Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "I"

 
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Icett, Harold W. Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Harold W. Icett, Jr. (MCSN: 1107831), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Carrier in Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. As wave after wave of the enemy charged his squad's position and inflicted many casualties during a series of vicious night attacks, Corporal Icett fearlessly moved about the fire-swept area, supplying ammunition for his gun and assisted in the care of the wounded. When the gun operator was seriously hurt during one assault, Corporal Icett rushed to his fallen comrade's aid and, standing over the stricken gunner, fired at point blank range, killing many of the oncoming hostile troops before he was struck by enemy fire and fell mortally wounded. His quick imitative, personal courage and indomitable fighting spirit were contributing factors in saving the life of his comrade and in the successful defense of the position, thereby reflecting great credit upon Corporal Icett and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: December 16, 1931 at Houston, Texas. Home Town: Houston, Texas. Death: KIA: September 12, 1951.

Iglesias, Victor Manuel (posthumous)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders #285 - 16 July 1951

Master Sergeant Victor M. Iglesias, RA10401041, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 23 April 1951, in the vicinity of Ognyo-bong, Korea, Company "F" was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. During the prolonged engagement, the Second platoon reported to the command post that the ammunition supply was dangerously low. Sergeant Iglesias immediately organized carrying parties and courageously made repeated trips through withering enemy fire to replenish the unit's supply. Receiving an urgent call for ammunition from a defensive position which was being subjected to concentrated fire, Sergeant Iglesias secured the ammunition and, while proceeding to the imperiled position, was mortally wounded by hostile rifle fire. Sergeant Iglesias' gallant and aggressive actions enabled the unit to contain the attack and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Imel, Norman L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Norman L. Imel (MCSN: 606314), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. When both the gunners and the majority of the crew became casualties during a series of fierce enemy assaults against the company's positions, Sergeant Imel exposed himself to intense hostile fire to man one of the weapons and delivered devastating counterfire upon the enemy troops. Although painfully wounded by hostile automatic weapons fire, he refused to be evacuated and bravely remained at his post and continued to deliver effective fire on the enemy throughout the night, thereby aiding immeasurably in repelling repeated counterattacks on his position. By his exceptional courage, marked fortitude and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Imel served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bucklin, Kansas. Home Town: Laramie, Wyoming.

Immel, James P. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant James P. Immel (MCSN: 1083265), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Section Chief of Battery C, First 4.5" Rocket Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 June 1951. With his section called upon to furnish close support fire when the assault echelons of an infantry battalion were held up by the fierce resistance of well-entrenched enemy troops occupying high ground, Sergeant Immel bravely moved across an exposed area in the face of hostile mortar fire to locate a suitable position for his rocket launcher. Mortally wounded by the explosion of an enemy land mine while guiding his launcher and crew into a new firing position, Sergeant Immel, by his marked courage, daring leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, had served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: December 8, 1927 at Greensburg, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Greensburg, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: June 19, 1951 - Buried at: Hillview Cemetery - Greensburg, Pennsylvania.

Inbody, Joe M.

Headquarters, 24ID
General Orders No. 52 - 25 January 1952

By direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action, is awarded to Corporal Joe M. Inbody, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company B, 19th Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Chuktae-ri, Korea, on 19 October 1951. His company was attacking firmly entrenched enemy forces, making slow progress against an almost impenetrable wall of defensive fire. The lead platoon was seen pinned down by intense enemy automatic weapons, mortar and artillery fire. Perceiving the need for immediate action, Corporal Inbody, Rifleman, took a machine gun from a fallen comrade and charged up the steep slope. Inspired by his fearlessness, his squad joined him as he detected two key enemy positions. With utter disregard for his own safety and although having only the remaining men of his squad to give him covering fire, he made his way to the first position. Firing as he assaulted the bunker, he destroyed it and killed its three occupants. He unhesitatingly continued to the next position, drawing all hostile firepower on himself and thereby allowing the remainder of the platoon to advance. As he attempted to charge the position, he was seriously wounded, but realizing his squad would be wiped out unless the emplacement was destroyed, he advanced, exposing himself to the intense fire, and gave accurate covering fire until the position was completely destroyed. Corporal Inbody’s courageous action, aggressive fighting skill and selfless performance of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit’s mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered service from Lincoln, Nebraska.

Ingraham, Gerald E. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Gerald E. Ingraham (MCSN: 601844), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company B, First Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 December 1950. Observing that a hostile gun emplacement was retarding the advance of his company, Private First Class Ingraham moved forward to within seventy-five yards of the enemy position and, despite the heavy hostile fire, delivered accurate and effective fire upon the emplacement until the enemy fire was completely neutralized. Although seriously wounded in this action, he remained in an unprotected position and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy forces until he was fatally wounded by hostile fire. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Ingraham contributed materially to the success of his company in attaining its objective, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: July 12, 1928 at Niagara Falls, New York. Home Town: North Tonawanda, New York. Death: KIA: December 8, 1950.

Ingram, David E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal David E. Ingram (MCSN: 1097498), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sahangu, Korea, on 17 May 1951. On that date the position occupied by Company I was attacked by a large enemy force, determined to penetrate the position and reach friendly installations in the rear. Although Corporal Ingram was with a small group, isolated from the remainder of the company, he made repeated trips across open, fire-swept terrain to evacuate wounded personnel, and to lend the fire power of his rifle wherever needed. His accurate fire took a high toll of enemy troops and aided greatly in the success of the company in repulsing the attack. The gallantry, initiative, and devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Ingram on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 180 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Tennessee.

Ingram, Jack William Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Jack William Ingram, Jr. (NSN: 49633), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while participating in an aerial flight as Pilot of a jet fighter aircraft while attached to Fighter Squadron One Hundred Fifty-One (VF-151), embarked in U.S.S. Boxer (CV-21), in Korea, on 25 July 1953. While leading an armed reconnaissance mission in the Tanchon area of Communist-held North Korea, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Ingram destroyed four railroad cars, damaged two others, and gave his life while protecting the lives of two other pilots in his flight. Flying in mountainous terrain in an area known to be heavily defended by enemy anti-aircraft fire he spotted an emplacement of four 37-mm. guns which other members of his flight did not see. In order to divert their fire from his fellow pilots he made a strafing attack with 20-mm. cannon. During this attack Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Ingram's plane sustained several direct hits setting it afire and causing it to crash into the sea costing him his life. The courageous action exhibited by Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Ingram in giving his life to protect his fellow pilots was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Board Serial 992 (November 6, 1953). Born: January 10, 1928. Home Town: Grand Prairie, Texas. Death: KIA: July 25, 1953.

Ingram, Kenneth

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 252 - 28 October 1950

Second Lieutenant Kenneth Ingram, 02033736, Artillery, Battery C, 159th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  When the battery position became untenable on 1 September 1950 in the vicinity of Haman, Korea and march order was given, Lieutenant Ingram and four enlisted men who attempted to move their howitzer were subjected to concerted hostile fire from commanding positions.  Although forced to seek cover on three occasions and though he was wounded by small arms fire, Lieutenant Ingram and his crew, heedless of the withering fire, disengaged the trails which were imbedded in the ground, coupled the howitzer to the prime mover and moved through a narrow pass under enemy fire to bring the gun and vehicle to safety.  Lieutenant Ingram's courage, determination and heroic devotion to duty prevented capture by the enemy of valuable equipment and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Oklahoma.

Ingram, Robert W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert W. Ingram (MCSN: 1045663), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Member of an Eight Man patrol attached to the Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. When the occupants of an enemy cave opened fire with two automatic weapons upon his patrol unit, Corporal Ingram courageously crawled forward in the face of the enemy fire to a position where he could retaliate with heavy fire from his own weapon. Successful in silencing one hostile gun, he continued to fire upon the other until he was painfully wounded. By his courage, daring initiative and bold leadership, Corporal Ingram upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Enid, Oklahoma. Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Ingram, Willie Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Willie Ingram, Jr. (MCSN: 384104), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Platoon Sergeant of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 March 1951. When the company was subjected to heavy enemy automatic weapons fire during an attack against a well-fortified hill position, and the platoon to which he was attached encountered even more devastating fire upon securing an intermediate objective, Staff Sergeant Ingram bravely remained in an exposed position to direct the machine gun section in delivering fire upon the enemy entrenchments. Although suffering a serious and painful gunshot wound during the course of the battle, he courageously refused medical attention and continued to direct the supporting fires until the assault elements had seized the objective. By his marked courage, skill and unswerving devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Ingram served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Luxora, Arkansas. Home Town: Luxora, Arkansas.

Iorio, Frank J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Frank J. Iorio (MCSN: 1082380), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of the Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. While under intense enemy fire, Private First Class Iorio unhesitatingly crawled from his forward position to rescue a wounded Marine who was staggering about blindly in an apparently shocked condition. Severely wounded himself during his attempt to pull his comrade out of the line of fire, he bravely persisted in his efforts until he succeeded in drawing the wounded man to a covered position. By his selfless and heroic actions in aiding another at the risk of his own life, Private First Class Iorio upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania.

Irvin, Darrell

Citation not yet found.

"Word has been received that First Lt. Darrell Irvin has been awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action in Korea.  Lt. Irvin is a nephew of Mrs. Byron Bell and is a former resident of Absarokee." - Billings Gazette, 17 October 1952

Ivaniski, Anthony J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Anthony J. Ivaniski (MCSN: 332417), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 - 7 July 1952. With his platoon moving through the lead platoon, which was pinned down, during the company's attack against a fanatically defended enemy hill position, Technical Sergeant Ivaniski, although partially blinded by a painful facial wound, refused to be evacuated and continued to lead his men in the attack until directed to reorganize and set up a hasty defense. Repeatedly exposing himself to the hostile mortar and artillery shells falling about the area, he fearlessly moved throughout the platoon sector, reorganizing his unit, rendering aid to the wounded and setting up a base of fire on the enemy trenches and bunkers. Although the friendly position was constantly subjected to hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire, he continued to move from one man to another for over three hours until the unit was ordered to break contact with the enemy, steadfastly refusing evacuation for himself until all his men were safely back. By his outstanding courage, expert leadership and indomitable fighting spirit, Technical Sergeant Ivaniski served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Rockville, Connecticut. Home Town: Rockville, Connecticut.

Ivers, John J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal John J. Ivers (MCSN: 654965), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radio Operator of Headquarters and Service Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. Stationed in the company command post when a strong hostile force suddenly attacked employing small arms, automatic weapons, grenades and mortars, Corporal Ivers unhesitatingly turned his radio over to another qualified operator and joined in the defense of the command post. Continually exposing himself to the intense barrage, he delivered accurate fire and, when a group of the enemy was discovered moving along a covered route leading to high ground which overlooked the command post, collected all available hand grenades and voluntarily moved alone up the ridge to intercept the attackers. In the ensuing action, he personally accounted for sixteen enemy dead and for the destruction of a machine gun. Corporal Ivers, by his daring initiative, courageous efforts and heroic fighting spirit, aided materially in the successful defense of the command post, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ballston Spa, New York. Home Town: Ballston Spa, New York.

 

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