Private Goodwin was killed. His courageous actions and complete devotion to his comrades reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Army Medical Service. Home Town: Lewis County, Kentucky.

Goodwin, Robert D.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert D. Goodwin (ASN: RA-18344618), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea. On 19 December 1952, Corporal Goodwin, a member of the 26th Infantry Scout Dog Platoon attached to a combat patrol, moved forward with a small group of friendly troops through the night. The patrol's mission was to capture a prisoner and as they moved well ahead of the main line of resistance, Corporal Goodwin's dog scented the enemy. From the point position which he occupied, he relayed this information back to the platoon leader who immediately deployed his men and started to circle the enemy force. As the patrol crossed a small stream, a rifleman directly behind Corporal Goodwin stepped on a mine and had both legs severed. The ear-shattering explosion threw Corporal Goodwin to the ground and frightened the scout dog so that he broke away. Although dazed, Corporal Goodwin moved deeper into the minefield and retrieved the valuable animal. As the patrol attempted to withdraw from the danger area, the leader stopped on a mine and the entire patrol, confused and unable to proceed in a different direction, halted. As the enemy force, attracted by the explosion, brought small arms fire to bear on the area, Corporal Goodwin realized the seriousness of the situation. Calling to his men to follow him at a safe distance, Corporal Goodwin seized the initiative and, completely ignoring his own safety, moved across the dangerous minefield, gallantly breaking a path for his comrades to follow. For thirty minutes, at great risk to his own life, he led the patrol until it had reached the friendly lines and safety. The gallantry and selfless devotion to his comrades and his duty displayed by Corporal Goodwin on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Long Beach, California.

Gordon, Alfred Nelson (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant Colonel Alfred Nelson Gordon (MCSN: 0-5953), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane and Commanding Officer of Marine Attack Squadron One Hundred Twenty-One (VMA-121), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 November 1951. During a sixty-plane coordinated attack against a main enemy supply route in the vicinity of Pyongyang, Lieutenant Colonel Gordon flew his plane at a dangerously low altitude in extremely adverse weather to locate the target and led his flight of eleven aircraft in a daring glide bombing assault in the face of intense hostile anti-aircraft fire, effecting numerous cuts in the railway line and inflicting heavy damage on the area. With his mission successfully accomplished, he skillfully directed the rendezvous and retirement of his strike group and led the planes safely to base. By his marked courage, brilliant airmanship and steadfast devotion to duty throughout the action, Lieutenant Colonel Gordon was directly instrumental in the success achieved by his squadron and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General 1st Marine Division: Serial 2845 (March 5, 1952). Born: April 8, 1915 at De Soto, Kansas. Home Town: De Soto, Kansas. Death: KIA: November 18, 1951 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, VA.

Gordon, Donald A.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 16 June 1951

Corporal Donald A. Gordon, US56080199, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company A, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Panmogi-ri, Korea.  On that date Corporal Gordon, with complete disregard for his own safety, took it upon himself to lead a blinded comrade through enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire and through a friendly artillery barrage, to safety.  Though the fire directed at the pair was intense.  Corporal Gordon remained with the wounded soldier, leading him across mountainous and enemy infested terrain until they reached friendly positions.  The gallantry in action and loyal devotion to duty and to his comrade in a situation of extreme danger, displayed by Corporal Gordon on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Washington.

Gordon, Roy T.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 301 - 16 July 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Master Sergeant Roy T. Gordon, RA20717114, Corps of Engineers, United States Army, a member of. Company B, 2d Engineer Combat Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 27 November 1950, in the vicinity of Kujang-dong, Korea. On that date he was the first sergeant of a company of combat engineers who were on a hill forward of other friendly forces with the mission of defending the hill against the enemy. This hill gave a commanding view of the approach road leading from the north. Although one of the platoons was overrun and several killed by the superior numbers of the enemy, Sergeant Gordon assisted the company commander in reestablishing the line of defense by personally exposing himself and encouraging other men of the unit to hold, thus preventing the enemy from overrunning both his company and a company to the rear. Sergeant Gordon’s inspiring leadership and fearless conduct under fire gave his men an example of courage that enabled them to repulse the fierce enemy attack for nearly seven hours until his company’s ammunition supply was nearly exhausted. When this happened Sergeant Gordon assisted the company commander in directing the withdrawal of the company to another area. Here his unit acted as a rearguard for the successful withdrawal of the other unit. He assisted in organizing the company and withdrawing them through a virtual hail of enemy fire across the frozen Chongchon River. The enemy followed and fired at the company across the river. Later he assisted in the rescue of three wounded men of his company who had been left behind in the withdrawal. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Gordon reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Rapid City, South Dakota.

Gore, Willis L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Willis L. Gore (MCSN: 0-43637), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Battery G, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. During a fierce enemy attack, First Lieutenant Gore repeatedly exposed himself to heavy hostile automatic weapons, mortar, grenade and small arms fire to direct the re-emplacement of his howitzers into more advantageous firing positions. Although his battery suffered many casualties during the mortar barrage preceding the assault, he bravely rallied his remaining men and directed devastating fire on the enemy, forcing them to retire with heavy losses. By his daring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, he served to inspire his men in successfully defending the battery position, thereby saving a large friendly truck convoy from possible destruction or capture on a road nearby and preventing the enemy from establishing a roadblock at a critical point. His marked courage, professional skill and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Gore and the United States Naval Service. Born: Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Home Town: Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Gorman, John E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel John E. Gorman (MCSN: 0-7562), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 16 to 19 September 1951. Assuming command of the battalion during the course of an attack against a series of fiercely defended enemy hill positions, Lieutenant Colonel Gorman skillfully coordinated the units under his command during the ensuing battle. Braving devastating hostile artillery, mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire, he expertly directed the attack from forward observation posts and, after seizing the objective, effectively supervised the establishment of a strong defense line. By his outstanding leadership, marked courage and unswerving devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel Gorman served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Rockport, Massachusetts. Home Town: Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

Gorman, Paul

Headquarters 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 190 - 9 May 1952

First Lieutenant Paul F. Gorman, 062379, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 32d Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sangmo'kil, North Korea.  During the early morning hours of 7 May 1952, Lieutenant Gorman lead a patrol deep into enemy-held territory.  The mission of the patrol was to observe enemy activity, secure information of intelligence interest, and capture a prisoner if possible.  Advancing stealthily up the slope of a small hill, Lieutenant Gorman, as point man, was observed and received fire from an enemy armed with a "burp" gun.  Lieutenant Gorman was wounded in the hand as a result of this initial burst of fire.  Immediately, the enemy soldier was joined by approximately fifteen others, and the patrol began to receive a devastating hail of enemy small arms fire and grenades.  In an effort to withdraw and establish a base of fire at more secure positions, a member of the patrol was wounded.  Upon reaching positions of comparative safety, Lieutenant Gorman detected that a member of his patrol was missing.  Despite his wound, he and the patrol started up the hill to aid their wounded comrade, when they again were met with a hail of fire.  During the course of evacuating the first wounded man of the patrol, three other members were wounded.  With utter disregard for his safety, Lieutenant Gorman moved forward aggressively.  Exposed to the intense enemy fire, he effectively deployed his men and proceeded in the task of evacuating the wounded.  During this exchange of fire, Lieutenant Gorman was again wounded in the leg and face by grenade fragments.  Once the casualties were safely evacuated, Lieutenant Gorman directed the orderly withdrawal of his patrol.  Though weak from loss of blood from his numerous wounds, he continued to effectively direct the actions of his patrol.  Upon reaching the patrol's base point, he directed accurate mortar and artillery fire on the enemy's positions.  Not until he was assured that his patrol was secure and the wounded safely evacuated, did he permit himself to be evacuated.  The intrepid gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Gorman proved a great inspiration to his men and was directly responsible for the safe return of the patrol.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Gorman reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Massachusetts.

Gormley, James W. (KIA)

Corporal Gormley distinguished himself by gallantry in action while serving with Battery A, 39th Field Artillery Battalion, 3d Infantry Division, in Korea on 25 April 1951. On that date, near Hill 283, Korea, Company A, 7th Infantry, was attacked by an enemy force of estimated regimental strength. Corporal Gormley, a member of the artillery forward observer team attached to Company A, voluntarily remained in the position and continued to call for and adjust artillery fire on the enemy after the forward observer officer of the team had been wounded and evacuated. Despite his exposed position and the hail of enemy fire, he continued to initiate fire missions until the radio was put out of action by enemy fire. The gallantry and exemplary courage displayed by Corporal Gormley reflect great credit on him and are in keeping with the high traditions of the military service."

[KWE Note: Corporal Gormley was killed in action on May 24, 1951 when he was struck and killed by mortar fire.  His remains were temporarily interred in a military cemetery in South Korea. His casket arrived in the United States in October 1951. Jim's remains were buried in his final resting place by his family at Pittsburgh's Calvary Catholic Cemetery on October 31, 1951. This sad occasion would have been the date of his 20th birthday.]

Goschke, Donald W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Donald W. Goschke (MCSN: 446977), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Train Guard Detail of Company A, First Amphibian Tractor Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 November 1950. When a numerically superior hostile force attacked the supply train which his unit had been assigned to protect, Sergeant Goschke observed a member of his detail seriously wounded in an open field during the ensuing bitter fight. Fearlessly risking his life, he unhesitatingly ran through heavy enemy machine-gun and small arms fire for a distance of approximately sixty yards to assist a Corpsman in carrying the wounded Marine to a place of safety. By his daring initiative, coolness under fire and grave concern for another at great risk to his own life, Sergeant Goschke served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. Born: Dodson, Montana. Home Town: Bremerton, Washington.

Gotay, Jose Ramon

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 279 - 13 July 1951

Sergeant First Class Jose R. Gotay, RA30402756, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 27 April 1951, near Uijongbu, Korea, while attempting to hold blocking positions against an enemy force, Company "B" was finally surrounded. Near dawn the enemy launched a fierce assault on the friendly outpost near the crest of Hill 476. Sergeant Gotay, who was in command of the defense position, continually encouraged his comrades to increase their volume of fire. Inspired by his exemplary leadership, the friendly troops fired round after round into the attacker's ranks, enabling the company to break out of the encirclement and withdraw to more tenable positions. Sergeant Gotay's gallantry under fire reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Gottschalk, Vincent J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Vincent J. Gottschalk (MCSN: 0-8353), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 26 September 1950. With the enemy holding two strategic ridges commanding a road along which our troops were advancing, Major Gottschalk executed repeated low-level passes between the hills in an attempt to draw hostile fire and thereby warn the friendly column of an impending ambush. Flying a light unarmed plane without radio contact with our troops, he boldly exposed himself to fierce enemy fire in order to drop messages to the friendly forces. Despite severe damage to his plane inflicted by hostile small arms fire during his second pass, he bravely remained over the danger area until close support aircraft arrived and completely neutralized the enemy positions. By his marked courage, skilled airmanship and unswerving devotion to duty, Major Gottschalk was instrumental in preventing the ambush of our troops, thereby reflecting the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Born: Pontiac, Michigan. Home Town: Pontiac, Michigan.

Gough, Dale C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Dale C. Gough (MCSN: 0-47019), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Attack Squadron One Hundred Twenty-One (VMA-121), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. Assigned the mission of attacking hostile artillery positions which were inflicting heavy casualties upon friendly troops, First Lieutenant Gough scored a direct bomb hit on one of the enemy gun emplacements, although the positions were surrounded by precipitous terrain. During his second attack on the target, his plane became severely damaged by hostile defensive fire and he was forced to discontinue his run. Despite the concentrated enemy anti-aircraft fire, he maneuvered his crippled aircraft into position for a third attack and succeeded in destroying another gun emplacement and in successfully suppressing artillery fire in the area. By his heroic actions, First Lieutenant Gough was directly responsible for the destruction of two hostile weapons which were endangering the security of friendly ground forces. His outstanding skill, indomitable courage and gallant devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Salt Lake City, Utah. Home Town: Spokane, Washington.

Gould, William R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain William R. Gould (MCSN: 0-30419), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company A, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 7 to 11 December 1950. Assigned the mission of coordinating the use of demolitions to assist the delaying action during the movement along the Hagaru-ri and Hamhung axis, Captain Gould repeatedly braved enemy fire in order to supervise the destruction of materiel of military importance which remained along the route. When he was later assigned the mission of destroying a bridge after the division equipment had crossed, he established a defense around the bridge despite hostile fire and, after ascertaining that all friendly elements had reached the other side, disengaged his defenses from contact with the enemy and supervised destruction of the bridge. By his professional skill and indomitable courage, Captain Gould was directly responsible for preventing the hostile forces from using remaining military equipment and for closing the route of approach to the enemy, thereby contributing materially to the successful movement of the Division. His resourcefulness and heroic devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Powell, Wyoming. Home Town: Laramie, Wyoming.

Gout, Chris L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 42 - 4 October 1966

Master Sergeant Chris L. Gout, (then Private First Class), United States Army, while serving as a member of Company I, 38th Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations, on 24 December 1951, in Korea.  As a member of a platoon patrol, Sergeant Gout was moving toward the objective when the patrol was pinned down by a heavy volume of machine gun fire by one of the many enemy outposts along the route of advance.  With complete disregard for his own safety, he exposed himself to the enemy gun fire and, using his rifle, killed the entire crew operating the machine gun.  After silencing the machine gun, he reorganized his widely dispersed squad.  Then, as the patrol moved toward the objective area and became the target of intense automatic weapons and mortar fire, it withdrew.  Again Sergeant Gout demonstrated indomitable courage and determination by remaining behind to cover the platoon's withdrawal.  After assisting wounded men to a safe area, he went forward a second time through heavy automatic weapons fire and provided covering fire for two medics who were pinned down with a wounded man which enabled these men to return safely to the friendly lines.  Sergeant Gout's heroic conduct, his profound concern for his fellow soldiers, and his gallantry on the battlefield are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.  Deceased 1994 - Tampa, FL.

Graham, Arnold W. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (posthumously) to Sergeant Arnold W. Graham, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company I, 31st Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, for gallantry in action in the vicinity of Nodong-ni, Korea, on 9 June 1951. Sergeant Graham’s company was assigned the mission of attacking and securing strategic enemy-held high ground. When the assaulting elements of the company were in close contact with the enemy, an enemy counterattack was launched, which temporarily disorganized the assault platoon. Sergeant Graham, assistant platoon sergeant of the support platoon, observing confusion in the assault platoon, voluntarily moved forward from his positions and joined the assault platoon in order to aid in controlling and reorganizing it so that they could continue. In the face of intense enemy fire with automatic weapons and small arms, Sergeant Graham continually moved from one dangerous position to another without benefit of cover or concealment. He frequently engaged in close-in fighting with the enemy and singlehandedly destroyed seven of the enemy. When the company was ordered to withdraw for consolidation of positions for the night, Sergeant Graham voluntarily remained with the rear guard and directed heavy fire on the enemy until he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. Home of record: Marysville, Montana.

Graham, George W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class George W. Graham (MCSN: 655253), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of the Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1950. When his rifle unit was subjected to heavy enemy fire from a well-concealed position in a wooded area, Private First Class Graham courageously charged the hostile position and, firing his automatic rifle with telling effect, killed three of the enemy and wounded two. Continuing his blazing fire until he was severely wounded and forced to be evacuated, Private First Class Graham, by his daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Muhlenburg County, Kentucky. Home Town: Old Hickory, Tennessee.

Graham, Harold R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Harold R. Graham (MCSN: 937619), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FirstMarine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. When his platoon encountered a numerically superior hostile force in its sector during an assault against enemy-held Hill 532, Sergeant Graham boldly moved forward and deployed his squad under hostile observation and fire and, by setting up a strategic base of fire, permitted the platoon to gain fire superiority, advance in its sector and destroy the enemy. Seriously wounded during this action, he courageously refused to be evacuated and continued to lead his squad until the platoon seized its objective. His courageous leadership, coolness under fire and steadfast devotion to duty inspired all who observed him, thereby reflecting great credit upon Sergeant Graham and the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Graham, James A. Jr.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 2799 - 26 July 1953

Second Lieutenant James A. Graham, Jr., 066945, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 10 June 1953, Company "F" commenced to attack enemy held Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. The first unit to leave the line of departure was a volunteer eleven man assault element led by Lieutenant Graham. The mission was to attack and destroy known fortifications in two enemy caves on the forward slope. After reaching a point a short distance from the first cave, he ordered the rest of the patrol to cover him as he went on alone. He then pulled the pins of two grenades and with complete disregard for his personal safety, he started to rush the enemy position. Reaching the opening to the cave, he hurled his grenades at the entrenched enemy. His aggressive action resulted in mortally wounding three soldiers, thereby neutralizing the position. As he left the entrance, he came under a hail of automatic weapons fire from the second cave and suffered a wound in the leg. Despite his wounds, he reorganized his men and led them in the assault on another fortified position. The team succeeded in destroying this objective, as well. Only then did he permit himself to be evacuated to safety. Lieutenant Graham's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from North Dakota.

Graham, Ray J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Ray J. Graham (MCSN: 0-38233), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot and Division Leader in Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMF-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 October 1951. Leading his division in an attack against a heavily defended bridge on the enemy's main supply route south of Sunchon, Captain Graham personally scored a direct hit on the target with a 1,000-pound bomb and skillfully directed his flight in placing a second bomb on the objective, destroying two of the three bridge spans. Learning that two aircraft had sustained major damage from hostile flak while he was leading his flight from the target area, he immediately instituted effective emergency rescue measures, insuring that one of the damaged planes received an escort to the waters of the enemy coast in sufficient time for the pilot to execute a successful water landing and alerting a friendly agency to pick up the airman. When the pilot of the second damaged aircraft was forced to crash-land in an area infested with large numbers of hostile troops a short distance from the target, Captain Graham initiated a daring covering action and, although his plane was repeatedly hit by intense enemy anti-aircraft fire, bravely persevered in his task throughout a period of 70 minutes until advised that the rescue of the downed airman was impossible. By his courageous leadership, outstanding ability as an airman and selfless efforts in behalf of his fellow pilots, Captain Graham upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cedar Springs, Virginia. Home Town: Bridgewater, Virginia.

Graham, Robert E. Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Robert E. Graham, Jr. (MCSN: 632905), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 May 1951. On that date, Company A was occupying positions near Hill 441 when attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. Corporal Graham immediately moved to a machine gun and began firing on the enemy. Although painfully wounded, he continued to fire until he observed a wounded Marine lying in an exposed position. He voluntarily crossed the open, fire-swept terrain, and, with complete disregard for his personal safety, moved the wounded man to a position of comparative safety. Corporal Graham then returned to his machine gun and continued to fire at the enemy. His actions contributed immeasurably to the successful repulsion of the enemy attack. The gallantry and outstanding devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Graham on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 178 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Texas.

Graham, William W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman William W. Graham (NSN: 5687256), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. Hospitalman Graham was serving as a Corpsman when his company was assaulting a hill near Yudam-ni, Korea. He voluntarily and without hesitation, left his covered position and exposed himself to the heavy enemy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire and made numerous trips to enemy fire-swept areas to five aid and evacuate the wounded Marines. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he continued to expose himself to the heavy enemy fire to move from position to position to search for and evacuate the wounded Marines. His actions were an inspiration to all members of his company and undoubtedly saved many casualties from receiving additional wounds and suffering from extreme exposure to the sub-zero temperatures. Hospitalman Graham's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 3311 (February 17, 1951).

Graves, Carl L.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 245 - 11 July 1953

Private Carl L. Graves, RA16424475, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the day of 9 June 1953, Private Graves returned from a reconnaissance of Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, where he had gathered vital intelligence information by advancing to within close proximity of enemy held positions, under heavy concentrations of hostile mortar fire. He then immediately volunteered as a member of an assault patrol. The patrol carried the action into the enemy trenches and closed with the foe in intense hand to hand combat. Private Graves repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire to inflict casualties upon the foe. On one occasion he charged directly into the face of hostile fire and mortally wounded three enemy soldiers who were attempting to drag off a wounded member of the patrol. As a result of his reconnaissance, the friendly attack was well planned and coordinated. His aggressive part in the assault, contributing materially to the success of the operation, was instrumental in preventing an enemy attempt to capture a wounded member of the patrol. Private Graves' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Michigan.

Gray, Harold Z.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Harold Z. Gray (MCSN: 0-38165), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in carrier based Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 February 1953. Participating in the rescue of a downed Marine aviator who was surrounded by hostile troops deep in enemy territory, Captain Gray conducted numerous daring, minimum-altitude strafing assaults to draw the heavy hostile fire away from the downed pilot. Although his own aircraft was severely damaged by enemy fire, he continued to maneuver his plane at low level through intense and accurate barrages of anti-aircraft fire directed at the downed aviator. After expending his remaining ordnance, he conducted repeated dummy strafing runs on the hostile positions despite the increasingly accurate enemy fire that was bursting around his faltering aircraft, and with his fuel supply dangerously low, remained in the area until relived by another flight of Marine attack aircraft. By his exemplary initiative and heroic actions in repeatedly subjecting himself to hostile fire, he was greatly responsible for the success of a mission that saved the life of a fellow Marine and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy. His gallant fighting spirit, superb airmanship and steadfast devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Captain Gray and the United States Naval Service. Born: Dallas, Texas. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Gray, John S. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant John S. Gray (MCSN: 0-54459), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Artillery Forward Observer of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 28 - 29 March 1953. Participating in the company's night assault against a vital enemy-held outpost position located well forward of the main line of resistance, First Lieutenant Gray bravely exposed himself to murderous hostile mortar and artillery fire throughout the vicious attack to personally adjust the fire of friendly supporting arms. When the objective was attained, he courageously made his way through the deadly hostile fire to the forward slope of the position to better observe and adjust friendly fires and, repeatedly moving from one position to another, expertly directed his men in repulsing an enemy counterattack. Mortally wounded while engaged in this hazardous undertaking, First Lieutenant Gray, by his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and gallant devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 25, 1928. Home Town: Greenwich, Connecticut. Death: KIA: March 29, 1953.

Gray, Lemuel T. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 173 - 12 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Lemuel T. Gray (ASN: RA-14229196), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery A, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. During the defense of the city the numerically superior enemy had infiltrated the battalion's positions and drove friendly forces from their guns. Sergeant Gray, accompanied by several others, returned to the position to retrieve the howitzers that had been left behind. With utter disregard for his personal safety and under intense artillery, mortar, and small arms fire, he attempted to retrieve the guns. In this heroic action, Sergeant Gray was killed. His gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Born: May 17, 1928. Home Town: Kinston, North Carolina. Death: KIA: July 20, 1950.

Gray, Stephen Eugene

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 115 - December 23, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Stephen Eugene Gray (ASN: 0-28683), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 21 September 1950 in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea, while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. On 20 September 1950 Lieutenant Gray's company had crossed the Naktong River and had seized commanding terrain on the west bank. On 21 September 1950 the enemy launched an attack in battalion strength against the company's positions. Subjecting the company to intense artillery, mortar, and automatic weapons fire, the enemy succeeded in penetrating the defensive positions and driving the forward elements of the company back on Lieutenant Gray's platoon. As the full fury of the enemy attack became concentrated on Lieutenant Gray's platoon position, he repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire as he directed the defensive tactics of his unit. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he directed mortar fire on the advancing enemy, adjusting this fire to fall but a few yards in front of his position. Throughout the engagement his heroic conduct under severe hostile fire and his grim determination to hold against overwhelming odds, inspired his men to greater efforts. After approximately 30 minutes of fierce close-in fighting the numerically superior enemy force was repulsed, leaving 22 dead within a few yards of the platoon's position and carrying an estimated 70 wounded with them. The gallantry and inspirational leadership demonstrated on this occasion by Lieutenant Gray reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

Green, Claude E.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 195 - 2 December 1953

Second Lieutenant Claude E. Green, 01891905, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 23 February 1953, Lieutenant Green was leading an ambush patrol in the vicinity of Chich-on, Korea. When the patrol neared its ambush site, it was fired upon at close range by an enemy force. Lieutenant Green was seriously wounded in the initial burst of fire and tumbled into a small defiladed position. Sensing the danger to his men and with complete disregard for his personal safety, he ordered his patrol to return to a covered position and reorganize. Lieutenant Green was unable to move due to his wounds, but with determination, he kept his radio in operation, constantly informing his company commander of the situation and giving directions for friendly mortar fire, He was transmitting messages when he was assisted back to safety by two volunteers from his patrol. His actions were contributing factors in routing the enemy and inflicting many casualties upon them. Lieutenant Green's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from North Carolina.

Green, Guthrie R.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Guthrie R. Green (ASN: 0-2035422), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Service Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in Korea. On 15 - 16 February 1951, in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea, Captain Green was the S-4 of an infantry regiment, which was completely surrounded by a large enemy force. Throughout this volume of enemy fire which continued to come into the area throughout this period, Captain Green personally directed the recovery and distribution of vitally needed ammunition. Despite the fact that ten of his men and officers became casualties, he constantly exposed himself to the enemy fire in order to move from point to point in the area. So critical was the ammunition supply that if this speedy distribution had not been made, the entire regiment might have been overrun by the large hostile force. His calm and heroic conduct over this entire period was instrumental to the success of the regiment in making its heroic stand on this occasion. The gallant conduct of Captain Green during this action reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.

Green, Homer (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Homer Green (MCSN: 668320), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of a 4.2 inch Mortar Company of the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 November 1950. During a fierce counterattack by a numerically superior enemy force employing small arms, machine guns and hand grenades, Corporal Green steadfastly remained in his position in the face of heavy hostile fire until overrun by the enemy. Mortally wounded while placing a grenade in the barrel of his mortar so as to render it useless to the attackers, Corporal Green, by his outstanding courage and aggressive determination, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 1, 1929 at Polk County, North Carolina. Home Town: Harris, North Carolina. Death: KIA: November 2, 1950.

Green, Leon A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 174 - 12 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal [then Private] Leon A. Green (ASN: RA-12298037), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near the Kum River, Korea, on 16 July 1950. During the reorganization of his company following a withdrawal from the Kum River line, the enemy was observed on the flanks preparing to attack the company and prevent its reorganization. With complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Green unhesitatingly set up a 60-mm. mortar in an open field. Working alone, he positioned, sighted, and fired the weapon. By directing the enemy's fire at his exposed position, he enabled his unit to bring effective fire to bear on the enemy. Only when the sights of his mortar had been shot off and the tube pierced by accurate enemy rifle fire did he abandon his position. Through his gallant action, the company succeeded in eliminating the threatening enemy. His courage and coolness in the face of enemy fire reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Morris, New York.

Green, Richard I.

Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division
June 24, 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Capt. Richard I. Green (then 1st Lieutenant), Corps of Engineers, United States Army, Company A, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 4 September 1950 at Kanp-Yong, Korea.  Company A was assigned the mission securing the center of a ridge overlooking the main supply route leading into Taegu.  When the left flank of the ridge was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force and the infantry defenders were forced to withdraw, the flank became exposed and gave the enemy direct fire into the friendly units in the valley below.  The North Koreans immediately began to drop mortars on the infantry command post and on friendly mortar positions.  Captain Green quickly deployed his platoon to protect the exposed flank.  Courageously leading a squad of men across the open ridge, he directed a counterattack in the face of heavy automatic weapons and small arms fire.  Although it was impossible to retake the lost ground, Capt. Green led a counterattack time after time with different groups of men, thereby forcing the enemy to cease fire on the friendly forces below.  By this insistent attacking, the infantry troops in the valley were able to withdraw with a minimum of casualties.  Capt. Green's courageous action and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military services.

"Raised in the Steamboat Rock community, Capt. Green was graduated from high school there in 1935.  He enlisted in the army in January 1939, and took officer's training at Fort Belvoir, Va., in 1943, being commissioned a second lieutenant in the army corps of engineers.  In the European campaign, Capt. Green crossed the channel on D-Day and participated in the Battle of the Bulge and other engagements, in which he was decorated with the Silver Star and Bronze Star and received the Purple Heart for combat wounds.  Discharged in the fall of 1945 with the rank of first lieutenant, he was subsequently elected commander of Hoover-Eiserman American Legion Post at Steamboat Rock.  Re-entering the service in April 1948, he was sent to Japan in September 1949, and is still stationed in Korea.  The Steamboat Rock man was promoted to captain in April of this year.  Married to Lillian Farnham of Bath, Me., he has a son.  His family is residing in Tokyo." - Eldora Herald Ledger, July 10, 1951

Green, Robert T.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 455 - 28 September 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major [then Captain] Robert T. Green, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action 24 March 1951 as pilot of a B-26 light bomber, 452d Bombardment Wing (L), Fifth Air Force. While flying at minimum altitude en route to rail targets north of Pyongyang, Korea, the aircraft encountered intense anti-aircraft fire, which severely damaged the aircraft and wounded all three crew members. Major Green discovered that he had lost elevator trim control, had very little rudder control, no radio and complete loss of hydraulic pressure. The gunner, bleeding profusely from multiple wounds, reported that the rudder had been shot away. Despite mounting risks, Major Green bombed and strafed gun positions of opportunity. Before turning toward friendly lines the gunner reported the punctured bomb bay gasoline tank had caught fire. Major Green decided to crash land the aircraft in an effort to save the gunner's life. Unable to extend the landing gear, he crash landed the burning B-26 at a friendly airfield. The aircraft had hardly stopped sliding when Major Green, injured himself, assisted the navigator in extricating the critically wounded gunner from the burning plane. Major Green's tenacity in completing his mission, his gallantry in risking his life to save his gunner from almost certain death, his skillful landing of the severely damaged aircraft despite personal injuries was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Greenes, Joseph (2nd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 220 - 26 June 1951
Amended by GO 245, 1951

The Silver Star (Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster) is awarded to First Lieutenant Joseph Greenes, 01176983, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 23 May 1951 in the vicinity of Sangny-un-gol, Korea. On that date he was checking forward observers on duty with the rifle companies of the 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment. When he received word that one of the forward observers had been wounded, he immediately proceeded to the area where the rifle company was located. Upon nearing the hill he came under intense enemy machine gun fire and was forced to take cover. With undaunted courage Lieutenant Greenes started to move forward into the intense and deadly machine gun fire. He realized that his immediate presence was needed at the company in order to take the place of the wounded forward observer and direct artillery fire on the enemy who might cause serious casualties to the friendly forces. Upon reaching the base of the hill the company was assaulting, he got a radio and called in the much needed artillery support. The intense incoming artillery directed by Lieutenant Greenes relieved the pressure on the riflemen and enabled them to advance. Lieutenant Greenes then picked up a rifle and joined the infantrymen in securing the objective. His gallantry and complete devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Ohio.

Greenes, Joseph (3rd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 270 - 7 July 1951

The Silver Star (Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster), First Lieutenant Joseph Greenes, 01176983, Artillery, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Battery, (then Battery C), 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Changbong-ni, Korea. On that date, Battery C was overrun by a strong enemy force. After a brief firefight, march order was given. The battery had withdrawn approximately one mile when the head of the column came under heavy small arms fire, forcing it to stop. Enemy bugles sounded from nearby ridges in preparation for an attack on the remainder of the column. Lieutenant Greenes ordered the howitzers uncoupled and supervised the delivery of over 400 rounds of direct fire. With utter disregard for his personal safety, he moved from gun to gun pointing out targets and danger points, all less than 200 yards from the convoy position. Many times he would take a wounded gunner’s place until a new gunner could be found. After the main attack was stopped, Lieutenant Greenes rallied as many men as he could and led them in a counterattack, clearing the hills on each side of the road. Upon returning to the column, he supervised the loading of all wounded on trucks. The gallant leadership displayed by Lieutenant Greenes reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Ohio.

Gregorious, John H.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 395 - 17 August 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John H. Gregorious, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against enemy forces in Korea on 24 April 1951, while participating in a tactical, low-level bombing mission near Chonwon, Korea, with the 728th Bombardment Squadron (Light), Fifth Air Force. Lieutenant Gregorious, piloting a B-26 type light bomber, demonstrated exceptional airmanship and courage while attacking a large concentration of enemy troops and supplies with bombs, rockets, napalm and machine gun fire. Flying through intense enemy ground fire, which damaged his aircraft, Lieutenant Gregorious made repeated attacks, diving his light bomber through narrow mountain canyons to obtain the most effective results. After killing or wounding approximately fifty enemy troops, destroying nine supply-filled buildings, and starting numerous fires in a supply area, Lieutenant Gregorious sighted a downed friendly aircraft and surviving crew members. He immediately pin-pointed their location and called for a rescue helicopter. Awaiting the arrival of the helicopter, and in spite of the damage to his aircraft, he repeatedly strafed groups of enemy troops attempting to reach the downed crew members, subjecting himself to intense enemy ground fire. Upon arrival of the helicopter, Lieutenant Gregorious intensified his strafing attacks to draw the enemy's fire while the helicopter rescued the crew members of the downed airplane. After the last member was aboard the rescue craft, Lieutenant Gregorious turned his crippled aircraft toward home base. Although his fuel supply was low, he successfully made the long flight to his home station across two hundred miles of open sea and landed after he had been in the air for almost seven hours. His aircraft had sustained sixty hits from enemy anti-aircraft and small arms fire. The superlative skill, gallantry, and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Gregorious were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Gregory, Paul Johnson

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Seaman Apprentice Paul Johnson Gregory (NSN: 9884425), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy in the Korean Theater on 15 September 1950. While a member of a landing craft during assault operations on enemy beaches, Seaman Gregory returned with the coxswain of the boat to the beach and assisted in rescuing from a group undergoing sniper fire a wounded Marine and returned him to safety. His daring initiative and courage were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 974 (October 26, 1950).

Gresens, Rosslyn E.

Headquarters 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 140 - 24 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Rosslyn E. Gresens (ASN: RA-17261073), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company B, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 11 August 1950, in Korea. At this time he was a member of a patrol assigned the mission of penetrating enemy lines and observing location, movement, and strength. After proceeding 5000 yards, the fourteen man patrol was fired upon from three sides by enemy riflemen of vastly superior numbers, killing and wounding several members of his patrol. Exposing himself, Corporal Gresens advanced on the enemy and killed two riflemen who were directly threatening the patrol from advantageous positions on the opposite bank of the Hoechon River. His effective covering fire during the river crossing accounted for at least fifteen enemy casualties and he was last seen following the patrol across the river firing his rifle at the enemy. His heroic action and utter disregard for his own safety in the face of numerically superior forces reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. Home of record: Hill City, Minnesota

Griffin, Cecil J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Cecil J. Griffin (MCSN: 974913), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Truck Driver of Battery M, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. Observing a tractor ahead of him without a driver while proceeding in convoy to Hagaru-ri, Corporal Griffin promptly located a driver for his own truck and proceeded to operate the tractor and, as the enemy continued to lay down a heavy barrage of mortar, machine gun and small arms fire, assisted in clearing the road of damaged and stalled vehicles. By his daring initiative, cool courage under fire and courageous efforts, Corporal Griffin contributed materially to the successful movement of the convoy to its destination, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Dallas, Texas. Home Town: Dallas, Texas.

Griffin, Cornelius

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade (Chaplain Corps) Cornelius Griffin (NSN: 0-522437), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Chaplain for the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the period 2 November through 8 November 1950. On 3 November at 0130 the enemy conducted a fierce coordinated night attack against elements of the Seventh Marines. During the height of the attack Chaplain Griffin continually exposed himself to heavy enemy fire as he moved among the troops lending encouragement. His very presence and display of courage inspired the men about him and aided materially in a rapid consolidation of the lines. During the later morning of 3 November the same units of the Seventh Marines were subjected to heavy small arms fire. Chaplain Griffin left the comparative security of the battalion sick bay where he was rendering aid to the wounded and moved back to the front lines. Here he repeatedly exposed himself without regard for his personal safety to render what aid he could to the men wounded in the attack. Chaplain Griffin served as a veritable pillar of strength for the men of the organization and served as an unforgettable inspiration to all who observed him. His knowledge, use of first aid, coupled with the spiritual comfort he lent, proved to be invaluable assets to the organization. Chaplain Griffin's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 2615 (January 21, 1951).

Griffin, Frank L.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 255 - 28 October 1950

Second Lieutenant Frank L. Griffin, 01688574, Infantry, Company A, 29th Infantry, United States Army.  Lieutenant Griffin and his platoon had completed laying wire to a forward installation and were in bivouac for the night of 18 August 1950 to the rear of a company protecting the flank of the regiment near Pangmok, Korea.  A determined enemy attack from the flank and rear of the company threatened the regimental position.  Organizing his men into a tight perimeter, Lieutenant Griffin borrowed a mortar from an adjacent unit and directed its fire into the attackers, destroying a mortar and machine gun and disrupting the attack.  Lieutenant Griffin's initiative and courageous devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Georgia.

Griffis, Griff

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
12 December 1950

Sgt. Griff Griffis, RA19291337, Company A, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Majon-Ri, Korea, on 29 November 1950.  Sergeant Griffis's platoon was ambushed; many of the men were wounded and were forced to abandon their weapons on the field.  Sergeant Griffis, with no thought of his own personal safety, left his covered position and went forward under heavy enemy fire and recovered these weapons.  He then returned to a machine gun which had jammed and successfully placed it back in operation, thereby greatly supplementing the fire power of the company.  His heroic action under fire prevented the loss of weapons to the enemy and materially aided the company in repulsing the enemy attack.  The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Griffis on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Griffith, Joe E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 247 - 10 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Joe E. Griffith (ASN: 0-2204308), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company M, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Yang-dang, Korea, on 24 September 1950. While on a reconnaissance mission, he was informed that an enemy force estimated at 150 was located forward of his position. Advancing to the enemy's position, in order to maintain visual contact until friendly troops could be brought up, he was met by heavy small arms fire. Returning this fire, five of the enemy surrendered to him, while the remainder withdrew. Against displaying great courage he continued his pursuit of the enemy force. When a patrol from his battalion moved into the area he guided it to the enemy's positions and led an aggressive attack capturing 40 prisoners and killing many others. Lieutenant Griffith's gallant actions and exceptional devotion to duty with utter disregard for his own safety, exhibited against overwhelming odds reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Charleston, South Carolina.

Grigsby, Claron

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 71 - August 22, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Claron Grigsby (ASN: RA-17233246), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company B, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division in Korea. On 24 July 1950 when three enemy tanks penetrated the forward positions of Company B near Saugn-yong, Korea, Corporal Grigsby obtained a 3.5 rocket launcher and two rounds of ammunition and returned to his position. One of the tanks had been disposed of Corporal Grigsby moved to within seventy-five yards of the second tank and fired his first rocket. Machine gunners on the tank immediately opened fire but Corporal Grigsby fired the second rocket which seriously damaged the tank treads. He remained in his precarious position for forty-five minutes until additional ammunition was obtained, and fired three more rounds which set the third tank afire. His courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Grigsby, James F.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 63 - October 12, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James F. Grigsby (ASN: RA-6890242), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Tank Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 3 September 1950 at Sibi-Ri, Korea. On this date, he was a member of the regimental reserve, when the Regimental Command Post was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. A group of Headquarters personnel consisting of cooks, clerks, mechanics, and communications personnel were hastily organized into an infantry force and led by Sergeant Grigsby who was in command of a tank. During the action the infantry was pinned down by heavy machine gun and small arms fire and could not advance. He placed his tank in a position to bring fire upon the enemy and with complete disregard of the hail of enemy fire directed against him, manned the .50 caliber machine gun on top of his tank. His accurate fire pinned down the enemy and allowed the infantry elements to withdraw without losses. He continued to man his machine gun until wounded, and then the members of his crew in bringing fire upon enemy positions, until evacuated to receive medical treatment. The intrepid gallantry and exemplary leadership displayed by Sergeant Grigsby on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Grigsby, Wiley Julian Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Wiley Julian Grigsby, Jr. (MCSN: 0-50374), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Leader of a Machine Gun Platoon of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. Prior to a coordinated company assault to secure commanding ground near a ridge from which a well-entrenched enemy were throwing hand grenades at the Marines below in an effort to dislodge them, Second Lieutenant Grigsby observed a hostile soldier, armed with a sub-machine gun, suddenly appear directly above the observation post with the obvious intent of attacking it. Despite the personal risk involved, he immediately stood up in an unprotected position and destroyed the enemy with accurate carbine fire, thereby saving the personnel of the observation post from being wounded or killed. His quick-wittedness, unselfish initiative and heroism in risking his life to save the lives of others reflect great credit upon Second Lieutenant Grigsby and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 27, 1925 at Rogersville, Tennessee. Home Town: Oak Ridge, Tennessee.  Death: KIA: September 25, 1950.

Grimes, Harold L.

Sergeant First Class Harold L. Grimes, 21st AAA AW Battalion (SP). On 29 March 1951 friendly forces launched an attack on strong hostile positions near Changgo-ri, Korea. Despite exposure to intense small arms and automatic weapons fire, Sergeant first Class Grimes guided his half-track section to flanking vantage points which commanded a full sweep of the main enemy strong points. By his skillful coordination of movement and fire, he was instrumental in enabling the infantry to secure the objective. He was seriously wounded while fulfilling his mission. Sergeant First Class Grimes' courageous leadership, military ability and inspirational devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the American Soldier.

Grimes, John R.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 186 - 15 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery) John R. Grimes (ASN: 0-2025348), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery A, 26th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (AW) Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Taepyong-ni, Korea, on 16 July 1950. When an effective enemy road block had cut off the Division Artillery and elements of the 19th Infantry Regiment, Lieutenant Grimes brought his half track anti-aircraft vehicles into the area to combat the enemy. Under his direct supervision, his platoon, by the accuracy and volume of its fire, successfully destroyed three enemy machine guns and an anti-tank weapon. In addition, heavy casualties were inflicted upon the opposing enemy company, causing them to withdraw. Although wounded in the action, with complete disregard for his own safety, he continuously exposed himself while moving to each of his seven vehicles, assisting in the evacuation of the injured, and inspired his crews to greater efforts. Only when the enemy pressure on the friendly troops had been relieved did he permit himself to be evacuated for medical aid. His courage, unselfish devotion to duty, and superior leadership, enabled the friendly troops to withdraw with a minimum of casualties and loss of equipment. His gallant actions reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Milledgeville, Georgia.

Gritta, Paul B.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 150 - November 11, 1950

Sergeant First Class Paul B. Gritta (then Sergeant) RA6251755, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 3 September 1950 near Tabu-Dong, Korea. Sergeant Gritta’s platoon was attacked during the night by a banzai charge of a large number of the enemy. In this action, Sergeant Gritta was wounded in the body by an enemy hand grenade fragment while assisting a wounded comrade to safety. Despite his severe wound, Sergeant Gritta refused to be evacuated and continued to direct fire of a machine gun for a period of from five to six hours. He so effectively directed the fire of this gun that two more fanatical assaults were repulsed with heavy losses to the enemy. Sergeant Gritta’s gallantry and selfless devotion to duty reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered federal service from South Carolina.

Gronsky, John

First Lieutenant John Gronsky, Battery B, 21st AM AW Battalion (SP). On 3 April 1951, friendly forces were advancing over a flat, open valley toward strong hostile positions near Chugang-ni, Korea. Lieutenant Gronsky preceded his half-track platoon to search for mines and to select advantageous firing positions. When three of his men were wounded by a bursting mortar shell, he exposed himself to the deadly barrage to carry them to safety. Throughout several hours of constant action, he repeatedly exposed himself to direct more effectively the movement and fire of his men and to administer to the needs of the wounded. Lieutenant Gronsky's courageous leadership, aggressive spirit and unwavering devotion to duty enhance the high traditions of the United States Army. Entered military service from Pennsylvania.

Gross, Anton W.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 23 - 28 January 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal Anton W. Gross, RA19315216, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company M, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 15 September 1950 in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea. On that date Corporal Gross was the gunner of an 81mm mortar section with the mission of supporting a rifle company. In spite of heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire, he remained at his weapon and fired on the enemy with great effect. An enemy sniper infiltrated into position, firing at each muzzle blast, and seriously wounded Corporal Gross. He made several attempts to return to his mortar but was prevented from doing so by members of his squad. His disregard for his personal safety and his determination to continue firing was a great source of inspiration to his comrades. The gallantry and inspiring conduct displayed by Corporal Gross on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Born in Emmons County, ND, 1930. Entered the military service from Rosebud, Montana.

[KWE Note: Corporal Gross was separated from Army in October 1950 for other than disability. He also served in Vietnam. He died in 1993.]

Grkovic, Nicholas

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant [then Lieutenant, Junior Grade] Nicholas Grkovic (NSN: 0-447427/1100), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Minesweeper U.S.S. Kite (AMS-22), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 10 to 31 October 1950. A highly skilled and resolute officer, Lieutenant Grkovic boldly directed his ship in the hazardous task of sweeping enemy mines from channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan in the face of heavy fire from hostile coast defense batteries. By his inspiring leadership throughout this intensive action, he contributed materially to the ultimate success of the operation. His marked courage, expert seamanship and steadfast devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Lieutenant Grkovic and the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1073 (November 17, 1950). Born: October 13, 1922. Home Town: Salmon, Idaho. Death: June 21, 1996.

Groff, Goodwin C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Goodwin C. Groff (MCSN: 0-30968), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 September 1950. When his battalion was attacked at night by a hostile force of battalion strength, supported by five tanks and an ammunition truck, Captain Groff courageously moved from platoon to platoon across a fire-swept hillside, directing and controlling the fire of his men. By his inspiring leadership in the face of intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, he was largely responsible for his company's success in destroying two of the hostile tanks and in killing approximately three hundred of the enemy. During the engagement, he continually kept his battalion commander informed of the progress of the action, thereby aiding in the destruction of the enemy along the entire battalion line. His exceptional skill and aggressive determination despite the heavy odds, were contributing factors in the company's ability to launch an attack within thirty minutes after repelling the enemy. Captain Groff's unwavering devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Washington, D.C. Home Town: San Diego, California.

Grove, John R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain John R. Grove (MCSN: 0-13051), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as S-1 of the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. When an enemy ambush halted the vehicle train during a blistering night attack, Captain Grove courageously moved forward through the intense barrage to the head of the column and, arriving at a narrow bridge where a vehicle had overturned midway across, made a desperate but futile attempt to remove it despite continued accurate small arms fire laid down by the enemy. With advance elements of the convoy proceeding forward, he ran over a fire-swept, four hundred yard stretch of road to establish contact and, ordering a bulldozer operator to return with him to again attempt to clear the bridge, supervised the construction of a by-pass when it was impossible to move the vehicle blocking the passage of the convoy. By his aggressive and determined leadership, exceptional ability and heroic actions in the face of grave peril, Captain Grove served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed immeasurably to the forward advance of the convoy to its destination. His staunch devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Home Town: Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Grubbs, Johnnie R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 142 - 21 March 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Johnnie R. Grubbs, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy in Korea as Pilot of a B-26 Bomber in the 13th Bombardment Squadron, FAR EAST Air Forces, on 9 January 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Grubbs flew under low overcast on an armed reconnaissance over the heavily defended supply route between the towns of Namsi and Chongju. Although he was exposed to automatic weapons fire, he pressed repeated bombing and strafing attacks until a total of ten boxcars, five warehouses and three vehicles were destroyed by fire and explosion. Turning his attention to the enemy gun positions which were firing on him, he silenced 14 anti-aircraft batteries and destroyed four by explosion. At the completion of these devastating attacks, automatic weapons fire from the remaining gun position struck the aircraft, with one shell piercing the canopy and exploding in Lieutenant Grubbs' face. Despite a severe head wound which blinded his left eye, he destroyed the battery with his forward-firing guns before climbing to a safe altitude. Intermittently blind and suffering shock, Lieutenant Grubbs flew his aircraft to his home base, aided by instructions from the navigator. Lieutenant Grubbs' actions reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Gruenther, Richard L.


Captain Richard L. Gruenther
(Click picture for a larger view)

X Corps
General Orders No. 37 - November 20, 1950

Captain Richard L. Gruenther, 0-28711, Infantry, US Army, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against an armed enemy. On 17 November 1950, while commanding Company C, 17th Infantry Regiment of the 7th Infantry Division, Captain Gruenther led his unit in an advance on the Division objective, the town of Kapsan, North Korea. Against strong and persistent enemy resistance, Captain Gruenther distinguished himself by skillfully directing his attack and personally moving among his men to supervise their activities. His outstanding leadership and his complete disregard for his own personal safety gave great encouragement to his troops and resulted in the successful advance of his unit to the objective. Although seriously wounded during the course of this action, he continued to direct the attack. His personal action materially aided the accomplishment of the 7th Infantry Division’s mission and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered service from Nebraska.

Grumbles, Wilbur J.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 562 - 30 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel Wilbur J. Grumbles, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 24 May 1951 as Commanding Officer, 49th Fighter-Bomber Group, Fifth Air Force. On that date, Colonel Grumbles led a flight of four F-80 aircraft deep within enemy-held territory to attack an enemy rear area supply dump. Leading his flight through below marginal weather, Colonel Grumbles pressed an attack upon a target which was known to be heavily defended. On the first pass his aircraft was damaged by intense anti-aircraft fire from small arms and 20 and 40 millimeter automatic weapons. Several direct hits tore a hole through the left flap approximately six inched in diameter and severely damaged the aft section. In spite of the intense enemy fire and heavy damage to his aircraft, Colonel Grumbles instructed his flight to stay clear while he made four more passes alone on the target. His attacks destroyed one POL dump and two trucks, damaged three more trucks, and left numerous fires burning in the stacks of supplies. Only after all ammunition and rockets had been expended, did Colonel Grumbles lead his flight back to friendly territory. The aggressiveness, courage and devotion to duty displayed by Colonel Grumbles reflect great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Guard, Donald E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Donald E. Guard (MCSN: 545613), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company H, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 June 1951. During an attack by Company H on Hill 787, Corporal Guard, chief of a machine gun squad, repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire to observe and direct the fire of his squad. Although painfully wounded early in the attack, he refused evacuation, and remained with his men, pointing out targets and searching for the most advantageous positions for his machine guns. He then moved his squad to a small hill offering an excellent field of fire on the enemy positions. Due to the skillful leadership of Corporal Guard, his squad inflicted numerous casualties on the enemy, and aided greatly in the complete disorganization and routing of the enemy force. The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Guard on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 179 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Indiana.

Guerra, John

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 52 - 25 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant John Guerra (ASN: RA-12294879), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 8 December 1951. His platoon was occupying defensive positions on a strategic terrain feature when it was subjected to an intense enemy mortar and artillery barrage. The hostile force then launched a massive attack, deploying such intense fire in their fanatical charge that the platoon was forced to withdraw to more strategically defensible positions. Sergeant Guerra fearlessly exposed himself to the murderous enemy fire as he regrouped his men in the new defense perimeter. Although painfully wounded, he refused to leave his men. During the ensuing conflict, he noticed that a group of hostile soldiers had maneuvered dangerously close to a mortar position and were throwing grenades into the emplacement. With complete disregard for his own safety, he left his place of comparative protection and charged the enemy single-handedly, killing and wounding several of them and forcing the others to flee. He returned to his former position and continued to play a vital part in repulsing successive enemy attacks until he was seriously wounded by small arms fire and had to be evacuated to medical attention. Sergeant Guerra's courageous action, unswerving determination and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Schenectady, New York.

Guffain, Tomas H.

Headquarters 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 217 - 22 June 1951

Captain Tomas H. Guffain, 01287699, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 1 April 1951, while leading his company in an attack to seize Hill 398 near Sopyonchon, Korea, Captain Guffain was confronted with the task of assaulting enemy emplacements over extremely rough terrain. Despite a devastating air attack, the enemy remained strongly entrenched and apparently determined to hold their positions. Captain Guffain, at the beginning of the assault up the hill's steep slope, moved fearlessly forward, in the face of withering enemy fire, to supervise the action. Realizing the need for effective leadership, Captain Guffain remained close to the leading elements of the attack until they reached the crest of the hill, forcing the enemy to withdraw. The gallantry and courage displayed by Captain Guffain were an inspiration to the men in his command and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Guffey, James E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James E. Guffey (MCSN: 288957), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge of a Machine Gun Section of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 September 1950. Assigned the mission of supporting the attack of the infantry company by machine gun fire, Sergeant Guffey skillfully reorganized his section and quickly established a base of fire which was so accurately directed against enemy positions that the company moved forward with little difficulty. Repeatedly exposing himself to heavy enemy fire to inspire and encourage his men, he refused to be evacuated when he was seriously and painfully wounded and declined medical treatment until the objective was taken. His courage, outstanding leadership and steadfast devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Sergeant Guffey and the United States Naval Service. Born: Scottsboro, Alabama. Home Town: Scottsboro, Alabama.

Guidry, Rodney c.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Rodney C. Guidry (MCSN: 1185769), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 August 1952. While leading a relief patrol through intense hostile small arms fire, Private First Class Guidry established contact with the ambushed squad and immediately directed his fire team up the slope of a fiercely defended hill position. Although painfully wounded during the course of the action, he unhesitatingly participated in a second assault on another sector. Wounded again by the enemy fire and forced to withdraw from the hill position, Private First Class Guidry steadfastly refused medical treatment until the more seriously wounded casualties were evacuated. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and resolute determination, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: San Diego, California.

Guinn, William H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 270 - 19 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) William H. Guinn (ASN: 0-2017052), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 2d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Angang-ni, Korea, on 5 - 6 September 1950. During a tactical withdrawal his battalion was attacked by a large enemy force which had established a strong roadblock along the route of withdrawal. Utterly disregarding his own safety he left his position of relative safety and moved to the head of the column in order to ascertain the enemy's strength and disposition. After securing this vital information he began the perilous return to the battalion command group. As he moved along the column the enemy increased the intensity of his fire. Determined to eliminate this source of the enemy's strength Lieutenant Guinn armed himself with hand grenades and fearlessly moved to a position from which he could observe the enemy group. Hurling grenade after grenade he silenced three machine guns and killed or wounded their crews. He then continued his return to the command group furnishing information which ultimately led to the enemy's complete dispersion with heavy casualties. Lieutenant Guinn's gallant actions and complete devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Houston, Texas.

Guiver, Jay Leslie (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Third Class Jay Leslie Guiver (NSN: 2604348), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Corpsman with Headquarters and Service Company, 2d Battalion, 5th Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 and 27 March 1953. Volunteering to accompany a platoon far forward of the main line of resistance to assist in evacuating the casualties sustained during a counterattack on an enemy-held outpost, Hospitalman Third Class Guiver bravely exposed himself to intense hostile artillery and mortar fire upon reaching the devastated area and administered timely medical aid to the wounded. Skillfully directing teams to search the area for casualties, he instructed his comrades in the treatment of the stricken men until the first evacuation unit had departed, and rushed to the forward elements of the action in the face of deadly enemy small-arms fire to carry the wounded to a sheltered position for medical assistance. Although thrown to the ground by the bursts of hostile rounds landing nearby and suffering from shock and concussion, he steadfastly refused to be evacuated and continued to administer aid to the wounded. By his exceptional courage, marked fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Hospitalman Third Class Guiver served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Authority: Board of Awards: Serial 586 (July 3, 1953). Born: March 24, 1931. Home Town: Salt Lake City, Utah. Death: KIA: March 29, 1953.

Gunn, George C. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) George C. Gunn (ASN: 0-1309256), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Kunmol-Gol, Korea. On that date, as Regimental Communications Officer, he intercepted a message from a 2d Battalion radio operator that the battalion command post had been overrun. He immediately proceeded toward the command post and encountered numerous groups of riflemen moving south away from the enemy. Captain Gunn re-grouped the men, joined a tank platoon and continued toward the command post which had been overrun and was in enemy hands. With the tank support, he placed his riflemen in positions where their fields of fire were most effective. During the period he remained exposed and passed up and down the line assuring himself that the fire was being correctly placed and at the same time assisted in the recovery of both vehicles and wounded personnel. He remained in the area until the last tank withdrew by which time the road was under small arms fire from the high ground on either side. Because of his determination and courageous example many wounded men and serviceable vehicles were recovered that would have otherwise been lost. The gallantry in action and outstanding leadership displayed by Captain Gunn reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered Service from Virginia.

Gustafson, Rudolph R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Rudolph R. Gustafson (MCSN: 1020897), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 10 - 11 September 1952. While the company was effecting a relief of the main line of resistance, the entire area was subjected to devastating enemy mortar, artillery and small arms fire, and four Marines of the company being relieved fell seriously wounded. Dauntlessly exposing himself to the intense hostile barrages, Sergeant Gustafson rushed to the aid of his fallen comrades. Although painfully wounded by the enemy fire during the course of this hazardous undertaking, he carried one of the Marines to safety and returned with stretcher bearers to rescue the other casualties, refusing treatment and evacuation for himself until all the other men were safe and their wounds had been treated. By his courageous leadership, determination and gallant devotion to duty, Sergeant Gustafson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Jamestown, New York. Home Town: Lakewood, New York.

Gutierrez, Manuel F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Manuel F. Gutierrez (MCSN: 446508), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Section Leader of an Anti-tank Platoon of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces when his company was attacked by a hostile battalion supported by fierce mortar fire in Korea on 6 December 1950. Instructing his section to change its targets of fire after noting a change in the enemy's route of attack which presented a serious threat, Sergeant Gutierrez unhesitatingly cradled a light machine gun in his arms and, despite heavy hostile fire, charged forward of the front lines, directing enfilade fire which killed at least ten of the attacking enemy. Realizing that the situation had reached very grave proportions, he remained exposed to intense hostile automatic weapons and grenade fire and continued to man his weapon until it jammed. His skilled leadership, aggressiveness and indomitable courage were contributing factors in the repulse of a vigorous enemy attack and reflect great credit upon Sergeant Gutierrez and the United States Naval Service. Born: Alliance, Nebraska. Home Town: Denver, Colorado.

Guyott, Dean B.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 825 - 7 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant First Class Dean B. Guyott, US55015487, (then Sergeant), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company I, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 9 October 1951 in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea. On this date, during an attack on enemy-held positions, elements of Company I were pinned down by the determined fire from a well entrenched and numerically superior enemy force. Sergeant Guyott, upon being informed that his unit was ordered to withdraw to more tenable positions, voluntarily remained behind to cover the withdrawal. In the course of this act he was seriously wounded but refused to be evacuated and despite the pain, tenaciously defended his emplacement until all the members of his unit had withdrawn to more advantageous positions. His dogged determination and devotion to duty were an inspiration to his comrades and were highly responsible for the orderly withdrawal of his unit. The gallantry in action displayed by Sergeant Guyott on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Glover, North Dakota.

 

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