Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "H"

 
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Haag, 2LT Douglas Hopkins

Second Lieutenant Douglas H. Haag, 0-210107, nfantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by courageous action near Chonui, Korea on 11 July, 1950. A numerically superior enemy force, supported by exceptionally heavy artillery and mortar fire launched an attack against Lieutenant Haag's company. With utter disregard for his own safety, he exposed himself to a hail of withering fire, directing the movement of weapons to positions from which the maximum fire could be brought to bear upon the attacking enemy. Completely unmindful of the intense fire sweeping the area, he moved among the men urging them on to greater efforts in their gallant efforts against overwhelming numbers of the fanatical enemy. Throughout the fierce firefight he was a constant source of inspiration to his men by his fearless actions and outstanding leadership. When the order to withdraw was received, he unhesitatingly moved to a forward position, where he covered, with automatic rifle fire, the withdrawal of his platoon. When last seen, Lieutenant Haag was firing with great volume and accuracy into a hoard of advancing enemy. Lieutenant Haag's gallant actions, exemplary leadership, and complete devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Louisville, Kentucky.

Haagensen, Richard Allen (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Richard Allan Haagensen (MCSN: 1198438), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 1 January 1953. Acting as assistant commander of twenty-seven men who were occupying and defending a vital combat outpost located far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Haagensen skillfully directed the positioning of a heavy machine gun to support another platoon during a raid on strongly defended enemy positions. Unhesitatingly volunteering to man the weapon, he delivered deadly fire upon the enemy and completely silenced two hostile rocket positions. Although the area was subjected to murderous enemy mortar barrage, he steadfastly remained at his weapon and continued to bring devastating fire upon the opposition until he fell, mortally wounded. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Private First Class Haagensen served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 12, 1934 at Duluth, Minnesota. Home Town: Duluth, Minnesota. Death: KIA: January 1, 1953.

Haake, Clarence T.

Undated news-clipping [1951]:

"The Silver Star, the nation's third highest combat decoration, has been awarded to Sgt. First Class Clarence T. Haake for gallantry in action in Korea.  It was announced today by the First Cavalry Division in Japan.  Sgt. Haake's wife, Elizabeth, resides in Germantown.

The award was made while Sgt. Haake was serving as a member of Company I, 8th Cavalry Regiment, near Mago-ri last October 16.  He was cited for taking command of his platoon after the death of the platoon leader and rallying the men to make four assaults on fanatically defended Red hill bunkers.  Although wounded on the fourth assault, Sgt. Haake remained with his men until the position was secured."

Date of Action: October 16, 1951

Haase, Elvin W.

General Orders No. 449 - 29 November 1950
Headquarters, 25th Division

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class (then Private) Elvin W. Haase, Infantry, Company L, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army.  On the night of 31 August 1950 near Baga, Korea, a strong column of enemy including mechanized elements attacked the company positions.  In the heavy barrage of small arms, mortar and artillery fire, Private First Class Haase moved about with his 3.5 inch rocket launcher to obtain most advantageous fields of fire.  Frequently exposing himself boldly to the intense hostile fire, he succeeded in destroying a 76mm self-propelled gun and three anti-tank guns, and in damaging an artillery piece.  His skillful and courageous actions were of vital importance in disrupting the hostile assault.  Private First Class Haase's gallant devotion to duty and military ability are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States soldier.  Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Haase, W.L.

Citation not yet found.

"Army Corp. W.L. Haase of Sidney [Montana] has won the Silver Star medal for gallantry in Korean action.  His parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Haase, received the citation.  It said the member of the 2nd Infantry Division "was a crewman in a tank platoon attached to a rifle company in a defensive position.  The enemy had penetrated the line, forcing the rifle company back, thus leaving the tanks without infantry support.  It was imperative that this line be reformed at once, or not only would the tanks be lost, but the whole line of defense would be endangered... Haase volunteered as a member of a patrol... to contact and rally the outnumbered rifle company.  Supported by two tanks, the patrol made its way through intense enemy artillery and small arms fire, and succeeded in reforming the line of defense and recovering the ground that had been lost."

Hackenson, Robert D.

General Orders No. 274 - 26 July 1953
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Sergeant Robert d. Hackenson, US55235754, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 10 June 1953, Company "F" commenced to attack enemy held Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. When attempting to attack enemy positions on the reverse slope of the hill, the assault team was met by a hail of enemy grenades, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. Two squads from the support platoon were quickly called into the conflict. Sergeant Hackenson was a squad leader in this support unit. The platoon leader then asked for volunteers to form an eight man assault team in a rush of the enemy's positions. Armed with grenades, Sergeant Hackenson immediately volunteered and began hurling grenades into enemy trenches. Moving over the crest, he came under automatic weapons fire from a concealed enemy position. Exposing himself to the raking fire, he continued his advance, throwing grenades with devastating effect. His actions resulted in mortally wounding four of the enemy, rendering others as casualties, and contributing immeasurably towards the complete rout of the enemy from their entrenched positions. Sergeant Hackenson's outstanding gallantry and devotions to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Illinois.

Hackett, Allen P. (posthumous)

General Orders No. 62 - 26 July 1950
24th Infantry Division

Captain Allen P. Hackett, O433834, Company C, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. General Order 62, 26 July 1950, Amendment IV reads: So much of Section I General Order No 47, Headquarters 24th Infantry Division APO 24 dated 20 July 50, pertaining to [Hackett. . .] awarded the Bronze Star for gallantry in action against the enemy in Korea as reads: “Bronze Star”, is amended to read “Silver Star”.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 47 - 20 July 1950
Amended by No. 24 - 26 July 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain (Infantry) Allan P. Hackett (ASN: 0-433834), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force at Taepyong-ni, Korea, on 16 July 1950, while assigned as Adjutant of the 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. At about 0800 hours on that date the Battalion Command Post was subjected to mass attacks of several waves of enemy infantry. In the resulting confusion, the personnel in the vicinity of the Command Post became disorganized. Captain Hackett calmly, and in the face of intense small arms fire, organized these persons into an effective fighting force which engaged the enemy and repulsed his attacks, thus keeping intact the Command Post of Battalion. Captain Hackett's calmness under fire and his personal courage and heroism inspired those about him so that his efforts in repulsing the enemy attacks were successful. After securing the Command Post area, Captain Hackett continued to lead men in an attack against enemy positions until he was killed by small arms fire. By his gallant actions he brought great credit to himself and to American arms. Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA July 16, 1950.

Hackney, Harm K.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 144 - May 23, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Harm K. Hackney (ASN: US-53120293), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Medical Company, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On the night of 24 April 1953 and during the early morning hours of 25 April 1953, elements of Company F were defending their positions on Outpost HARRY, in the vicinity of Surang-ni, Korea, against a numerically superior hostile assault. When friendly reinforcements were called for, Private Hackney, the Company Aidman, accompanied them. Moving toward the scene of the battle through the intensely shelled area, he treated the wounded as he advanced. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he frequently exposed himself to direct hostile fire in order to treat and encourage his wounded fellow soldiers. He remained with the wounded and refused to return to safety until the last casualty had been evacuated. As a result of his actions, the lives of many friendly soldiers were saved. Private Hackney's outstanding gallantry, initiative and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Hackworth, David Haskell (1st Award)

General Orders No. 208 - 13 April 1951
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to David Haskell Hackworth (OF-103837), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. On 6 February 1951 near Soam-ni, Korea, the lead elements of Sergeant Hackworth's task force were subjected to heavy small arms and mortar fire. After organizing his men in advantageous positions, he mounted a tank and directed a heavy volume of effective machine gun fire at the hostile emplacements. When his ammunition was exhausted, he immediately moved to the exposed deck of another tank and directed its weapon against the foe. Although the enemy concentrated their firepower on his position, he continued his mission until he was severely wounded. Sergeant Hackworth's valorous initiative, determined spirit and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself, his unit and the Armed Forces.

Hackworth, David Haskell (2nd Award)

General Orders No. 510 - 2 September 1951
25th Infantry Division

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting an Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Silver Star Medal to David Haskell Hackworth, OF-103837, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. On 8 August 1951, Lieutenant Hackworth volunteered to lead a reinforced patrol against well-defended positions near Pongmi, Korea. When the enemy began an intense small arms and automatic weapons barrage, he left his place of cover to emplace the tanks and half-tracks and to direct their fire. Moving to the front, he led the infantrymen in a furious grenade and bayonet assault to rout the hostile forces from the initial strong points. Although under the direct observation of the enemy, he continued to direct an effective heavy weapons barrage on their positions. When the overwhelming numerical superiority of the foe forced a withdrawal, he manned a machine gun and gave supporting fire until the last of the patrol had reached safety. Lieutenant Hackworth's valorous leadership, aggressive spirit and steadfast devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself, his unit and the United States Armed Forces.

Hackworth, David Haskell (3rd Award)

General Orders No. 8 - 9 January 1952
25th Infantry Division

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Second Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Silver Star Medal to David Haskell Hackworth (OF-103837), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company E, 27th Infantry, in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 4 November 1951. Lieutenant Hackworth's unit was engaged with a well entrenched hostile force over the possession of a vital hill mass. While leading the assault squad up the slope through intense small arms, automatic weapons fire and bursting grenades, he was painfully wounded but refused evacuation and continued directing accurate concentrations on the main points of resistance. Finally leaving the impact area, he received medical aid. Quickly returning to his men, he led a spirited charge against the foe to overrun the position and rout the enemy. Unable to hold a weapon because of his broken arm, he accepted the assistance of an enlisted man, who held the carbine level while Lieutenant Hackworth placed heavy fire on the retreating enemy. He continued exposing himself to the withering crossfire in order to coordinate the tactics of his men and direct the evacuation of the wounded until he was called to the telephone and ordered to the rear for medical aid. Refusing to stay out of the impact area, he again went forward to assure himself that his men were well organized and all helpless soldiers were brought back to friendly positions. Lieutenant Hackworth's inspirational leadership, aggressive determination and courageous devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself, his unit and the Armed Forces.

Haffey, Eugene H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Eugene H. Haffey (MCSN: 0-17254), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 18 January to 2 June 1951. With his company assigned the mission of attacking and seizing a heavily defended and well-fortified enemy position in the vicinity of Hwachon on 28 May, Captain Haffey expertly directed a brilliantly executed attack to overcome all hostile resistance despite constant small-arms, machine-gun and mortar fire. After seizing the assigned objective, he promptly reorganized his company and continued to hold the position against numerically superior counterattacks throughout the night and early morning. By his determined and inspiring leadership, bold tactics and superb courage in the face of heavy odds, Captain Haffey contributed materially to the rapid and successful accomplishment of his company's missions throughout this period of intensive combat and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. SPOT AWARD, 1st Marine Division, Serial 23888. Born: Cleveland, Ohio. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio.

Hageboeck, John H.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 41 - 16 February 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Captain John H. Hageboeck, 01175728, Artillery, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Battery, 15 Field th Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 28 November 1950 in the vicinity of Kujang-dong, Korea. On that date the enemy succeeded in overrunning the regimental command post to which Captain Hageboeck was attached as an Artillery Liaison Officer. Throughout the attack, he remained in an exposed position, with no thought for his personal safety, in order to direct artillery fire on the fanatical enemy forces. When the Command Post displaced to a more tenable position, he moved back to the new position and immediately established communications and proceeded to adjust artillery fire on the enemy. His close and continuous supporting fire was instrumental in materially reducing the number of enemy troops to reach the command post, thereby enabling the small number of infantrymen in the area to counterattack and regain their former positions. He ceased calling for artillery fire only when he was forced to fire his individual weapon in the defense of the position. Captain Hageboeck’s actions contributed materially to the success of the infantry in repelling the enemy attack and were in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Home of record Avoca, IA)

Haggerty, Leroy L.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 129 - 9 September 1950

Private Leroy L. Haggerty, RA14305025, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 28 July 1950 near Hwanggan, Korea, Private Haggerty was serving with a team which was repairing communications lines to Company C.  While working on the mountainside, the crew was met by the Company which was withdrawing under heavy enemy attack.  Wit the aid of one man, Private Haggerty, armed with an automatic rifle, fought a rear guard action for the company, neutralized at least one hostile machine gun and so effectively harassed and delayed the attackers that the company was able to complete its movement in an orderly manner.  At a river crossing he assisted in carrying wounded through the shoulder deep water to safety.  Private Haggerty's gallant unflagging devotion to duty reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Michigan.

Haggett, Charles Edmund

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Charles Edmund Haggett (MCSN: 1136156), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 July 1952. Volunteering to return to the scene of a former patrol action to locate a missing Marine, Corporal Haggett, accompanied by a comrade, courageously proceeded to the summit of an enemy-held hill although subjected to intense hostile small arms, grenade and mortar fire, which blew off his helmet and shattered his armored vest. Locating the body of the missing Marine, he provided covering fire for his partner who carried the body to the base of the hill where, due to the heavy volume of enemy fire, they were forced to place it in a position from which it could be recovered by a subsequent patrol. Later, Corporal Haggett again volunteered to accompany a patrol which successfully recovered the body. By his exceptional courage, initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Corporal Haggett served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hoboken, New Jersey. Home Town: Jersey City, New Jersey.

Haight, Frederick E.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 535 - 21 December 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Armor) Frederick E. Haight (ASN: 0-1030477), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action near Mundung-ni, Korea. On 4 November 1951, Captain Haight was in command of his company which was on a mission against a strongly defended enemy hill. During the initial stages of the action, the company was subjected to intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons, grenade and mortar fire. Exposing himself continuously to the concentrated enemy fire, Captain Haight moved courageously from position to position, aiding the wounded and giving words of encouragement to his men and directing the assault, stopping in his movements only to fire on the deeply entrenched enemy./ As the tempo of the resistance increased, Captain Haight continued to expose himself to the enemy fire to locate targets and direct the fire of his men. During the ensuing action, he received a head wound, but with complete disregard for his personal safety, refused evacuation and continued to crawl forward urging his men and inspiring them to continue the assault until orders were received to withdraw. Despite his painful wound, Captain Haight refused evacuation until all the wounded and dead were removed from the field of battle. The gallantry displayed by Captain Haight reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. From Connecticut.

Haines, Charles F. (posthumous)

General Orders No. 160 - 13 November 1950
Headquarters, Eighth United States Army Korea (EUSAK)

Sergeant First Class Charles F. Haines, RA6731072, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Chir-won, Korea, on 4 September 1950.  On this date, Sergeant Haines volunteered to man a .50 caliber machinegun from a completely exposed position on one of two M-39 Personnel Carriers to take supplies and ammunition to a cut off company and to bring out wounded.  The enemy had an undetermined number of road blocks on the route he had to follow.  On the return trip, after having delivered the cargo of supplies and ammunition and picked up twenty-three wounded soldiers, the carriers were attacked by an estimated half dozen enemy from a village.  Sergeant Haines assisted in killing all of them.  Later an undetermined number attacked the carriers at close range with automatic weapons and hand grenades.  Sergeant Haines, from his completely exposed position and with utter disregard for his personal safety heroically and gallantly continued to fire his machinegun into the enemy ranks until he was killed by a burst of automatic weapons fire.  His inspiring actions, above and and beyond the call of duty was instrumental in saving the lives of fifteen of his wounded comrades.  The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Haines reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from new Jersey.

Haines, William D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Engineman First Class William D. Haines, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while attached to and serving on board the U.S.S. Partridge (AMS-31) on 2 February 1951. When that ship struck an enemy mine while engaged in minesweeping operations in the Korean Combat Zone, two men were seriously injured and pinned down in the wreckage of the pilot house. Despite the short time this type of vessel usually stayed afloat after striking a mine he quickly climbed the wreckage, and with the aid of another, successfully rescued two men. Not until the vessel began to sink rapidly did he abandon ship. By his aggressive initiative coupled with complete disregard for his own safety, Engineman First Class Haines contributed greatly to the safety of his shipmates, and his zealous devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1221 (August 4, 1951).

Hakala, Edwin W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Edwin W. Hakala (MCSN: 0-49700), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Forward Observer of Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Although wounded by enemy mortar fragments when the infantry company to which he was attached was halted momentarily by rigid resistance from a fanatically determined enemy during an assault, First Lieutenant Hakala refused to be evacuated and continued to move in the attack with the forward elements. Displaying exceptional skill, he called artillery fire upon the hostile strong points so effectively that the attacking company was able to seize its objective which had been savagely defended by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength. By his outstanding courage, resolute determination and steadfast devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Hakala contributed materially to the success of his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Port Au Prince, Haiti. Home Town: Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Haley, John L. Sr.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 193 - 18 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant John L. Haley Sr., RA37726384, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against the enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Changbong-ni, Korea. On that date Sergeant Haley’s battalion had established a defensive perimeter around an assembly area while a roadblock to the south was being cleared. The enemy, from commanding positions, poured intense small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire into the area. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he ran to a nearby vehicle and obtained a .50 caliber machine gun which he put into action. When he ran out of ammunition, he again exposed himself to the intense enemy fire in order to resupply the weapon. Later, he again braved the enemy fire and successfully recovered a 60mm mortar whose gunner had been killed and fallen over the weapon. He personally saw that the mortar was placed back into action. Sergeant Haley’s display of courage and initiative before the enemy were inspiring to those who witnessed his deeds and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Kansas City, Missouri.

Hall, Abner Charles (posthumous)

General Orders No. 61 - 25 July 1950
24th Infantry Division

Private Abner C. Hall, RA12300430, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950, near the Kum River, Korea. An enemy roadblock was holding up the withdrawal of the Regiment to new positions. Company B was given the mission of reducing the roadblock. Private Hall, the automatic rifleman for one of the squads, placed himself in an exposed position and laid down a base of fire with his weapon which enabled the other members of the Company to reach their objective. When the objective had been reached, Pvt. Hall advanced to rejoin his companions. Again exposing himself to enemy fire, he began firing to assist in a further advance. This time he was wounded by enemy small arms fire, and by the fire he laid down, Pvt. Hall enabled his unit to clear a roadblock which was holding up the movement of the entire Regiment. His heroic actions brought great credit to himself and to the military service. (Hall was killed in action on this date.) Home or county of record: Cortland, NY.

Hall, Edward C. Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Second Lieutenant Edward C. Hall, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49867), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine rifle company of the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 August 1950. On that date, the First Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, encountered and attacked the rear guard of the 83d North Korean Motorized Regiment in the vicinity of Changallon on the Kosong-Sachon road. Lieutenant Hall, leader of the frontal machine gun platoon, was hit in the leg and thigh by an enemy machine gun burst. Suffering three wounds, he accepted temporary first aid but refused to be evacuated. Later, he crawled approximately fifty feet to a machine gun inactivated as a result of casualties sustained by the crew; and, manning the weapon from a position in a ditch filled with rice-paddy water, he delivered destructive fire on enemy positions for a two-hour period, knocking out two machine gun nests and accounting for a number of enemy dead. Despite his multiple wounds and the continuous fire from hostile small arms and automatic weapons, he refused to leave his post, and directed that medical attention and evacuation be completed for the more seriously wounded. Finally he was evacuated, but only after receiving a direct order from his company commander. Lieutenant Hall's exemplary courage, heroic determination and selfless concern for his wounded comrades is conduct in keeping with the most cherished traditions of the military service. Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 87 (December 20, 1950). Entered Service From Texas.

Hall, Eugene

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Eugene Hall (MCSN: 1295044), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Carrier of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 March 1953. Although the mortar section with which he was serving had not been committed to action during the company's attack on a vitally important outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Hall voluntarily moved up the shell-torn hill and skillfully assisted in treating and evacuating the wounded Marines. Painfully wounded himself, he steadfastly continued to administer aid to his stricken comrades and, despite his weakened condition, personally carried an unconscious, wounded man from the outpost back to the safety of the front lines. Subsequently evacuated when the company was relieved, Private First Class Hall, by his inspiring initiative, courageous actions and selfless efforts in behalf of others, was directly responsible for saving the lives of at least four Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kilgore, Texas. Home Town: Luling, Louisiana.

Hall, Robert M. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Medical Corps) Robert M. Hall (ASN: 0-435168), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. On 15-16 February 1951, Captain Hall was Regimental Surgeon for a unit which was completely surrounded and under constant enemy artillery and mortar fire, near Chipyong-ni, Korea. With more than 200 wounded to treat, Captain Hall was forced to use every available tent and shelter to provide cover for the wounded. During the period 15 February 1951 through 16 February 1951, he moved constantly through the area from tent to tent, treating and reassuring the wounded. His complete disregard for his own safety in moving around under the heavy enemy fire was a source of great inspiration to all of his men and patients throughout this difficult period. His heroic performance on this occasion was unquestionably responsible for saving many lives. The gallant conduct of Captain Hall over a long and trying period was well beyond the call of duty, and fully upheld the highest traditions of the military service.

Hall, Robert M. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major (Medical Corps) Robert M. Hall (ASN: 0-435168), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer of Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in n action against an armed enemy on 22 May 1951, in the vicinity of Inje, Korea. On that date he was Regimental Surgeon for the 23d Infantry Regiment, which was being subjected to enemy sniper fire wounding several soldiers. Without regard for his personal safety, Major Hall advanced to the wounded man in an exposed rice paddy where he administered first aid. He then made his way back to obtain blood plasma and immediately returned to the wounded men administering the plasma, still exposed to sniper fire. Having previously arranged for a litter jeep, the wounded men were evacuated to safety. His courageous action was instrumental in saving two lives, which otherwise might have been lost. The gallant conduct displayed by Major Hall reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Hall, William C. (posthumous)

General Orders No. 29 - 14 January 1952
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery) William C. Hall (ASN: 0-61124), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Battery A, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Uijongbu, Korea, on 25 April 1951. On that date, strategically placed enemy forces ambushed motorized elements of his Battalion, damaging the lead vehicles of the column with devastatingly accurate mortar fire and subjecting the entire column, trapped in a narrow mountain pass, to intense mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire. Lieutenant Hall, Battery Executive Officer, realizing that immediate action was necessary to prevent the enemy from overrunning the column, immediately organized the men around him, quickly put a howitzer in action, and directed a concentrated volume of fire into the enemy hordes. With complete disregard for his own safety, he continuously moved across the fire-swept terrain, directing the defense. As he was still gallantly leading the fighting during the final moments of the bitter conflict, he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. Lieutenant Hall's courageous action, exemplary leadership and self-sacrificing performance of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.

Hallinan, Kenneth J.

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918, and pursuant to authority in AR, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to:

Captain Kenneth J. Hallinan, 013371810, Infantry, United States Army. Captain Hallinan, Commanding Officer of an infantry company (heavy Mortar), distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Chup-ri, Korea. Early on the morning of 24 July 1953, Captain Hallinan, while under intense enemy artillery fire, was given the mission of organizing his company into march order formation and proceed to an alternate position. While his company was moving out of the area, still under continuous heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire, Captain Hallinan observed a bunker in his area receive a direct hit by an enemy shell. Without regard for his personal safety, he proceeded immediately to the bunker which had collapsed, organized a rescue party, and personally aided and supervised the digging out of four men who were trapped inside the collapsed bunker under tons of debris. During this action, enemy artillery and mortar rounds continued to drop into the immediate area and although Captain Hallinan was wounded by one of these rounds, he continued his actions which were directly responsible for saving the lives of two of the men. Although wounded himself and without regard for his personal safety and well being, Captain Hallinan then led his company in an orderly manner to an alternate position, and his mortars set up in firing position, and for several hours directed accurate and deadly fire upon the enemy. The gallantry and selfless devotion to duty exhibited by Captain Hallinan on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from New York.

Hallums, Tommy M.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 83 - 30 October 1950

Corporal Tommy M. Hallums, RA14311760, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 2 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea.  On that morning, the Regimental Command Post was subjected to an intense enemy mortar and self-propelled gun barrage, which pinned down most of the personnel.  One group of men, caught in the open by the sudden barrage, was pinned down in a rice paddy, with four members being wounded and in immediate danger of drowning.  Corporal Hallums immediately, and with total indifference for his safety, dashed to the wounded men and administered first aid to them.  After causing them to be evacuated, he made a thorough search of the rice paddy, searching for other wounded.  Later he proceeded to a nearby outpost also under heavy enemy fire and continued his search for wounded comrades.  The inspirational and gallant heroism displayed by Corporal Hallums on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and fully upholds the highest traditions  of the military service.  Entered the military service from Tennessee.

Halstead, Bobby L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Bobby L. Halstead (MCSN: 628172), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Weapons Company, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving with an infantry company, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 April 1951. Unable to secure another weapon when his machine gun was damaged during a night-long attack on the company position by a large enemy force, Private First Class Halstead skillfully maintained a maximum volume of accurate, effective fire throughout the night without a single stoppage. Although severely wounded by enemy hand grenades, he refused to leave his weapon and delivered withering fire on the enemy until the attack subsided. One two occasions, when the enemy penetrated to within twenty feet of his position, he fearlessly exposed himself to hostile fire to repel the attackers with a pistol and hand grenades, accounting for three enemy dead. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and steadfast devotion to duty, Private First Class Halstead served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the successful defense of the strategic ground, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Foster, West Virginia. Home Town: Foster, West Virginia.

Halstead, Thomas F.

Headquarters, 25th infantry Division
General Orders No. 53 - August 13, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Thomas F. Halstead (ASN: RA-14289937), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company B, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division in Korea. On 24 July 1950, near Yongam-ni, Korea, Private First Class Halstead was performing duties as assistant squad leader in Company B. Although seriously wounded during the initial stages of the enemy attack, he declined evacuation and remained with his squad. Throughout the day despite intense pain form his wound and exposure to the sun, he directed machine gun fire on the enemy. At nightfall he withdrew form his position under enemy fire and was evacuated. His devotion to duty was an inspiration to his comrades and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Hamaguchi, Rodney Nariyuki (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 105 - 28 March 1952
Amended by General Orders No. 142 - 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Rodney Nariyuki Hamaguchi (ASN: RA-29051723), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Service Battery, 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, near Osan, Korea, on 5 July 1950. He was serving with an infantry unit when the element was savagely attacked by a numerically superior force. So intense and surprising was the assault that a large group of the friendly troops was soon surrounded and all possible avenues of escape were cut off by enemy road blocks. Although he was in a relatively safe position outside the encirclement, Private Hamaguchi volunteered to go forward with a machine gun crew to break up the road blocks. Although outnumbered twenty-to-one, he engaged the hostile soldiers in a fierce fire fight, exposing himself repeatedly as he fought and succeeded in dispersing the enemy and opening a safe route of withdrawal for his comrades. When last seen, he was firing his machine gun at harassing enemy snipers. Private Hamaguchi's gallant actions, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army Artillery. Born: November 16, 1927. Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii. Death: KIA: July 5, 1950.

Hamby, Ronald L.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Ronald L. Hamby (MCSN: 578919), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action while serving with the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on Hill 1057 on 2 June 1951. On that date, the Second Battalion was assaulting Hill 1057, defended by a strong, well entrenched enemy force. Corporal Hamby, a squad leader of a rifle platoon, was leading his squad up a ridge line toward the enemy position when his advance was halted by intense and accurate enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Corporal Hamby led his men in a bayonet assault which quickly routed the enemy force and secured the position. His inspiring leadership and high courage aided materially in the success of the mission. The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Hamby on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 181 (August 16, 1951),. Entered Service From Oklahoma.

Hamilton, Kenneth Carroll (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Kenneth Carroll Hamilton (MCSN: 1156951), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Bearer in Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. During his company's attack on a series of strongly fortified enemy hill positions, Private First Class Hamilton courageously exposed himself to intense hostile artillery, mortar, small arms and automatic weapons fire to keep his machine gun supplied with ammunition. Realizing that an adjacent squad was running dangerously low on ammunition, he unhesitatingly moved through a mined area to supply them and, when the automatic weapons fire was masked by attacking infantrymen during the final stages of the attack, volunteered to go forward as a rifleman with a badly depleted rifle squad. Boldly charging forward through heavy enemy fire, he single-handedly assaulted a large hostile bunker and succeeded in neutralizing it completely before he fell, mortally wounded. By his heroic initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave danger, Private First Class Hamilton upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 29, 1932 at Amarillo, Texas. Home Town: Amarillo, Texas. Death: KIA: September 12, 1951 - Buried at: Memorial Park Cemetery - Amarillo, Texas.

Hamilton, Robert W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Robert W. Hamilton (MCSN: 0-35990), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 September, 21 October and 4 November 1951. Discovering a large hostile truck convoy in the vicinity of Singoaan while he was engaged in a night intruder mission, Captain Hamilton carried out a series of devastating attacks on his objective and destroyed nine of the vehicles. Although painfully wounded in the arm and leg by enemy shrapnel, he continued to press his attacks until his ordnance was expended and succeeded in damaging nine additional trucks. Despite serious damage to his plane by hostile ground fire during his initial run on the target while participating in a similar mission near Singye, he persisted in strafing a seven truck enemy convoy at minimum safe altitude and destroyed a truck laden with explosives. Undeterred by further damage to his aircraft, Captain Hamilton continued to attack until the failure of one engine forced him to break off the action, destroying four more vehicles in the convoy and damaging another. Locating three hostile tanks seeking concealment under a railroad overpass while he was engaged in another night intruder assignment in the vicinity of Sinmak, he bravely attacked his objective in the face of intense enemy anti-aircraft fire and, although compelled to make a hazardous recovery up the face of the mountains flanking the area, scored a direct hit on the target with a napalm bomb which caused intense fires and explosions. Quickly discovering a secondary target on which to expend the remainder of his ordnance, he pressed home repeated bombing and strafing runs on a hostile convoy, destroying three trucks and inflicting extensive damage upon four others. By his outstanding courage, superb airmanship and determined fighting spirit in the face of grave danger, Captain Hamilton was directly instrumental in dealing a damaging blow to the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Denver, Colorado. Home Town: Denver, Colorado.

Hamilton, William H.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 82 - September 2, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Field Artillery) William H. Hamilton (ASN: 0-41322), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Battery, 77th Field Artillery Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy near Kawnop-Yong-ni, Korea, on 27 July 1950. Battery B, 77th Field Artillery Battalion was subjected to heavy artillery fire from the enemy and it became so intense that it was necessary to displace the firing battery. It was during this period of intense enemy fire that Captain Hamilton, with total disregard for personal safety and exhibiting the highest principles of leadership, went through the battery position and took command of one of the guns. He directed fire of that gun and destroyed an enemy observation post from which the enemy fire was being directed. This courageous act enabled his battery to take up new positions with a minimum of casualties. Captain Hamilton's aggressive and gallant action while under enemy fire reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service.

Hammerbeck, Edward E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Edward E. Hammerbeck (MCSN: 0-15197), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observer attached to Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 September 1950. Flying on a reconnaissance mission ahead of advancing infantrymen, Captain Hammerbeck observed a large, well-concealed group of enemy troops in position to ambush the friendly forces. Realizing that radio communications with leading elements of the ground troops were not available, and that his supply of message-drop containers was exhausted, he dropped a message wrapped in his handkerchief and weighted with bullets, warning friendly troops of the impending danger. Although the vulnerable aircraft was severely damaged by intense enemy anti-aircraft fire during the initial low dive over the hostile concentration, the pilot carried out a second low run in the face of the heavy fire and, Captain Hammerbeck determining further details, dropped another message to the friendly troops. After quickly summoning fighter aircraft to the scene, he remained over the area in the badly damaged plane, until the enemy troops had been dispersed with heavy casualties. By his courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Captain Hammerbeck upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Duluth, Minnesota. Home Town: Duluth, Minnesota.

Hammett, Warren Rod (1st citation) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Warren Rod Hammett (NSN: 9959723), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 September 1950. During an enemy night attack on his unit, Hospitalman Hammett acting as a Company Corpsman, fearlessly and courageously crawled across open ground infested by enemy grenade and machine gun fire to administer aid to several of the wounded. While on his voluntary mission and after administering aid to several of the wounded he was mortally wounded. By his heroic actions several of the wounded were given aid much earlier than would otherwise have been possible, resulting in saving several lives. His conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty were an inspiration to all men and contributed in large measure to his company repulsing the enemy attack and regaining the fire superiority. Hospitalman Hammett's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 17731 (November 6, 1950).

Hammett, Warren Rod (2nd citation) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Warren Rod Hammett (NSN: 9959723), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), as a Corpsman attached to a heavy machine gun section which was supporting the Infantry Company, when the enemy launched a sustained and close-in attack on the company positions on 27 September 1950 in Korea. When he learned that many casualties were occurring some distance from his position, he voluntarily and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, moved forward through heavy enemy small arms and machine gun fire to administer aid to the casualties. In the thickest of the fight, he was heard calling out that he was a Corpsman and was searching for the wounded. On four separate occasions he went forward in this manner and was successful on each trip to find, administer aid and assist in evacuating casualties. Later in the action, while performing his duties, he was mortally wounded by enemy mortar fire and heroically gave his life for his country. His aggressive actions materially aided the wounded Marines in receiving medical aid much earlier than would otherwise have been possible, resulting in saving several lives. His conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty were an inspiration to all men and contributed in large measure to his company repulsing the enemy attack and regaining the fire superiority. Hospitalman Hammett's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East, Serial 2459 (March 27, 1951). Born: November 5, 1928. Home Town: Jefferson, Georgia. Death: KIA: October 1, 1950.

Hammond, Hugo (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Hugo Hammond (MCSN: 623926), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 November 1950. With his platoon engaged in a mission to guard a vehicle convoy loaded with supplies for an infantry unit, Private First Class Hammond was quick to act when a numerically superior enemy force suddenly attacked with small arms and machine guns. Repeatedly exposing himself to heavy enemy fire, he carried messages from his platoon leader to vehicles in the convoy and, when his platoon leader became a casualty during the bitter engagement, unhesitatingly risked his life to go to his aid. Mortally wounded during his valiant attempt to aid another, Private First Class Hammond served as an inspiration to all who observed him, and his cool courage, selfless efforts and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 22, 1928 at Birmingham, Alabama. Home Town: Geneva, Alabama. Death: KIA: November 2, 1950 - Buried at: Pleasant Ridge Cemetery - Geneva, Alabama.

Hammonds, Willie P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Willie P. Hammonds (MCSN: 983927), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. With the platoon subjected to devastating hostile automatic weapons, mortar and small arms fire and temporarily unable to advance while engaged in an attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Staff Sergeant Hammonds charged forward through the heavy enemy fire to lead his squad in a series of vicious assaults on the hostile bunkers. Although he suffered painful wounds twice during the engagement, he refused medical attention until the enemy had been completely routed and the position secured. By his outstanding leadership, valiant fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty in the face of intense hostile fire, Staff Sergeant Hammonds contributed greatly to the success of the mission and served to inspire all who observed his fearless actions, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Carrolton, Mississippi. Home Town: Winona, Mississippi.

Hampton, Edgar Wade (2nd award)

Headquarters Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 155 - 31 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Colonel Edgar Wade Hampton (AFSN: 1805A/ASN: 0-22468), United States Air Force, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as Commanding Officer of the 314th Combat Cargo Wing, FIFTH Air Force, during the period 16 October to 23 October 1950. On 17 October 1950, Colonel Hampton personally performed a detailed aerial reconnaissance deep within enemy territory in order to study terrain surrounding an intended drop zone and determine the strength of enemy fire. On 20 October 1950, Colonel Hampton personally led 120 aircraft on the airborne invasion of the Sukchon-Sunchon area of Korea. Colonel Hampton led the unarmed aircraft of his organization over the drop zone and heavily defended enemy positions at extremely low altitude, thereby exposing himself to intense enemy ground fire. The heroism, courage, and unfaltering devotion to duty demonstrated by Colonel Hampton on these extremely hazardous missions reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Hamrick, Clifford D.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 170 - 11 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry), [then Sergeant First Class] Clifford D. Hamrick (ASN: 0-2262109), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Ch'ang-yong, Korea, on 17 August 1950. During an attack, his platoon was held up by fire from a well-concealed machine gun. Unable to locate the gun's position from his immediate area he moved forward into the withering fire. With complete disregard for his own safety he stood up, drawing on himself the full fury of the enemy's fire. Although wounded in this heroic action he successfully located the gun and leading his platoon, destroyed it. Lieutenant Hamrick's gallant example reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Columbus, Georgia.

Hancock, John Richard (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant John Richard Hancock (MCSN: 0-39544), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 28 November to 11 December 1950. On 28 November, when his company was ordered to occupy and defend a ridge overlooking Yudam-ni, First Lieutenant Hancock personally reconnoitered the ridge, returned to lead his men up its slope, and succeeded in relieving elements of a friendly unit under heavy fire. Successfully directing the attack of two of his platoons, he aided his company in attaining defensible ground and in preventing the enemy from firing into the regimental area. For three nights and two days he directed the fighting of his company against a numerically superior hostile force which occupied well-concealed positions on commanding ground. Foregoing rest, and despite badly frostbitten feet, he courageously exposed himself to heavy enemy fire, guiding and controlling the defense of his positions and supervising the evacuation of casualties. On 1 December, after having covered the movement of other regimental units, he was ordered to withdraw his company, the last unit to leave the original regimental defense perimeter. Despite a lack of artillery and air support, and although the enemy was in immediate pursuit and rapidly gaining advantageous firing positions, he successfully covered the movement by the skillful use of machine gun fire. On 7 December, when a strong hostile force penetrated the regimental defense perimeter and he was ordered to reinforce the unit under attack, he personally led his platoons into the penetrated areas during sub-zero temperatures and darkness, reformed the defense line and guided his sector in the repulse of the hostile assault. Hid daring initiative, outstanding leadership and superb courage in the face of enemy fire reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Hancock and the United States Naval Service. Born: January 3, 1924 at Craig, Nebraska. Home Town: Craig, Nebraska. Death: KIA: February 7, 1951 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Handwerger, John

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal John Handwerger (MCSN: 1035596), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When the company was subjected to a series of violent attacks by a numerically superior hostile force during the hours of darkness, three of Corporal Handwerger's machine guns were put out of action and their crews became casualties. Braving the furious hail of hostile mortar, small arms and automatic weapons fire, he skillfully repaired the weapons and put them back into action, manning one gun himself and employing ammunition bearers on the others. A brave and determined leader, he delivered devastating fire upon the enemy until his gun was hit and damaged beyond repair, whereupon he assisted in the evacuation of casualties, dashing repeatedly into fire-swept areas to carry wounded comrades to safety. By his outstanding courage, quick initiative and resolute determination, Corporal Handwerger served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bronx, New York. Home Town: Iselin, New Jersey.

Hane, Lloyd L. (posthumous)

Corporal Lloyd L. Hane, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company I, 17th Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Chup-a-ri, Korea. On 2 and 3 September 1951, a numerically superior enemy force counterattacked the friendly position on a strategic hill. Corporal Hane, a machine gunner, immediately advanced forward to an exposed position and began to fire his weapon rapidly and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy. Although hurled from his gun emplacement by the concussion of exploding enemy grenades, he quickly returned to his weapon and continued to offer stiff resistance to the enemy. When his weapon was partially disabled, he repaired it completely, using parts from a damaged machine gun. Although burned by an enemy phosphorous grenade, he continued, with complete disregard for his personal safety, to man his weapon until he was mortally wounded by an enemy sniper. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Hane reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest tradition of the military service. Home of record: Rippey, Iowa.

Hanes, Lucius E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Sergeant Lucius E. Hanes (MCSN: 622239), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving as Squad Leader, First Squad, Second Platoon, Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 September 1950 during the assault on Hill 105 in the outskirts of Seoul. Sergeant Hanes was assigned the mission of the initial assault of Hill 105, a vital terrain feature in the First Battalion and Regimental Zone of action, defended by heavily entrenched enemy forces and covered by enemy machine gun, mortar and artillery fire. With a high degree of courage, skill, and outstanding leadership, he led his squad up the side of the hill against fierce enemy fire. Upon capturing the hill, Sergeant Hanes was ordered back off the hill because of intense enemy artillery and mortar fire. A concentration of our own artillery fire was placed on the hill and again Sergeant Hanes led his squad up the hill under intense enemy machine gun and small arms fire from his left flank, destroyed the enemy thereon, and reoccupied Hill 105. Upon successful completion of his assignment he reorganized his squad and continued the attack. Sergeant Hanes' heroic actions were instrumental in enabling the First Battalion to capture the objective and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 5 (September 27, 1950).

Haney, J. Bruce

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 67 - 5 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery) J. Bruce Haney (ASN: 0-2208529), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division on 10 July 1950 at Yongdeng, Korea. Displaying great courage and leadership Lieutenant Haney, as forward observer for his battery, remained at his post even after the Infantry had withdrawn and continued to observe and direct artillery fire on enemy positions. He stayed until the enemy overran his position with armor and Infantry at which time he called for artillery on himself and the enemy. When direction of fire was no longer possible he escaped over an extremely dangerous and hazardous route of several thousand yards under direct fire from tanks. Upon return to his unit he immediately drew supplies and returned to the front for successive operations. His outstanding courage and devotion to duty reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri.

Hanger, Albert H.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 9 - January 15, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry), [then Second Lieutenant] Albert H. Hanger (ASN: 0-960311), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company B, 15th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, in Korea. On 23 November 1950, near Majon-ni, Korea, Lieutenant Hanger was Platoon Leader of the forward element of Company B, which was advancing through a valley in an effort to make contact with the 3d Republic of Korea Marine Battalion. As the company proceeded, it suddenly received intense fire from the enemy. Although his platoon was being fired upon from three directions, Lieutenant Hangar, who was subjected and exposed to the intense fire of the enemy, moved throughout his platoon area directing its fire and giving words of encouragement to his men. When the order to withdraw was given, Lieutenant Hanger was assigned the task of covering the withdrawal of the company; and as a result of his leadership, many wounded personnel were evacuated successfully. Lieutenant Hanger's outstanding leadership and gallantry reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Hanlon, Edmund W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Edmund W. Hanlon (MCSN: 0-49703), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Fearlessly exposing himself to small arms, machine gun, grenade and mortar fire while his sector of the defense line was under attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Second Lieutenant Hanlon moved among his men to direct and supervise accurate and effective fire. When the exchange of fire became point-blank and the enemy penetrated a portion of his position, he boldly advanced along his platoon front, to the flanks and along the rear, encouraging his men to greater efforts. On one occasion, he personally engaged hostile troops with his sub-machine gun and succeeded in killing seventeen of the enemy and wounding many others. By his indomitable courage, inspiring leadership and steadfast devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming opposition, Second Lieutenant Hanlon contributed materially to successful repelling of the hostile attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Boston, Massachusetts. Home Town: Dorchester, Massachusetts.

Hanrahan, William P. Jr.

Hanrahan's Battle Exploits Related

With the Third Infantry Division in Korea - A Greenville officer has recently been awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action in Korea.  First Lieutenant William P. Hanrahan, Jr., son of Mrs. R.B. Thomas of 435 Neff Street, was awarded the decoration while serving as a machinegun platoon leader with D Company, 15th Infantry.  The 27-year-old officer's platoon was leading a motorized convoy which was proceeding between Majon-ni and Tongyong, Korea, when the column was ambushed by a well entrenched, cleverly camouflaged enemy.  Lt. Hanrahan immediately moved to the nearest machinegun and directed heavy fire on the enemy.  In the ensuing battle the black-haired, 185-pound southerner was wounded in the arm, neck and head.  However, despite his painful wounds he remained with his platoon and led his men to move [line lost in photocopy given to KWE] ... toward tenable positions.  Still not content, Hanrahan then returned to the ambush area and assisted in removing wounded personnel and weapons and equipment.  Only after all the other wounded had been treated would the lieutenant accept aid for himself.  The citation read in part, "the selfless devotion to duty, heroic actions, and gallantry displayed by Lt. Hanrahan reflect great credit on himself and the military service."

The tall, young officer is a 1942 graduate of McComb High School.  He spent four years at Mississippi State College in Starkville where he received a commission as Second Lieutenant through the ROTC.  In 1948 he was ordered to active duty with the Third Infantry Division, then training at Fort Benning, Georgia.  He sailed for Korea with the famous 15th "Can Do" Regiment and participated in the bitter battles of the Hamhung-Hungnam beachhead.  Completely recovered from his wounds, Lt. Hanrahan is once again leading his platoon in the fight against Communist aggression in Korea.  His wife, the former Martha Ann Solomon, also of Greenville, resides at 418 North Willett Street, Memphis.

Hansen, George Herman (posthumous)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 421 - 1952

First Lieutenant George Herman Hansen, A02086385, United States Air Force, (posthumously).  Lieutenant Hansen distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Flight Commander, 8th Fighter Bomber Squadron, 49th Fighter Bomber Group, on 27 April 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Hansen led a flight of four F-84E type aircraft in an attack against enemy rail lines near Sukchon, Korea, where they scored several rail cuts.  Later, while making a strafing pass on a building, Lieutenant Hansen discerned that it housed a live locomotive.  Quickly contacting another flight which had retained its bombs, Lieutenant Hansen made several strafing passes through heavy automatic weapons fire to establish the target's exact position.  Disregarding his own personal safety, he provided protection for the attacking flight by strafing enemy gun positions, through heavy automatic weapons fire.  Through Lieutenant Hansen's superior combat tactics and directions, the flight was able to destroy the locomotive, the repair building housing the locomotive, and one gun position.  Through his keen airmanship, high personal courage, and outstanding devotion to duty, Lieutenant Hansen reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.  Home of Record: Davenport, Iowa.

Hanson, Fred W.

General Orders No. 313 - 3 August 1953
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Sergeant Fred W. Hanson,US28100328, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United states Army. On the afternoon of 10 June 1953, Company "F" assaulted enemy defended positions on Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. Sergeant Hanson, who had been searching for alternate enemy positions, located a heavily defended cave held by the enemy forces. Organizing a supporting element to cover his approach, Sergeant Hanson, armed with grenades, advanced through a devastating hail of enemy fire towards the well fortified cave. Arriving at the desired location amidst the fire which the enemy were directing against him, he hurled his grenades through the opening of the cave and effectively neutralized the position. Sergeant Hanson's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from California.

Hansotte, Henri E.


Second Lieutenant
Henri E. Hansotte

(Click picture for a larger view)

General Orders No. 270 - 31 May 1953

Second Lieutenant Henri E. Hansotte, 01874677, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 31st Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sokkogae, Korea.  On 17 April 1953, during an intensive offensive by numerically superior enemy forces, Lieutenant Hansotte moved into a key position in the battered command post where he could better observe the actions of the enemy.  When hordes of the fanatical enemy charged through their own artillery and mortar fire, Lieutenant Hansotte stood in an exposed position in order to direct plunging fire on them.  Although knocked from his position by the blasts from enemy artillery, mortar, and satchel charge fire, Lieutenant Hansotte returned to the position again and again, inflicting numerous casualties among the enemy.  The fearless determination and aggressive leadership exhibited by Lieutenant Hansotte were sources of great inspiration to all members of the organization and contributed materially to the successful defense of the command post.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Hansotte reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Massachusetts.

[KWE Note: The original Silver Star orders listed Henri Hansotte incorrectly as Henry Hansotte.]

Harcourt, Carl Craig (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Carl Craig Harcourt (NSN: 3516850), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 February 1952. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Harcourt displayed outstanding initiative and courage during an intense enemy mortar barrage. With complete disregard for his own safety he left his covered position to go to the aid of a wounded Marine. While running to the wounded man he was killed by enemy mortar fire, gallantly giving his life for his country. His selfless devotion to duty was an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Harcourt's courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 30716 (October 12, 1952). Born: February 24, 1952. Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Death: KIA: May 7, 1932.

Hardaway, Thomas Gray (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 204 - 26 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Thomas Gray Hardaway (ASN: 0-59232), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company I, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Kyong-ju, Korea, on 8 September 1950. During an attack by a group of heavily armed enemy troops that had infiltrated into the company rear area, Lieutenant Hardaway immediately led a squad of his men to face the enemy in an attempt to stop their advance by his concentrated fire power. After deploying his men to assure the maximum effect from their fire, he attacked ahead of his men with grenades. Through his repeated grenade attacks many of the enemy were killed and his squad successfully repulsed the hostile attack. During this gallant action, Lieutenant Hardaway was killed. His gallantry and unhesitant devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Born: November 22, 1926. Home Town: Brigham City, Utah. Death: KIA: September 8, 1950 - Buried at: U.S. Military Academy Cemetery - West Point, New York.

Hardigan, Kenneth A. (posthumous)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 660 - 21 December 1952

First Lieutenant Kenneth A. Hardigan, A01911416, United States Air Force (posthumously).  Lieutenant Hardigan distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 9th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 49th Fighter-Bomber Group, on 31 July 1952.  Leading a flight of four F-84 type aircraft, Lieutenant Hardigan flew on an armed reconnaissance mission along a main supply route in the Songnae-ri, Korea, area.  Having detected activity at one point along the main supply route, but reluctant to jeopardize his entire flight, Lieutenant Hardigan elected to make a lone strafing pass.  During his attack, intense and accurate ground fire scored a hit on the right wing of Lieutenant Hardigan's aircraft.  With the control of his aircraft in a critical state, Lieutenant Hardigan courageously led his flight in a devastating attack in an effort to insure the destruction of the target.  His competent leadership and flying ability resulted in five hits on the target.  Through his outstanding devotion to duty and gallantry in the face of the enemy, Lieutenant Hardigan reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Force, and the United States Air Force.

Hardin, Vernon C. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Vernon C. Hardin (ASN: RA-14297781), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 11 October 1950, near Kaesong, Korea. When it became necessary for an area in front of advancing friendly infantry troops to be cleared of concealed anti-personnel mines, Private Hardin immediately volunteered for the dangerous assignment. Although intense artillery and mortar shells were rocking and showering the mine field with jagged shrapnel, he moved out with his men detection equipment and courageously started to sweep the area. Forced to fling himself upon the ground when shells exploded close by, Private Hardin quickly arose after each burst and doggedly continued to search for the traps of death that would threaten his fellow soldiers if not found and removed. While engaged in this mission, Private Hardin made the supreme sacrifice when he was struck by enemy mortar fire. His extreme bravery and courageous devotion to duty, at the cost of his own life, aided materially in clearing a mined area for the passage of infantry troops. Private Hardin's gallantry is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Harms, Garriet A. (posthumous)

"Private First Class Garriet A. Harms Jr., US55068089, Infantry, U.S. Army, Company G, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, is cited for gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 8-9 October 1951, near Honangni, Korea. As the enemy attacked friendly emplacements with wave after wave of fanatical troops. Private Harms, a machine gunner, was inflicting severe casualties on them, when his weapon developed a malfunction. In spite of the heavy fire the foe was directly on him, Private Harms stood up, calmly repaired the weapon, and resumed firing into the charging Chinese with deadly accuracy. Then the friendly troops were forced to withdraw, Private Harms was in the process of giving them covering fire, when he was fatally wounded." - Monticello Express, April 10, 1952

Harms, Roy C.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 535 - 21 December 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Roy C. Harms (ASN: 0-1338229), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company I, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action near Chup'a-ri, Korea. On 3 September 1951, Captain Harms' company received four counterattacks from a numerically superior hostile force. During the ensuing action, Captain Harms directed the defense of the company's positions from his command post which was constantly exposed to heavy enemy small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. Calling upon his vast knowledge of tactics, he maneuvered his depleted company and successfully repulsed the enemy attacks. On several occasions, the enemy force drove to within ten yards of the command post and Captain Harms exchanged carbine fire and grenades with the enemy and inflicted several casualties, forcing the remainder to withdraw. Using his one operable radio, he maintained contact with higher echelons and directed the tactical air support. Throughout the entire battle, he continuously exposed himself with complete disregard for his personal safety and although eleven members of a forward observer party in his immediate area became casualties, he refused to vacate his exposed position and constantly moved about, encouraging and advising the men. Through his courageous and inspiring leadership, the enemy assaults were halted and severe casualties inflicted while Captain Harms' company received only negligible casualties. The gallantry displayed by Captain Harms reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. From Iowa.

Harnack, Milo L.

The Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to Sergeant First Class Milo L. Harnack, US-55217213, Infantry, Company B, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 12 June 1953, Company B had the mission of defending a friendly held outpost in the vicinity of ??ngnae-dong, Korea, when the enemy launched an assault against them. As the enemy stormed the friendly position, Sergeant Harnack, a machine gunner stationed on the forward slope, fired his weapon with effective accuracy. Constantly vulnerable to the intense enemy barrage and though his position was enveloped by the enemy forces, he refused to vacate his post and seek shelter. During the ensuing fire fight, his weapon jammed. Observing enemy forces advancing on several wounded comrades, he rushed from his emplacement and lunged toward the enemy, throwing grenades as he ran, dispatching the foe before they could reach the wounded. He thereupon summoned help and had the wounded safely evacuated. He continued to battle the foe until assured that they had been driven off the outpost. Sergeant First Class Harnack’s outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Harney, Cornelius Francis (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Cornelius Francis Harney (MCSN: 332617), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 31 August - 1 September 1953. Refusing evacuation when hit by enemy fire during the initial stages of a hostile ground attack, Staff Sergeant Harney bravely continued to lead and inspire his men. Undeterred by his wounds, he unselfishly assisted in the evacuation of other Marine casualties and, in the face of intense and heavy enemy fire, continued to direct the fire of his platoon until he fell, mortally wounded. By his cool courage, inspiring leadership and zealous devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Harney was instrumental in the successful accomplishment of his platoon's defensive mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 18, 1926 at Jersey City, New Jersey. Home Town: Jersey City, New Jersey. Death: KIA: September 1, 1952.

Harp, Robert E.

General Orders No. 256 - 14 July 1953
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Second Lieutenant Robert E. Harp, 01926049, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 10 June 1953, Company "F" commenced an attack on heavily entrenched hostile positions on Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. After destroying two enemy held caves on the forward slope in the initial contact, the assault was momentarily halted by intense hostile small arms, grenade and mortar fire. Immediately, Lieutenant Harp, who was in command of a support element, made his way to the most forward point of advance. Calling for volunteers, heavily armed with grenades, he led his men in a charge across the shell torn crest and descended on the enemy defenses. While hurling grenades with devastating accuracy and ordering his men to effective action, a hostile concussion grenade exploded at his side. Stunned and dazed by the explosion, he nevertheless led his men straight to the enemy trenches, ordering them to return to friendly lines only when ammunition was expended. He permitted himself to be evacuated only when ordered to do so by his commanding officer. Lieutenant Harp's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Ohio.

Harrell, James E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant James E. Harrell, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Platoon Leader, Anti-tank Assault Platoon, Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 5 - 6 December 1950. When an enemy force estimated at company strength attacked, under cover of darkness, his position at a roadblock protecting the main enemy route of approach, Second Lieutenant Harrell skillfully led his men in repulsing the hostile force. After reorganizing his unit and replenishing his ammunition supply, he voluntarily moved forward of the company sector with two of his men in the face of a hail of enemy fire, and directed and delivered effective enfilade fire on the attackers, personally accounting for at least six of the estimated thirty enemy killed. With the rest of the enemy forced to withdraw, Second Lieutenant Harrell returned to his roadblock position after covering the withdrawal of his two men over open, fire-swept ground. Throughout the remainder of the night, he toured his positions, aided his men in any way he could, and succeeded in maintaining the integrity of his assigned area. Second Lieutenant Harrell's outstanding leadership and inspiring initiative were contributing factors in the successful defense of the Battalion's positions. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Waco, Texas. Home Town: Waco, Texas.

Harrigan, William Edward (posthumous)

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 276 - 31 May 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal William Edward Harrigan (ASN: US-55171979), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action near Sokkogae, Korea. On 23 March 1953, heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire began falling on the friendly positions in conjunction with enemy attacks against strategic friendly-held outposts. During this attack, Corporal Harrigan, a squad leader in the weapons platoon, moved from position to position, shifting his men to fill in the gaps in the defenses and aiding in the evacuation of the friendly wounded. Continuing to patrol the fire-swept trenches, Corporal Harrigan, ignoring the intense enemy fire, encouraged and calmed the fighting men until he was killed by an enemy artillery round. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Harrigan reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Harrington, Clinton F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Clinton F. Harrington, Jr. (MCSN: 1112861), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner in a 60-mm. Mortar Section of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. With his sector under attack by a numerically superior hostile force employing small arms, machine guns and hand grenades, Corporal Harrington immediately placed his mortar section in an exposed position to deliver accurate fire on a large concentration of hostile troops and, although constantly subjected to intense enemy machine gun fire, remained at his post and delivered effective fire to inflict heavy casualties among the attackers, reduce their fire power and contribute to the repulse of the attack. By his daring and aggressive leadership, bold combat tactics and courageous actions in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Harrington was in large measure responsible for the effective cover provided his company during the intensive engagement, and his staunch devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Boston, Massachusetts. Home Town: Boston, Massachusetts.

Harrington, Eldridge (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 209 - 29 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Eldridge Harrington (ASN: RA-17010292), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. During the establishment of the Naktong River beachhead, his platoon, attacking an enemy strong point was subjected to intense machine gun fire killing the platoon leader and wounding many others. Sergeant Harrington, assuming command, reorganized the platoon, led the assault and the men, inspired by his gallant example overran the positions. His courageous actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Faulkner, Arkansas. Death: KIA: November 5, 1950.

Harrington, James A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant James A. Harrington (MCSN: 888407), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 April 1952. When the outpost position to which his unit was attached was brought under an intense hostile artillery barrage and attacked by an overwhelming and fanatical enemy force, Technical Sergeant Harrington courageously reorganized his section and other members of the platoon and skillfully set up a perimeter defense. Moving form one section of the perimeter to the other throughout the night, he encouraged and inspired his men to withstand the numerous attacks of the enemy. By his outstanding courage, initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Technical Sergeant Harrington contributed materially to the successful defense of the position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cameron, North Carolina. Home Town: Portsmouth, Virginia.

Harrington, William L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 35 - February 9, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class William L. Harrington (ASN: RA-44064266), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 1 September 1950, in the vicinity of Tongaen-ni, Korea. On that date powerful enemy forces crossed the Naktong River and succeeded in overrunning several front line units. An enemy force of estimated company strength attacked Sergeant Harrington's platoon, subjecting its position to withering automatic weapons fire which pinned the platoon down. Sergeant Harrington immediately and with complete indifference for his personal safety dashed through the intense hostile fire to the squad nearest the enemy. Organizing the men under fire, he led them in a counterattack against the enemy's right flank, employing marching fire as he ran forward. Following his fearless leadership the squad succeeded in overrunning the enemy, causing them to withdraw with heavy losses and in disorder. When the enemy launched another attack with a still larger force, he received orders to withdraw. Refusing to abandon his advantageous position, he held his unit in place, inflicting great casualties upon the advancing enemy and withdrew only when the company had effected an orderly withdrawal. His heroic actions permitted the orderly disengagement of his company with a minimum of casualties. The gallantry and inspiring leadership displayed on this occasion by Sergeant Harrington reflect great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.

Harris, Allen L.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 104 - 28 December 1950

Private First Class Allen L. Harris, RA14223524, Company "D", 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Majon-Ni, Korea, on 29 November 1950.  On this date as a gunner for a light machine gun, he was a member of a combat patrol.  As the patrol proceeded along a narrow mountainous road, it was attacked by superior enemy forces.  Other members of the machine gun squad ran for cover.  Private First Class Harris saw that heavy fire was being placed on a 75 millimeter recoilless rifle squad.  Heedless of intense and accurate enemy fire, with no thought of his own personal safety, Private First Class Harris immediately went to their position and commended firing on enemy positions.  Without the aid of his tripod, it was necessary that he fire his weapon from his hip.  This he did until he had expended all his ammunition.  He called in vain for more ammunition to be brought forward.  Realizing that none of his gun crew were around, he dashed to the rear, across open terrain, exposed to enemy fire. Obtaining the ammunition with the aid of another enlisted man, they returned across the same route to the original position.  Once more he commenced firing effectively on enemy positions, ceasing only to allow his machine gun to col.  By his actions he kept the brunt of fire away from the 75 millimeter gun crew, enabling it to perform more efficiently.  The gallantry displayed by Private First Class Harris on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Alabama.

Harris, Chester R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Chester R. Harris (MCSN: 0-20945), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 May 1952. Volunteering to fly a slow, unarmed aircraft on a search mission for a pilot who had been forced down in enemy territory, Captain Harris proceeded to search the valleys and hills at extremely low altitude in the face of heavy enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire. Losing radio communications, he returned to base and immediately resumed the search in another plane. Despite heavy anti-aircraft fire, he continued the mission until darkness compelled him to return. By his indomitable courage and unyielding devotion to duty in the face of grave danger, Captain Harris served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Subiaco, Arkansas. Home Town: Jonesboro, Arkansas.

Harris, Clarence A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 195 - 22 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Clarence A. Harris (ASN: RA-35280954), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Waegwan, Korea, on 23 September 1950. During an attack his platoon was held up by intense machine gun fire. Although wounded in this action he refused to be evacuated and with utter disregard for his own safety, left a position of relative security, advancing through a hail of withering fire to retrieve a fallen comrade lying in an exposed position. Despite his own wounds he continued in the fight, assuming command when the platoon leader was wounded and directed the platoon's fire until the mission had been successfully completed. Sergeant Harris' gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Akron, Ohio.

Harris, Elmer W.


(Click picture for a larger view)

By direction of the President, Major Elmer Wayne Harris, AO 433840, United States Air Force, has been awarded the Silver Star.

Major Elmer W. Harris distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a pilot, 25th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, 51st Fighter Interceptor Group, on 28 April 1952.  On that date, Major Harris was flying number three position in a flight of four F-86 type aircraft when the flight was attacked by a much larger force of enemy planes.  The enemy's determined aggressiveness caused the flight to split into elements, and during a defensive maneuver, Major Harris' element was forced to break up.  Immediately three of the enemy planes attacked the wingman and two attacked Major Harris.  Disregarding his own precarious situation, Major Harris attacked the three MIGs, shooting one of them down and forcing the other two to break off.  Then Major Harris switched his attention to his own attackers, but before he could gain the offensive, his wingman was again attacked by a flight of enemy planes.  For the second time Major Harris completely disregarded personal safety to aid his wingman, and again he destroyed one of the enemy planes and forced the others to break off their attack.  Through his high courage, aggressive airmanship, and outstanding devotion to duty in the face of direct enemy attack, Major Harris reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Click HERE for a PDF of the original Citation.
Click HERE for a newspaper clipping about the presentation.

Harris, Howard Hodges (1st award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Howard Hodges Harris (MCSN: 0-48095), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 November 1950. First Lieutenant Harris, commanding "Item" Company, fearlessly and courageously led his company in the attack of a heavily fortified enemy position known as "Hill H," in the vicinity of Sumgori. The company was separated when a rifle platoon and weapons platoon were flanked and counterattacked by the enemy. He continued to lead his First and Second Platoons forward despite enemy hand grenades and heavy automatic weapons fire. Just short of the objective, he was directed to withdraw his company because of the heavy casualties suffered. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, First Lieutenant Harris continually exposed himself to enemy fire while reorganizing and directing the withdrawal of the company and supervising the evacuation of the dead and wounded. His skillful and courageous leadership undoubtedly saved the lives of many men. First Lieutenant Harris' heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.   Born: Hamilton, Ohio. Home Town: Hamilton, Ohio.

Harris, Howard Hodges (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Howard Hodges Harris (MCSN: 0-48095), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company H, Third Battalion Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 December 1950. Painfully wounded in the leg by hostile rifle fire while leading a company attack against a well-entrenched enemy on high ground, First Lieutenant Harris courageously continued to spearhead the assault under intense hostile fire, refusing to be evacuated and remaining at the head of his unit until the objective was secured several hours later. His cool leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty served to inspire the officers and men of his command and were contributing factors in the successful seizure of the objective, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hamilton, Ohio. Home Town: Hamilton, Ohio.

Harris, John E.

General Orders No. 517 - 16 November 1951
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Lieutenant Colonel John E. Harris, 0370107, Infantry, Headquarters and  Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 29 September 1951, the 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry, was attacking strong enemy positions near Chorwon, Korea. When the attack tended to falter and become disorganized, Colonel Harris, with complete disregard for his safety, moved across more than 500 yards of open terrain, rocked by intense hostile artillery, mortar and small arms fire to establish his observation post on line with the attacking elements, from where he was able to rally the wavering men and consolidate the position for the night. The following day, he personally directed and advanced with the rifle elements to the point where the attack gained the momentum necessary to accomplish the mission., During the advance, Colonel Harris was constantly exposed and subjected to hostile fire from automatic weapons and mortars; however, he undauntedly continued to direct the attack. For the remainder of the engagement, Colonel Harris operated from a forward position, much nearer to attacking elements than necessary, in order to  maintain immediate control. The gallant leadership and exemplary courage displayed by Colonel Harris reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Harris, Rachael (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 244 - 26 October 1950

Sergeant Rachael Harris, RA34152985, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 24th Infantry, United States Army.  When the regimental command post near Haman, Korea was assaulted by a strong enemy force on the morning of 2 September 1950, Sergeant Haman's group of outposts received the brunt of the attack.  Repeatedly exposing himself to the intense enemy fire, Sergeant Harris effectively adjusted the fire of each outpost on important targets until he was mortally wounded.  Sergeant Harris' courageous leadership and unswerving devotion to duty were largely responsible for repelling the attack, and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Michigan.

Harris, Richard E. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Richard E. Harris (MCSN: 343400), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Section Leder in a Machine Gun Platoon of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 September 1950. Although subjected to intense enemy small arms, mortar and machine gun fire during a vicious attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Sergeant Harris moved his machine gun to an exposed position to direct accurate and devastating fire on the enemy. Steadfastly refusing to take cover, he remained in this position until he fell, mortally wounded. By his outstanding courage, valiant fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Harris contributed directly to the successful repulse of the hostile assault and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 21, 1924 at Athens, Tennessee. Home Town: Athens, Tennessee. Death: KIA: September 26, 1950 - Buried at: Cedar Grove Cemetery - Athens, Tennessee.

Harris, Theodore R. "Ted"

[KWE Note: Ted Harris was the last POW repatriated through Freedom Village in 1953.]

By direction of the President, Captain Theodore R. Harris, AO 782261, United States Air Force, has been awarded the Silver Star.

Citation:

Captain Theodore R. Harris distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as Aircraft Commander of RB-29 type aircraft, 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, Far East Air Force, on the night of 3 July 1952.  On that date, Captain Harris flew on a highly classified mission into North Korea to gather photo intelligence of vital importance to United Nations operations.  Just before the target was reached, the crew was warned that enemy MIGs were in the area and would probably attack since it was a clear night with full moon.  Despite this hazard, Captain Harris proceeded to the target, where radar-controlled searchlights and moderate flak were encountered.  At this time, numerous enemy MIGs began to initiate attacks in waves of three.  Even though hits from the second attack started a fire in the fuselage, Captain Harris continued his photographic run.  Another MIG attack scored hits on the left wing, causing fire which rapidly spread to the bomb bay tanks, at which time Captain Harris gave the order to bail out.  Without oxygen equipment now and suffering intense pain from flames in the cockpit and bomb bays, Captain Harris continued to maintain control of the heavily damaged aircraft.  Although the rudder was jammed and there was no control of the left elevator or left aileron, Captain Harris calmly remained at the controls, fighting to keep the ship straight and level.  Only after the crew had successfully bailed out did Captain Harris leave the aircraft.  Through the high personal courage he demonstrated by remaining at his controls despite intense pain so that his crew could abandon the aircraft, and through his intrepidity and exemplary devotion to duty, Captain Harris reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Harrison, Fred L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 47 - September 16, 1950, Amended by G.O. 55 (1950)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Fred L. Harrison (ASN: 0-224163), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Headquarters, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 9 August 1950, in the Naktong River Salient, near Yongsan, Korea. On the morning of 9 August 1950, the 2d Battalion of the 9th Infantry launched an attack in an effort to secure commanding ground in the Naktong River Salient. In the initial stages of the attack, Colonel Harrison was painfully wounded in the leg by enemy sniper fire. With complete disregard for his wounded condition, Colonel Harrison continued to direct and coordinate the attack of his battalion for approximately six hours, at which time the battalion had accomplished its mission. Colonel Harrison still refused to be evacuated for medical treatment for his wound, until he had been assured that all of the wounded within the battalion had been evacuated. Colonel Harrison's courageous and aggressive leadership were an inspiration to all that witnessed this action and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Harrison, William S.

Headquarters, Eighth US Army Korea
General Orders No. 428 - June 14, 1951

1st Lieutenant William S. Harrison, 01116226, Corps of Engineers, United States Army.  Lieutenant Harrison, a member of the United States Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Changsa-dong, Korea.  On 14 September 1950, when a Republic of Korea guerrilla type battalion made an amphibious landing behind enemy lines near Changsa-dong, Lieutenant Harrison voluntarily accompanied the unit as an advisor.  As the first company reached the beach, it was immediately pinned down by intense enemy fire.  Without regard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Harrison assumed command of the troops and led them in a successful attack on the key terrain feature overlooking the beach.  After receiving reinforcements, the enemy opened fire on the landing craft used by the friendly force, damaging it and causing it to run aground. When the reinforced enemy launched an attack against the friendly force, Lieutenant Harrison established a defense perimeter and moved from one position to another, encouraging the men and directing their fire.  Under his able leadership, the perimeter was successfully defended until additional landing craft arrived and the battalion was evacuated.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Harrison on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the federal service from Massachusetts.

Harter, George F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal George F. Harter (MCSN: 1095182), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 May 1951. When a numerically superior enemy force launched a fanatical attack while he was manning a position in the company defensive perimeter, Corporal Harter courageously exposed himself to a withering hail of enemy small arms and machine gun fire to fire accurate volleys with his rifle, killing or wounding many of the enemy who were attempting to overrun his sector. Later, after his squad was brought under heavy fire by an enemy machine gun, he and another member of the unit left their foxholes and fiercely assaulted the hostile emplacement, killing the crew and capturing the gun. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, Corporal Harter contributed materially to the successful repulse of the enemy attack and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Endicott, New York. Home Town: Binghamton, New York.

Harvey, Ben Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 75 - 27 February 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Corps of Engineers) Ben Harvey, Jr. (ASN: 0-40688), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer of the 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, near Tumok, Korea, during the period 13 through 15 October 1951. One of his companies had the mission of extending a road approximately five miles to enable tanks, artillery and mortars to move forward and give critically needed fire support to attacking infantry elements. Despite a concentrated sporadic hail of enemy small arms and artillery fire, Colonel Harvey personally supervised the operation. With complete disregard for his own safety, he repeatedly subjected himself to extreme physical danger to make reconnaissance through enemy minefields and under enemy observation, and continually exposed himself to hostile fire to direct the laying out of the route and to conduct its construction. Displaying outstanding determination and high professional skill, he quickly overcame problems of minefields, equipment breakdowns and precipitous terrain. Under his fearless, expert supervision, his men worked with inspired enthusiasm and accomplished the difficult task with outstanding success. Colonel Harvey's gallant actions, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of the company's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Home Town: Staunton, Virginia.

Harvey, Raymond (2nd Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 103 - December 15, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Raymond Harvey (ASN: 0-1286281), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action near Pungsan, Korea, on 2 November 1950. On this date, while assigned as Adjutant of the 1st Battalion, Captain Harvey received information that an infantry platoon was cut off by enemy action and in danger of annihilation near Pungsan. Voluntarily and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he proceeded to the scene of the action. Moving through heavy enemy automatic weapons fire with daring leadership and inspirational bravery, while constantly exposed to enemy observation, he succeeded in reorganizing the trapped unit and leading it in a successful attack on the enemy positions. During this action he crawled through heavy grazing fire in a daring effort to save the life of a wounded soldier. The gallantry displayed by Captain Harvey on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

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"The beloved and almost legendary American infantry captain lay naked on a hospital cot.  'I have got a Silver Star for you,' his commanding colonel announced proudly, 'But I don't see how I am going to pin it on.'  Despite extreme pain from a punctured back, Capt. Raymond Harvey, 32, Altadena, California, smiled.  'That's all right, Colonel,' he said.  'Pick a patch of skin and pin it on.'  The tough captain earned the coveted medal in his first of many reckless exploits which established him as the idol among his fighting men of C Company.  He took over the outfit in northeast Korea last November when its commander was wounded and led the first American company to the Yalu river on the Manchurian border.  The reason for his smashed back brought a recommendation for an even greater award--the Distinguished Service Cross.  It also meant a lengthy interruption of an almost legendary combat career.  Harvey arrived in Korea in the comparatively safe job of battalion adjutant.  He looked more like a successful businessman than a fighting infantryman.  His persistent requests for combat assignment went unheeded until a bitter November day near Pungsan.  From an observation post, he saw the Company C commander struck down.  Harvey dashed to the scene and took over.  Nobody dared take his command away after that day.  He had to fight his way through the enemy to a surrounded platoon.  He broke the trap and led the platoon to safety.  His orders that day and many days since were to fight fire with fire--to meet banzai charge with banzai charge.  Moreover, he insisted on being among the first to carry out his own orders.  'There was only one way the enemy could get him,' said Sgt. Jose Mendoza, Delano, Calif.  'They shot him in the back.  No gook ever met him face to face and lived to tell about it.'  Harvey fell this week while leading his company up treacherously steep Mt. Taemi in east central Korea's uncharted mountain wilderness.  He was fixing his bayonet for another daring charge into North Korean troops dug into rock pillboxes when a burst from an anti-tank rifle smashed into his back.  Harvey joshed with litter bearers on the agonizing six-hour evacuation down the mountains.  'We handled him like a baby,' said Cpl. Charles D. Farber, Altoona, Pa.  A helicopter took the beloved commander from the first aid station.  His men could hardly believe he was gone." - by William Burson

Harwood, Chester L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 7 - 26 March 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant Chester L. Harwood, RA6575336, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company G, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 25 and 26 November 1950 in the vicinity of Kujang-dong, Korea. Company G had attacked an enemy-held hill and was forced to withdraw after sustaining severe casualties. When fourteen wounded men were brought to the bottom of the hill, Sergeant Harwood voluntarily remained with the wounded soldiers. During the night, although the enemy had surrounded his position, he remained on constant guard, protecting the wounded. At dawn he went to the battalion command post, organized litter teams and led them back to the wounded men. His courageous action in remaining behind enemy lines resulted in saving the lives of all the wounded. The gallantry displayed by Serge ant Harwood reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Nebraska.

Haskins, Clinton J. (POW)

General Orders No. 79 - 8 August 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

Private Clinton J. Haskins, RA14333429, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 20 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. During the evacuation of Taejon, a 3/4 ton vehicle with a .50 caliber machinegun mounted was blocking the evacuation route of the convoy. Private Haskins voluntarily drove the 3/4 ton vehicle, stopping at intervals to man the machinegun and fire at enemy machinegun nests along the evacuation route, thereby clearing the route for the remainder of the convoy. After leaving Taejon, and although wounded himself, Private Haskins stayed behind the convoy to direct men still coming out of Taejon along the route of evacuation. This conspicuous act of gallantry on the part of Private Haskins reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered service from Cleveland, OH.

Hastings, Kester L.

BG Kester L. Hastings, QM of the Far East Command was recently awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action during the early stages of the Korean Campaign. In the words of the citation, General Hastings "voluntarily, and with complete disregard for his safety, made daring trips through areas under constant guerilla attack to obtain an accurate estimate of the situation vital to solving many complex problems that occur in logistical support during such critical periods. His presence in the forward areas under constant threat of enemy air attack and fire inspired personnel of the Quartermaster Corps to greater achievements and was a contributing factor in resolving supply problems, thus aiding united Nations' forces in the subsequent launching of a counteroffensive. General Hastings through his valor and tireless devotion to duty, reflected great credit on himself and upheld the highest traditions of the military service."

Hatch, Kenneth Martin

General Orders No. 277 - 21 December 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers) Kenneth Martin Hatch (ASN: 0-50640), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a member of the 72d Engineer Company, 24th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Hatch distinguished himself by courageous action near Waegan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. During the advance on the city his platoon was attached to an infantry battalion. The enemy was pounding the area with artillery which destroyed the only suitable bridge over a swift flowing stream and was pouring a hail of machine gun fire into the attacking troops. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Lieutenant Hatch unhesitatingly left his position of relative safety and moving through a hail of withering fire made a reconnaissance in order to find a suitable site for the construction of a sandbar bridge. Returning, he assembled his men and equipment and despite the continuous shelling and machine gun fire directed the swift construction of the bridge, thereby permitting the continued advance. Lieutenant Hatch's courageous action, devotion to duty and outstanding leadership reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Place of Birth: Alaska. Home of record: Florence, Oregon.

Hatfield, Raymond Davidson (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 26 - 3 April 1954

Captain Raymond Davidson Hatfield, Transportation Corps, United States Army, a general staff officer, Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action at Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950.  An overwhelming enemy force, supported by armor, penetrated the defenses of the division around the city of Taejon.  Captain Hatfield, the division transportation officer, with complete disregard for his safety and in the face of heavy enemy fire, personally directed efforts made to evacuate critical supplies and ammunition.  Although encouraged by his division commander to joint he forces rapidly withdrawing in the face of heavy enemy pressure, he remained forward and was frequently seen moving about under heavy small-arms fire attempting to repair a damaged locomotive and other rail equipment necessary to permit movement of an ammunition train to preclude its capture.  Later in the course of this action he was mortally wounded.  Captain Hatfield's act of gallantry was an inspiration to his comrades, reflects credit on himself, and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Hathaway, Jack W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Seaman Jack W. Hathaway (NSN: 2807918), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as the Bow Hood and member of an assault landing craft crew of the LCVP-18, attached to U.S.S. Seminole (AKA-104), during the amphibious assault against Inchon, Korea, on 15 September 1950. Without order in the face of enemy rifle and mortar fire he left the relative security of his boat and climbed the seawall to assist heavily burdened Marine troops to disembark rapidly, despite their urging that he jump down into the boat for protection. At about the time the last Marine disembarked, he was painfully wounded in his right leg and had to be lifted into the boat. He assisted materially in the successful landing of troops from his boat and contributed directly to the success of the operation. His daring initiative and courage were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1283 (December 28, 1950).

Hattan, Roy E.

General Orders No. 88 - 13 August 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

Lieutenant Colonel Roy E. Hattan, 017563, Field Artillery, United States Army, Commanding Officer of the 63rd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 19 July 1950, at Taejon, Korea. Having assumed command of the 63rd Field Artillery Battalion and equipment, Colonel Hattan, by exhibiting superior leadership reorganized the battalion for an effective perimeter defense of the Taejon Airstrip. Beginning at 0730 hours on 19 July 1950, the battalion and attached units were subjected to intense enemy mortar, artillery and tank fire, which lasted for a period of 10 hours. During that period Colonel Hattan personally controlled operations of the Battalion fire direction center, and despite inadequate communications and extreme adverse conditions, he continued to defend his position. After dark Colonel Hattan skillfully selected escape routes, and directed the withdrawal of all firing batteries into the town of Taejon and so placed them as to afford concealment from enemy observation. The withdrawal was accomplished without loss of men or equipment. Colonel Hattan was the last man to leave the air strip which was still under heavy enemy fire. This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of Colonel Hattan reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. GO 88, 13 August 1950. Colonel Hattan entered the service from San Antonio, TX.

Haugan, Gilbert D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Gilbert D. Haugan (MCSN: 1164513), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 June 1952. During an attack by a numerically superior enemy force, Private First Class Haugan courageously exposed himself to intense enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire to deliver accurate and effective machine gun fire, killing twenty and wounding countless enemy troops. Although thrown from his position by the concussion of a hostile mortar shell, he bravely crawled back to his gun and resumed firing. By his skill, determination and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Haugan was greatly instrumental in repelling the enemy attack. His exemplary courage and gallant spirit of self-sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Canton, South Dakota. Home Town: Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Hauge, Harry K.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 80 - August 25, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) Harry K. Hauge (ASN: 0-435925), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in Korea. On 25 July 1950 near Sangn-yong, Korea, the rear guard covering the withdraw of the 27th Infantry in the face of numerically superior enemy forces was subjected to heavy enemy artillery, mortar and automatic weapons fire in addition to the direct fire from the tanks; the enemy also threatened the right flank. Major Hauge, with calm determination and exemplary leadership, maintained control and directed operations of the rear guard until the entire regiment had completed a successful withdrawal. Major Hauge's outstanding courage and devotion to duty under the most adverse conditions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Havelka, Arnold (posthumous)

By direction of the President, Private First Class Arnold Havelka, US55077123, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star (Posthumously) for courageous action near Chuktae-ri, Korea, on 19 October 1951. Serving as ammunition bearer, Private Havelka determinedly delivered ammunition to the gunners over the rough terrain under an intense concentration of mortar fire. During the operation, the strongly entrenched enemy swept the friendly positions with devastating bursts of fire, inflicting several casualties and forcing the riflemen to seek cover. Seeing that some of his comrades had fallen in completely exposed positions, Private Havelka fearlessly sprang from his protective cover and with complete disregard for his own safety, raced through the hail of bullets to their side. Administering first aid, he lifted a man to his shoulders and hurriedly carried him to safety. He went forward again to rescue two other comrades, but as he returned with the last men, he was mortally wounded by small arms fire. Private Havelka’s gallant actions, indomitable spirit and self-sacrificing devotion to his comrades saved three lives which might otherwise have been lost and reflect the highest credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered military service from Prague, Nebraska.

Hawelu, Richard

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Richard Hawelu (MCSN: 1245313), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 19 - 20 March 1953. Encountering a hostile company forming for an attack while he was leading a six-man reconnaissance patrol on a mission of screening an outpost forward of the main lines, Corporal Hawelu fearlessly engaged the enemy in a brief fire fight, despite the overwhelming odds, in order to warn the outpost personnel of the impending danger. Skillfully taking advantage of the enemy's confusion created by his first volley of fire, he ordered the patrol to withdraw to the outpost, courageously exposing himself to the intense hostile mortar and small arms fire to direct the patrol's movements. Although painfully wounded during the action, he carried several of his wounded comrades back to the outpost before the enemy attack had gained full momentum and, once his unit had successfully disengaged and was re-established in the defense of the outpost, assisted the outpost leader during the subsequent battle. By his daring initiative, outstanding leadership and zealous devotion to duty in the face of heavy enemy fire, Corporal Hawelu served to inspire all who observed him and greatly aided in maintaining the integrity of the position, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kurtistown, Hawaii. Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii.

Hawkins, Captain Charles A.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 255 (3 July 1951)

Captain Charles A. Hawkins, 01295205, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 25 May 151 in the vicinity of Amsu-dong, Korea.  On that date, as Regimental Tactical Air Control Officer, he had the mission of controlling air strikes in support of a battalion which was attacking with the mission of taking a critical road junction.  As the battalion progressed down the road, it was halted by intense small arms and automatic weapons fire from the high ground on both sides of the road.  Without hesitation, Captain Hawkins proceeded forward to the advance elements of the battalions where he could better direct and control air strikes on the enemy positions.  Although the enemy fire was being directed on his position, he remained exposed and called in several air strikes causing numerous enemy casualties and thereby enabling the battalion to continue the attack with minimum losses.  The gallantry displayed by Captain Hawkins reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Hawkins, Jack

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Jack Hawkins (MCSN: 0-5931), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, during the period 16 to 29 September 1950. Lieutenant Colonel Hawkins, serving as Battalion Commander, fearlessly and courageously exposed himself to intense enemy fire while personally directing the offensive operations of his unit. He repeatedly occupied observation posts that were exposed to enemy small arms and machine gun fire without regard for his own personal safety and maintained the tactical control of his unit in the assault. His courageous conduct in steadfastly facing enemy fire was an inspiration to all members of his unit and materially aided in the successful completion of the assigned missions. Lieutenant Colonel Hawkins' display of initiative and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Roxton, Texas. Home Town: Roxton, Texas.

Hawkins, Wesley N.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 255 (3 July 1951)

Corporal Wesley N. Hawkins, RA14013598, (then Private First Class), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 30 May 1951 in the vicinity of Kosa-ri, Korea.  Company L was ordered to attack an enemy roadblock and Corporal Hawkins was acting platoon leader of the leading platoon in this attack.  As his platoon moved down the road, it suddenly came under heavy enemy mortar, small arms and automatic weapons fire, and had to seek cover.  Immediately Corporal Hawkins moved his men in firing positions and directed their fire at enemy targets.  Throughout the enemy assault, Corporal Hawkins moved from man to man encouraging them to hold their positions and shifting their fire to new targets.  The valiant stand made by the platoon, under his inspiring and heroic leadership was responsible for preventing the encirclement of the company when after a three hour firefight the opponent finally ceased his attack.  The gallantry demonstrated by Corporal Hawkins reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Florida.

Hawkins, William G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant William G. Hawkins (MCSN: 0-55897), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. When his platoon was subjected to intense hostile small arms and mortar fire during the final assault of a company raid on two strongly fortified enemy positions, Second Lieutenant Hawkins exposed himself to the heavy fire to shout words of encouragement to his men while employing the left portion of his unit in an enveloping maneuver and, personally hurling an explosive charge into an enemy-occupied bunker which was impeding the advance of the attack, fearlessly entered the position to kill the two occupants with his carbine. After conducting his unit's withdrawal from the objective, he returned to the top of the hill through intense hostile fire to assist in organizing a party to evacuate the wounded members of a machine gun crew which had been hit earlier in the attack and, when all personnel of a stretcher team became casualties during the evacuation, rushed to render aid to them. Despite severe wounds sustained while he was carrying a wounded man to safety, Second Lieutenant Hawkins refused medical treatment until all the other casualties were given aid, and left the area only after all of his men were out and all the equipment had been salvaged. By his outstanding courage, gallant fighting spirit and selfless devotion to the fulfillment of a vital task, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Richmond, Virginia. Home Town: Keysville, Virginia.

Haxton, Floyd C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Floyd C. Haxton (MCSN: 0-13627), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 September 1951. Flying over extremely mountainous terrain at minimum safe altitude during a night intruder mission in the area of Singosan, Major Haxton succeeded in locating a large enemy motor convoy proceeding through a steep defile and boldly attacked the column despite the extremely poor avenues of approach and retirement in relation to the target area. Undaunted by a continuous barrage of intense enemy anti-aircraft fire, he continued to press his attacks with relentless determination and completely destroyed a total of 20 hostile vehicles together with their associated loads. By his marked courage, brilliant airmanship and loyal devotion to duty, Major Haxton dealt a damaging blow to the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hayden, Colorado. Home Town: Fullerton, California.

Hay, Solomon L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 266 - 18 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Solomon L. Hay (ASN: 0-966210), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company I, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Anju, Korea, on 5 - 6 November 1950. During an attack the flank platoon of his company was pinned down by intense mortar and automatic weapons fire. Leading his platoon he moved to a position, from which he could place the fire of his automatic weapons and recoilless rifle sections on the enemy force. Completely disregarding personal safety he exposed himself to the enemy's fire, marking targets for his men, by firing accurate tracer ammunition into the enemy positions. The positions were soon destroyed and the advance continued. The enemy, regrouping later launched a strong counter attack against the company's positions. Lieutenant Hay, again unmindful of his own safety, displayed outstanding aggressiveness and although exposed to the full fury of the enemy's attack secured a light machine gun and firing from his hip, placed deadly fire on the advancing enemy. He fired with such devastating effect that the enemy withdrew in disorder leaving behind many dead and wounded. Lieutenant Hay's courageous actions, complete devotion to duty and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Johns Island, South Carolina.

Hayes, Mark Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Dentalman Mark Hayes, Jr., United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Amphibious Tractor Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 November 1950. Serving as a Corpsman in a train guard detail, which was engaged in a fire fight with numerically superior enemy forces, to protect a supply train and in support of a small United States Army signal unit trapped by enemy fire, Dentalman Hayes, hearing the army units call for "Corpsman," voluntarily and fearlessly attempted to cross an open enemy fire-swept area. Gathering several Marine volunteers about him, he led them across the open field and during this action, one Marine in the party was seriously wounded by enemy small arms fire. Dentalman Hayes with complete disregard for his own personal safety, moved to the side of the wounded Marine, administered first aid and remained with the patient to assist in evacuating him to a covered position. His aggressive actions and coolness under fire were an inspiration to all who observed him and undoubtedly prevented the wounded Marine from receiving further wounds. Dentalman Hayes' heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Hayes, Robert L. Jr.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 167 - 19 September 1950

Second Lieutenant Robert L. Hayes Jr., 01686792, Infantry, Heavy Mortar Company, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 24 July 1950 near Sanyong-ni, Korea, enemy tanks penetrated the perimeter and threatened to overrun a platoon which was running out of ammunition.  Lieutenant Hayes, although not assigned to the infantry platoon, met the ammunition truck and was leading it forward when an enemy tank fired point blank at his jeep, hit it and put it out of action.  Though stunned by the blast, Lieutenant Hayes quickly deployed his men and crawled forward to the platoon and rallied the men who were starting to displace.  The rocket launcher which he tried to fire failed, so he used hand grenades on the hostile tanks thereby diverting their action so that the platoon could withdraw to more secure positions.  Lieutenant Hayes' initiative, valorous leadership and personal example of undaunted courage reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Georgia.

Hayhurst, Jerimiah V. (1st Citation)

General Orders No. 176 - 9 June 1953
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

First Lieutenant (then Second Lieutenant) Jerimiah V. Hayhurst, 01918966, Infantry, Company "H", 65thInfantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 28 October 1952, the recoilless rifle platoon of Company "H", of which Lieutenant Hayhurst was leader, was assigned the mission of rendering fire support to friendly forces attacking "Jackson Heights", in the vicinity of Kangong-Ni, Korea. A hostile light artillery piece was delaying the friendly attack and because of the exposed position of the friendly forces, continuous delay would have caused numerous casualties. While relaying his fire command to his gun crews, Lieutenant Hayhurst's communications were destroyed by enemy artillery fire. With complete disregard for his safety, Lieutenant Hayhurst left his command post bunker and exposed himself to the intense enemy incoming artillery fire to personally carry the essential elements of fire data to his gun positions. While en route, he was struck by the force of an explosion from a close landing enemy shell, the flash blinding him and injuring his eyes. Although he was partially blinded, he reached his firing positions, giving each in turn the required data needed to accomplish the mission. His courage and steadfast determination resulted in the prompt delivery of the vital fire support which destroyed the enemy artillery piece and permitted the friendly forces to continue their attack. Lieutenant Hayhurst's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from California.

Hayhurst, Jerimiah V. (2nd Citation)

General Orders No. 195 - 2 December 1953
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

First Lieutenant Jerimiah V. Hayhurst, 01918966, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 16 May 1953, Company "G", holding a defensive position on Outpost "Harry", in the vicinity of Surang-Ni, Korea, was subjected to an intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage followed by an attack by a large enemy force. Despite the imminent danger from enemy fire, Lieutenant Hayhurst entered an ammunition storage point to retrieve a wounded comrade. While advancing through the devastated area to aid the wounded man. Lieutenant Hayhurst was subjected to constant enemy shell fire. Though at times his path came within close proximity of the falling enemy rounds, he continued until he reached the wounded comrade and brought him to safety. Lieutenant Hayhurst then moved to the forward slope of the shell-ridden area, giving first aid to the wounded and offering them encouragement. Lieutenant Hayhurst's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from California.

Haynes, Brig. Gen. Loyal M.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 89 - 16 November 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Brigadier General Loyal M. Haynes, 08379, United States Army, Commanding 2d Infantry Division Artillery, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy from 31 August 1950 to 15 September 1950 in the vicinity in the Naktong River Salient. During this period a numerically superior enemy forced the front lines of the division back to a point 700 yards from General Haynes’ Command Post, thereby breaching our lines for about 7000 yards, and threatened the tactical integrity of the entire Division. Although communications were practically non-existent, General Haynes assumed command of the infantry and armored elements in his sector and, having evaluated the enemy dispositions, ordered an immediate counterattack. The then reestablished communications between his Command Post north of Changnyong and the elements of the divisions south of Yongsan, although the area between was in enemy hands. Skillfully coordinating the efforts of the two infantry regiments in his zone and providing them with superb artillery fire support, General Haynes then directed the defense of the Northern Sector with such vigor that the town of Changnyong, key to the pass leading to the Eighth Army’s supply route, was denied to the enemy, and the front stabilized. His outstanding technical competence in the command and utilization of infantry, armored, artillery, and air units, his coolness and speed of decision under long continued pressure in the face of a vigorous and fanatical enemy and his personal bravery and leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Hays, Jacky E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Jacky E. Hays (MCSN: 599479), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rocket Gunner of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FirstMarine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When his rocket launcher was struck by hostile fire and rendered inoperable during the early stages of a violent attack on the company defense perimeter by a large enemy force, Private First Class Hays bravely exposed himself to fierce hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire to defend his position with a pistol and hand grenades. Although suffering from severe concussion when literally blown from his position by enemy hand grenade explosions on five separate occasions, he gallantly crawled back and resumed the defense until finally ordered to seek medical attention. By his aggressive fighting spirit and fortitude, Private First Class Hays served to inspire all who observed him and materially aided in the defense of the strategic ground. His marked courage, initiative and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pampa, Texas. Home Town: Pampa, Texas.

Hayton, Laverne B. (posthumous)

25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 286 - 3 November 1950

Award of the Silver Star (posthumous).  By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43 1918) and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is posthumously awarded to the following enlisted man:

Se3rgeant (then Private First Class) Laverne B. Hayton, RA12285235, Infantry, Company E, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 25 July 1590 near Hoenggan, Korea while withdrawing with platoon, Sergeant Hayton realized that the third platoon, not having received the withdrawal order, was still attacking an enemy position defended by a superior number of hostile forces.  Seizing an automatic rifle, he made his way back to the third platoon, notified the leader, and assisted in its displacement.  Observing a group of enemy approaching the right flank, Sergeant Hayton charged at them and killed more than half of them with his automatic rifle before they fled in panic.  Seeing a wounded soldier unable to walk, Sergeant Hayton picked him up and, continuing to fire his weapon, carried him to safety.  Sergeant Hayton's conspicuous bravery is in keeping with the highest traditions of the American soldier. Entered the military service from New York.

Hazelrigg, Charles B.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 57 - September 25, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Armor) Charles B. Hazelrigg (ASN: 0-323975), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as Commanding Officer, Company B, 72d Tank Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, in action during the period 1 through 3 September 1950, in the vicinity of Songnae'Pi, Korea., on the Naktong River Line. On 1 September 1950, numerically superior enemy forces supported by tanks, anti-tank guns, and mortars had broken through the left flank of an Infantry Regimental Combat Team and pushed to the vicinity of Yongsan. Captain Hazelrigg's company was given the mission of attacking to regain ground lost between Songnae'Pi and the Naktong River Line. Captain Hazelrigg, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, repeatedly exposing himself, led the successful counter-attack against the enemy while under heavy enemy tank, anti-tank, mortar and small arms fire, and against numerically superior enemy foot troops. Attacks and counter-attacks by Company B were made with insufficient infantry support thereby making the task more perilous. By courageous and resourceful leadership he personally controlled his company which was dispersed on an unusually wide front. His aggressive tactics and inspiring leadership resulted in driving the enemy back, and the company regained lost ground, and aided in securing the Division's Main Supply Route. The gallantry displayed by Captain Hazelrigg on this occasion reflects great honor upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Hazelton, James

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Hospital Corpsman First Class James Hazelton (NSN: 3293263), United States Navy, for gallantry in action while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to the Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea by rescuing two wounded men from an area covered by heavy enemy fire on the morning of 15 September 1950, on the Inchon side of Green Beach of Wolmi-do Island. The enemy was well entrenched in two pillboxes and had the company pinned down by rifle and grenade fire. The Marine riflemen were forced to take cover at the rear of the two pillboxes. Word was received at the aid station that there were two wounded Marines lying between the pillboxes. Hospital Corpsman First Class Hazleton, with complete disregard for his personal safety dashed across an exposed line of fire and dived into the hole where the wounded men were. The enemy fired on him repeatedly and threw grenades in his direction. After aiding the wounded, one of whom was bleeding copiously, he returned grenade fire to the mouth of one pillbox, in an attempt to clear a path for evacuation. Hospital Corpsman First Class Hazelton crawled over the brink, dragging one of the wounded with him and then returned under fire with a litter to remove the second man. This display of gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and upon the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 5 (September 27, 1950).

Headland, Edwin Harvey

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Edwin Harvey Headland (NSN: 0-75074), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Mansfield (DD-728), during the assault on Inchon, Korea, 13 - 15 September 1950. He navigated his ship through an enemy mine field, engaged enemy shore batteries at close range, and contributed greatly to the successful landings at Inchon. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 918 (October 14, 1950). Death: April 8, 2006.

Healy, John William (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade John William Healy (NSN: 0-486199), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot of an Attack Aircraft in Attack Squadron Fifty-five (VA-55), embarked in U.S.S. Essex (CV-9), during action against the enemy in North Korea on 23 November 1952. Flying on an assigned mission over unfamiliar terrain in search of a downed pilot, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Healey boldly exposed himself to intense enemy anti-aircraft fire for over an hour in an attempt to locate his missing comrade. Determined to accomplish his task, he made a low-level pass over what he thought to be the missing plane, and sacrificed his life when he was caught in an accurate enemy cross-fire. His devotion to a shipmate and his heroic actions in the face of devastating enemy fire serves as an inspiration to us all. His courageous conduct and steadfast devotion to duty throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Board Serial 142 (March 3, 1953). Born: November 5, 1925. Home Town: Shieldsville, Minnesota. Death: KIA: November 23, 1952.

Heckemeyer, Benjamin White (1st award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 228 - 20 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Benjamin White Heckemeyer (ASN: 0-19930), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, 3d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Kumchon, Korea, on 24 September 1950. When his battalion was in the attack against a strong and stubbornly resisting enemy, he made his way from position to position, without regard for his own safety, lending encouragement to his men and assisting in the attack. Through a series of well planned and brilliantly executed attacks he was able to lead his battalion in its successful attainment of its objective. Colonel Heckemeyer's example and unselfish devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri.

Hedeman, Maurice O.

General Orders No. 59 - 26 January 1952
Headquarters 24th Division

By the direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to First Lieutenant Maurice O. Hedemen, 01341222, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company G, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by courageous action in Korea on 14 October 1951. His company had the mission of attacking and securing a strategic hill laced with a network of well fortified trenches and bunkers containing an over-strength enemy company armed with small arms, automatic weapons, and mortars. Lieutenant Hedeman, Platoon Leader, led his unit in a swift, powerful thrust against the hostile forces. With complete disregard for his own safety, he continuously exposed himself to the devastating hail of enemy fire as he moved among his men, directing the fighting. The friendly troops pushed the enemy to the reverse slope of the hill but were then subjected to lobbed grenades and close-range machine gun fire. Lieutenant Hedeman fearlessly moved to the front of his men and, despite the extreme danger, led a charge against the remaining enemy. The riflemen fought with such fury and aggressiveness that they completely routed the hostile soldiers, killing 20, capturing 14, and destroying a large amount of tactically valuable equipment. Lieutenant Hedeman's courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Columbia, Missouri.

Hedges, William R.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 154 - 25 June 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery) William R. Hedges (ASN: 0-981917), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Battery A, 37th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Chaun-ni, Korea. On that date Lieutenant Hedges was in charge of a forward observer party directing artillery fire in support of an infantry company. When the company was attacked and surrounded by numerically superior enemy forces, Lieutenant Hedges organized the remainder of the men, explained the situation and planned an attempt to lead them out of the trap. With complete disregard for his own safety Lieutenant Hedges personally destroyed one machine gun emplacement, killing five enemy troops with carbine and grenade fire. The elimination of this enemy strong point allowed the men to continue their orderly withdrawal. The gallantry and inspiring leadership displayed by Lieutenant Hedges reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Oklahoma.

Heersma, James R.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade (MC) James R. Heersma (NSN: 0-496123), United States Navy, for gallantry in action against the enemy near Chi-Dong, Korea, on 26 April 1951. On this date, during the initial phase of the enemy offensive, the 58th Armored Field Artillery Battalion, 3d Infantry Division, was withdrawing to a new position, moving along the Main Supply route in column. Lieutenant Heersma, Battalion Surgeon, was tailing the column in an ambulance. In the vicinity of Chi-Dong the column made a halt due to a traffic jam. As the column came to a halt, the enemy, who had taken up positions behind the railroad embankment which ran parallel to the Maine Supply route at a distance of approximately 100 yards, took the Battalion under fire with automatic weapons, machine guns, and small arms fire. Calls for medics went out along the column as soldiers became wounded. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Heersma, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, walked down the column, which was under fire at all times, rendering aid to the wounded. Three times Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Heersma left a place of safety to render aid, walking distances of 100 to 300 yards, on foot and under fire, to assist wounded soldiers. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Heersma's actions, gallantry, and heroism on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, I Corps, General Orders No. 109 (July 24, 1951).

Hefley, Ernest B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Second Class Ernest B. Hefley, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1950. Hospital Corpsman Second Class Hefley serving as a Corpsman was assigned duty with a rifle platoon. During a fanatical attack by enemy forces he fearlessly and without regard for his own personal safety repeatedly exposed himself to enemy rifle, machine gun and mortar fire to administer to wounded Marines. On one occasion he courageously ran seventy-five yards along a ridge line in plain view of the enemy to give first aid to a wounded Marine. After treating the casualty and supervising his evacuation, he, himself sustained hand wounds from an enemy grenade. Although painfully wounded and suffering from loss of blood, he refused medical treatment and directed first aid treatment and evacuation of two other casualties before he submitted to treatment and evacuation. Hospital Corpsman Second Class Hefley's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 2995 (February 2, 1951).

Heider, Robert W.

General Orders No. 26 - 15 March 1952

By direction of the President, under the provision of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following-named enlisted man:

Corporal Robert W. Heider, US 55050854 (then Private First Class), Infantry, United States Army, Company E, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy, near Haugae, Korea. On 12 January 1952, Corporal Heider was an automatic rifleman serving with his company in an attack on well-fortified enemy hill emplacements. As the assault progressed, Corporal Heider's squad was delayed by Chinese ground weapons. Ignoring the enemy fire falling all around him, Corporal Heider calmly set up his automatic rifle and fired at the most troublesome hostile emplacement, thus enabling his squad to move to more tenable positions. During this action Corporal Heider was wounded in the knee by a shell fragment. Nevertheless, when the order to withdraw came, Corporal Heider remained on the barren slope and offered cover-fire for his whole platoon until it had reached safety. Then he shifted to another point and provided protection for another friendly platoon while it evacuated its wounded and withdrew from the hill. Only after Corporal Heider had walked back to the company assembly area did he reveal that he had been wounded. The gallantry and determination displayed by Corporal Heider reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Nebraska.

Heiple, Rayman Gregory (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Rayman Gregory Heiple (MCSN: 0-36280), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Attack Squadron Two Hundred Twelve (VMA-212), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 May 1953. Participating in the covering of a downed Marine aviator and observer who were surrounded by enemy troops deep in hostile territory, First Lieutenant Heiple carried out a series of daring bombing assaults at minimum altitude to suppress the fire directed at the downed crew. Although his aircraft was seriously damaged by enemy fire, he skillfully maneuvered at low level through the precipitous terrain and scored direct bomb hits on the enemy's positions. After expending his external ordnance, he gallantly conducted low-level runs in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire and, despite the increasingly accurate fire that was bursting all around his faltering aircraft, remained in the area until weather conditions forced the flight to withdraw. By his superb airmanship, courageous initiative and resourcefulness, First Lieutenant Heiple was largely responsible for the success of a mission that inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy and suppressed hostile ground fire directed at the downed man. His unwavering devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: April 15, 1923 at Portland, Oregon. Home Town: Molalla, Oregon. Death: MIA: May 21, 1953.

Helgeson, William A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class William A. Helgeson, Jr. (MCSN: 1117913), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the First Marine Division, near Taebong-ni, Korea, on 17 August 1950. On this date, during the course of an attack, Private First Class Helgeson's platoon leader became a casualty and he, upon his own initiative, secured the platoon commander's radio and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, proceeded to request and direct mortar fire upon enemy machinegun positions. He continuously relayed messages to other units of his company from higher authority. During this time Private First Class Helgeson also directed the evacuation of the wounded men in his area. Although he was in an exposed position under direct enemy machinegun and mortar fire he did not leave his post until ordered to do so. The gallantry displayed by Private First Class Helgeson reflects credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, EUSAK, General Orders 162 (November 8, 1950). Entered Service From Texas.

Helms, Henry M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant [then Sergeant] Henry M. Helms, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hagaru-ri, Korea, on or about 3 December 1950. When the battalion convoy was pinned down by a cross fire of well-directed enemy sniper fire, sustaining several casualties among the drivers and foot troops, Staff Sergeant Helms placed himself in an extremely open and dangerous position on the side of a hill near the convoy and, skillfully directing the fire from his machine gun on the enemy position throughout a three-hour period, was instrumental in neutralizing the roadblock, thereby allowing the convoy to proceed to Hagaru-ri. His outstanding courage, expert marksmanship, and inspiring devotion to duty in the face of intense hostile fire were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: September 24, 1926 at Los Angeles, California. Home Town: Tucson, Arizona.

Henderson, Curtis R.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Curtis R. Henderson (MCSN: 661679), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division, by carrying ammunition through heavy gun fire to a gun position. On 21 September 1950, Private First Class Henderson, under extreme fire, carried ammunition to a BAR gun position, exposing himself to heavy enemy fire. Upon reaching the BAR's position Private First Class Henderson found the gunner wounded and manned the BAR himself to assist in destroying of an enemy machine gun unit on the extreme right front of his battalion. Private First Class Henderson received shrapnel wounds in the hand. His display of gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 5 (September 27, 1950). Home Town: Wilmington, Delaware.

Henkel, James H.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 255 (3 July 1951)

Corporal James H. Henkel, RA37792203, (then Private First Class), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Chaun-ni, Korea on 25 May 1951. Company L had the mission of securing the high ground north of the Soyang River.  Corporal Henkel was riding on one of the lead tanks.  While en route to the objective, the company encountered a strong enemy roadblock.  The lead tank struck a mine an the enemy sprayed the supporting troops with automatic weapons and small arms fire.  When an enemy rocket launcher team fired a round into the tank he was riding, seriously wounding the entire crew, Corporal Henkel, with complete disregard for his personal safety, immediately jumped upon the turret of the tank and fired the .50 caliber machine gun, killing the members of the enemy team.  He then engaged the enemy held positions in an intense firefight, although he was completely exposed to the fire of the enemy.  He remained in his exposed position for one hour and a half in order to cover the evacuation of the wounded, during which time he inflicted numerous casualties upon the hostile force.  The gallantry displayed by Corporal Henkel reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Montana.

Hennessy, John J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John J. Hennessy, Jr. (MCSN: 1126658), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When the company was subjected to a series of vicious attacks by a numerically superior hostile force during the hours of darkness, Private First Class Hennessy bravely maintained his position in the face of devastating enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire and succeeded in pouring a large volume of accurate fire upon the advancing hostile force, although his machine gun was emplaced in an exposed position because of the poor terrain and repeatedly received the brunt of the fanatic enemy assaults. Despite painful wounds sustained during the early stages of the engagement, he refused medical attention and remained at his gun until the hostile force was completely routed with heavy casualties. By his outstanding courage, determination and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Hennessy aided materially in the successful defense of the strategic ground and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kansas City, Kansas. Home Town: Kansas City, Kansas.

Hennig, William H.

Col. William H. Hennig, Arty., 10th AAA Group, distinguished himself by outstanding gallantry in action against the enemy near Unsan, Korea, between 25 October 1950 and 2 November 1950. During this period, the 10th AAA Group and attached artillery battalions were deployed around Unsan with the mission of supporting the 1st Republic of Korea Infantry Division, which held an advanced salient to the north of Unsan. On the afternoon of 25 October 1950 this division made its initial contact with the Chinese Communist forces which immediately launched strong enveloping attacks. A night disengagement and withdrawal was under consideration by elements of the division when Colonel Hennig's decision to hold all elements of his command in their exposed positions, and the effectiveness of the defensive fires which he personally directed, assisted the supported units in determining to hold their positions and thus avoid the hazards incident to a night withdrawal under enemy attack. During the entire period the enemy aggressively pressed his attack both day and night, but Colonel Hennig's cool, skillful handling of his units' fires held the numerically superior enemy in check until the night of 1-2 November 1950 when the division was attacked by overwhelming numbers of the enemy. Colonel Hennig maintained his command post in Unsan and continued directing defensive fires and coordinating displacement of his units in such a way that an orderly withdrawal, with minimum loss of personnel and equipment, was effected while continuing to inflict maximum destruction on the enemy. Colonel Hennig only withdrew his command post from Unsan after all his units had withdrawn to more tenable positions and the command post itself was under enemy fire and threatened with encirclement. Colonel Hennig's persistence, cool courage, and professional skill under extremely hazardous and difficult conditions are in the highest traditions of and reflect utmost credit upon the military service of the United States. Entered the military service from New Jersey.

Henry, Ben D. Jr.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders #128 - 6 March 1952

Private Ben D. Henry Jr., RA18396508, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company M, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 28 September 1951 in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea.  On that date the machine-gun platoon of Company M became encircled by a numerically superior enemy force occupying bunkers on Hill 656.  After a bitter battle, the unit was able to withdraw to positions of safety with the aid of a tank platoon.  Upon reaching covered positions, Private Henry volunteered to return to the draw, where his platoon had been trapped and bring out or destroy weapons or equipment left behind and to look for stragglers.  Advancing over the open terrain which was under constant hostile fire, Private Henry reentered the draw, and without covering fire from friendly forces, fearlessly accomplished his mission.  As a result of his heroic actions the enemy was denied the use of equipment left behind by the withdrawing friendly unit.  His dauntless courage on this occasion was an inspiration to all who observed him.  The gallantry in action and selfless devotion to duty demonstrated by Private Henry are in accordance with the esteemed traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Arkansas.

Henry, Carl "Pat"

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 40 - January 24, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Carl P. Henry (ASN: 0-971706), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 22 December 1951 in the vicinity of Sanggasan, Korea. On this date Lieutenant Henry led a patrol on a mission to destroy enemy positions and capture a prisoner. Leading the patrol in a fearless manner he immediately advanced toward the objective. During a fierce fire fight with the enemy, Lieutenant Henry was wounded, but determined to remain with his men until the mission was accomplished, he refused evacuation. Although still under intense hostile fire from nearby emplacements, Lieutenant Henry remained on the objective destroying enemy positions and equipment and capturing a prisoner before returning to friendly lines. His selfless devotion to duty and valiant leadership resulted in the successful completion of the mission and greatly impeded the enemy. The gallantry in action displayed by Lieutenant Henry on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

---

"Lt. Carl P. Henry, former resident of Wymore, was awarded the Silver Star medal for gallantry in action in Korea, it was announced here today.  A platoon leader in Co. C, 38th Regiment, Lt. Henry was decorated by Maj. Gen. Robert N. Young, commander of the 2nd Division.  He distinguished himself Dec. 22, 1951, while leading a patrol seeking five prisoners.  The citation, in part, stated: "Lt. Henry led his men in a relentless drive to capture prisoners for interrogation purposes.  His personal heroism and display of courage inspired his men.  Although painfully wounded, he refused evacuation and elected to remain until the mission was accomplished." - Beatrice Daily Sun, 31 January 1952

Henry, John O.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant John O. Henry (MCSN: 1043046), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. When the company was attacked by a large enemy force during the hours of darkness, Sergeant Henry, exposing himself to intense hostile automatic weapons, hand grenade and small arms fire, moved from one position to another to encourage his men and direct their fire. As the enemy approached within a few yards of his guns, he bravely remained in exposed positions to drive them back, effectively employing hand grenades and his rifle. Throughout the night-long attack, he refused to seek safety for himself and continued to direct the defense of his sector, ultimately routing the hostile force with heavy losses. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and resolute determination, Sergeant Henry aided immeasurably in the successful defense of the strategic ground and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chattanooga, Tennessee. Home Town: Nashville, Tennessee.

Henry, Kenneth W. (POW)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Kenneth W. Henry (MCSN: 0-43000), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while attached to the U.S.S. Manchester during combat rescue operations deep in enemy territory, northwest of Wonsan, Korea, on 8 February 1952. Although keenly aware of the grave hazards involved, First Lieutenant Henry volunteered to accompany the ship's helicopter on a daring mission in an attempt to rescue a downed pilot. With his aircraft forced down while hovering for the pickup and rendered inoperable by damaged rotor blades, he hurried to the assistance of the badly injured airman and, sacrificing his own chance of immediate rescue in another helicopter which had landed twice on a steep incline some 300 yards distant, rendered first aid to the stricken man in the face of small arms fire from concealed enemy positions and prepared the casualty for movement to the landing point. When the second helicopter was damaged by hostile fire and forced to temporarily abandon the area, First Lieutenant Henry continued to protect he injured pilot while awaiting further rescue operations. His marked courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of another were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Francisco, California. Home Town: San Francisco, California.

Henry, Roper (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Master Sergeant Roper Henry (MCSN: 267613), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a First Sergeant of Company A, Seventh Motor Transport Battalion, Service Command, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 10 - 11 December 1950. When a large hostile force ambushed his convoy and inflicted numerous casualties, Master Sergeant Henry braved intense enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire to carry a wounded driver to safety and, returning through the heavy barrage, transported a second wounded comrade out of danger. Attempting to enter the fire-swept area a third time to aid another casualty, he was struck by hostile fire and fell mortally wounded. His personal courage and unselfish consideration of others reflect great credit upon Master Sergeant Henry and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: May 19, 1919 at Hickman, Kentucky. Home Town: Hickman, Kentucky. Death: KIA: December 11, 1950.

Hepler, Robert D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert D. Hepler (MCSN: 647176), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. Unable to deliver accurate fire on the enemy from his position behind a small rise in the ground during an attack against his company by numerically superior hostile forces, Sergeant Hepler voluntarily crawled through the snow from his squad's location on an icy snow-covered ridge to higher ground in hostile territory, continually exposing himself to intense enemy fire en route. Reaching this vantage point, he stood up, boldly sprayed supporting hostile mortar and machine gun emplacements with sub-machine gun fire and succeeded in neutralizing these positions. When the enemy machine gun began to fire again as he was returning to his squad to replenish his ammunition and displaced his weapon, he retraced the same route, again braving heavy fire and single-handedly destroyed the enemy machine gun. His outstanding initiative, coolness in the face of intense hostile fire and indomitable fighting spirit were contributing factors in aiding the defense of his company's position and inspired all who observed him, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Emmaus, Pennsylvania.

Herbert, Anthony B.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 200 - 19 June 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Anthony B. Herbert (ASN: 0-78348/RA-13260331), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company E, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of Kummul-gol, Korea on 18 May 1951. On that date Corporal Herbert's platoon was caught in an enemy roadblock and fought desperately to escape the trap. Corporal Herbert was wounded almost immediately. Heedless of his wound and observing his comrades to be held down under intense fire, he continued to fire his weapon until his ammunition was expended. Fully exposing himself, he daringly charged the enemy with fixed bayonet and killed all of an enemy machine gun crew in fierce hand-to-hand combat. Corporal Herbert then assisted in removing other wounded comrades to safety before he permitted himself to be evacuated. His bold and determined action enabled the platoon to advance and eliminate the roadblock with a minimum of casualties. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Herbert reflects great credit upon himself and the military.  Entered military service from Philadelphia, PA.

Herbert, Anthony B. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 745 - 21 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Anthony B. Herbert (ASN: 0-78348/RA-13260331), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company E, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 12 September 1951 in the vicinity of Tally'ong, Korea. On this date Company E had the mission of attacking and securing a strongly fortified enemy-held hill. The approaches to the hill were covered from all directions by hostile machine guns and snipers. When repeated assaults by the company failed, Sergeant Herbert, platoon leader, realized that the frontal hostile automatic weapons had to be destroyed. Immediately organizing his men, he led them forward until intense automatic weapons fire from a lone bunker pinned them down. Undaunted, Sergeant Herbert heroically exposed himself to the deadly enemy fire and assaulted the bunker, throwing grenades into it. He succeeded in killing its occupants and silencing their automatic weapons. He then led his men in destroying the remainder of hostile emplacements and in the successful accomplishment of their mission. The gallantry in action and outstanding leadership displayed by sergeant Herbert reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Herbin, John L.

[KWE Note: The following citation appeared as in (i.e., in part) in Stars and Stripes, 22 November 1951.  He was serving with A Company of the 2d Chemical Mortar Battalion.  The award was given for actions on the night of November 2, 1950.]

".... During a fierce fire fight with the enemy, a call for 'medic' was heard from several positions within the company perimeter.  Lieutenant Herbin immediately asked for permission from the company commander to investigate and bring into the command post all wounded personnel.  He was warned of the danger, as terrific small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire was falling over the entire position, but Herbin persisted in going.  When permission was granted he sprang from his foxhole, disregarding his own personal safety and ran from one position to another looking for wounded personnel.  He brought each one to the center of the company area for first aid treatment and was personally responsible for saving several of their lives."

Herder, Harry J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Harry J. Herder, Jr. (NSN: 9888491), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 January 1952. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Herder displayed outstanding courage and selfless devotion to duty while on a volunteer mission deep in enemy territory. When an exploding land mine seriously wounded him and several other members of the patrol he unhesitatingly went to the aid of the other casualties. Though he was the most seriously wounded, he continued to give medical treatment and direct other members of the patrol in the administration of first aid to the less seriously injured. Despite intense pain he refused medical aid for himself until all other casualties had been treated. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Herder's heroic actions were an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 18329 (July 2, 1952).

Herlihy, Robert Gerard (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Robert Gerard Herlihy (MCSN: 0-57805), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 25 - 26 July 1953. Courageously organizing and leading a small group of Marines in a determined assault to restore a critical sector of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Herlihy fearlessly engaged in a bitter hand-to-hand combat with numerically superior enemy troops that were attempting to gain control of a friendly bunker which sheltered eleven seriously wounded Marines. Steadfastly remaining at his post, he successfully resisted the enemy until the arrival of friendly reinforcements. Mortally wounded by enemy fire during the fierce encounter, Second Lieutenant Herlihy, by his indomitable fighting spirit, exceptional courage and self-sacrificing efforts, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: December 17, 1930 at Arlington, Massachusetts. Home Town: Winchester, Massachusetts.

Hermanski, Eugene

General Orders No. 713 - 13 November 1951
Headquarters 2nd Infantry Division

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Eugene Hermanski (ASN: RA-12293160), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Aidman, attached to Company K, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, on 1 September 1951, in the vicinity of Yanggu, Korea. On this date Company K was engaged in fierce combat with a numerically superior enemy force. During the ferocious encounter, most of the noncommissioned officers of the company and adjoining unit became casualties. Sergeant Hermanski, a Medical Aidman, volunteered to lead an attack against the enemy positions. Unhesitatingly he led his men forward and despite the intense hostile fire, Sergeant Hermanski assaulted the hostile positions throwing hand grenades and firing his rifle with devastating effect. He continued this action until he was painfully wounded and forced to be evacuated. His aggressive leadership inspired his comrades and encouraged them on to secure their objective. The gallantry in action displayed by Sergeant Hermanski on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: New York

Hernandez, Ismael Jimenez (posthumous)

General Orders #220 - 23 June 1951
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Sergeant Ismael Jimenez Hernandez, RA30451709, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 31 March 1951, as Company "F" was attacking Hill 398, near Choksong-myon, Korea, the assault platoon was halted by intense enemy small arms, grenade, and mortar fire. Voluntarily, Sergeant Jimenez Hernandez moved from his covered position over an exposed area, inspiring his squad to follow. Gaining a flank position where his men could bring fire on the enemy entrenchments, Sergeant Jimenez Hernandez fearlessly exposed himself as he deployed his squad. Disregarding the heavy volume of hostile fire, he continued to point out enemy targets until mortally wounded. His unhesitating actions resulted in effective fire being quickly placed on the enemy, thereby saving the lives of many of his comrades in the assault platoon. The gallantry and courageous initiative displayed by Sergeant Jimenez Hernandez reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Hernandez, William

General Orders No. 67 - 12 March 1951
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Private First Class William Hernandez, RA10406523, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 31 January 1951, near Kalgok, Korea, Private Hernandez was serving as forward scout in a platoon assault on an enemy held hill. When he approached one of the enemy strongholds, Private Hernandez took the initiative and charged fearlessly up the forward slope. In spite of the incessant small arms fire and hand grenades thrown against him, he charged the enemy position throwing grenades into the midst of the defenders. His action completely disorganized the enemy and forced him into a disorderly retreat. Private Hernandez pursued the retreating enemy, firing his rifle as he ran. This outstanding display of courage and aggressiveness allowed the platoon to clear the enemy from the hill. Private Hernandez's actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Herold, Robert T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert T. Herold (MCSN: 1130664), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 July 1953. Although his combat patrol sustained several casualties during a fierce fire fight with enemy troops far forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Herold skillfully directed his men in inflicting numerous casualties on the hostile force despite devastating enemy automatic weapons and mortar fire from the front and both flanks. After ordering the main force of his unit to disengage, he fearlessly remained in position with two other Marines and effectively covered the withdrawal of the patrol. By his skilled leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Sergeant Herold was directly responsible for safeguarding the lives of the wounded men in his patrol and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Muncie, Indiana. Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana.

Hesser, Ross D. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Ross D. Hesser (MCSN: 1262476), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 August 1952. When his unit was engaged in defending the strategically important "Bunker Hill" position, Private Hesser fearlessly exposed himself to intense enemy mortar and artillery fire to aid in digging defensive fortifications for the impending hostile counterattacks. Mortally wounded while carrying a stricken Marine to safety, Private Hesser served to inspire all members of his unit by his courageous actions under fire. His daring initiative, valor and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 12, 1932 at Denver, Colorado. Home Town: Council Grove, Kansas. Death: KIA: August 13, 1952.

Hickerson, James G. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Infantry) James G. Hickerson (ASN:0-61983), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 28 January 1951, near Onjan-ni, Korea. Lieutenant Hickerson was in charge of the point vehicle during a battalion movement and had halted preparatory to sending a patrol into a village. When a large enemy force suddenly opened fire from the village and both flanks, Lieutenant Hickerson quickly deployed his machine gun and 57-mm recoilless rifle section into advantageous positions and returned the fire. Although exposed to the intensive volume of bullets that swept the area with deadly effect, he moved from man to man to give encouragement and fire directions. After silencing the enemy guns to his front, Lieutenant Hickerson started to move the recoilless rifle closer to another area of fighting when automatic fire from a ridge flank stopped the movement. Again deploying his men into defensive positions, he courageously moved among his weapons, fully exposed to the enemy, to give fire directions and advice. While in the midst of this dauntless act, Lieutenant Hickerson was struck by hostile fire and eventually died of these wounds. Due to his gallant leadership, Company D was materially aided in inflicting serious losses upon the enemy, and enabling the battalion movement eventually to move in safety. Lieutenant Hickerson's exemplary devotion to duty at the cost of his own life reflected the highest credit on himself and the military service.

Hickey, Chester Oliver

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Commander Chester O. Hickey (NSN: 0-168228), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and resourcefulness as Squadron Materiel Officer of Destroyer Squadron Nine embarked in the U.S.S. Mansfield (DD-728), on 30 September 1950, when the Mansfield struck an enemy mine in North Korean waters. Lieutenant Commander Hickey displayed exceptional audacity and proficiency in evacuating the wounded and in repairing of damage in the ship. By his striking courage in entering compartments filled with fumes, smoke and debris, and by his calm direction of the daring rescue of the wounded from the Chief Petty Officer's quarters, Lieutenant Commander Hickey demonstrated outstanding leadership in this grave emergency. His extraordinary initiative was revealed by his aid to the Damage Control Officer in ascertaining the extent of the damage. Lieutenant Commander Hickey well knew the dangers of entering these compartments, but promptly evidenced his unswerving devotion to his shipmates and ship by being the first officer to enter the explosion area. His valorous actions directly contributed to the prompt medical attention received by the wounded and to the effective control of the damage sustained. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 839 (January 30, 1951).

Hickman, Don R.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 50 - August 8, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Don R. Hickman (ASN: 0-35996), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division in Korea. On 25 July 1950 near Kwanggan, Korea, during the initial engagement of the Battalion while under constant enemy fire, Captain Hickman functioned as Battalion S-3. When repeated attacks by overwhelming enemy forces threatened to overrun the Battalion Command Post, Captain Hickman, although exposed to enemy artillery and small arms fire directed fire against the enemy until he succeeded in stopping the enemy attack. His outstanding bravery and heroism were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Hicks, Norman W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Norman W. Hicks (MCSN: 0-47573), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. When the withdrawal of the battalion was endangered by a strong enemy force in commanding positions during retrograde operations in the vicinity of Hwachon, First Lieutenant Hicks led his men up a steep slope in the face of withering hostile fire to deploy his squads and directed a successful assault which routed the enemy from their positions. Later, when ordered to break contact and rejoin the battalion, he skillfully maneuvered his platoon to new positions despite the increasing enemy pressure on both flanks and, the last to leave the area, carried one of his wounded men across an open rice paddy which was interdicted by enemy small arms and mortar fire. By his outstanding leadership, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Hicks served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Antonio, Texas. Home Town: San Antonio, Texas.

Hicks, Oscar A. Jr.

General Orders No. 404 - 15 September 1953
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Sergeant Oscar A. Hicks Jr., US55259918, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 6 July 1953, in the vicinity of Honu-Chon, Korea, Company "K" commenced to attack enemy held Hill "250". The assault platoon met with no resistance until entering the second sector of the objective, where they came under intense automatic weapons and small arms fire. Sergeant Hicks, squad leader of the second assault squad, immediately began to move among his men, effectively deploying them and directing their fire. As the attacking force neared the crest of the second sector, they came under raking machine gun fire from a large bunker located to their left front. Without hesitation, Sergeant Hicks ordered his men to move to the right and give covering fire to enable him to rush the position in an attempt to destroy it. Despite the heavy fire, he ran to the bunker and, with a comrade, succeeded in climbing onto the roof. When last seen, he was courageously hurling grenades into the aperture. His heroic actions contributed in large measure to the destruction of the fortification and the successful completion of the mission. Sergeant Hick's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Missouri.

Higdon, Jack

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 233 - 24 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Jack Higdon (ASN: RA-15421405), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company M, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Kynju, Korea, on 8 September 1950. His company had been attacked by an overwhelmingly numerically superior enemy force which had completely surrounded it and was pouring a hail of deadly fire into its positions. Completely disregarding his own safety, Corporal Higdon exposed himself time and again, rallying and regrouping the various disorganized sections of the company and directing their fire against the enemy. Moving a recoilless rifle into position he inflicted heavy casualties among the enemy and with the combined fire of the re- grouped force the enemy was repulsed. Corporal Higdon's gallant actions and inspiring leadership were responsible for the rout of the enemy and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Owensboro, Kentucky.

Higgins, Franklin D.

Second Lieutenant Franklin D. Johnson, while a member of 8attery D, 15th AA AW Battalion (SP), distinguished himself by gallantry in action near the Chosin Reservoir in Korea on 28 November 1950. On this date, the command post of the first platoon of the battery was taken under heavy enemy attack, and the occupants of the command post were in grave danger of being killed or captured. The battery commander called for volunteers to go to the relief of the besieged command post. Although just previously wounded in the shoulder by enemy fire, Lieutenant Johnson unhesitatingly joined the patrol and proceeded at great personal risk to cross open ground under intense enemy automatic weapons, small-arms and mortar fire to carry out an attack against the enemy force. He courageously took a number of enemy under fire with his carbine and killed them. As a result of his courage the patrol was successful in destroying many of the enemy and forcing the remainder to flee, thereby saving the personnel still alive in the platoon command post. The actions of Lieutenant Johnson on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Tennessee.

Higgins, John Martin

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Rear Admiral John Martin Higgins (NSN: 0-57597), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commander, Cruiser Division Five, Joint Task Force SEVEN, United Nations Command, in action in the Inchon-Seoul operation during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army Korea, General Orders No. 49 (October 27, 1950). Born: August 13, 1899 at at Madison, Wisconsin. Home Town: Madison, Wisconsin. Death: December 7, 1973.

Higgins, Joseph F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Joseph F. Higgins (MCSN: 1175787), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 May 1952. Serving as a fire team leader with a combat patrol deep in hostile territory, Private First Class Higgins courageously led his unit forward in an assault against a hostile position. Unhesitatingly assuming command of the squad when his squad leader became a casualty, Private First Class Higgins skillfully reorganized the unit while under heavy enemy mortar fire and directed the men in the attack. Although seriously wounded by hostile grenades and small arms fire during the vicious fighting which ensued, he refused medical aid until the position was secured and his men properly deployed. By his outstanding valor, daring initiative and indomitable fighting spirit in the face of overwhelming odds, Private First Class Higgins served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the patrol. His courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Higgins, Walter N.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 139 - 14 May 1951

First Lieutenant Walter N. Higgins, 057695, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 13 November 1950, Lieutenant HIGGINS was leading a motorized patrol in the vicinity of Handongson-ni, Korea, when a group of twenty enemy entrenched on a commanding ridge opened fire on his platoon, forcing it to disperse and take cover in the ditches on either side of the road. Fully realizing that he would be a target for intense enemy fire and with complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Higgins grabbed up a light machine gun and ran down the road and up the slope to a point from which he delivered sweeping fire at the enemy flank, killing two enemy soldiers, wounding several others and causing the remainder to flee. The patrol which had been driven to cover by enemy fire was then enabled to continue on its mission. Lieutenant Higgin's gallantry and heroism reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Texas.

Hilger, John Allen

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 115 - 19 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel John Allen Hilger (ASN: 0-20437), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action near Sinuiju, Korea, on 8 November 1950. Serving as Commanding Officer of the 307th Bombardment Group, FIFTH Air Force, Colonel Hilger led an aerial attack against that strategically important enemy stronghold and temporary capitol of North Korea. Due to Sinuiju's extreme importance as a supply and communications center, the enemy was expected to defend it with all resources at his disposal. Because of its location only 666 yards across the Yalu River from Manchurian city of An-Tung, it was considered highly probable that Colonel Hilger's group would be attacked by anti-aircraft fire from both sides of the river and conventional and jet fighter aircraft from the Manchurian side of the international boundary. In order to assure destruction of this vital enemy installation, as well as prevent international consequences which could arise from American aircraft passing over or bombs landing on Manchuria, Colonel Hilger personally led his group. His skillful technique assured maximum destruction of the target area and his courage served as an inspiration to the personnel of the group. The leadership and gallantry displayed by Colonel Hilger on this mission are in keeping with the highest traditions of the

Hill, David H. (1st Bronze Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 130 - June 02, 1951

Captain David H. Hill, 01284331, Infantry, Army of the United States, Commanding Officer of Company F, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 4 March 1951 in the vicinity of Tokkosan, Korea.  He was leading Company F in an attack on enemy positions on Hill 705 when elements of the company were stopped by withering automatic weapons fire from the vicinity of a woodpile on the top of the ridge.  The nature of the terrain made it impossible to maneuver elements to either flank along the steep sides of the ridge.  With utter disregard for his own safety, Captain Hill dashed forward in a singlehanded assault on the enemy machine gun position.  Hurling hand grenades with amazing accuracy, he completely destroyed the enemy machine gun.  Captain Hill so inspired his men by this act that they renewed their attack with such savagery as to force the enemy from the hill.  The gallantry displayed by Captain Hill reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from West Virginia.

Hill, Edd D.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No.  71 - August 22, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Edd D. Hill (ASN: RA-6276469), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division in Korea. On 3 August 1950 when the Regimental Command Post was attacked by enemy forces near Chin-Dong-ni, Korea, Corporal Hill, a cook, joined in delivering fire on the enemy who were less than one hundred yards from the Command Post. Shortly after the attack began, Corporal Hill observed that an organizational vehicle loaded with ammunition which was attempting to reach the position, was suddenly halted when the driver was wounded by sniper fire. Corporal Hill, disregarding the intense fire, immediately ran out across the open terrain for a distance of three hundred yards, moved the wounded driver from his position behind the wheel, and drove the truck through a hail of small arms fire to the Command Post where the wounded driver could be cared for and the ammunition unloaded. His gallant actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Hill, John G. Jr.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders 157 - July 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Captain John G Hill Jr, 027997, Infantry, U.S. Army, Commanding Officer, Company E, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 10 March 1951 near Yongdogwon-ri, Korea. While Captain Hill’s company was attacking the well-fortified Chinese positions on Hill 554, heavy and accurate machine gun fire suddenly swept the slopes and halted the advance. Realizing the great danger to his men unless aggressive action was continued, Captain Hill rushed through the intense hostile fire to the point of his platoon. Shouting words of encouragement and displaying outstanding personal bravery, Captain Hill led his men in the attack and final assault. Inspired by his leadership and conspicuous courage, the members of his company charged forward and routed the strongly-entrenched Chinese who fled in a disorganized mob, leaving behind many dead and much equipment. Captain Hill’s gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Montana.

Hill, Joe C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Joe C. Hill (MCSN: 110146), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Cannoneer of Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces near Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 4 December 1950. When an enemy mortar shell landed in the gun pit, killed or wounded all members of his gun crew and started a fire which threatened one hundred rounds of high-explosive ammunition stored in an adjacent pit, Private First Class Hill immediately emerged from his tent and, although not on a duty watch, risked danger from exploding ammunition and continued enemy mortar fire to enter the pit and proceed to smother the fire with his parka. By his daring initiative, prompt action and cool courage in the face of grave danger, Private First Class Hill prevented serious injury to the remaining men and materiel of his organization and enabled the battery to keep his gun in action during a critical phase of the operation, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cherokie, Alabama. Home Town: Birmingham, Alabama.

Hill, Lewis R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Chief Gunner's Mate Lewis R. Hill (NSN: 3284618), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a member of a repair party on board the U.S.S. Collett (DD-73) during the amphibious assault on Inchon, Korea, from 13 to 15 September 1950. Chief Gunner's Mate Hill's utter disregard for his personal safety in picking up an unexploded fused projectile from the wardroom and throwing it over the side, saved his companions from possible serious injury and prevented further damage to that area of the ship. His outstanding courage and steadfast devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1089 (November 20, 1950).

Hill, Malcolm A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Malcolm A. Hill (MCSN: 0-22619), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot in carrier based Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 February 1953. Participating in the rescue of a downed Marine aviator who was surrounded and being fired upon by hostile troops deep in enemy territory, Captain Hill conducted a series of daring minimum altitude strafing assaults, intentionally drawing the heavy hostile fire away from the downed pilot. Undeterred when his aircraft was hit and severely damaged by the enemy fire, he continued to maneuver the crippled plane at low level through intense and accurate barrages of hostile anti-aircraft fire and, on several occasions, succeeded in completely suppressing all ground fire directed at the downed aviator. After expanding all his ordnance, he skillfully conducted repeated dummy strafing runs on the enemy positions despite the increasingly accurate fire that was bursting all around his stricken aircraft. Although his plane's fuel supply became dangerously low, he remained in the area until relieved by another flight of Marine attack aircraft. By his brilliant airmanship, indomitable courage and gallant devotion to duty, Captain Hill was greatly responsible for the success of a mission that resulted in the saving of a fellow Marine's life and in the infliction of heavy casualties upon the enemy, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Newburyport, Massachusetts. Home Town: Amesbury, Massachusetts.

Hillerud, Roger E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Roger E. Hillerud (NSN: 9845030), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 September 1951. Serving as a Company Corpsman, Hospitalman Hillerud exhibited outstanding courage and initiative during the company's attack of a fanatically defended and heavily fortified enemy hill position. When the assaulting elements were pinned down by devastating enemy fire near the summit of the hill, and sustained heavy casualties, he unhesitatingly moved forward through the heavy enemy fire to reach and render aid to the wounded. Although he was himself painfully wounded by shrapnel, he steadfastly refused to seek cover, continuing to aid his comrades until all had been treated and evacuated, and only then sought aid for his own wound. His unflinching devotion to duty and great personal bravery were an inspiration to all members of the command, and undoubtedly contributed to the saving of human life. Hospitalman Hillerud's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 61031 (December 6, 1951).

Hillgrube, Samuel A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Malcolm A. Hill (MCSN: 0-22619), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot in carrier based Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 February 1953. Participating in the rescue of a downed Marine aviator who was surrounded and being fired upon by hostile troops deep in enemy territory, Captain Hill conducted a series of daring minimum altitude strafing assaults, intentionally drawing the heavy hostile fire away from the downed pilot. Undeterred when his aircraft was hit and severely damaged by the enemy fire, he continued to maneuver the crippled plane at low level through intense and accurate barrages of hostile anti-aircraft fire and, on several occasions, succeeded in completely suppressing all ground fire directed at the downed aviator. After expanding all his ordnance, he skillfully conducted repeated dummy strafing runs on the enemy positions despite the increasingly accurate fire that was bursting all around his stricken aircraft. Although his plane's fuel supply became dangerously low, he remained in the area until relieved by another flight of Marine attack aircraft. By his brilliant airmanship, indomitable courage and gallant devotion to duty, Captain Hill was greatly responsible for the success of a mission that resulted in the saving of a fellow Marine's life and in the infliction of heavy casualties upon the enemy, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Newburyport, Massachusetts. Home Town: Amesbury, Massachusetts.

Hilliard, Sidney H. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Sidney H. Hilliard, Jr. (MCSN: 0-48415), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observer of the Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 June 1951. Participating in a reconnaissance mission forward of friendly lines, First Lieutenant Hilliard sighted a large hostile force entrenched on a high ridge delivering heavy fire on attacking friendly troops and, immediately requesting close support aircraft, flew low over the enemy through withering automatic weapons fire in the slow, unarmed aircraft in order to pinpoint their positions. With the arrival of fighter aircraft, he carried out two runs in the face of hostile fire to mark the target with smoke grenades for the air strike and later reconnoitered at a low altitude over the area to ascertain the extent of damage to the enemy. Despite damage sustained by his aircraft from hostile fire, he continued to remain over the danger area and effectively directed the second air strike in completely neutralizing the enemy positions. By his expert airmanship, outstanding courage and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Hilliard materially aided friendly ground forces in seizing their objective with a minimum of casualties and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Jacksonville, Florida. Home Town: Wildwood, Florida.

Hilton, Donald L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Donald L. Hilton (MCSN: 1094580), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Runner of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 December 1950. Subjecting himself to direct hostile grenade, mortar and small arms fire while delivering greatly needed supplies of ammunition during a bitter, sustained encounter with numerically superior hostile forces at Hagaru-ri, Private First Class Hilton found that the wooden boxes containing supplies of 3.5 ammunition had been set on fire by a bursting while phosphorous mortar shell. Realizing that an explosion of the ammunition would completely breach the precariously held defense line, he unhesitatingly ran to the ignited supply area through enemy-occupied positions and under heavy fire, removed the burning boxes from the ammunition dump, brushed the flaming phosphorous from the cases and then extinguished the blazing wood by smothering the flames with his coat. By his prompt and determined action, daring initiative and cool courage in the face of grave peril, Private First Class Hilton undoubtedly prevented the ammunition dump from exploding. His heroic efforts were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Saco, Maine. Home Town: Saco, Maine.

Hindle, Kenneth R.

First Lieutenant Kenneth R. Hindle, 01873667, (then Second Lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company "A", 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 9 November 1952 in the vicinity of Chorwon, North Korea.  On that date, Lieutenant Hindle, a Platoon Leader, was on a night patrol with the mission of establishing a blocking position at the base of Hill 200.  Upon hearing that another friendly patrol had suffered several casualties in the immediate vicinity, Lieutenant Hindle, with complete disregard for personal safety, moved through a hail of enemy fire to aid in the evacuation of the wounded to the Aid Station.  He then moved out with his own patrol in an assault upon the enemy positions under intense enemy fire.  During the assault Lieutenant Hindle was seriously wounded, and although bleeding profusely and in great pain, he refused medical attention and remained with his men during the entire assault.  Though weak from loss of blood and nearing exhaustion he then supervised the withdrawal of his patrol and the evacuation of the wounded.  Only when he was sure that all his men were accounted for did he submit to medical attention and allow himself to be evacuated.  The courageous actions displayed by Lieutenant Hindle reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Rhode Island.

Hines, Marion

Master Sergeant Marion Hines, member of Company K., 38th Infantry, 2nd Division of the U.S. Army was awarded the Silver Star for Gallantry in Action. On November 9, 1950 in the vicinity of Yongwon, Korea, numerically superior enemy forces attacked the hill positions defended by Sergeant Hines’ platoon. The enemy attacked the right flank which was defended by Sergeant Hines with his platoon and 12 men. In the ensuing firefight, all but Sergeant Hines and two men remained unwounded. While the two soldiers aided the wounded to the company command post, Sergeant Hines remained in position surrounded by the enemy, and relayed information to his commander as to the hostile movements. At the same time, he delivered a continuous and heavy stream of fire upon the enemy, keeping them at bay until a counterattack was organized which drove the enemy from the hill and regained the lost position.

(Sergeant Hines is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Otis Hines of Chicago, formerly of Kinmundy, IL.)

Hinman, Charles T.

For conspicuous gallantry...in action against the enemy while serving (as a forward observer) with a Marine infantry company in Korea on February 10, 1951.  While proceeding along a narrow uncovered trail on an independent mission near Chigadong, Korea, was taken under fire by deeply entrenched, well camouflaged enemy positions located on the high ground less than 100 yards from the trail.  He, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, continually exposed himself to savage enemy automatic weapons fire in order to gain a better position from which to direct artillery fire against the enemy positions.  When the platoon leader was seriously wounded, Lieutenant HINMAN took over the platoon and skillfully deployed them and directed their fire against the enemy forces.  Though painfully wounded in the thigh and leg, Lieutenant HINMAN refused to be evacuated and continued to direct the platoon and give instructions for the placing of the artillery fire on the enemy positions.  His aggressive actions and devotion to duty materially contributed to the success achieved by his company.

Hinnant, Worth M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman First Class Worth M. Hinnant (NSN: 2638567), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. Hospital Corpsman First Class Hinnant was attached to the Battalion Command Group on a reconnaissance near Yang-gu when it was subjected to a murderous enemy mortar barrage. Although painfully wounded by shrapnel, he immediately began to administer first aid to the other casualties and assisted them to covered positions with complete disregard for the shells bursting all around him. Even when he was wounded a second time, he continued to treat the wounded in such an efficient manner that the battalion surgeon credited him with saving the lives of six of the more seriously wounded. Hospital Corpsman First Class Hinnant's courageous actions and outstanding professional skill were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 60174 (November 30, 1951).

Hinson, Robert B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert B. Hinson (MCSN: 1193164), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Wireman of Headquarters and Service Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 August 1952. When a heavy enemy mortar and artillery barrage severed wire communications to outpost positions, Corporal Hinson made repeated trips under intense fire to reinstall wire lines, thereby enabling the company to maintain vitally needed communications. Although suffering serious and painful leg wounds, he continued to reinstall wire lines under direct enemy observation until his wounds forced his evacuation. By his outstanding courage, initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Corporal Hinson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina. Home Town: Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina.

Hinterschied, Theodore "Ted" R.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 106 - 28 November 1952

Corporal Theodore R. Hinterschied (then Private), Infantry, a member of Company C, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations near Pia-ri, Korea, on 15-16 September 1951.  After a bitter conflict, repulsing fanatical enemy attacks, his platoon was ordered to withdraw and Corporal Hinterschied covered the movement, throwing grenades and pouring fire into the ranks of the enemy and engaging in hand-to-hand combat before he rejoined his unit.  Resupplied with ammunition, the platoon assumed the offensive and forced the enemy to withdraw.  Corporal Hinterschied's courageous actions and calm demeanor bolstered morale and contributed significantly to the safe withdrawal of the platoon reflecting great credit upon himself and the military service.

Citation (Wharang Distinguished Military Service Medal with Silver Star, Republic of Korea)

In recognition and appreciation of his exceptionally outstanding and meritorious service, I take great pleasure in accordance with the powers delegated to me by the Presidential Order No. 2, in awarding the Wharang Distinguished Military Service Medal with Silver Star to Corporal Theodore R. Hintershied [sic], US52060241, United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy in Korea, on 15 and 16 September 1951.  During the period, through his professional knowledge, skillful ability, keen judgment [sic] and profound experience, he has performed the assigned duties in an outstanding and exemplary manner.  In addition, his devotion to duty, courageous leadership and aggressiveness was a great contribution to the successful accomplishment of the United Nations efforts against the Communist aggression in Korea.  The outstanding achievements performed by him throughout the period reflects great credit upon himself and the military service of the United Nations.  (signed) Sohn Won Yil, Minister

Hinton, Reginald J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 63 - 12 October 1950

Captain Reginald J. Hinton, 01313094, Infantry, Army of the United States, Commanding Officer, Tank Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 2 September 1950 on the Naktong River Front, Korea.  Captain HInton had been given the mission of determining the position of adjoining troops, which had been cut off during the enemy penetration of 1-2 September 1950.  With his command tank and another tank, he daringly penetrated the lines of the attacking enemy and established contact with the battalion on the left.  After establishing contact, he led his tanks through the enemy held terrain to his own unit, picking up several wounded on the way and evacuating them to aid stations.  Throughout this operation, which penetrated 15 miles into enemy territory, he was exposed to intense enemy fire and was entirely without infantry support.  By his bold leadership and complete disregard for personal safety he established the location of the isolated troops and succeeded in clearing a path for the infantry to join the separated battalion.  The gallantry displayed by Captain Hinton on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Hinton, Reginald J. (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 62 - 18 March 1951

The First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Captain Reginald J. Hinton, 01313094, Infantry, Army of the United States, Commanding Officer of Tank Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. Captain Hinton was in the company of his regimental commander, witnessing the operation of a tank-infantry task force whose mission it was to break through enemy lines, effect a junction with surrounded friendly units, and support their withdrawal. When the advance of the task force was halted by hostile mortar fire at a defile, the regimental commander ordered Captain Hinton to assume command. Un-hesitantly and without question, Captain Hinton rushed to the point where the tanks were halted and, placing himself ahead of the lead tank, assumed command of the task force, utterly heedless of the heavy enemy fire around him. Inspired by his example of fearlessness, the tankers and infantrymen immediately resumed their advance while he led them on foot, pointing out targets and directing tank fire on enemy emplacements. Under his aggressive leadership the task force effected a link-up with the surrounded forward units. He then disposed his men to act as a covering force and, under the screen of his fire, led the units back through the enemy roadblocks until friendly lines were reached. The gallantry and inspirational leadership displayed by Captain Hinton reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Hinton, Reginald J. (2nd Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 880 - 28 December 1951

The Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Captain Reginald Hinton, 01313094, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 38 Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Kunmul-gol, Korea. On that date the 2d Battalion was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. During the action, captain Hinton was given command of the unit when the commanding officer and executive officer were wounded and the battalion command post was overrun and communications disrupted. Despite the fact, he calmly accepted command and immediately commenced the task of assembling and forming the remaining elements of the unit as they infiltrated back to the assembly point. He fearlessly exposed himself to the enemy fire as he led friendly tanks and infantrymen into the battle. Moving forward during the rage of action, he found the forward progress of the unit halted by the enemy, who was delivering heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire from well concealed and entrenched positions. Without regard for his personal safety, he advanced to the forward elements and, upon organizing the men, directed them in the assault. His personal courage and bravery under intense hostile fire inspired the weary troops to make an all out effort and rout the enemy from his positions. The gallantry in action and outstanding leadership displayed by Captain Hinton on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Hintze, Russell F.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 347 - 17 August 1953

Sergeant First Class Russell F. Hintze, US52125493, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June 1953, Company "E" launched an assault on enemy held Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. Sergeant Hintze was the platoon sergeant of a platoon, forming a section of the assault element. As they approached the objective, the platoon came under intense enemy mortar, artillery and small arms fire, and suffered numerous casualties. Sergeant Hintze immediately organized several groups of men to evacuate the seriously wounded personnel to places of comparative safety. He aroused a high spirit of aggressiveness in the remaining members of the depleted platoon and encouraged them forward to meet the enemy in a close fire fight. On one occasion, when it was believed that the platoon entered a mine field, Sergeant Hintze, with complete disregard for his personal safety, volunteered to search for a safe lane through which the force could advance in its mission. Sergeant Hintze's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Maryland

Hirata, Manuel H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Manuel H. Hirata (MCSN: 337367), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 March 1951. During a platoon-sized raid against a steep ridge line defended by a determined enemy force occupying well-constructed emplacements, Sergeant Hirata led his squad in a vicious assault against a portion of the objective. Fearlessly exposing himself to intense and accurate enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire, he moved single-handedly from bunker to bunker, and succeeded in neutralizing the hostile emplacements with hand grenades. By his exceptional fortitude, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Hirata served to inspire all who observed him and enabled the remainder of the platoon to advance rapidly and secure the objective, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Los Angeles, California. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Hire, Homer E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Homer E. Hire (MCSN: 0-6152), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 and 3 June 1951. Assigned the mission of passing through a friendly unit to continue the attack in the Hwachon Reservoir area, Lieutenant Colonel Hire led his command group on a reconnaissance through areas under enemy observation. When the group was subjected to intense enemy mortar fire, causing numerous casualties, he fearlessly remained exposed to enemy fire to carry the wounded to safety and to insure that they received medical treatment. Proceeding with the reconnaissance, he expertly formed a battle plan and, reorganizing his battalion despite the loss of four company commanders, led his men in the attack the following morning, seizing all the objectives. By his resourceful leadership, cool courage and unswerving devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel Hire served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fort Wayne, Indiana. Home Town: Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Hitchings, Aulbry C.

Citation not found.

"Captain Aulbry C. Hitchings of Livingston Tuesday night was awarded the Silver Star medal for 'gallantry in Korea.'  Hitchings, formerly of Washington, was cited for action Sept. 3, 1950, during a ground advance when his infantry unit was opposed by superior enemy forces.  He now is a regular army instructor for the second battalion, Montana national guard." - Billings Gazette, 6 May 1952

Hittner, George Bryant (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 146 - 24 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant George Bryant Hittner (ASN: NG-28033814), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 6th Tank Battalion (Medium), 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 16 December 1951. His armored unit was advancing up a narrow valley in support of attacking infantry elements, when his tank was attacked by a number of enemy troops armed with grenades and bangalore torpedoes. Although fully aware of the danger of both the nearby hostile soldiers and the terrific mortar and artillery barrages hitting the immediate area, Sergeant Hittner unhesitatingly exposed himself to stand in the open turret and fire his machine gun at the attacking foot troops. He succeeded in dispersing them, thus saving his vehicle from possible destruction but, in so doing, he was mortally wounded by mortar fragments. Sergeant Hittner's gallant action, intrepid fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Armor. Born: May 24, 1932. Home Town: Sinclair, Wyoming. Death: KIA: October 16, 1951 - Buried at: Green Hill Cemetery - Laramie, Wyoming.

Hletko, Bernard P.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Bernard P. Hletko (MCSN: 1109868), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), near Saemol, Korea, on 9 June 1951. On that date, Company B was engaged in an assault on a strongly defended enemy position. During the attack, Private Hletko moved aggressively forward, throwing hand grenades into the enemy bunkers, and encouraging his comrades. Although he became painfully wounded, he refused evacuation and remained in advance of his squad, drawing enemy fire and pointing out targets. His courageous actions contributed greatly to the success of the company's mission. The gallantry and initiative displayed by Private Hletko on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 181 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Illinois.

Hobbs, Harry S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Harry S. Hobbs (MCSN: 1098191), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 December 1950. With his platoon receiving the brunt of a strong hostile attack, Private First Class Hobbs fearlessly remained at his post in the face of heavy and accurate enemy fire and, skillfully manning his weapon, delivered effective counterfire until the rifle failed to operate. Observing a threatened breakthrough at the platoon flank, he voluntarily moved to a position near the enemy and, with his bare hands, threw grenades at the hostile troops, inflicting severe casualties and dispersing the remainder. Courageous throughout this engagement, he continued to throw grenades until his hands became frozen and he could no longer manipulate them and, despite great pain, bravely directed and assisted others in their defense of the flank until the enemy attack had been successfully repelled. His courageous initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Private First Class Hobbs and the United States Naval Service. Born: Dayton, Ohio. Home Town: Dayton, Ohio.

Hodge, Paul A.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Technical Sergeant Paul A. Hodge (MCSN: 265977), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongsan, Korea on 18 August 1950. Sergeant Hodge, company gunnery sergeant, was in a defensive position when he suffered a severe wound of the thigh during an enemy counterattack. Despite this wound, and the intense automatic rifle fire and hand grenade volleys, Sergeant Hodge, with complete disregard of his wound, carried a message to a platoon leader. He then moved to a position on higher ground from which he was able to effectively throw hand grenades and deliver rifle fire against the enemy. Not until the counterattack had been repulsed and the company had seized its objective did Sergeant Hodge report his wound and accept evacuation. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 104 (October 7, 1950). Entered Service From California.

Hodges, Gerald L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Gerald L. Hodges (NSN: 2608567), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 July 1952. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospitalman Hodges displayed exceptional heroism when the unit was assaulting heavily fortified enemy positions. Wounded in the early stage of the attack he refused evacuation and continued to treat the other casualties. Many times during the engagement, he climbed up the hill to the leading platoon in full view of the enemy to continue treating the wounded and aid in their evacuation. On return trips he carried much needed ammunition to machine gun positions. Wounded again he once more refused evacuation and continued to treat the other casualties. Only when the platoon had withdrawn to a forward aid station did he submit to treatment. Hospitalman Hodges' extreme courage under fire and initiative were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 30799 (October 13, 1952).

Hodges, Walter L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Walter L. Hodges (NSN: 2694384), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Tank Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Hodges displayed outstanding courage, professional skill and coolness under fire. The tank platoon in which he was serving was engaged in support of an infantry company attack on a strongly defended enemy hill support position. As an intense barrage of enemy shells began to fall in the area, he observed on platoon suffering heavy casualties, including the platoon Corpsman. Requesting and receiving permission to leave the tank positions so that he could aid the wounded, he dashed across more than one hundred yards of ground under heavy fire and immediately began to administer aid and direct evacuation of the wounded. He exposed himself to fire for several hours taking care of the casualties and remained with the platoon until it was withdrawn to the main line of resistance. By his devotion to duty he saved the lives of many Marines and was an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Hodges' courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 25336 (August 26, 1952).

Hodges, Wesley L.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 104 - 9 June 1951

Sergeant First Class Wesley L. Hodges, RA34765596, Infantry, United States Army, Company K, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 5 September 1950 near Tabu-dong, Korea.  When Sergeant Hodges was advancing up the hill with his squad toward the platoon's objective, the enemy suddenly opened fire from a well entrenched position with automatic weapons and small arms, causing the attack to bog down.  Sergeant Hodges, in spite of the heavy fire, moved forward until he came abreast of the automatic weapons and killed four enemy soldiers.  Sergeant Hodges' heroic action materially aided the platoon in reaching their objective and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered federal service from Georgia.

Hoeschen, Kenneth Gervase (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Kenneth Gervase Hoeschen (NSN: 3664008), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 August 1952. Serving as a Platoon Corpsman, Hospitalman Hoeschen displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. Under cover of darkness, he accompanied a squad of Marines who were directed to occupy a combat outpost forward of the main line of resistance. Immediately after assuming the defensive positions on the outpost, an intense concentration of enemy mortar and artillery fire commenced. During the barrage, the bunker occupied by him and five Marines, received a direct hit in the front doorway. The explosion caused instant death to two men and wounded three others. Although seriously wounded, he refused aid and instructed other Marines in the first aid treatment and care of the other casualties and continually inquired as to the condition of the wounded men. As a result of the wounds he received, Hospitalman Hoeschen died, gallantly giving his life for his country in the performance of his duty. His indomitable spirit and selfless devotion to his fellow men were an inspiration to all who observed him and his gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 39907 (December 30, 1952). Born: June 13, 1932. Home Town: Albany, Minnesota. Death: KIA: August 8, 1952.

Hoesly, James R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal James R. Hoesly (MCSN: 644063), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Assigned the mission of leading his squad in assaulting several key enemy positions to his platoon's left front during a maneuver to reinforce an infantry company which had been engaged in attacking a numerically superior force occupying heavily fortified positions on high ground overlooking his battalion's assembly area near Yudam-ni, Corporal Hoesly expertly deployed his men and led them against the emplacements despite intense fire laid down by the enemy. With his squad suffering numerous casualties, he effected a prompt reorganization and directed and controlled a brilliantly executed maneuver to rout the enemy, personally destroying three fortified automatic weapons during the furious encounter. By his daring initiative, aggressive and determined leadership and bold combat tactics against heavy odds, Corporal Hoesly served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed materially to the seizure of his platoon's objective. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ontario, Canada. Home Town: Hennilworth, New Jersey.

Hoff, Alan (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Alan Hoff (NSN: 0-466541), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as pilot of an unarmed jet photographic reconnaissance plane attached to Composite Squadron Sixty-one (VC-61), and serving with Fighter Squadron One Hundred Eleven (VF-111), embarked in U.S.S. Valley Forge (CV-45), during an important and dangerous mission taking aerial photographs of concentrated anti-aircraft gun positions that were located on the vital main rail line located west of Yangdok, North Korea on 11 March 1952. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Hoff flew his plane at a dangerously low altitude on a straight course while taking the pictures, thereby denying him the advantage of using evasive tactics. He was taken under a withering and accurate cross fire by automatic and radar controlled heavy anti-aircraft guns, and even after receiving severe damage to his plane he continued on course through the increasing barrage of deadly flak. A few moments later his plane received additional hits, mortally wounding him. The plane rolled over and dived into the side of a mountain exploding upon impact. His complete disregard for his own safety and courageous devotion to duty reflects the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Board Serial 316 (May 2, 1953). Born: November 24, 1923. Home Town: Los Angeles, California. Death: KIA: March 11, 1952.

Hoffecker, Frank Shawn Jr. (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Major Frank Shawn Hoffecker, Jr. (MCSN: 0-8609), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Eleven (VMF-311), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 July 1951. Carefully briefing his squadron before the mission, Major Hoffecker skillfully led them in a daring strike against hostile forces in the city of P'yongyang. Due to conditions which necessitated flying by instruments, he led the group to the target above the overcast and, with outstanding navigational ability, executed a difficult instrument letdown into the target area with seventeen planes. Although the flight was subjected to continued intense and accurate enemy anti-aircraft fire, he was responsible for allowing each pilot to take evasive action and thus avoid the heavy fire. Forced to begin his attack from a dangerously low altitude, he immediately located the target and spearheaded an effective bombing and strafing attack, inflicting severe damage on enemy supplies and starting numerous fires in the area. When weather conditions made it impossible for the pilots to maintain visual contact with each other during the strike, he skillfully coordinated the attack by radio. Major Hoffecker's exceptional tactical ability, inspiring leadership and courageous devotion to duty in the face of heavy enemy anti-aircraft fire were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: September 19, 1915 at Towson, Maryland. Home Town: Sparrows Point, Maryland. Death: MIA: August 12, 1951.

Hoffman, John E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant John E. Hoffman (MCSN: 652991), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Mortar Section Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1952. When the company position was subjected to a heavy enemy mortar concentration, which destroyed a mortar and set fire to a supply of ammunition, Staff Sergeant Hoffman unhesitatingly entered the danger area and carried out flaming rounds of ammunition to reduce the danger of an explosion, thereby preventing probable casualties among his comrades and conserving vital ammunition. Painfully burned while engaged in this heroic act, Staff Sergeant Hoffman, by his daring initiative, cool courage and resolute determination in the face of grave personal risk, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Susanville, California. Home Town: Idaho Falls, Idaho.

Hoffman, Lamar E.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 382 - 8 September 1953

Master Sergeant Lamar E. Hoffman, NG3445337, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the afternoon of 10 June 1953, in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, Company "F" attacked enemy held Hill "412". After the leading assault platoon had taken the crest of the hill, it attacked the reverse slope and was forced back by intense enemy fire. The platoon leader was wounded and there was danger of the troops becoming disorganized. Realizing the urgent need for leadership, Sergeant Hoffman left the support platoon and went forward to the assault platoon despite the intense enemy machine gun fire. Upon assuming command, he organized the men and prepared them for a new assault. He courageously led one squad after another in attacks on the reverse slope. When the enemy counterattacked, he remained in an exposed position to better direct automatic weapons fire on the attacking force. Sergeant Hoffman's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Ohio.

Hogan, Henry H.

Headquarters 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 185 - 31 March 1951

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43 1918) and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following-named officers and enlisted men:

Sergeant First Class Henry H. Hogan, RA20446560, Infantry, Company M, 35th Infantry, United States Army. On 28 November 1950 near Unsan, Korea, Sergeant First Class Hogan's unit was attacked by a numerically superior hostile force. Advancing through intense automatic weapons fire and bursting mortar and artillery shells, he moved his machine gun to a vantage point and created a route of withdrawal with a heavy volume of devastating fire. Leading his comrades through the encircling enemy, he effectively dispersed every hostile block, thus enabling his unit to secure new positions. Sergeant First Class Hogan's valorous actions reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Armed Forces. Entered the military service from Louisiana.

Hogan, Paul E.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 81 - 28 October 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant Paul E. Hogan, 0948650, (then Second Lieutenant), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Company, 1 Battalion, st 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 2 September 1950 in the vicinity of Sasi-Dong, Korea. On that date he was a platoon leader who was assigned the mission of destroying an enemy
force then of unknown strength which occupied high ground with a commanding view of the main supply route. In the initial phases of the attack the entire platoon was subjected to intense fire from an enemy machine gun. Perceiving that the success of his mission was doubtful and that his troops were unable to advance, Lieutenant Hogan with utter disregard for his own personal safety, charged the enemy machine gun and hurled grenades which destroyed it. Under his inspired and aggressive leadership his troops then rallied to destroy the numerically superior enemy force, thereby assuring the constant un-harassed flow of supplies to the front. Lieutenant Hogan’s fearlessness and high devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Montana.

Hohmann, Keith Edward

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Keith Edward Hohmann (NSN: 2885448), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 July 1953. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospitalman Hohmann displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the company's sector of the main line of resistance was subjected to devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire, he courageously and with complete disregard for his personal safety moved into the battered trenchline in order to render first aid treatment to the many casualties and direct their evacuation. Upon being severely injured when an enemy shell exploded close to him, he refused to submit to treatment of his wounds and continued to give treatment and aid in the evacuation of his wounded comrades. Throughout the night he repeatedly exposed himself to the murderous hostile fire as he gave first aid to the many wounded. Only after the action had ceased and he had insured himself that all casualties had been treated, did he finally rest. Hospitalman Hohmann's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 29273 (December 7, 1953).

Holder, Harry L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 153 - 2 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Harry L. Holder (ASN: RA-19349246), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 13 August 1950 near Ch'ongon, Korea. When his company's position was threatened by a numerically superior enemy, Private Holder, seeing that their right flank was entirely exposed, left the comparative safety of his foxhole armed with a light machine gun, carried the fight to the enemy. Exposing himself to the almost point blank fire, he successfully routed the hard pressing enemy by the accuracy and volume of his fire, killing and wounding several. In addition he courageously destroyed several machine guns which had moved in to threaten the company's positions. The courage and complete disregard for his own safety inspired the men of his company and reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Flagstaff, Arizona.

Holder, J.M.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 265 - 17 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Chaplain) J. M. Holder (ASN: 0-932654), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 3d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Anju, Korea, on 8 to 10 November 1950. Personnel of the 1st Battalion of the Regiment, which had previously been cut off by overwhelming numbers of the advancing enemy, were still unaccounted for after four days. Determined to evacuate the wounded and dead who now lay deep behind the enemy's lines he unhesitatingly joined patrols in probing the former positions of the battalion. During this period he advanced, time after time, into areas infested by the enemy, without regard for his own safety, intent only on locating and evacuating both the living and the dead. Often fired upon at close range by enemy patrols he refused to be deterred from his self-appointed mission and continued on until assured that all his fallen comrades had been located and removed to friendly positions. Chaplain Holder's courageous actions and complete devotion to his fellow man reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Chaplain Corps. Home Town: Bluff, Arkansas.

Holder, Walter R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Walter R. Holder (MCSN: 562593), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of the First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. Although painfully wounded by a hostile bullet through the right arm and shoulder during a strong enemy attack on his company's positions, Private First Class Holder bravely remained in his foxhole, refusing to be evacuated for medical treatment and, when the hostile forces again assaulted, delivered accurate and effective fire to assist in repelling the enemy a second time. After receiving first aid at the company command post where he fearlessly remained for the rest of the night. His personal courage, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty inspired all who observed him, thereby reflecting great credit upon Private First Class Holder and the United States Naval Service. Born: Prescott, Arizona. Home Town: Payson, Arizona.

Holemon, William L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant William L. Holemon (MCSN: 975880), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 March 1951. When the unit was suddenly subjected to intense automatic weapons and small arms fire from well-concealed hostile positions on high ground while he was moving with the point to a contact patrol deep in enemy territory, Sergeant Holemon bravely exposed himself to the hostile fire to rally his men and led them forward in a daring attack. Skillfully maneuvering the assault squad into position, he directed his group in neutralizing five hostile bunkers and in killing fifteen or more of the enemy, personally destroying one of the emplacements and three of the enemy in attaining his objective. Undeterred by the constant hostile fire, he directed the patrol in successfully defending its position against a determined counterattack launched from the reverse slope of the hill. Subsequently ordered to break contact with the enemy, he remained in the rear guard position himself while deploying his men in pairs, and succeeded in moving the entire patrol sustaining only two minor casualties. By his inspiring leadership, marked courage and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Holemon was greatly instrumental in the success achieved by his patrol and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Montgomery, Alabama. Home Town: Birmingham, Alabama.

Holladay, Morse L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Morse "L" Holladay (MCSN: 0-9646), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on the night of 19 May 1951. When his battalion was ordered into a blocking position on the left flank of the regimental zone of action, Major Holladay quickly moved his units over rugged and hazardous terrain in complete darkness, enabling other friendly units to withdraw through his lines to new positions. Although unable to make physical contact with the unit on his left, he organized a provisional platoon and effectively positioned it to guard the exposed flank. When the enemy launched a series of heavy attacks during the early morning hours, Major Holladay fearlessly exposed himself to the intense small-arms and mortar fire to personally inspect his front-line units, thereby gaining a more advantageous position to bring supporting arms to bear upon the fanatical attackers. Throughout the action, he effectively deployed his units and skillfully employed supporting weapons, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and thwarting their attempts to penetrate the battalion sector. By his inspiring leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty, Major Holladay upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pima, Arizona. Home Town: Tucson, Arizona.

Hollingsworth, Dale G.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 50 - 25 February 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant Dale G. Hollingsworth, 02021064, (then Second Lieutenant), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company G, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 29 November 1950 and 30 November 1950 in the vicinity of Kunu-ri, Korea. On the afternoon of 29 November 1950, two companies of his battalion were under heavy attack by numerically superior enemy forces and were being forced to withdraw to better positions. Lieutenant Hollingsworth led his platoon across a fire-swept valley to a covering position on high ground from where he could protect the withdrawal. Finding a few of his men seeking cover, he boldly stood upright and fired his weapon at the enemy while fully exposed to hostile fire. This example inspired his men who took up firing positions and delivered a large volume of fire upon the enemy. After the two companies had withdrawn, he led his platoon across the valley to his previous positions where he placed his men and resumed the firefight. At dark his company was ordered to withdraw to new positions to the rear, which were assumed under cover of darkness. Here it was necessary for him to place each man and then check him from time to time. As the night progressed, the enemy attacked, and he went from foxhole to foxhole encouraging his men and caring for the wounded even though fully exposed to enemy small arms fire and hand grenades from a distance of 25 yards. His devotion to duty and his undaunted spirit were a source of inspiration to his men who stayed in their positions and repelled repeated enemy assaults. On 30 November 1950, following another withdrawal the previous night, Lieutenant Hollingsworth was ordered to mount one of several tanks to break through a roadblock established by the enemy. During this attack he stayed on the tank, firing his weapon at the enemy even though fully exposed to intense machine gun and small arms fire. The gallantry and inspirational leadership displayed on this occasion by Lieutenant Hollingsworth reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Des Moines, Iowa.

[Lieutenant Hollingsworth was killed in action on May 1951.]

Holloway, Raymond R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Raymond R. Holloway (NSN: 7844971), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 March 1951. Serving as a Medical Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Holloway displayed outstanding courage and professional ability when the company, moving in the assault of a strongly defended enemy hill position, was subjected to murderous enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire. He fearlessly and with complete disregard for his personal safety moved forward through the heavy enemy fire, rendering aid to the casualties and dragging them to covered positions. Although he was himself painfully wounded in the leg, he refused to be evacuated, continuing steadfastly to treat the wounded until other Corpsmen arrived to relieve him. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Holloway's courageous devotion to duty and heroic actions were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 60174 (November 30, 1951).

Hollister, Edgar Allen (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain Edgar Allen Hollister (MCSN: 0-49340), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Attack Squadron One Hundred Twenty-One (VMA-121), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1952. Leading a flight of attack planes on a vitally important mission to provide close air support for friendly front-line units, Captain Hollister promptly located the well-camouflaged objective in close proximity to friendly troops and initiated a dive-bombing assault in the face of intense and accurate enemy anti-aircraft fire. Realizing he was not in position to accurately release his bombs on the target, he fearlessly maneuvered his aircraft to an extremely low level through heavy enemy fire to carry out a second attack and scored direct hits that destroyed the hostile positions and inflicted heavy enemy casualties. Although painfully wounded when his plane was damaged by hostile fire, he remained over the target area to release his remaining ordnance and skillfully piloted his crippled aircraft into friendly territory. Fully aware of the extreme danger his uncontrolled aircraft would impose on friendly troops if he parachuted from his plane, he gallantly elected to attempt a crash landing in the hazardous terrain and guided the stricken plane over a cleared area where it went out of control and crashed. His superb airmanship, outstanding courage and self-sacrificing efforts reflect the highest credit upon Captain Hollister and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 3, 1924 at Santa Barbara, California. Home Town: Santa Barbara, California. Death: KIA: October 27, 1952.

Holman, Charles Rutherford (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Charles Rutherford Holman (NSN: 0-486204), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot of an Attack Bomber of Attack Squadron One Hundred Ninety-Five (VA-195), embarked in U.S.S. PRINCETON (CV-37), during a strike mission against the Fusen #1 Hydro-Electric Power Station in Communist held North Korea on 1 August 1952. Upon the disability of his division leader, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Holman gallantly led a division of aircraft through heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire and courageously succeeded in destroying the target. With great determination and complete disregard for his own personal safety he executed his attacks upon this vital target amidst the bursting of enemy shells. His skillful maneuvering and bombing precision resulted in two direct hits on the power station and one on the penstocks. Gun ammunition remaining, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Holman returned to the coastal areas to inflict further damage to the enemy by leading repeated strafing attacks in the face of intense ground fire upon supply concentrations and beached boats. During this devastating attacks he or his plane was hit causing the aircraft to crash into the sea. The superb airmanship and daring exhibition by Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Holman in carrying out his assigned mission at the cost of his own life immeasurably contributed to the offensive efforts of the United Nations' Forces in North Korea. His extraordinary heroism and gallant devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Board Serial 462 (May 26, 1953). Born: May 30, 1925. Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana. Death: KIA: August 1, 1952.

Holmes, Gerald J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Gerald J. Holmes (MCSN: 1204248), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Gunner of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. When his unit was pinned down by heavy fire from an enemy bunker during an attack against a strongly defended position, Private First Class Holmes fearlessly exposed himself to intense grenade and small arms fire to single-handedly assault the strong point, firing his gun and hurling grenades until the position was neutralized. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and resolute determination in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Holmes inspired his fellow Marines to sweep on and overrun the enemy strong point, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Garden City, New York. Home Town: Uniondale, New York.

Holmes, Gilbert H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Gilbert H. Holmes (MCSN: 0-51476), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Sniper Platoon Commander of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. With the infantry company to which he was attached temporarily halted by a devastating shower of hostile hand grenades thrown from an enemy emplacement on commanding ground, Second Lieutenant Holmes unhesitatingly left his position with the leading elements of the assault forces and fearlessly advanced through a hail of exploding grenades toward the enemy position. Although painfully wounded twice, he gallantly charged into the entrance of the emplacement and, despite partial blindness from a third wound, moved forward to kill the enemy occupant, thereby enabling the company to advance and secure its objective. By his indomitable fighting spirit, exceptional fortitude and unyielding devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Holmes contributed in large measure to the success of the company's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Massachusetts. Home Town: Southville, Massachusetts.

Holmes, Willard Bernie (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 127 - 12 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Willard Bernie Holmes (ASN: US-52003101), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 7 December 1951. He was serving as an ammunition bearer for an outpost platoon machine gun emplacement when the positions were savagely attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. Deploying a tremendous concentration of small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire, the hostile hordes penetrated the platoon's defenses and wounded the machine gunner. Private Holmes quickly took over the weapon and, realizing the extreme seriousness of the rapidly developing situation, swept the onrushing masses with devastatingly accurate streams of fire, inflicting severe casualties upon them. The rapidity and effectiveness with which he fired his machine gun from an exposed position was highly instrumental in enabling the quick reorganization of his unit and the successful repulsion of the enemy. While firing into the retreating attackers, however, he was mortally wounded by enemy small arms fire. Private Holmes' gallant action, intrepid fighting spirit and self-sacrificing devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Lorain County, Ohio. Death: KIA: December 7, 1951.

Holtz, Jack

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Jack Holtz (NSN: 7532746), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 September 1951. Serving as Company Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Holtz displayed exceptional courage and devotion to duty when the company was subjected to a devastatingly accurate enemy mortar and artillery barrage, causing numerous casualties. Exposing himself fearlessly and with complete disregard for his own safety to the intense enemy fire, he skillfully treated six of his comrades, and then attempted to carry one seriously wounded man to safety. When the intensity of the enemy fire increased, he courageously threw himself over his helpless comrade to shield him, and was himself painfully wounded. His great personal bravery and unhesitating care of his comrades were an inspiration to all members of the command. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Holtz's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 60723 (December 4, 1951).

Hope, Richard L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Second Class Richard L. Hope, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 October 1950. As the platoon to which Hospital Corpsman Second Class Hope was attached as a Medical Corpsman fought its way to the top of a barren peak enemy fire increased and the enemy counterattacked following a barrage of hand grenades. Seeing the platoon leader and runner struck down by the enemy attack, he rushed forward to a position where he covered them with fire. Then without regard for his own personal safety and despite intense enemy grenade and small arms fire he disregarded warnings of the danger and fought his way to the aid of the wounded. While in an exposed position he was struck by enemy fire and seriously wounded. Hospital Corpsman Second Class Hope's display of initiative and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 18140 (November 28, 1950).

Hopkins, John Leland (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel John Leland Hopkins (MCSN: 0-7421), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 22 April 1951. Assigned the mission of protecting the right sector of the regimental zone, Lieutenant Colonel Hopkins skillfully organized the defensive position. During the hours of darkness, a large enemy force succeeded in penetrating the friendly unit on the right, posing a serious threat to the regiment. Although exposed to continuous hostile mortar and automatic-weapons fire, he ably employed his reserves and launched a devastating counterattack against the enemy force, successfully restoring the friendly positions. By his outstanding courage, quick actions and resolute determination, Lieutenant Colonel Hopkins materially aided in preventing the enemy from exploiting the penetration and overrunning the supporting-arms positions, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Marshfield, Oregon. Home Town: Sacramento, California.

Hopkins, John Leland (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel John Leland Hopkins (MCSN: 0-7421), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, from 25 to 29 April 1951. When a savage attack by numerically superior enemy forces exposed the flanks of his battalion, Lieutenant Colonel Hopkins led his men in a highly complicated and difficult retrograde movement. Constantly exposing himself to intense and accurate hostile mortar, artillery, automatic-weapons and small-arms fire, he directed the defense of successive blocking positions and, at all times, inspired his units to greater efforts in inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. Laboring untiringly, he devised intricate maneuvers to delay and confuse the hostile forces, and devoted himself to insuring adequate medical care for the battalion casualties. By his aggressive leadership, decisive actions and thorough understanding of the multitudinous problems confronting his battalion, he aided immeasurably in the success achieved by the regiment. His outstanding courage, daring initiative and devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Hopkins and the United States Naval Service. Born: Marshfield, Oregon. Home Town: Sacramento, California.

Hopkins, Kenneth E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Kenneth E. Hopkins (MCSN: 263628), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as a Light Machine Gunner of a Wharang Platoon of South Korean Police, during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. With his platoon subjected to a sudden, vicious attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Corporal Hopkins fearlessly exposed himself to the intense barrage to deliver accurate and effective machine gun fire on the approaching attackers and inflict extremely heavy casualties among their ranks, forcing them to withdraw in disorder. When the enemy reorganized and again attacked and overran elements of platoon strength nearby, he promptly displaced his machine gun to bring fire to bear on targets of opportunity. Standing fast, he continued his fire until the hostile troops surrounded his position and attacked from the rear then, displacing his machine gun, he joined friendly forces, personally accounting for more than sixty hostile deal. Corporal Hopkins, by his daring initiative, aggressive determination and heroic fighting spirit, succeeded in preventing the enemy from completing its mission of overrunning the battalion command post, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ann Arbor, Michigan. Home Town: Toledo, Ohio.

Horan, Robert M. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 18 - 25 January 1951

First Lieutenant Robert M. Horan, 027704, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 17 October 1950, Lieutenant HORAN volunteered to lead a motorized patrol from Ch'up'ungnyong-ni, Korea to investigate a report that another company of the regiment was engaged in an intense fire fight with an estimated enemy force of three hundred men, and to render assistance to the besieged company or request any additional support required. En route, at Tommak-tong, Korea, Lieutenant Horan's patrol engaged the enemy, inflicted considerable casualties, and captured two of the enemy. When the enemy had been routed, Lieutenant Horan personally led his patrol in pursuit. Although in this gallant action, undertaken without regard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Horan was mortally wounded by the enemy, his aggressive leadership inspired his men to complete their pursuit and destruction of the enemy. Lieutenant Horan's outstanding initiative and heroism on this occasion are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Wisconsin.

Horgan, Raymond M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Raymond M. Horgan (MCSN: 1116447), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Provisional Infantry Platoon of Battery K, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. With his platoon assigned to reinforce a Marine infantry company in assaulting and securing Hill 1449 near Hagaru-ri, Private First Class Horgan fought gallantly throughout the intense action. When a captured machine gun on the hostile side of the crest of the hill which was being employed against the enemy, developed a stoppage, and seven of the nine Marines protecting the gun were wounded, he voluntarily exposed himself to heavy hostile small arms, machine gun and mortar fire to assume the duties as gunner although he had no previous experience with a machine gun. After clearing the stoppage, he remained in the exposed position and placed accurate and effective fire on the outnumbering force throughout four coordinated attacks, inflicting heavy casualties and denying the enemy the highest portion of the hill. By his daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and courageous efforts in the face of tremendous odds, Private First Class Horgan succeeded in preventing a penetration of the defense perimeter and served as an inspiration to all who observed him. His heroism throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Horn, Eugene

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Technical Sergeant Eugene Horn (MCSN: 247251), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a 3.5 inch rocket squad of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in the Obangi-ni Ridge area west of Yongsan, Korea, on 18 August 1950. At approximately 0230, a number of enemy troops, estimated to be one company in strength, launched a fierce counter-attack against Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, which had secured its position on the ridge. The attack carried through Company B's perimeter of defense, confusing and disorganizing the men. Sergeant Horn, Leader of the squad, stood up in the midst of the overrunning enemy, and called loudly to his men to follow him in a retaliatory charge. The men, inspired by his courage, quickly rallied and fell in behind Sergeant Horn, who daringly led them in an attack against the main body of enemy penetration, driving them from the hill. Sergeant Horn's aggressive and fearless leadership, exemplary valor and complete disregard for personal safety in the face of great danger are in keeping with the highest military traditions. Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 88 (December 23, 1950) Entered Service From California.

Horn, William K.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major [then Second Lieutenant] William K. Horn, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity on 20 May 1951 while serving as a Mortar Section Leader, attached to Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea. When a numerically superior hostile force attacked the company position during the night, penetrated a portion of the line, and forced one squad to withdraw to the mortar position, Major Horn, who was then on his way to high ground to observe and adjust mortar fire, realized the danger of leaving a portion of the line undefended and immediately led the withdrawn squad through heavy hostile fire to their former positions, thereby preventing the enemy from exploiting the penetration. He then proceeded to direct accurate and effective fire on the enemy, aiding materially in repulsing the attack. Major Horn's courageous leadership and inspiring devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: August 20, 1926 at Hibbing, Minnesota. Home Town: Hibbing, Minnesota.

Hornbeak, Walter B. Sr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Technical Sergeant Walter B. Hornbeak, Sr. (MCSN: 409514), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1952. Repeatedly braving intense and devastating barrages of hostile artillery and mortar fire, and undeterred by deadly snipers, Technical Sergeant Hornbeak effectively directed the fire of his squads and shouted words of encouragement to his men until he was seriously wounded by enemy fire and rendered immobile. Continuing to advise his men and refusing medical aid in order that other casualties might be treated, he later succumbed to his wounds while being evacuated. By his outstanding courage, daring leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 5, 1923 at Sharon, Tennessee. Home Town: Burton, South Carolina. Death: KIA: October 27, 1952.

Horony, John A. (posthumous)

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to Lieutenant John A. Horony, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Anju, Korea on 5 November 1950. His company was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force supported by exceptionally intense automatic weapons fire. Utterly disregarding the intensity of this fire, Lieutenant Horony moved among his men directing their fire into the ranks of the advancing enemy and inflicting heavy casualties. An enemy force, however, had moved to Lieutenant Horony’s rear and commenced to pour a hail of deadly fire into the platoon’s position. Although he was severely wounded in this action, Lieutenant Horony skillfully displaced his machine gun and neutralized this enemy attempt to encircle his position. When the order to withdraw was received, he supervised his platoon’s movement and remained behind to aid in the evacuation of his wounded men. While aiding his fallen comrades, the enemy swept the area with machine gun fire and Lieutenant Horony was killed. His gallant actions and complete devotion to his men reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered the military service from (Centerville) Pennsylvania. (Titusville Herald, 19 Oct 1951)

(Records indicated Horony was a member of the 1st Cav Div during WWII and that he was wounded three times while fighting in the Pacific.)

Horst, Charles K. Jr.

Private First Class Charles K. Horst, Jr., a member of Battery A, 50th AAA AW Battalion (SP), is cited for heroism in action against an armed enemy in Korea. On 11 December 1950, Private Horst was manning a machinegun position in a defensive perimeter near Chinhung-ni when the enemy, trying to infiltrate, opened fire with automatic weapons. With complete disregard for his safety, exposing himself to the heavy automatic weapons fire, he located the enemy positions. Then, despite repeated warnings to take cover, he remained in his exposed position delivering such a heavy volume of machinegun fire that the enemy was forced to withdraw. His heroic actions in preventing an infiltration of the perimeter reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the service from West Virginia.

Horting, Thomas E.

Headquarters 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No.580 - 14 August 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Thomas E. Horting (ASN: RA-19325364), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a member of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Horting distinguished himself by courageous action near Hudong-ni, Korea, on 26 June 1951. His company was given the mission to advance and secure a well-fortified stronghold, defended by an estimated enemy of reinforced company strength. From his well-concealed dugouts, strategically positioned in this terrain, the enemy controlled the entire area with machine guns, grenades and small arms. As the lead platoon moved up a rocky ridge line, its advance was halted by a shower of grenades from one of these positions. Picking up his weapon and throwing a belt of ammunition over his left shoulder, Corporal Horting, a machine gunner, charged forward firing his weapon. Unable to silence the position, he, with complete disregard for his personal safety, laid his weapon down, raced through blasting concussion grenades, armed a fragmentation grenade and hurled it into the enemy position. In a matter of seconds his grenade was thrown out of the position, exploding near him. He repeated his action again with the same result. Slipping down the side of the steep ridge, he began winding his way through trees and underbrush until in back of the position. With a shovel, he began digging a hole in the enemy bunker and through this, he fired his .45 caliber pistol, killing the 3 occupants thus enabling his platoon to advance. Corporal Horting's courageous actions reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Home of record: Richfield, Idaho

Horton, Billy D.

19 May 1951
General Orders Number 209

Private First Class Billy D. Horton, RA16322473 (then Private), Artillery, United States Army, while a member of Headquarters Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy near the Chosin Reservoir, Korea, between 28 November 1950 and 10 December 1950. During this period, elements of the 57th Field Artillery Battalion were attacked and surrounded by a numerically superior enemy force. Though continuously exposed to enemy fire, Private Horton, with complete disregard for his personal safety, volunteered to collect, treat, and transport casualties to the battalion aid station and the Marine medical installations. He worked constantly for three days and nights, while under heavy enemy fire, giving first aid and comfort to the wounded. On one occasion, Private Horton picked up a wounded Marine, carried him on his back a distance of three miles, and delivered him to a battalion aid station in Koto-ri. During this action, Private Horton suffered severe frostbitten fingers and toes. Private Horton's gallant actions during this period reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Kansas.

Hoskins, John Madison

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Rear Admiral John Madison Hoskins (NSN: 0-57067), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commander, Carrier Division Three, Joint Task Force Seveb, United Nations Command, in action in the Inchon-Seoul operation during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. Admiral Hoskins displayed fearless and aggressive leadership while directing his Division, which provided air coverage for the invasion fleet and assault craft and close air support for the landing troops until complete attainment of ground objectives was accomplished. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Hosman, Raymond E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Raymond E. Hosman (MCSN: 1239672), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 May 1952. With his unit suddenly encountering intense and accurate hostile small arms and mortar fire and forced to withdraw before entrenching themselves in an outpost position, Corporal Hosman voluntarily remained with the wounded members of his squad and defied the attempts of the enemy to annihilate the group. Repelling the attackers with effective rifle and grenade fire, he moved among the wounded men, administering medical aid and lending words of encouragement until reinforcements arrived and the casualties were evacuated. By his outstanding courage, valiant fighting spirit and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Corporal Hosman served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hamilton, Missouri. Home Town: Grand Island, Nebraska.

Hough, Bruce B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Bruce B. Hough (MCSN: 563481), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Mortar Crewman in Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. With his position under attack by a large hostile force which placed a machine gun within twenty-five yards of his weapon, Private First Class Hough exposed himself to intense hostile machine gun, small arms and grenade fire and, boldly charging the emplacement, succeeded in destroying it with hand grenades. Fearlessly choosing an uncovered site, he delivered accurate and effective fire which permitted his squad to regain fire superiority and force the enemy to withdraw. By his courageous initiative, fighting spirit and indomitable devotion to duty, Private First Class Hough inspired all those who served with him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Shreveport, Louisiana. Home Town: Houston, Texas.

Houghton, Kenneth J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Kenneth J. Houghton (MCSN: 0-13965), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 September 1950. Assigned to lead a small detachment in a reconnaissance of an enemy held shore line, Captain Houghton successfully swam the Han River, reconnoitered the beaches and nearby town and, returning with his patrol to the shore, was attacked by intense hostile small arms, machine gun and mortar fire. Repeatedly exposing himself to the enemy barrage, he directed and supervised the destruction of his equipment and then ordered his men into the water. Undeterred by the pain from wounds inflicted by hostile mortar fire, which also wounded several others while the patrol was swimming back, he continued to swim, with assistance, to a friendly amphibious vehicle and subsequently reported information of vital importance to division intelligence. His aggressive initiative, tactical ability and courageous actions were contributing factors in permitting the neutralization of enemy positions by friendly air strikes and in preventing an ambush of the main landing force. His undaunted devotion to duty reflects great credit upon Captain Houghton and the United States Naval Service. Born: October 17, 1920 at San Francisco, California. Home Town: San Francisco, California. Death: March 27, 2006 - Buried at: Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery - San Diego, California.

Hourtienne, Bernard J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Bernard J. Hourtienne (MCSN: 1206840), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 August 1952. When the patrol sustained heavy casualties after it was ambushed by intense enemy mortar and small arms fire and was pinned down in an exposed area, Private First Class Hourtienne unhesitatingly maneuvered toward a hostile machine gun position to draw the enemy's fire. Undeterred by the opposition, he courageously stormed the position, killing or wounding the entire machine gun crew. Although painfully wounded during this heroic act, he succeeded in drawing the enemy's fire, thereby permitting the remaining members of the patrol to seek cover. By his indomitable fighting spirit, resourceful initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Private First Class Hourtienne served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Millington, Michigan. Home Town: Millington, Michigan.

House, Ernest J. Jr.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 204 - 24 June 1953

Second Lieutenant Ernest J. House, Jr., 01925514, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 16 May 1953, Lieutenant House was in command of a platoon of Company "G", occupying Outpost "Harry", in the vicinity of Songnae-dong, Korea. The outpost came under intense artillery and mortar fire followed by a numerically superior enemy attack. Lieutenant House, knowing that the heavy shelling would be followed by an enemy attack, immediately began checking his men to insure that everyone was in position to repel the foe. Completely disregarding his personal safety, he moved through the devastated area, contacting every man to reassure them and to point out sectors of likely enemy approach. When the main attack came, the platoon was prepared to effectively drive off the foe. Lieutenant House continued to expose himself throughout the attack to locate groups of enemy soldiers and direct the platoon's fire on them. His actions were instrumental in repulsing the attack and securing the outpost. Lieutenant House's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from New York.

Hovatter, Eugenous M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Eugenous M. Hovatter (MCSN: 0-37574), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When his company's assault elements were pinned down by intense hostile automatic weapons, mortar and small arms fire during an attempt to rescue an isolated rifle company which had been surrounded by the enemy for forty-eight hours south of Yudam-ni with many of its casualties in urgent need of evacuation, First Lieutenant Hovatter bravely moved ahead of his leading units in the face of accurate hostile fire to appraise the tactical situation. Quickly completing his plans to resume the attack, he led his men in a fierce and well-coordinated assault on the objective which completely overwhelmed the enemy, driving them from their entrenched positions and destroying many of the hostile troops. By his inspiring leadership, marked courage and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Hovatter was greatly instrumental in the timely rescue of the besieged company and in saving the lives of many of its wounded personnel, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Grafton, West Virginia. Home Town: Independence, West Virginia.

Hovey, Marvin D.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 270 - 19 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Marvin D. Hovey (ASN: RA-19240030), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chinnampo, Korea, on 17 October 1950. His battalion was advancing to secure the ferry south of the town when an enemy column approaching from the flank was intercepted. With complete disregard for his own safety he unhesitatingly secured a machine gun and advanced to a point from which he could bring fire to bear upon the enemy. Observing his actions the enemy tried desperately to prevent Sergeant Hovey from placing his weapon in operation. Completely unmindful of the intense fire directed on his position he delivered such devastating fire that one of the enemy's vehicles was disabled and many casualties inflicted. Turning the gun over to another soldier he returned to the column, secured another gun and brought it forward where he poured a hail of deadly fire into the enemy destroying additional vehicles and equipment and inflicting heavy casualties among the enemy force. Sergeant Hovey's courageous actions and complete devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Grand Junction, Colorado.

Howard, Alva D. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Alva D. Howard, Jr. (MCSN: 0-52310), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Attack Squadron Two Hundred Twelve (VMA-212), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 March 1953. Sustaining a serious shrapnel wound from an anti-aircraft projectile that severely damaged his aircraft during an aerial assault against hostile personnel and supply shelters, First Lieutenant Howard bravely concealed the extent of his injuries and, determined not to jeopardize the remainder of the flight, calmly pressed his attack against the enemy. Despite the severe shock and his precarious position, he bravely continued his bombing run in the face of intense and accurate hostile fire, scoring direct hits on the target. Although weakened by the loss of blood, he expertly maneuvered his crippled aircraft to a friendly airfield and effected a safe landing. First Lieutenant Howard's exceptional gallantry in successfully completing his attack after he had sustained severe wounds, and despite continuing intense hostile ground fire, exemplified the highest standards of intrepid airmanship in the face of the enemy. His indomitable courage, outstanding skill and resolute determination were contributing factors in the success of a vital mission deep in hostile territory and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Mt. Vernon, Illinois. Home Town: Bethnay, Oklahoma.

Howard, Jimmie Earl

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Jimmie Earl Howard (MCSN: 1130610), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with a Marine 4.2" Mortar Company in the First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 12 to 15 August 1952. Serving as a forward observer attached to a rifle company, Corporal Howard displayed outstanding professional competence and courage in the performance of his duties. His ability to call in accurate and devastating fire upon the enemy materially strengthened the defense of an important hill position. During one instance he was engaged in close hand-to-hand combat with the enemy. Later, although relieved for rest, he aided in evacuating the wounded and in carrying vitally needed supplies. Although knocked unconscious by an enemy mortar shell, he continued to perform his duties as soon as he recovered consciousness. Later he was again knocked unconscious and was forced to be evacuated. Corporal Howard's selfless devotion to duty, initiative and calm manner while under fire were inspirational to all who observed him. His gallant and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: July 27, 1929 at Burlington, Iowa. Home Town: Burlington, Iowa. Death: November 12, 1993 - Buried at: Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery - San Diego, California.

Howard, T.R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade T. R. Howard, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Redhead (AMS-34), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, from 10 to 31 October 1950. A highly skilled and resolute officer, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Howard boldly directed his ship in the hazardous task of sweeping enemy mines from channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan in the face of heavy fire from hostile coast defense batteries. By his inspiring leadership throughout this intensive action, he contributed materially to the ultimate success of the operation. His marked courage, expert seamanship and steadfast devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Howard and the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1073 (November 17, 1950). Born: November 28, 1925. Death: June 13, 1993.

Howe, Dwight D.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 52 - 27 February 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Master Sergeant Dwight D. Howe, RA39497896, Corps of Engineers, United States Army, a member of Company D, 2d Engineer Combat Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 30 November 1950 in the vicinity of Kunu-ri, Korea. On the night of that date he was riding in a convoy which was attempting to break through an enemy roadblock that was approximately five miles in depth. When the convoy was halted by intense enemy fire, the men in his portion of the convoy dismounted and sought cover along the side of the road. Sergeant Howe organized the men and led them across country away from the main supply route. Upon encountering further enemy fire, he planned and directed an attack which enabled the group to proceed through the enemy positions. For the rest of the night he led the group through the enemy lines, evading enemy concentrations and attacking weak points. At dawn, he joined with a larger force, and his determination and courage enabled the group to penetrate the lines of a numerically superior enemy force and undoubtedly saved many lives. The gallantry and inspiring leadership displayed by Sergeant Howe on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Nebraska.

Howell, Edward D. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 130 - June 2, 1951

Captain Edward D. Howell, 01297726, Infantry, Army of the United States, Commanding Officer, Company I, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 10 February 1951 in the vicinity of Rum Wang-ni, Korea.  Captain Howell was leading his company in an attack on Hill 444, a well dug-in, camouflaged, and heavily fortified enemy position.  As the company attempted to move forward, it was pinned down by effective enemy mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire.  Disregarding his own safety, Captain Howell stood erect, openly defied the enemy, and encouraged his men to move forward. He fearlessly exposed himself to a murderous hail of enemy fire as he moved from flank to flank.  Inspired by his heroic actions, Company I moved forward.  When the company was within 100 yards of its objective, Captain Howell was seriously wounded.  Although in intense pain and bleeding profusely, he continued to urge his men on until they finally overran the enemy positions.  Captain Howell died as a result of his wounds.  The gallant action, courage, and inspiring leadership displayed by Captain Howell reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Michigan.

Howell, John Theodore (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class John Theodore Howell (MCSN: 663518), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Demolition Team of Company D, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. With his company pinned down by enemy fire from a heavily fortified hostile emplacement during an assault against deeply entrenched enemy positions, Private First Class Howell unhesitatingly left his covered position and, under direct small arms and machine gun fire, boldly moved forward to an exposed area to destroy the emplacement with a demolition charge. Although fatally struck down while carrying out his valiant action, Private First Class Howell, by his daring initiative, indomitable courage and grave concern for others, contributed to the success achieved by his battalion and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 5, 1930 at Longton, Kansas. Home Town: Elk City, Kansas. Death: KIA: March 15, 1951 - Buried at: Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery San Diego, California.

Hruschanko, John

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John Hruschanko (MCSN: 1071270), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Carrier in Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. Although wounded during a vigorous hostile mortar and small arms fire attack, Private First Class Hruschanko boldly left his covered position to carry a wounded Marine to his foxhole and administer first aid to the casualty, instead of seeking medical attention for himself. Voluntarily substituting for a wounded machine gunner, he maneuvered the weapon skillfully and accurately, thereby forcing the enemy to seek cover and permitting his company to withdraw successfully to a more favorable position. His courageous initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty in the face of great personal risk reflect great credit upon Private First Class Hruschanko and the United States Naval Service. Born: Czechoslovakia. Home Town: Berwick, Pennsylvania.

Hubbard, Jay W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Jay W. Hubbard (MCSN: 0-17963), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot and Executive Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMF-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1951. Intercepting an urgent request from an airborne controller for a flight to attack hostile tanks and supplies on the east coast while leading an eight-plane strike against warehouses and tanks along the main enemy supply route south of Wonsan, Major Hubbard unhesitatingly obtained approval to divert from his original objective in the western sector of the battle zone and, realizing that prompt action would be necessary to effect destruction of these priority targets before they could be concealed, skillfully navigated to the designated area despite unfavorable weather and approaching darkness. Undeterred by intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire, he instructed his unit to remain at altitude and personally carried out a series of daring low-level reconnaissance runs over the area to ascertain the exact positions of the enemy tanks. Although the hostile troops had completed partial camouflage, he located the vehicles as well as numerous supply buildings, boldly maneuvered his flight into the most advantageous position and, throughout a period of an hour, led repeated napalm, bombing and strafing attacks, destroying ten tanks and fifteen buildings and exploding a store of ammunition. By his courageous leadership, outstanding ability as an airman and unswerving devotion to duty, Major Hubbard was directly instrumental in dealing a damaging blow to the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Francisco, California. Home Town: San Diego, California.

Huber, John F.

First Lieutenant John F. Huber, 01862108, (then Second Lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company "E", 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 16 October 1952 in the vicinity of Chorwon, North Korea.  On that date, Lieutenant Huber was leading a patrol whose mission was to set up an ambush for an enemy force on the crest of Hill 198.  Approximately ten yards from the objective, the friendly patrol was ambushed by a numerically superior force and immediately subjected to a murderous cross fire which necessitated their withdrawal.  Arriving at the bottom of the hill, it was discovered that one of the members of the friendly force was missing.  Lieutenant Huber, with complete disregard for personal safety, unhesitatingly made his way back up the hill to where his comrade lay wounded.  Although wounded himself during that action he succeeded in carrying the unconscious man back to the base of the hill.  He then covered the withdrawal of the friendly unit until certain they were out of immediate danger.  The inspirational courage, outstanding leadership and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Huber reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Texas.

Huggins, Charles W.

Private First Class Charles W. Huggins, RA 14327853, Infantry, US Army, a member of Company B, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action near Osan, Korea on 5 July 1950. The 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry, was in a defensive positions which was being attacked by thirty-two enemy tanks, artillery, mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire. One of the tanks had been disabled but the enemy were still able to place effective fire on friendly positions. PFC Huggins voluntarily and at the risk of his life crawled through an area covered by small arms fire and when close to the tank he sprang up and threw a grenade through the open turret of the tank killing the entire crew. His fearless example reflects great credit on himself and the United States Army. GO 55, 24 Jul 1950.(Home unknown)

Hughes, David Ralph (1st award)

Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 71 - 10 April 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) David Ralph Hughes (ASN: 0-62721), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division, in action on 8 February 1951, near Konjiam-ni, Korea. During an attack against firmly established enemy hill positions, Lieutenant Hughes' platoon was held up by extremely severe enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire. Realizing the urgency of the mission, he single-handedly charged the enemy position, with complete disregard for his own safety and at great risk to his own life. Completely ignoring seven enemy concussion grenades which were thrown directly at him, Lieutenant Hughes fearlessly rushed the enemy positions, firing his rifle. After firing all of his ammunition he continued moving from one enemy position to another, throwing grenades into their emplacements. During this action Lieutenant Hughes killed or wounded five of the enemy. His aggressiveness and complete disregard for his own welfare contributed greatly in his unit's successful completion of their mission. First Lieutenant Hughes' gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Hughes, David Ralph (2nd award)

Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 327 - 21 October 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) David Ralph Hughes (ASN: 0-62721), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division, in action on 28 September 195, near Hyonjo, Korea. On that date, at 2400 hours, an estimated enemy battalion attacked Company K, penetrating the friendly lines at two points. The enemy overran the defensive area, severed all communications, split the company into three different groups and completely disrupted the organization. During the hours of darkness, Lieutenant Hughes, although under continual small arms fire, reorganized the company and commanded it in such a superior manner, that the unit was able to repel and stall the enemy until daylight. Many times during the night, Lieutenant Hughes personally led small groups of men in attacks against hostile strong points, accounting for numerous enemy dead. As a result of his courageous actions, the company defensive perimeter was maintained. Lieutenant Hughes' gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Hulburt, Charles W.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 75 - 4 April 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Second Lieutenant Charles W. Hulburt, 061331, Armor, United States Army, a member of Tank Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 26 and 27 November 1950 in the vicinity of Won-ni, Korea. Lieutenant Hulburt was commanding a tank in a tank platoon which had the mission of supporting the defensive positions of a rifle battalion and of subsequently covering its withdrawal. Lieutenant Hulburt was ordered with his tank to assume a position in front of the rifle elements. When a hostile machine gun brought the rifle troops under fire, he fearlessly exposed himself to climb out of his turret to man the deck-mounted .50 caliber machine gun. He engaged the enemy with machine gun fire and, although the enemy gunners shifted their fire to his tank, he continued the firefight until he had destroyed the enemy weapon. When another machine gun brought his tank under fire, he engaged this new enemy and, although his tank at this time was struck by two rocket shells, continued to fire until ordered by his platoon leader to withdraw and disengage. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Hulburt reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Huls, Claude C.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 307 - 17 July 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant First Class Claude C. Huls, RA57504803, Armor, United States Army, a member of Company B, 72d Tank Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action on 18 May 1951 near Yongnae-ri, Korea. On this date Sergeant Huls was a tank commander positioned on the left flank of his platoon in a very narrow draw. The enemy was attempting to push through this draw and cut the main road in an effort to get behind other units further to the north. The enemy’s main attack came from the left flank and was immediately taken under fire by Sergeant Huls. The return fire from the enemy was intense and directed at his position in an effort to get past him. Realizing the need tor more fire from his tank in order to hold the enemy, Sergeant Huls, with utter disregard for his own safety, exposed himself above the turret of his tank to fire his fifty caliber machine gun. He remained in this position until seriously wounded by the enemy small arms fire. His bravery resulted in the enemy being held until further support from his platoon arrived. With their help the enemy was beaten back and our positions held. The gallant actions of Sergeant Huls on this occasion were an inspiration to his comrades and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: St. Wendel, Minnesota.

Hulsey, Thomas J. (posthumous)

25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 286 - 3 November 1950

Award of the Silver Star (posthumous).  By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43 1918) and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is posthumously awarded to the following enlisted man:

Sergeant Thomas J. Hulsey, RA44212041, Artillery, Battery A, 25th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion, United States Army. On 6 September 1950 when his battery near Chiriwon-ni, Korea was attacked by a numerically superior hostile force, Sergeant Hulsey remained in his exposed position on top of a M-16 multiple gun despite the intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire directed at the position, he continued to direct the fire of his men until mortally wounded.  By his calm and courageous leadership, he was instrumental in repelling the attack. Sergeant Hulsey's gallant action reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Mississippi.

Hume, Edgar E.

Major General Edgar Erskine Hume, 04033, Medical Corps, United States Army, Surgeon, United Nations Command, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry in action during the period 18 October to 21 October 1950. General Hume, voluntarily and without regard for his safety, made daring flights in light unarmed aircraft over enemy held territory within the range of enemy fire to visit frontal areas and obtain vital information concerning the medical requirements for the treatment and evacuation of wounded United Nations' personnel. While in these areas and under constant threat of enemy fire, he made his way through the front-line medical stations to coordinate personally activities in connection with existing medical problems. His untiring devotion to duty and presence in the forward areas not only inspired the members of the Army Medical Service to greater achievements, but contributed materially in aiding the United Nations' effort in the Korean campaign and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered Federal service from Kentucky

Humphrey, Frederick M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Frederick M. Humphrey (MCSN: 0-10053), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Service Battery, First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces between Yudam-ni and Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 4 December 1950. Although his own unit, composed of inexperienced infantry and artillery personnel, was outnumbered by the enemy who also had the advantage of excellent cover and concealment, First Lieutenant Humphrey courageously spear-headed an assault against a hostile roadblock which was menacing the advance of the division convoy. Undaunted by the heavy odds, he led his platoon through the hostile positions, killing over 150 of the enemy and pursuing the remainder until his group was recalled. A skilled leader of outstanding ability and courage, he contributed materially to the destruction of a large amount of enemy materiel with no casualties in his own unit, and aided the convoy in successfully reaching its destination. First Lieutenant Humphrey's inspiring and staunch devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lyons, Kansas. Home Town: San Diego, California.

Humphrey, Robert Jay (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant Robert Jay Humphrey (NSN: 0-347084), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while participating in aerial flight on 13 June 1952, while serving with Composite Squadron Three (VC-3), in U.S.S. Princeton (CV-37), as leader of a flight of fighter and attack aircraft on a night heckler mission over North Korea. Piloting his plane through total darkness and in reduced visibility over mountainous terrain he detected enemy activity in the heavily defended rail yard at Chigyong. Illuminating the area with a flare, Lieutenant Humphrey discovered a loaded twelve-car train. Directing the remainder of the flight to proceed to that area Lieutenant Humphrey courageously and alone initiated an immediate attack to prevent the train from being moved to safety. Despite a concentration of intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire he made repeated bombing attacks to destroy three of the rail cars and seriously damage the locomotive. When his bombs were expended Lieutenant Humphrey made a low level napalm attack, without the support of another aircraft and despite intense ground fire to set eight more cars afire. He then continued his attacks with machine guns until his plane sustained a direct hit from a large caliber anti-aircraft shell causing it to burst into flames. Lieutenant Humphrey was unable to abandon his plane until just prior to the time it crashed into the ground. By his exceptional skill, cool courage in the face of danger, and aggressive spirit Lieutenant Humphrey made a major contribution to the night interdiction efforts of the United Nations' Forces and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Board Serial 20 (January 13, 1953). Born: March 29, 1924. Home Town: Billings, Montana. Death: MIA: June 12, 1952.

Humphreys, Richard D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Richard D. Humphreys (MCSN: 0-45542), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 March 1951. When his platoon was subjected to devastating automatic weapons and small arms fire, and was temporarily unable to advance during a company attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, First Lieutenant Humphreys courageously crawled forward through the withering fire to extremely close range of the enemy emplacements. Accurately throwing hand grenades into the positions, he succeeded in killing several of the enemy and in demoralizing the remainder of the hostile troops, permitting his platoon to advance and secure the objective. By his aggressive leadership, outstanding bravery and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Humphreys contributed materially to the success achieved by his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Hungerford, Victor Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 159 - 5 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Victor Hungerford, Jr. (ASN: RA-6557972), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near the Kum River, Korea, on 16 July 1950. During an attack on strong enemy positions his platoon was held up by intense enemy machine gun fire. He instructed his men to remain in position and worked his way around the enemy position destroying the gun with hand grenades. Returning, he led his platoon's advance and the men, inspired by his heroic example, overran the positions. In this action Sergeant Hungerford was wounded, but despite his intense pain refused to be evacuated until other wounded men around him had been located. His superior leadership and gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Toledo, Ohio.

Hunt, Robert Gordon Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Second Lieutenant Robert Gordon Hunt, Jr. (MCSN: 0-50150), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry in during the period 29 November 1950 to 4 December 1950. His actions contributed materially to the successful breakthrough of United Nations forces in the Chosin Reservoir area and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Military Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders NO. 66 (December 15, 1951). Born: September 20, 1927. Entered Service From California. Death: September 3, 2000.

Hunter, Arthur H.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 104 - 9 June 1951

Corporal Arthur H. Hunter (then Private First Class), RA13292003, Infantry, United States Army, Company G, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 14 August 1950, near Samni-dong, Korea.  While Corporal Hunter's company was occupying a defensive position along the Naktong River front, they were subjected to an overwhelming attack by the enemy which threatened to overrun the area.  During the ensuing action, Corporal Hunter and a companion, armed with a machine gun and rifle, voluntarily remained in a forward position exposed to the intense enemy fire in order to cover the forced partial withdrawal of the company.  When their machine gun malfunctioned, rendering their position untenable, Corporal Hunter seized his rifle and laid down a stream of accurate fire, stalling the hostile attack.  This action enabled the companion to repair the machine gun and gave his company time to reorganize and finally defeat the enemy.  When the action ended, more than 70 dead North Koreans were counted in front of the position occupied by Corporal Hunter.  His gallantry reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service.  Entered federal service from Virginia.

Hunter, Walter Jr. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Walter Hunter, Jr. (NSN: 2764425), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Reconnaissance Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 September 1950. At about 1800, Company D, Seventh Marines, and his company came under heavy small arms fire and accurate enemy mortar and artillery concentrations, killing five men and wounding 18 including the Corpsman from Company D. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Hunter, voluntarily and with absolute disregard for his own safety, in the face of heavy enemy fire, assumed the responsibility for and directed the evacuation of the dead and wounded of both companies. He established an aid station in a shack near his company and spent several hours under heavy enemy sniper fire, and by his efficient and expert administration of blood plasma and medical aid to the wounded he saved numerous lives. The following morning still under extremely heavy fire and in the face of a determined enemy counterattack he remained at his post and treated 27 additional wounded from Company D and Company E, Seventh Marines. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Hunter's display of initiative and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 18139 (November 28, 1950).

Hunter, Walter Jr. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Walter Hunter, Jr. (NSN: 2764425), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Reconnaissance Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 November 1950. At about 0800, while accompanying a reconnaissance patrol forward of friendly front lines, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Hunter, serving as Company Corpsman, and the patrol were pinned down by intense and accurate enemy small arms and mortar fire. Several members of the patrol were wounded and he observed one of the wounded lying in an exposed area. Without regard for his own personal safety, he ran through the enemy fire and drug the wounded Marine to a covered position, administered aid, and then attempted to rejoin his patrol and render aid to the remaining wounded. While crossing the enemy fire-swept area, he was severely wounded and lay in an exposed area, partially paralyzed until friendly forces were able to reach and evacuate him. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Hunter's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 18137 (November 28, 1950).

Hunter, William R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal William R. Hunter (MCSN: 1078643), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 22 April 1951. Repeatedly exposing himself to intense enemy fire while moving his machine gun with the assault echelon during an attack against a hostile stronghold, Corporal Hunter skillfully emplaced his weapon in a strategic, forward position in order to cover an important approach into the company defensive perimeter. Taking over the machine gun when the gunner and assistant gunner were wounded while his squad was subjected to heavy enemy attack, he kept up a withering volume of fire for over twenty minutes and succeeded in inflicting heavy casualties upon the hostile forces until he sustained severe wounds and his machine gun was completely destroyed. By his outstanding courage, aggressive leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, Corporal Hunter was directly instrumental in repulsing the enemy attack and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Agricola, Mississippi. Home Town: Lucedale, Mississippi.

Hursey, Jan Fredrick (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Jans Fredrick Hursey (MCSN: 1072029), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman in Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 23 September 1950. During his platoon's assault on a heavily-fortified enemy position, Private First Class Hursey repeatedly subjected himself to hostile fire in order to deliver more accurate and effective fire upon an enemy machine-gun nest. Diverting the fire of the hostile machine gun to his own exposed position to facilitate his platoon's advance, he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his courageous actions, he materially aided his platoon in maintaining fire superiority and in successfully completing its assigned mission. His fortitude, initiative and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Hursey and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: July 7, 1930 at Slidell, Louisiana. Home Town: Slidell, Louisiana. Death: KIA: September 23, 1950.

Hurst, Chilton W.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 17 - 9 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Chilton W. Hurst (ASN: RA-35655010), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 14ID, near Tongong-ni, Korea, on 30 January 1951. His company had the mission of taking and securing enemy-occupied Hill 389, a rugged, snow-covered terrain feature. As the friendly troops advanced, they were subjected to a tremendous volume of interlocking fire from well placed and strongly reinforced enemy emplacements. Most of the heavy fire was coming from the southeast slope of the hill and was inflicting a number of casualties in the allied ranks. Sergeant Hurst, Squad leader, realizing the perilous situation of his company and with utter disregard for his own personal safety, raced forward through the withering enemy fire and, with his automatic carbine blazing, killed two enemy soldiers, rendering their heavy machine guns useless. Heedless of the intense concentration of enemy fire, he continued his assault, wounding three more of the enemy. His comrades were so inspired by his action that they launched a successful attack on the objective, killing and wounding many of the enemy troops and routing the rest in disorder. Sergeant Hurst's courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United Sates Infantry.

Hurt, Raymond E. Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Hospitalman Raymond E. Hurt, Jr. (NSN: 5694869), United States Navy, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman on 31 May 1951. On that date, Company H was attacking a well defended enemy position on Hill 483. During the fierce engagement, Hospitalman Hurt, as Company Aidman, repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire to go to the aid of wounded personnel. He made repeated trips across open, fire-swept terrain, to carry four wounded Marines over one hundred yards to safety. The actions of Hospitalman Hurt resulted in the saving of many lives, and contributed to the success of the company's mission. The gallantry, initiative, and outstanding devotion to duty displayed by Hospitalman Hurt on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 182 (August 16, 1951).

Hutchins, James C.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders #128 - 6 March 1952

First Lieutenant James C. Hutchins, 0957462, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company F, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 21 December 1951 in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea.  On that date when Company F was given the mission of getting a patrol to the top of Hill 598, Lieutenant Hutchins volunteered to lead the group.  Upon nearing their objective, one of the members of the patrol was injured by hostile mortar shrapnel.  Lieutenant Hutchins directed two of his men to remain with the wounded man while he and the rest of the patrol continued on their mission.  As the patrol neared the crest of the hill, Lieutenant Hutchins pointed out routes for each of the men to take.  Their skillful approach caught the enemy by complete surprise, and the men were able to ascend the ridge without much difficulty.  When the men advanced within a few feet of the enemy's positions, their presence was discovered and a fierce fire-fight followed.  Several times during this action, Lieutenant Hutchins exposed himself to enemy fire to give instructions and words of encouragement to the men of the patrol.  When the order to withdraw was received he was out in front of the patrol, working his way from bunker to bunker neutralizing them as he went.  Every effort was made to reach him but deadly enemy small arms fire rendered it impossible.  He was last seen firing his rifle into hostile positions.  His courageous and selfless actions were an inspiration to all who observed him and were responsible in inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy.  The gallantry in action displayed by Lieutenant Hutchins will live forever in the hearts of his fellow men.  Entered the military service from New York.

Hutchinson, Hardy James (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Hardy James Hutchinson (MCSN: 309578), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Mortar Section Leader in Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 September 1950. During an attack by enemy forces, Staff Sergeant Hutchinson advanced through heavy hostile fire to personally direct and control the fire of his mortar squad. Occupying an exposed position in order to better observe the results of his fire, he was mortally wounded by enemy small arms fire. By his courageous actions, he materially aided his company in repulsing the enemy attack, in regaining fire superiority and successfully completing its assigned mission. His initiative, leadership and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Staff Sergeant Hutchinson and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 2, 1925 at Frost, Louisiana. Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: September 27, 1950.

Hutchison, Robert N. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th  Infantry Division
General Orders No. 57 - August 15, 1l 950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Robert N. Hutchison (Hutchinson) (ASN: RA-36123682), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company C, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division in Korea. On 25 July 1950, while Company C was in defensive positions near Yongdong, Korea, Sergeant Hutchinson continually exposed himself to intense enemy fire to direct the fire of his squad on the overwhelming enemy forces which were attempting to overrun the company position. He continued to direct his squad until he was killed by a sniper. Sergeant Hutchison's courage and devotion to duty inspired his squad to hold its position and protect the right flank of the company. His gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Hutchison, William Edwin

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant William Edwin Hutchison (MCSN: 0-51945), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 May 1952. Although wounded in the arm and leg by an exploding mine while leading his platoon, Second Lieutenant Hutchison bravely exposed himself to hostile small arms fire and directed his men in a daring attack against an enemy force sighted on a ridge line. Permitting a Corpsman to administer temporary treatment for his wounds after the hostile troops had been routed form the position, he steadfastly refused evacuation until accomplishing the withdrawal of his platoon to friendly lines and accounting for the safe return of all his men. By his outstanding courage, aggressive determination and selfless devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Hutchison served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Francisco, California. Home Town: Boise, Idaho.

Hutto, James E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman James E. Hutto (NSN: 2790462), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 February 1952. When the company was subjected to a fierce enemy mortar and artillery barrage which resulted in many friendly casualties, Hospitalman Hutto displayed exceptional courage and professional competence in the face of grave peril. With complete disregard for his personal safety he hurried to the scene and immediately began treating the wounded, working calmly and skillfully in the midst of intense enemy fire. Although he suffered painful shrapnel wounds he fearlessly continued working, refusing medical aid for himself until all other wounded had been treated and evacuated. His initiative and selfless devotion to duty were responsible for the successful evacuation of seventeen casualties and served as an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospitalman Hutto's courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 19282 (July 8, 1951).

Huyck, Donald George (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Donald George Huyck (MCSN: 1071332), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 June 1951. When intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire momentarily halted his platoon's advance during its attack against a heavily defended enemy hill position, Corporal Huyck immediately realized the need for quickly securing the location and, exposing himself to the heavy fire, led his team in a fierce grenade assault on the hostile force. By his daring initiative and aggressive determination in launching this attack, he was responsible in great part for causing the enemy to flee and, seizing their machine gun, poured heavy fire on them as they retreated. His inspiring leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave risk reflect great credit upon Corporal Huyck and the United States Naval Service. Born: May 11, 1929 at Erie, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Springboro, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: June 25, 1951.

Hyatt, Bruce M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Commander Bruce M. Hyatt, United States Naval Reserve, for gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commander Mine Division Thirty-two and in tactical command of that division during minesweeping operations conducted in Wonsan Harbor preliminary to occupation of Wonsan, Korea by United Nations forces. During the period 10 to 12 October 1950. The ships of his division penetrated to a depth of 19 miles from the outer mine defenses through heavily mined waters until well within range of enemy shore batteries. On 12 October he penetrated two lines of mines barring the entrance to the outer harbor and carried out the sweeping plans in the face of enemy gunfire until his flagship was mine. His leadership and professional competence contributed greatly to the efficient operation of the ships of his division and his loyalty and steadfast devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the U. S. Naval Service.

Hyde, Charles Russell (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Charles Russell Hyde (MCSN: 1175236), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. When the passage of his fire team was blocked by two hostile soldiers while the company was engaged in a raid on a strongly defended enemy position, Corporal Hyde confronted and killed both men and led his group forward in the face of intense hostile mortar and small arms fire, shouting words of encouragement as they advanced. Upon reaching the enemy position, he skillfully directed his team in clearing the trenches and, although painfully wounded during this action, refused evacuation and continued the assault until he was struck by enemy small arms fire and fell, mortally wounded. By his courageous leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and self-sacrificing devotion to duty, Corporal Hyde served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 19, 1930 at Brandywine, Maryland. Home Town: Brandywine, Maryland. Death: KIA: February 3, 1953 - Buried at: Maryland Veterans Cemetery - Cheltenham, Maryland.

Hyer, Robert A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert A. Hyer (MCSN: 1136904), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 October 1952. When a friendly patrol and supply train en route to a combat outpost were cut off and ambushed by an enemy force, Sergeant Hyer unhesitatingly led one of his fire teams from the comparative safety of the outpost to aid the stricken unit. Moving forward of his men, he exposed himself to a hostile machine gun in a brave attempt to draw its fire and, maneuvering his team to within a short distance of the enemy position, threw hand grenades to silence the hostile weapon. With the enemy laying down an impassable screen of concussion and white phosphorous grenades before the position could be assaulted, Sergeant Hyer, despite painful burns, obtained a new supply of grenades to rout the hostile troops that had re-manned the machine gun emplacement. Courageously advancing, he silenced the weapon again and subsequently assisted five other Marines in evacuating the critically wounded. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and resolute determination, Sergeant Hyer served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Homestead, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Hyman, Stanley D.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 318 - July 12, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Stanley D. Hyman, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 23 April 1951 as a pilot of a B-26 attack bomber on a mission over North Korea. En route to his home base after completing a successful attack on enemy forces, he responded to an emergency message from an entrapped United Nations ground unit. Proceeding to the designated area he found the unit surrounded by approximately two thousand enemy troops. Although the position of the surrounded unit required him to make the attacks as much as fifteen hundred feet below the level of adjacent hills, Lieutenant Hyman made repeated strafing passes in the face of intense enemy ground fire to relieve the pressure on the friendly forces. On the first of these strafing runs, his aircraft canopy was shattered by fire from guns concealed on the hills above. In spite of the wind and bitter cold entering through the shattered canopy, Lieutenant Hyman continued his attacks until his ammunition was exhausted and then continued orbiting in the area to draw fire away from the entrapped unit. He left only when low fuel supply forced an immediate return. Intelligence reports the following day indicated that as a result of Lieutenant Hyman's courageous and determined action the surrounded unit was able to rejoin the main body of the United Nations forces. Lieutenant Hyman's gallantry under fire and his unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Hyzer, Peter C.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 120 - 5 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Corps of Engineers) Peter C. Hyzer (ASN: 0-20589), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with the 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, on 11 August 1950, along the Naktong River, Korea. Colonel Hyzer, a Korean interpreter, Corporal Johnson, and Private First Class Bolster accompanied a Battalion Patrol to the West bank of the Naktong River and part of the way to its objective, Hill 207. After insuring that the patrol was well on its way and that it was not being followed, Colonel Hyzer decided to return with his group to the East bank of the Naktong River. Upon arriving at the landing site of the West bank of the river Colonel Hyzer's group discovered one of the boat guards lying beside the boat apparently dead and noted enemy movement in the area. By mutual agreement the group decided to swim the river. When they had swum for about ten yards the enemy brought machine gun and small arms fire upon the group. At this point the interpreter decided he could not make it and turned around to return to the West Bank. Colonel Hyzer, realizing the vital information as to the Battalion's disposition and the status known by his interpreter, while under heavy enemy small arms fire and at great personal risk, turned around and went to the assistance of the interpreter in an attempt to bring him to the East bank. About this time, Colonel Hyzer noticed that Private Bolster, having become exhausted, was floundering in the water. Releasing his hold upon the interpreter, Colonel Hyzer swam to the assistance of Private Bolster. The intensity of enemy fire and the struggling of Private Bolster made it impossible for Colonel Hyzer to save this man. Colonel Hyzer then swam to the assistance of Corporal Johnson and noted he was apparently capable of reaching the East shore. Colonel Hyzer then turned to go to the assistance of his interpreter and through increasing enemy fire returned to the spot in the river where he had last seen the Korean. Being unable to locate the interpreter at this time Colonel Hyzer then swam through enemy fire to the East bank of the river. Through Colonel Hyzer's effort and total disregard for his personal safety, the mission of the patrol was accomplished, and the Korean was able to reach a position of safety and prevent a possible source of vital information from falling into enemy hands. This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of Colonel Hyzer reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service.  Home of record: Rockport, Illinois

 

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