Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "J"

 
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Jackson, Bruce D.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 14 -  29 January 1954

Second Lieutenant Bruce D. Jackson, 01925078, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 30 May 1953, in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, Lieutenant Jackson led a reconnaissance patrol forward of the main line of resistance on a mission to enemy held Hill "412". Nearing the objective, Lieutenant Jackson dispersed his men in a perimeter to frustrate enemy ambush attempts and bravely advanced forward of the patrol to personally reconnoiter the immediate area. Moving approximately 75 yards up the slope, he was suddenly subjected to intense barrages of enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire and fell, mortally wounded. In this courageous move, he received the force of the enemy ambush and enabled his men to prepare for and repel the ensuing enemy attack. Lieutenant Jackson's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Florida.

Jackson, George D.

For gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Manyon-ni, Korea on 27 October 1952. On this date, Captain George D. Jackson was in command of Company G, approximately two kilometers forward of the Main Line of Resistance. At about 1800 hours, after intense artillery and mortar fire the enemy attacked the outpost. Constantly exposed to enemy fire, Captain Jackson moved among his men, coordinating the defense of the outpost and encouraging them until the enemy assault was stemmed. When one of his troops had his foot blown off by incoming artillery, Captain Jackson, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, went to him under heavy shelling and evacuated him to a protected position. At 2100 hours a tremendous artillery barrage pounded the outpost for thirty minutes with an estimated battalion of enemy attacking through their own artillery fire to storm the outpost. Captain Jackson's courageous actions and coolness under fire inspired and rallied his men. Captain Jackson's outstanding gallantry in combat and his devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 65th Infantry Regiment, and the United States Army.

Jackson, George Washington Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, I Corps
General Orders No. 73 - 20 May 1952

Private First Class George W. Jackson, Jr., US52023465, Artillery, United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Kohanhari-Saemal, Korea.  On 23 November 1951, Private First Class Jackson was a member of a sound ranging crew whose position was subjected to intense enemy automatic-weapons and mortar fire.  Disregarding his own safety, Private First Class Jackson left cover to obtain an accurate azimuth from his observation post to an enemy weapon which had been observed on a ridge within fifteen hundred meters of the outpost.  After he had succeeded in locating this and several other enemy weapons from his exposed position, he was killed instantly by a hostile mortar round.  As a result of his action a number of enemy mortars and artillery pieces were silenced.  The outstanding heroism and devotion to duty displayed by Private First Class Jackson reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the Federal service from Virginia.

Jackson, Hobson

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 83 - 30 October 1950

Corporal Hobson Jackson, RA14354022, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 37th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 22 August 1950 in the vicinity of Taegu, Korea.  On that date, Corporal Jackson's battery was subjected to an intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage which prevented the artillerymen from servicing their howitzers and inflicted severe casualties upon them.  Orders were received to vacate the position immediately, leaving the guns and equipment in the area.  Later that day, volunteers were called for to reenter the vacated position in an attempt to secure a howitzer and take it to the new battery position.  Corporal Jackson volunteered for this hazardous mission and, with two comrades, entered the area which still was under observation by the enemy and still under heavy concentrations of artillery and mortar fire.  With complete disregard for personal safety and indifference to the hostile fire, he moved calmly through the area and, aided by his comrades, succeeded in placing the piece in travelling position, hooked it to a truck and moved it to the new position.  The timely arrival of this desperately needed howitzer allowed the battery to furnish support to the hard pressed infantry and the fire delivered by the gun succeeded in breaking up an enemy attack.  The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Jackson on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Georgia.

Jackson, James A. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 209 - 29 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class James A. Jackson (ASN: RA-14275072), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Yongsan, Korea, on 4 September 1950. The motorized patrol of which he was a member was ambushed by an enemy force and pinned down by intense mortar and automatic weapons fire. With complete disregard for his own safety he exposed himself to the withering fire and poured such a volume of accurate fire into the enemy that the remainder of the patrol was able to extricate itself form its untenable position. He continued firing until his ammunition was exhausted. When the enemy overran his position Private Jackson was killed. His courageous actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: 1929. Home Town: Amery, Mississippi. Death: KIA: September 4, 1950.

Jackson, John M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant John M. Jackson (MCSN: 0-49783), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action at Korea on November 27 - December 8, 1950. With his mortar positions brought under extremely heavy mortar fire during a fierce hostile counterattack on 3 December, Second Lieutenant Jackson kept his mortars in action despite sub-zero temperatures and a heavy snow, directing and controlling effective fire against the enemy. Although ten Marines in his section were seriously wounded during the intense action, he and the two remaining men in his section continued firing in the face of direct enemy hits on his position. Braving hostile fire, he assisted in evacuating all of the casualties in his section and subsequently directed the displacement of his mortars and ammunition. By his brilliant and forceful leadership, daring tactics and cool courage, Second Lieutenant Jackson served to inspire all who observed him and contributed to the success of the assigned mission. His fearless devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sabetha, Kansas. Home Town: Effingham, Kansas.

Jackson, Robert R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Robert R. Jackson (MCSN: 0-55327), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 January 1953. During a night raid on a strongly defended enemy position, Second Lieutenant Jackson skillfully maneuvered his men to the objective and succeeded in destroying a numerically superior enemy force before devastating enemy mortar barrages necessitated a withdrawal from the sector. Moving among his men to direct the evacuation of the wounded during the withdrawal, he repeatedly returned to the enemy trenches to assist the wounded to a position of comparative safety and, while carrying one of the casualties, was painfully wounded by fragments from an exploding enemy mortar shell. Despite the severity of his condition, he refused evacuation until assured that all his men were removed from the area. By his outstanding courage, gallant leadership and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Jackson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Diego, California. Home Town: LaJolla, California.

Jacobs, John P.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 173 - June 16, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) John P. Jacobs (ASN: 0-2026202), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in connection with military operations against the enemy while serving with Company I, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 18 May 1951, in the vicinity of Pungchon-ni, Korea. At about 1500 hours of that date, Lieutenant Jacobs' platoon had the mission to re-take a fortified position located on a high hill which had fallen to the enemy. Making full use of supporting artillery and mortar fire, Lieutenant Jacobs so deployed and maneuvered his platoon as to accomplish the mission with light losses to his own men while inflicting very heavy casualties on the enemy. Throughout the action, Lieutenant Jacobs remained with the assault squad, leading the attack with complete disregard for his own safety and personally killing four of the enemy. The gallantry and inspiring leadership displayed by Lieutenant Jacobs reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Jaeger, John H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John H. Jaeger (MCSN: 0-46494), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1950. While his platoon was occupying a position directly opposite the enemy's main avenue of approach, First Lieutenant Jaeger exposed himself to continuous and intense hostile mortar, grenade, machine gun and small arms fire to move along his platoon front and re-deploy troops to more effective locations. As the fierce engagement continued, he personally placed reinforcements into strategic positions and, although wounded by fragments from enemy hand grenades, refused treatment until after the hostile attack had been repulsed. His coolness under fire, inspiring leadership and indomitable devotion to duty encouraged his men to increase their efforts in repelling the enemy and reflect great credit upon First Lieutenant Jaeger and the United States Naval Service. Born: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Jagielio (Jagiellio), Joseph Anthony (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Joseph Anthony Jagielio (Jagiello) (MCSN: 870275), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Platoon Sergeant of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 November 1950. With his position surrounded by a strong hostile force when the enemy counterattacked during an assault by his platoon against Hill 532, south of Sudong, Staff Sergeant Jagielio fearlessly moved among his men under heavy enemy fire, shouting words of encouragement and directing effective fire against the fanatic attackers. Personally engaging the hostile troops in hand-to-hand combat when they penetrated his lines, he boldly led his men in breaking through the encirclement and in withdrawing to tenable ground before he was mortally wounded by a bursting enemy grenade. His inspiring leadership, valiant fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty in the face of extremely heavy odds reflect the highest credit upon Staff Sergeant Jagielio and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 26, 1924 at Quantico, Virginia. Home Town: Winchester, Virginia. Death: KIA: November 4, 1950.

Jagiello, Walter Albert (1st award)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 285 - September 21, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Walter Albert Jagiello (NSN: 0-27584), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company L, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action on 29 May 1951, near Yongchon, Korea. During the attack on Hill 136, the commanding officer was killed and the forward observer was seriously wounded. Lieutenant Jagiello, realizing the perilous situation, immediately took command and reorganized the friendly troops in the attack, then proceeded to the forward observer's position, where he directed artillery fire into the enemy-held position with effective accuracy. After being relieved from the forward observer's position, Lieutenant Jagiello rejoined the platoon and led his men in a vicious attack against heavily fortified enemy positions. His relentless determination and disregard for his life was such an inspiration to the men, that they completely overran the hostile position, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. Lieutenant Jagiello's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Jagiello, Walter Albert (2nd award)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 292 - September 26, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Walter Albert Jagiello (NSN: 0-27584), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company L, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action on 6 September 1951, near Chinpa-ri, Korea. When Company L launched an attack on enemy positions in an attempt to relieve pressure on Company K, two platoon leaders were wounded by intense small arms and automatic weapons fire. Lieutenant Jagiello immediately rushed to the distressed platoons and organized them in a vigorous assault against the foe. When a large hostile force was observed preparing to attack his assaulting platoons, he acted as forward observer, directing devastating artillery fire on the enemy troops. As a result of his inspirational leadership the mission was successfully completed and heavy casualties were inflicted on the foe. Lieutenant Jagiello's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

James, Carroll L.

General Orders No. 80 - 1 March 1951

First Lieutenant Carroll L. James, United States Air Force. Lieutenant James distinguished himself by exceptional gallantry in action on 26 November 1950. While piloting an unarmed T-6 type aircraft on a prebriefed mission over enemy territory, Lieutenant James heard a plea for help from an injure forward ground controller who was surrounded by a large number of enemy troops. Because of the intense smoke and haze, the ground was barely visible, and only through exceptional alertness did he and his observer succeed in locating the man near an unfinished airstrip. Displaying remarkable courage, and completely disregarding his own safety, Lieutenant James landed the plane despite continuous enemy rifle fire. By the time he had rescued the wounded controller, enemy forces were pouring in from all directions, concentrating their fire on the aircraft. As the plane became airborne, the enemy was in complete control of the field. By his superior flying skill and decisive action, Lieutenant James saved the life of a member of the United Nations forces. His unfailing courage under fire, his conspicuous gallantry and his unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflect great credit upon Lieutenant James, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

James, Harry

Citation not yet found.

"A decorated Korean war veteran, Sgt. 1/c Harry James, is in line for the U.S. Army recruiting job in Huron.  James, a native of Huron, is being trained to replace the present recruiter, Sgt. 1/c L.M. Whiting.  Whiting has been in Huron since 1946 and expects to enter helicopter training school by the first of the year.  Recalled to service Sept. 16, 1950, James moved to Japan where he joined the Third Division, Seventh Regiment.  James served as a squad leader in the Seventh Regiment.  He was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action when he personally rallied American forces from a position on the flank of a British unit, enabling the British to withdraw to safety.  James' superiors had been killed in battle.  After serving about nine months in Korea, James returned to Huron in July of this year.  His most recent station was Fort Fix, NJ.  He is the son of Mrs. Irene James, 22 Second St. S.E." - The Huronite - 10/14/51

James, John W.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 256 - 25 October 1950

Corporal (then Private First Class) John W. James, RA13161334, Infantry, Company A, 24th Infantry, United States Army.  When his patrol was subjected to intense machine gun fire near Haman, Korea on 23 August 1950, Corporal James crawled under the withering fire and threw a hand grenade into the enemy position.  His courageous initiative resulted in the destruction of the weapons and its crew and permitted the patrol to continue on its mission.  Corporal James' heroic devotion to duty reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Maryland.

Jamieson, Robert W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert W. Jamieson (MCSN: 1199688), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 - 25 July 1953. During a vicious attack by a numerically superior hostile force on the company's position, Sergeant Jamieson fearlessly exposed himself to murderous enemy small arms, mortar and artillery fire in order to direct his men more effectively in repelling the hostile attack. Although painfully wounded, he refused evacuation and gallantly continued to lead the remnants of his squad in bitter hand-to-hand fighting until a second serious wound forced him to be evacuated. By his skilled leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Sergeant Jamieson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Long Beach, California. Home Town: Long Beach, California.

Jansen, Robert W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert W. Jansen (MCSN: 1295931), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 July 1953. When all communications were severed and numerous serious casualties were sustained during a murderous enemy mortar and artillery barrage on his platoon's position, Private First Class Jansen volunteered to take a message to an adjacent platoon area which had proper communications with the company command post, in order to obtain adequate medical aid for the critically wounded. Despite the devastating hostile fire falling around him, he fearlessly moved through an exposed area to reach the friendly unit and succeeded in completing his mission, resulting in the dispatch of immediate aid to the stricken platoon. Seriously wounded while returning to his position, Private First Class Jansen, by his indomitable spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Waukegan, Illinois. Home Town: Waukegan, Illinois.

Jarnagin, Spencer Hewitt (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Spencer Hewitt Jarnagin (MCSN: 0-49956), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander in Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. While under enemy machine gun fire, Second Lieutenant Jarnagin fearlessly led his platoon into a position from which he could more effectively launch an attack, repeatedly exposing himself to hostile fire to position the members of his platoon and personally direct their fire and that of his machine guns. Continuously running through enemy fire to carry out his mission, Second Lieutenant Jarnagin was fatally wounded by an intense hostile machine gun barrage. His courageous initiative and heroic actions reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 21, 1927 at Chattanooga, Tennessee. Home Town: Raleigh, North Carolina. Death: KIA: September 21, 1950.

Jaskilka, Samuel (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Samuel Jaskilka (MCSN: 0-13973), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1950. After successfully taking his company objective on an airfield, Captain Jaskilka boldly exposed himself to intense hostile fire in order to organize and control the various elements of the company and, by his skillful and inspiring leadership, was instrumental in preparing the men to meet and repel a pre-dawn enemy attack on their positions. Expertly continuing his direction, he led a strong daylight counterattack which virtually destroyed the remainder of the hostile force and paved the way for a rapid advance. Captain Jaskilka's aggressive determination, outstanding courage and staunch devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Ansonia, Connecticut. Home Town: Ansonia, Connecticut.

Jaskilka, Samuel (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Samuel Jaskilka (MCSN: 0-13973), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 27 November to 10 December 1950. Exhibiting outstanding courage and sound tactical knowledge, Captain Jaskilka skillfully led his company in the withdrawal from the Chosin Reservoir area. When his unit was attacked by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength during the night of 27 November, he directed his men in repulsing the attack, accounting for over three hundred enemy killed. Despite sub-zero temperatures and the critical military situation, he repeatedly exposed himself to heavy hostile grenade, small arms and automatic weapons fire throughout the entire period to lead his men in repulsing constant assaults by a fanatical enemy seeking to split the column. By his forceful and determined leadership, great personal valor and inspiring devotion to duty, Captain Jaskilka contributed materially to the success of the withdrawal and to the infliction of hundreds of casualties upon the enemy. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ansonia, Connecticut. Home Town: Ansonia, Connecticut.

Jaskowiak, Edmond C.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 692 - 8 November 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant Edmond C. Jaskowiak, RA37595417, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action on 4 August 1951 in the vicinity of Hyon-ni, Korea. On that date Sergeant Jaskowiak was leading a patrol when it was suddenly ambushed by a fanatical enemy force. In the ensuing action, armed only with a pistol, Sergeant Jaskowiak voluntarily assaulted a strongly fortified enemy position and killed all its occupants. Returning to his men, he led them in the assault until they were pinned down by an enemy sniper’s fire. Sergeant Jaskowiak again, with complete disregard for his personal safety, advanced alone and killed the sniper. As a result of his aggressive and fearless leadership, his platoon was able to accomplish its mission successfully with a minimum of casualties. The gallantry in action and selfless devotion to duty demonstrated by Sergeant Jaskowiak on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Jeddery, Joseph A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Joseph A. Jeddery, Jr. (MCSN: 1152583), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1951. With the company engaged in an attack against well-entrenched enemy positions, Private First Class Jeddery led his squad through intense hostile fire to a position from which it could deliver a concentrated volume of devastating fire on the objective and, repeatedly exposing himself to the enemy barrage, moved from man to man, calmly directing and encouraging each unit until another squad relieved his own as a base of fire. Subsequently, he charged forward and, shouting to his men to follow, led a vicious counterattack on the enemy. Although painfully wounded during the course of the battle, Private First Class Jeddery bravely continued to lead his men forward until the position was secured. By his outstanding courage, brilliant leadership and gallant devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: El Paso, Texas. Home Town: El Paso, Texas.

Jeffords, William D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class William D. Jeffords (NSN: 9860411), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 23 April 1951. When the company was subjected to a night-long attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Jeffords continually moved about the area, rendered aid to the casualties and removed them to covered positions despite the devastating enemy mortar, automatic-weapons and small arms fire. Frequently going forward of the battle line, although surrounded by hostile troops, he courageously hauled wounded comrades to safety and skillfully treated their wounds. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of others, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Jeffords served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Authority: Board of Awards: Serial 60044 (November 28, 1951).

Jenkins, David C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal David C. Jenkins (MCSN: 331749), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. When his platoon was subjected to intense hostile fire and forced to take cover, Corporal Jenkins voluntarily went to the assistance of two seriously wounded Marines. Remaining with a Corpsman while the rest of the platoon withdrew from the position, he courageously stayed at the side of the casualties, administering aid and furnishing covering fire for their protection. Resolutely continuing his efforts until other members of his platoon came forward, he successfully assisted in evacuating the wounded men under cover of a smoke screen set up by his comrades. By his daring initiative, selfless determination and loyal devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Corporal Jenkins upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lindale, Georgia. Home Town: Lindale, Georgia.

Jenkins, George E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major George E. Jenkins (MCSN: 0-24952), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Photographic Squadron One in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 September 1952. Encountering heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire, and in constant danger of attack by enemy aircraft while flying on a vital photo-reconnaissance mission, Major Jenkins flew repeated runs over the assigned targets on set courses at a constant altitude. As a result of his courageous and determined action, he obtained full coverage of the target area to provide photographic intelligence of material value to friendly forces in planning future operations against the enemy. By his outstanding airmanship, resolute determination and inspiring devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire, Major Jenkins upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Iowa City, Iowa. Home Town: Marshalltown, Iowa.

Jenkins, Henry Levor (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Sergeant Henry Lavor Jenkins (ASN: 39677477), United States Army, for distinguishing himself by extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Pungwan, Korea, on 2 November 1950. On this date Sergeant Jenkins was attacked to the First Platoon of Company C, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, as a Medical Aidman. When the company moved forward in the attack, the first platoon was subjected to heavy small arms and mortar fire, resulting in many casualties. With utter disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant Jenkins exposed himself repeatedly to enemy fire, as he moved about the platoon administering to the wounded. He was wounded in the leg in the early stages of the attack but continued to give first aid to the wounded and assist in their evacuation. In the bloody fighting that followed, Sergeant Jenkins' courage and supreme devotion to duty was displayed time after time, as he refused to be evacuated in spite of his painful wound and continued to administer to the wounded, not only of his platoon, but of those in the second platoon as well. Seven hours after he was wounded, his condition was brought to the attention of the Company Commander. Sergeant Jenkins was found to be seriously wounded and suffering from loss of blood. Only after he was so ordered would he allow himself to be evacuated to the battalion aid station where he was further evacuated to the rear. The service rendered and extreme devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Jenkins on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. General Orders:  Home of Record: Utah

Sergeant Henry Jenkins earned his first Silver Star in World War II.

Jenkins, John M.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 246 - 26 October 1950

Second Lieutenant John M. Jenkins, 058139, Infantry, Company C, 24th Infantry, United States Army.  On 29 August 1950 near Haman, Korea when his unit was subjected to bombing and attack by determined enemy ground troops, Lieutenant Jenkins repeatedly exposed himself to the intense hostile fire in order to organize his position, direct the fire of him men, and inspire them to greater accomplishment.  His courageous leadership resulted in the ultimate defeat of a numerically superior enemy force with a minimum of casualties to his men.  Lieutenant Jenkins' devotion to duty and military skill reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Virginia.

Jenkins, Lew

Master Sergeant Lew Jenkins, RA6268551, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company G, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 27 August 1951 in the vicinity of Chin-hogae, Korea.  On this date, after continuous enemy assaults on their positions, Company G was forced to withdraw toward hill pass 530.  Sergeant Jenkins was leading the fourth platoon through a pass and the enemy was closing in on them.  Realizing that if the enemy took the pass the entire battalion would be trapped, Sergeant Jenkins, immediately led his platoon to the head of a draw and set up a defensive position.  Ordering his men to hold their positions, he acted as ammunition bearer for the machine guns.  When the enemy attacked, Sergeant Jenkins, under intense enemy fire, made numerous trips between the platoon and the ammunition dump, keeping the machine guns well supplied with ammunition.  His courageous action prevented the enemy from cutting off the only escape route and enabled the remainder of the battalion to withdraw safely.  The gallantry in action displayed by Sergeant Jenkins reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Jenkins, Robert C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert C. Jenkins (MCSN: 651107), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman in Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 September 1950. Forced to seek cover when his patrol was subjected to intense hostile fire while moving through an enemy-held village, Private First Class Jenkins immediately left his protected position when he observed three wounded Marines in an open area. Despite the heavy enemy fire, he made three separate trips across a fire-swept area to move the casualties to a position affording cover. By his heroic actions, he materially aided the wounded in receiving prompt medical treatment and a hasty evacuation. His daring initiative and unselfish concern for the safety of others were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: York, Nebraska. Home Town: Stromsburg, Nebraska.

Jennings, Frank Primm  (posthumous)

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 399 (1951)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Frank Primm Jennings, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in connection with military operations against the enemy in Korea on 25 April 1951, while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. As he was observing enemy movements and reporting them by telephone to his platoon command post, an incoming mortar round severed the line of communication. Private Jennings, unhesitantly, left the scant cover of his foxhole and moved into the fire-swept terrain to successfully repair the broken wire. A short time later, after he had returned to his position, he noticed an enemy soldier approaching, and again leaving the foxhole he advanced on the man, taking him prisoner. Acting on orders, he turned the prisoner over to the platoon, and despite the obvious presence of large numbers of the enemy in the immediate area, returned to the outpost. Private Jennings continued to report the movement of the hostile troops and direct a steady stream of rifle fire into their ranks until the position he was fighting desperately to defend became overrun by the onrushing enemy.

Jennings, Payne Jr.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 115 - 19 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel Payne Jennings, Jr., United States Air Force, for gallantry in action near Sinuiju, Korea, on 8 November 1950. Serving as Commanding Officer of the 19th Bombardment Group, Fifth Air Force, Colonel Jennings led an aerial attack against Sinuiju, the well-defended temporary capitol of North Korea and an extremely important enemy communications and supply center. This city is located only 666 yards across the Yalu River from An-Tung, Manchuria. Enemy anti-aircraft artillery was located on both sides of the river and conventional and jet type aircraft were based in the area and expected to attack in force. Colonel Jennings knew this target was vitally important to the enemy. He also wished to prevent possible international consequences of American aircraft crossing over or bombs dropping upon Manchuria. He therefore chose to lead his group in the mission which resulted in maximum destruction of all assigned targets. His courageous leadership served as inspiration to all members of his command. The leadership and gallantry displayed by Colonel Jennings are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

[KWE Note: Colonel Jennings was lost at sea when his B-29 went down.]

Jensen, Bruce Allan (1st award)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 421 - 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Bruce Allan Jensen (AFSN: FR-20442/AO-1863453), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 8th Fighter Bomber Squadron, 49th Fighter Bomber Group, on 13 March 1952. While on a rail cutting mission near Sanchon, Korea, during inclement weather, Lieutenant Jensen's aircraft was hit and badly damaged by enemy fire. Ignoring the damage to his aircraft and his own personal safety, Lieutenant Jensen elected to continue the attack rather than return to base leaving his wingman unprotected. Diving through heavy flank and small arms fire, Lieutenant Jensen scored two direct hits on a string of boxcars which caused secondary explosions and fires. Breaking off the target, Lieutenant Jensen's aircraft was again hit by enemy fire, but he managed to maintain control, rejoin his flight, and return safely to base. Lieutenant Jensen's aircraft, as a result of the enemy flak and small arms fire, sustained sixty holes. Through his superior pilot skill, high personal courage, and outstanding devotion to duty, Lieutenant Jensen reflected great credit upon himself and the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.  Entered the military service from Wyoming.

Jensen, Keith A. (posthumous)

General Orders No. 110 - 1 April 1952
24th Infantry Division

By direction of the President, the Silver Star is (posthumously) awarded to Second Lieutenant Keith A. Jensen, 0957088, Artillery, U.S. Army, a member of Battery B, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Kumhwa, Korea, on 16 October 1951. Serving as a forward observer with a rifle company [of the 21st Regiment], he accompanied the unit in its attack on a steep hill, strongly defended by a large enemy force firing small arms, artillery and mortars. He continually exposed himself during the attack to direct artillery support for the onrushing infantry. Upon reaching the objective, the company was pinned down by an intense hail of enemy artillery and mortar fire. With complete disregard for his personal well being, Lieutenant Jensen left the comparative safety of the bunker he was in and fearlessly went forward to direct artillery fire on the enemy. He continued his vital duties, inflicting heavy destruction and casualties upon the enemy until he was mortally wounded. Lieutenant Jensen’s gallant actions, daring initiative and self-sacrificing devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit’s mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the U.S. Artillery. Entered service from Anoka, Minnesota.

Jenson, Lloyd K. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 69 - 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Major Lloyd K. Jenson, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Headquarters, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 18 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea. On that date he voluntarily led a task force, composed of infantry, tanks and antiaircraft firing vehicles, with the mission of driving the enemy from Hill 174. Approximately 400 yards from the objective, the task force encountered an enemy outpost and, under Major Jenson’s direction, inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy and forced them to withdraw. He realized, at this time, that it would be impossible to take the objective and decided to hold a ridge nearby to be used as a line of departure for a larger force. As a result of his initiative and complete disregard for his personal safety, the task force insured the success of the attack launched on the following day and enabled the assault elements to complete the mission with a minimum of casualties. The gallantry displayed by Major Jenson reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Hometown: Sidney, MT.

Jessup, John E. Jr.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 367 - November 20, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) John E. Jessup, Jr. (ASN: 0-62219), United States Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in Korea while serving with Company E, 5th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. On 16 September 1950, when his roadblock in the vicinity of Waegwan, Korea was attacked by numerically superior enemy forces, Lieutenant Jessup manned a light machine gun to provide covering fire for the displacement of his platoon. Although suffering from serious wounds from mortar fragments, he advanced on the enemy and continued firing until painful burns from the over heated weapon caused him to abandon the machine gun. Seizing a rifle, he continued to hold off the attackers until displacement had been accomplished, and his ammunition was exhausted. Then, armed only with his pistol, he remained until all casualties had been removed. Lieutenant Jessup's conspicuous heroism and outstanding leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Jimenez, Felix

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 83 - 30 March 1951

Sergeant First Class Felix Jimenez, RA10403269, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 31 January 1951 near Tongchon-ni, Korea, the 2d platoon, Company "F", launched an attack on Hill 297. As the platoon advanced up the steep hill firing on the well dug-in enemy, Sergeant Jimenez, of his own accord and with slight regard for his personal safety, ran forward of his platoon throwing hand grenades into the enemy, demoralizing him and destroying his positions. He repeated this action five times although endangered by the enemy's attempts to check the assault. The gallant actions of Sergeant Jimenez inspired his comrades and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Jimenez-Fernandez, Ismael (posthumous)

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Ismael Jimenez-Fernandez, RA30451709, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 31 March 1951, as Company F was attacking Hill 398, near Choksong-myon, Korea, the assault platoon was halted by intense enemy small arms, grenade, and mortar fire. Voluntarily, Sergeant Jimenez-Fernandez moved from his covered position over an exposed area, inspiring his squad to follow. Gaining a flank position where his men could bring fire on the enemy entrenchments, Sergeant Jimenez-Fernandez fearlessly exposed himself as he deployed his squad. Disregarding the heavy volume of hostile fire, he continued to point out enemy targets until mortally wounded. His unhesitating actions resulted in effective fire being quickly placed on the enemy, thereby saving the lives of many of his comrades in the assault platoon. The gallantry and courageous initiative displayed by Sergeant Jimenez-Fernandez reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Johansen, Peter J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Peter J. Johansen (MCSN: 1099344), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tank Section Leader of Company B, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 August 1952. When his platoon was assigned the mission of furnishing close fire support to the infantry element aiding in the relief of an ambushed squad on an outpost position well forward of the main line of resistance, Staff Sergeant Johansen observed the enemy reinforcing their positions and expertly maneuvered his tank forward within 150 yards of the hostile troops in a brave attempt to protect the besieged Marines and deliver more effective fire upon the enemy emplacements. From this position, he unhesitatingly exposed himself to intense hostile artillery, mortar and small arms fire to employ his turret-mounted anti-aircraft machine gun and succeeded in killing thirteen of the enemy. By his courageous leadership, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Johansen served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Johns, Philip Eugene (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 18 - 10 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Philip Eugene Johns (ASN: US-52079999), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Sungam-ni, Korea, on 27 July 1951. His platoon had the mission of taking and securing Hill 734, a rugged, steep terrain feature. As the unit advanced up a ridge, its attack was halted by a tremendous concentration of enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire. Private Johns serving as lead scout, led his squad to a flanking ridge and started towards the top of the hill in an effort to destroy the enemy automatic weapon position that was pinning down the friendly troops. Crawling ahead of the rest of the squad, he reached an enemy communications trench. Dropping into the emplacement, he surprised three hostile soldiers and killed them with a hand grenade and rifle fire. As the rest of the squad moved up to put a machine gun into action, the enemy again halted the attack with a withering hail of automatic weapons and small arms fire. Private Johns, seeing that his unit was still unable to advance, decided to personally destroy the critical enemy position. With complete disregard for his own safety, he jumped from the trench, exposing himself to the enemy's inter-locking bands of fire and rushed up the hill toward the enemy bunker. When last seen, he was going over the ridgeline, firing his rifle from the hip and fighting the enemy at point blank range. Private Johns' courageous action, aggressive initiative and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Lakewood, Ohio. Death: KIA: July 27, 1951 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Johnson, Arthur O. Jr.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 109 - September 27, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Arthur O. Johnson, Jr. (ASN: RA-18277046), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a member of Battery B, 99th Field Artillery Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy near Kumchon, Korea, on 2 August 1950. Sergeant Johnson was in the battery area carrying out his duties as Chief of Firing Battery. The unit was firing on enemy installations south of Kumchon when the battery area was subjected to heavy enemy counter battery fire. Several men had been wounded and killed. Sergeant Johnson unhesitatingly assisted the Medical Corpsman to aid and evacuate the wounded. While carrying his Battery Commander, who had been wounded, to the ambulance, Sergeant Johnson was hit and seriously wounded by shell fragments which struck him in the back. Disregarding his own injuries, Sergeant Johnson continued in this work until all casualties had been cared for. He then collapsed due to the seriousness of his wounds and was also evacuated. By his disregard for personal safety despite his own wounds, Sergeant Johnson helped save the lives of his comrades, reflecting great credit upon himself and the military service.

Johnson, Billy Edward (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Billy Edward Johnson (MCSN: 668112), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radio Operator attached to the Air and Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1950. When the vitally needed radio became inoperative during a fierce assault by a numerically superior hostile force, Private First Class Johnson voluntarily proceeded over open ground in the face of deadly enemy fire to salvage parts from an abandoned radio. Although suffering frostbitten fingers while working without gloves in the sub-zero weather, he braved continuous hostile fire until the essential radio was again operative. By his outstanding courage and inspiring actions throughout, Private First Class Johnson upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: August 29, 1929 at Crowley, Texas. Home Town: Kilgore, Texas. Death: MIA: November 30, 1950.

Johnson, Carl S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Carl S. Johnson (MCSN: 1189147), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 and 13 August 1952. When the three-man patrol to which he was attached was pinned down by hostile fire while operating forward of friendly lines with the purpose of contacting the enemy, Private Johnson courageously delivered effective fire upon the enemy, enabling the members of the patrol to withdraw and to relay vital information to the company commander. On the following day, while accompanying a platoon on a raid against enemy fortifications, he bravely moved into a hostile bunker, killing three of the enemy with his weapon and, when his ammunition had been expended, used his rifle to strike and kill another, subsequently proceeding to aid in the destruction of other hostile bunkers. Later, although seriously wounded in the arms and legs, he covered the platoon's withdrawal by hurling hand grenades at the counterattacking enemy. By his exceptional courage, initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Private Johnson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: McMinnville, Oregon. Home Town: Dayton, Ohio.

Johnson, Charles R. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Charles R. Johnson (ASN: US-51196473), United States Army, for gallantry in action on 11 June 1953 while serving as a Browning Automatic Rifleman with Company B, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in the Republic of Korea. During the night and early morning of 11 and 12 June 1953 against overwhelming odds during an attack on his element's position, Private First Class Johnson acted with complete disregard for his personal safety to ensure the safety of his fellow Soldiers. Ignoring his own injuries, he treated several wounded comrades, dragging one Soldier through the trenches while under direct artillery, mortar and small arms fire to a secure bunker, stopping only to clear the path of enemy soldiers in close combat operations. Ignoring the proximity of the opposing force, he left the bunker to assess the situation and secure weapons and ammunition. When he returned, he organized a defense and departed his fighting position in order to place himself between his comrades and the enemy, thereby creating the conditions for their successful rescue. Private First Class Johnson's actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 3d Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

Johnson, Clarence E., Jr.

First Lieutenant Clarence E. Johnson Jr., 02012847, Artillery, United States Army, Battery A, 49th Field Artillery battalion, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Kuron, Korea, on 19 February 1951.  On this date, Lieutenant Johnson was an Artillery Forward Observer supporting an infantry regiment which was attacking strongly entrenched enemy positions in a heavily wooded area.  The lead infantry company was halted by intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire.  Unable to adjust fire accurately because of the dense woods, Lieutenant Johnson, without hesitation, moved forward and assumed an exposed position where he could get clearer observation.  Although the enemy concentrated their fire on him, he remained exposed to direct the artillery until the infantry overwhelmed the fortification and moved on to the next position where they were again halted by stiff resistance.  With complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Johnson again moved forward to an exposed site to direct the artillery.  The enemy fire pierced his clothing and equipment, but he remained until the objective had been secured.  During this action a comrade was wounded and fell in an exposed position.  Observing the man was in great danger, Lieutenant Johnson raced across open ground to the wounded man and carried him to a place of cover where he administered first aid.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Johnson reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of California.  (This award supersedes the award of the Bronze Star Medal (First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster) with Letter "V" devise to Lieutenant Johnson, for heroism in action on the same date, published in General Orders 214, Headquarters 7th Infantry Division, 1951, as amended). [General Orders Number 374, 1 August 1951]

Johnson, Cornelius

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 45 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Cornelius Johnson (ASN: US-52089826), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Pangdang-dong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. During an assault on enemy positions, the lead elements of his company were subjected to deadly enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire. This resulted in the majority of his platoon being pinned down by the devastating enemy fire. Realizing the need for immediate action, Corporal Johnson, with complete disregard for his own safety, exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to boldly move forward, knocking out several enemy positions as he advanced. Because of his fearless deed, the enemy strongpoints were obliterated, thus enabling his comrades to continue their attack and secure the objective. Corporal Johnson's courageous action, unswerving determination and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Petersburg, Virginia.

Johnson, David G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain David G. Johnson (MCSN: 0-21209), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Forward Air Control Officer of the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. Unhesitatingly volunteering to replace an air control officer who had been critically wounded while calling air strikes in support of an infantry company's attack on a hill overlooking the main supply route, Captain Johnson ascended the hill by hand lines over precipitous and ice-coated terrain and, although suffering from frostbitten feet, moved to an unprotected position on the high mountainous ridge occupied by the infantry unit. Braving continuous intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire all day as well as specific attacks on his post which was easily spotted by its radio antenna, he staunchly remained at the dangerous site to control 76 aircraft in support of the infantry company's battle to attain its objective. In addition, he captured three and killed three of the enemy who attempted to destroy his position. His courageous initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty were contributing factors in the success of his battalion in this operation and reflect great credit upon Captain Johnson and the United States Naval Service. Born: Barnet, Vermont. Home Town: Monroe, New Hampshire.

Johnson, Edmund E. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Edmund E. Johnson, Jr. (MCSN: 0-56939), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 July 1953. When his main battle position was subjected to murderous enemy mortar and artillery fire while supporting an outpost that was under enemy attack, Second Lieutenant Johnson fearlessly exposed himself to the deadly fire to insure the expeditious evacuation of casualties and to check on his men's positions. Although twice thrown to the ground by the dangerously close explosions of enemy shells, he continued to move about the area to direct his men and to insure that disrupted communications were rapidly restored. When a machine gunner became a casualty, he quickly manned the weapon and delivered effective fire upon the enemy. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous leadership and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Johnson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cambridge, Massachusetts. Home Town: Medford, Massachusetts.

Johnson, Franklin D. (MIA)

Second Lieutenant Franklin D. Johnson, while a member of 8attery D, 15th AA AW 8n. (SP), distinguished himself by gallantry in action near the Chosin Reservoir in Korea on 28 November 1950. On this date, the command post of the first platoon of the battery was taken under heavy enemy attack, and the occupants of the command post were in grave danger of being killed or captured. The battery commander called for volunteers to go to the relief of the besieged command post. Although just previously wounded in the shoulder by enemy fire, Lieutenant Johnson unhesitatingly joined the patrol and proceeded at great personal risk to cross open ground under intense enemy automatic weapons, small-arms and mortar fire to carry out an attack against the enemy force. He courageously took a number of enemy under fire with his carbine and killed them. As a result of his courage the patrol was successful in destroying many of the enemy and forcing the remainder to flee, thereby saving the personnel still alive in the platoon command post. The actions of Lieutenant Johnson on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Tennessee.

Johnson, Gerald

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 256 - 25 October 1950

Corporal Gerald Johnson, RA16261238, Infantry, Company F, 5th Infantry, United States Army.  When his company position in the vicinity of Sahnglung-ni, Korea was being besieged by superior hostile forces on 7 August 1950, Corporal Johnson voluntarily remained in his position to provide covering fire with his machine gun while his unit withdrew.  Having exhausted all his ammunition he carried his weapon through hostile small arms and machine gun fire to rejoin his unit.  His courage and initiative were directly responsible for the safe withdrawal of his unit with a minimum of casualties, and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Michigan.

Johnson, Harold A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Harold A. Johnson (MCSN: 0-53534), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Outpost Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 24 July 1953. With his position subjected to a constant and unrelenting barrage of mortar and artillery fire followed by onrushing hordes of enemy troops, First Lieutenant Johnson fearlessly exposed himself to the intense hostile fire in order to move throughout his defensive position, directing and encouraging his men. When the enemy penetrated his position, he personally engaged them with small arms and grenades to inspire his men to meet the opposing forces in the ensuing hand-to-hand combat. Severely wounded and evacuated, First Lieutenant Johnson, by his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous leadership and unwavering devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Superior, Wisconsin. Home Town: Superior, Wisconsin.

Johnson, Homer E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Homer E. Johnson (MCSN: 0-52082), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Patrol Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 July 1952. After directing an assault upon a strongly fortified enemy position, Second Lieutenant Johnson discovered that a member of his patrol was missing and courageously exposed himself to hostile small arms, grenade and mortar fire in an effort to locate the man. Arriving at the main line of resistance, he voluntarily led a patrol back to the scene and succeeded in locating the missing Marine. Unable to remove the body to friendly lines because of the intense enemy fire, the unit was forced to abandon it in a position from which it was removed to friendly lines by another patrol the following day. By his exceptional leadership, marked courage and unyielding devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Johnson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States. Naval Service. Born: Preston, Idaho. Home Town: Preston, Idaho.

Johnson, Horace L. Jr. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Horace L. Johnson, Jr. (MCSN: 0-41906), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forced in Korea, on 3 March 1951. With his company pinned down by intense fire emanating from a heavily fortified enemy position during an advance against a vital objective in the vicinity of Hoengsong, First Lieutenant Johnson fearlessly moved through heavy machine-gun, small-arms and mortar fire to locate an advantageous position for establishing a base of fire with his light machine guns. Finding an ideal location approximately 100 yards forward of his own lines, he quickly re-crossed the fire-swept terrain, personally led the machine-gun section to the new position and then, directing the assault units in a brilliantly executed attack, succeeded in seizing the assigned objective with minimum casualties among his own troops. By his courageous and determined leadership, bold tactics and dauntless perseverance throughout the furious encounter, First Lieutenant Johnson contributed materially to the success achieved by his battalion and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Denison, Texas. Home Town: Ashley, Illinois.

Johnson, Horace L. Jr. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Horace L. Johnson, Jr. (MCSN: 0-41906), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forced in Korea, on 23 and 24 April 1951. Receiving the brunt of a fierce enemy night-long attack while reorganizing his positions, First Lieutenant Johnson bravely moved along the lines through the bitter fighting and, despite heavy hostile frontal fire, assisted the wounded, re-distributed ammunition and kept the battalion commander informed of the ever changing situation. Although his company was continually engaged by the enemy while carrying out its assigned rear-guard mission of covering the battalion re-deployment on 24 April, he skillfully maintained tactical control of his unit, permitting the battalion to evacuate almost two hundred dead and wounded and, at the same time, inflict heavy casualties on the determined hostile forces. By his marked courage, inspiring leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Johnson contributed materially to the success achieved by his battalion and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Denison, Texas. Home Town: Ashley, Illinois.

Johnson, James Kenneth

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 409 - November 12, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel James Kenneth Johnson, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as Pilot of an F-86 aircraft of the 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor wing, Fifth Air Force, on 17 May 1953. While flying as Element Leader in a counter-air patrol deep in enemy-held North Korea, Colonel Johnson sighted a MiG heading northwest and made an attack, scoring multiple hits on the left wing and fuselage of the enemy aircraft. As the MiG slowed, Colonel Johnson rolled around it, and called in his wingman who finished the kill. During the encounter, his wingman had been hit and lost all aileron control. Providing protective cover for his crippled wingman, Colonel Johnson drove off one attacking enemy aircraft and maneuvered away from others. Although dangerously low on fuel, colonel Johnson covered the damaged F-86 until they were safely over water, where his wingman bailed out. Colonel Johnson then proceeded to his home base, flaming out thirty miles from the field. By precise control and outstanding flying ability, Colonel Johnson was able to bring his aircraft in without damage. Through his high personal courage and gallantry in placing the safety of his wingman above his own, Colonel Johnson reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Johnson, J.N.L.

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army Korea
General Orders No. 481 - 30 June 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class J. N. L. Johnson (ASN: RA-14013766), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of the 24th Quartermaster company, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Sopa, Korea. On 25 April 1951, he was a member of a convoy which came under intense small arms and mortar fire from an enemy road block. Manning a .50 caliber machine gun which was mounted on one of his trucks, Sergeant Johnson remained in an exposed position and delivered heavy fire on the enemy positions, thereby enabling the infantry troops who were in the convoy to take cover and permitting the tanks of the convoy to be brought into position. After his ammunition was expended, Sergeant Johnson dismounted, drove one of the trucks to a tank position and while exposed to enemy fire delivered a supply of .30 caliber machine gun ammunition to the tank crew. Then, while leading his trucks to a position of cover, he observed that a vehicle had been hit by mortar fire and that the driver was wounded. Stopping his truck, he directed the removal of the wounded man from the vehicle, loaded him on one of the trucks and led the truck convoy out of range of enemy fire. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Johnson throughout this action reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered Service From Georgia.

Johnson, Junior

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 191 - 26 September 1950

Master Sergeant (then Sergeant First Class) Junior Johnson, RA44089095, Infantry, Company E, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 28 July 1950 near Hwaanggan, Korea, Master Sergeant Johnson volunteered to join in an assault on a hill from which the enemy was delivering heavy fire into the company area.  Having helped organize the group, he led the men boldly forward in the attack on the securely emplaced foe.  Inspiring his men by his example of courage and fighting zeal, and by personally neutralizing one machine gun, two automatic weapons and killing five enemy, he led them to route completely the hostile force.  Master Sergeant Johnson's outstanding valor and determination to overcome the enemy are in keeping with the highest traditions of the soldier.  Entered the military service from South Carolina.

Johnson, Laurence A.

Headquarters, 2ID
General Orders No. 507 - 8 November 1951

Lieutenant Colonel Laurence A. Johnson, 033361, Infantry, Headquarters and  Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. Shortly after midnight on 26 April 1951, the 2d Battalion was attacked by the enemy in the vicinity of Ilbisang-ni, Korea. So furious was the frenzied assault that the enemy troops succeeded in surrounding the battalion command post and in breaking through a portion to the defensive perimeter protecting this nerve center of battalion operations. Colonel Johnson, moving decisively amid the confusion of battle, called for artillery support which he adjusted with devastating effect upon the enemy, even though shells exploded within twenty-five yards of his own position. He then formed a relief force from all available personnel within the command post area and, repeatedly exposing himself to the withering hostile fire, placed them in advantageous positions from which their added firepower aided in bolstering the defense line grimly held by the besieged troops. Unceasing in his efforts to withstand the hostile onslaught, Colonel Johnson, constantly reorganized and shifted his forces to meet new tests of enemy strength, personally supervising the resupply of ammunition and assisting the evacuation of the wounded. Throughout the night-long engagement his calm resourceful presence enabled the battalion to repulse the enemy attack and finally compel him to withdraw with heavy losses. Colonel Johnson's brilliant leadership and personal gallantry reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Washington.

Johnson, Lyle I.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 209 - August 15, 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant Lyle I Johnson (Regular Army), Infantry, U.S. Army, Company L, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 4 June 1951 near Yongchon, Korea. The company’s mission was to secure Hill 205, stubbornly held by determined enemy forces equipped with automatic weapons and mortar. When the leading platoon was pinned down by intense enemy small arms fire, Sergeant Johnson was called upon to move his squad forward through the leading platoon’s position to eliminate the fire superiority of the enemy. Sergeant Johnson deployed his squad and rushed forward firing his weapon and throwing hand grenades, displaying to his men the necessity of aggressiveness in an attack. Although wounded in the beginning of the assault, he continued on to singlehandedly destroy an enemy machine gun position. This aggressive leadership materially aided in the success of the mission and was a source of inspiration to the men. Sergeant Johnson’s courage and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Minnesota.

Johnson, Merlin E. (posthumous)

Private First Class Merlin E. Johnson, RA11109347, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950, near Taip-yong-ni, Korea. The enemy succeeded in killing a tank crew of an American tank that had been supporting Company B’s position along the Kum River. After killing the crew the enemy then proceeded to use the tank against the position of Company B. At this time, PFC Johnson and two comrades took a 3.5 rocket launcher, while under cross machine gun and rifle fire, carried it 400 yards to a position about 50 yards from the American tank. Even though all these men were wounded when they reached this position they succeeded in knocking out the tank and denying its use to the enemy. PFC Johnson’s outstanding courage and his devotion to duty reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. (Johnson was listed as missing in action, and later reclassified as killed in action, on this date. See also: PFC James M. Carter and Walter D. Dusablom, both of whom were also killed in action.) GO 60, 25 Jul 1950Home or county of record: Hampden, MA.

Johnson, Paul N.

Sgt. Johnson Decorated In Korea For Heroism

WITH THE THIRD INFANTRY DIVISION IN KOREA—Sgt. First Class Paul N. Johnson, of Denton. has been awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action. The medal is the nation's third highest decoration. Sgt. Johnson, a son of Mrs. Franklin Johnson, of Route 1, Denton, MD, serves with Company "B" of the 15 Infantry Regiment, 3rd Division. The action for which the award was presented occurred November 23, 1950, in the vicinity of Majon-ni, Korea. The citation states that a patrol moving along a road was surprised and caught in a vicious crossfire from enemy positions. Sgt. Johnson saw that the lethal fusillade had caused numerous casualties and fearlessly exposed himself to evacuate the wounded from the scene. He then began to direct the patrol's counterfire and skillfully maneuvered two machineguns into locations for effective fire on the enemy. Sgt. Johnson made his way further down the road to contact a Republic of Korea Marine contingent for reinforcements. He led them back to the engagement where he directed the combined fire of both units and enabled the troops to force the enemy to retreat. He then led the patrol with its wounded through about 14 miles of enemy infested territory to friendly lines. Sergeant Johnson's courageous leadership and gallant aggressiveness reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service," the citation states. Denton Journal (MD) October 5, 1951

Johnson, Raymond K. (2nd award - 1st received in WWII)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 245 - 6 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Raymond K. Johnson (ASN: 0-1698177), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, Company K, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Kyong-Ju, Korea, on 10 September 1950. His company had withstood heavy enemy attacks for two days in spite of heavy casualties. Captain Johnson, completely disregarding his own safety, moved up and down the line of riflemen, placing them in position and directing their fire on the numerically superior enemy. At one time during the defense when his position was being raked by mortar fire he left his position of relative safety to aid in the treatment and evacuation of the wounded. Continuously exposed to better direct his troops he was an inspiration to those who fought about him. Captain Johnson's gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered Service From Illinois.

Johnson, Robert J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert J. Johnson (MCSN: 1051952), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. Assigned the mission of leading his platoon in an attack against a strong hostile position near Sudong, Corporal Johnson fearlessly exposed himself to heavy enemy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire as he led his squad forward in the assault. Although suffering from multiple wounds inflicted by hostile machine gun fire during the action, he courageously continued to lead his squad in closing with the enemy, occupying the objective and, after the position was secured, submitted to medical treatment. By his forceful and inspiring leadership, aggressive determination and heroic efforts in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Johnson contributed materially to the success of his company's assigned mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Council Bluffs, Iowa.

Johnson, Ross L.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 13 - January 18, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Ross L. Johnson (ASN: 0-59176), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 13 September 1950 while serving with Company LO, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action near Shindo, Korea. During two very severe enemy banzai attacks on the forward positions of his company which forced them to withdraw, Lieutenant Johnson, exposing himself to enemy small arms and mortar fire, moved to the forward positions searching for wounded that might have been left behind. Upon returning to his company's new location, he immediately reorganized his company for a new attack. During the ensuing action, Lieutenant Johnson was wounded and the company was again forced to withdraw. Voluntarily, Lieutenant Johnson remained behind to cover their withdrawal and, when forced to move by heavy enemy fire, followed in the rear of the company assisting wounded personnel, even though wounded himself. Lieutenant Johnson's selfless courage and outstanding gallantry in action reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Johnson, Victor E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Victor E. Johnson (MCSN: 0-34367), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commander of a Salvage Platoon of the Support Company, First Service Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces while his section was occupying a hastily organized and lightly defended sector of the Hagaru-ri perimeter in Korea on the night of 29 - 30- November 1950. When friendly troops ran down the steep slopes seeking cover from well-armed enemy troops who had driven them from their outpost, First Lieutenant Johnson fearlessly braved intense hostile fire concentrated on his sector to stand by one of his sand-bagged emplacements and identify each of the Marines until the last one had safely entered the perimeter. Skillfully throwing several grenades into the midst of the closely following enemy, he silenced their automatic weapons and averted a breakthrough in his lines. For several hours, he skillfully continued to direct the defense of his sub-sector, circulating among his men and encouraging them to greater efforts. His outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty were contributing factors in the success of the platoon in defending its position, thereby reflecting great credit upon First Lieutenant Johnson and the United States Naval Service. Born: Lakewood, New Jersey. Home Town: Nickerson, Kansas.

Johnson, Wayne A. (POW)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Wayne A. Johnson, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action during the period 12 July 1950 to 16 August 1953, while being held as a Prisoner of War in Tiger Camp by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Private First Class Johnson subjected himself to the risk of execution by his captors. He did so by compiling and maintaining a list of over 500 American POWs, most of whom had died in the camp system. Even when the Chinese guards were tipped off about the list and destroyed it, Private First Class Johnson able to convince his captors that the list was intended for humanitarian and not propaganda purposes, and was released with a threat of harsher consequences, should he continue this activity. Regardless of their warning, Private First Class Johnson continued to add names to a hidden copy of the original list. When he was released during the armistice, he smuggled his comprehensive list home in a toothpaste tube. As a result of efforts by the Defense POW/MIA Office, this list has come to light and is serving as an important document for providing confirmation of death or otherwise resolving open POW/MIA cases. Private First Class Johnson's exemplary courage and selfless determination to provide a record of deceased soldiers, even in the face of death by a hostile enemy, are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Johnson, William S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant William S. Johnson (MCSN: 1093068), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Noncommissioned Officer in Charge of a Mine Removal and Disposal Team of Company A, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 September 1950. Encountering a heavily mined area which had slowed up the advance of friendly elements operating against the enemy on Wolmi-do Island, Sergeant Johnson bravely led his team into the mine field ahead of the infantry and tank groups in the face of intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire and skillfully directed his unit in removing all enemy anti-personnel and anti-tank mines encountered in his assigned sector although lacking complete knowledge of their mechanisms. Under similar conditions of grave danger, he directed his team in removing all hostile mines from the causeway between Wolmi-do Island and Inchon, thereby contributing materially to the security of his battalion. By his courageous leadership, expert technical ability and inspiring devotion to duty, Sergeant Johnson was greatly instrumental in clearing the mine fields for the safe passage of advancing friendly troops and vehicles and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: McKeesport, Pennsylvania. Home Town: McKeesport, Pennsylvania.

Johnston, Dennis D.

Headquarters, 24ID
General Orders No. 13 - 8 January 1952

By direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action, is awarded to Master Sergeant Dennis D. Johnston, US55022829, (then Sergeant 1st Class), Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company K, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Inam-ni, Korea, on 18 October 1951. As his company assaulted strongly reinforced enemy positions, it met with exceedingly stubborn resistance. The friendly unit engaged an outpost at the base of the hill, driving the enemy back, and then advanced toward the ridge top. Upon reaching a knoll near the crest, the friendly soldiers were subjected to devastating enemy automatic weapons and grenade fire. Sergeant Johnston unhesitatingly exposed himself to the deadly enemy fire, charging boldly toward the critical enemy position and firing his weapon with extreme accuracy. He then unleashed a barrage of grenades and returned to friendly elements to replenish his depleted supply of ammunition. He advanced on the enemy bunker once again and destroyed it, thus enabling his comrades to continue the attack and ultimately secure the objective. Sergeant Johnston’s courageous action, tenacious determination and selfless devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered service from Leon, Iowa.

Johnston, John C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain John C. Johnston (MCSN: 0-25115), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 and 24 April 1951. When a numerically superior enemy force overran a small outpost on a high point overlooking the company's positions and the enemy pressed forward to set up their automatic weapons, Captain Johnston redeployed his force to minimize the danger and organized for a counterattack. Although suffering from a painful hand wound, he moved constantly along his entire company line, encouraging his men, directing their fire and personally delivering machine gun ammunition to forward positions. By his outstanding courage, aggressive leadership and unwavering devotion to duty, Captain Johnston served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the subsequent repulse of the enemy attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Knoxville, Tennessee. Home Town: Catawissa, Pennsylvania.

Johnston, Walter L.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Walter L. Johnston (AFSN: AO-2095970), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot of an H-19 Helicopter aircraft, Detachment 1, 3d Air Rescue Group, on 28 September 1952. Flying within twenty miles of the mouth of the Yalu River on a mission to recover a downed United Nations pilot, Lieutenant Johnston was advised that enemy aircraft were overhead and to turn back until friendly aircraft could arrive. However, he elected to continue on course. On arriving over the downed pilot Lieutenant Johnston displayed extraordinary airmanship to get the pilot aboard. Roaring waves which at one time struck the under side of the helicopter, endangered the operation. Further, the force disconnected the rescue sling from the cable, necessitating an improvised rope ladder to effect the pick up. Despite these extreme conditions, Lieutenant Johnston through his leadership and skill accomplished a successful rescue, saving a United Nations pilot from certain death. By his personal courage and devotion to duty, Lieutenant Johnston brought great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Jolley, Clifford Dale

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 495 - 1952 

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Clifford Dale Jolley (AFSN: AO-732008), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of an F-86 Jet Fighter of the 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 4 July 1952 in Korea. Leading a flight of F-86s protecting friendly fighter bombers in the Sakchu area, Captain Jolley sighted two MiGs and, positioning himself, damaged one of them before they escaped across the Yalu River. Later, Over Sinuiju, Captain Jolley was attacked by four MiGs, during which time he was wounded and his aircraft damaged. However, he regained control, destroyed one MiG that was attacking his wingman, and drove off another. A few minutes later, Captain Jolley damaged another MiG in a brief encounter. While proceeding out to sea he received a distress call from his wingman. Captain Jolley immediately made a 180 degree turn to his wingman's aid despite the face that he was wounded, and his aircraft badly damaged and very low on fuel. Before overtaking his wingman he was advised the wingman had headed safely out to sea, so Captain Jolley returned to a friendly island, bailed out, and was rescued by friendly aircraft. As a direct result of his superlative airmanship and quick thinking, one MiG was destroyed, two MiGs critically damaged, and he diverted a fierce enemy attack on his wingman in the second encounter of the day. Through his heroic gallantry in action against determined enemy opposition, Captain Jolley reflected the highest credit upon himself and the military service. great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
General Orders: Headquarters, Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 495 (1952)

Jonas, Henry F.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 317 - 5 August 1953

Chaplain (First Lieutenant) Henry F. Jonas, 01119072, Chaplains Corps, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June and during the early morning hours of 15 June 1953, in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, Company "E" attacked an enemy held outpost known as Hill "412". During the attack, the objective and all approaches were subjected to intense artillery, rocket and mortar and small arms concentrations. As casualties began returning to the lines, Chaplain Jonas, with complete disregard for his personal well-being, moved down the safe lane to meet and guide them to safety and medical aid. He moved about, giving comfort and encouragement to the wounded and guided blinded men to safety. Observing indigenous litter bearers wandering about in confusion, he organized them into efficient litter teams and led them to the casualties. One walking wounded had lost his steel helmet and Chaplain Jonas immediately gave his own helmet to the wounded man, continuing through the fire without this protection. When the wounded asked for water, he appeared with a supply and saw that each man had some, depending on the nature of the wounds. When casualties could not be evacuated by litter teams, he personally carried several men to the comparative safety of the lines. Chaplain Jonas's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from California.

Jones, Allan R.

Headquarters, 45th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 318 - 27 July 1952

Master Sergeant Allan R. Jones, US 55 052 118, Infantry, United States Army, Company E, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division is cited for gallantry in action against an armed enemy, near Tumyong-dong, Korea. On the morning of 12 June 1952, Company E attacked a disorganized but well-entrenched enemy on the crest of battle-razed Hill 191. As the third platoon began assaulting its designated sector, it was held up by a den of Chinese troops who were delivering accurate small-arms fire and hurling grenades on the friendly positions from the right flank. Seeing that immediate action was necessary, Sergeant Jones and three others volunteered to try to flank the enemy while the remainder of the platoon gave supporting fire to the mission. The four men waited until the rest of the platoon crawled into covered positions from where they could most effectively fire on the enemy, and then began advancing cautiously toward the hostile entrenchments. Suddenly, a Chinese soldier appeared only twenty five yards away, wielding a rocket launcher, and the four-man patrol dived for shelter. Sergeant Jones waited only a short time before he began a one-man assault on the viciously armed enemy. Circling the hostile emplacement, he patiently crawled through the still intense mortar fire toward the den of Chinese. When he was within ten yards of the hostile position, Sergeant Jones leaped to his feet and, hurling grenades into the well-entrenched fort, completely silenced the enemy position. During this daring maneuver, Sergeant Jones was wounded several times by shell fragments, but he doggedly continued his mission until the Chinese were killed and the platoon was free to continue its attack. This gallantry displayed by Sergeant Jones reflects the highest credit on himself and the United States Army. Entered the Federal Service from Michigan.

Jones, Donald R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Donald R. Jones (MCSN: 0-49868), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Mortar Section Leader of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. When rear elements of the company suffered numerous casualties from intense hostile mortar and automatic weapons fire while the unit was acting as rear guard for the battalion during an attempt to break out of an enemy encirclement, Second Lieutenant Jones unhesitatingly remained behind to assist the stricken men. Undeterred by devastating fire form the rapidly closing hostile troops, he coolly rendered first aid to a fallen Marine and carried the wounded man across a fire-swept valley and up the exposed face of a steep hill to a position of safety. By his outstanding courage, dauntless perseverance and selfless efforts in behalf of a comrade, Second Lieutenant Jones served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: Maywood, Illinois.

Jones, Edward E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Edward E. Jones (MCSN: 653143), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. When a large enemy force attacked the company's defensive position under cover of darkness, Private First Class Jones discovered that the bipod of his mortar had been rendered inoperable by the sub-zero temperatures. Realizing that the use of every possible weapon was necessary to successfully defend the position, he quickly dismantled the mortar and, carrying the tube and several rounds of ammunition, moved through heavy enemy fire to an exposed position on the line. Using his helmet as a base plate for his weapon, and cradling the mortar tube in his arms, Private First Class Jones delivered accurate, effective fire into the hostile ranks and, seizing a rifle after his mortar ammunition was exhausted, continued to pour heavy fire on the enemy until he was seriously wounded and was forced to be evacuated. By his daring initiative, valiant fighting spirit and resolute determination, he aided materially in the successful defense of the position and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Louis, Missouri. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri.

Jones, George Lamar

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel George Lamar Jones (AFSN: FR-4325A), United States Air Force, for gallantry and heroism in aerial combat against an enemy of the United Nations as Pilot of an F-86 aircraft, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 29 March 1953. While flying at 40,000 feet near the Yalu River, Colonel Jones, with his wingman, sighted two MiG's and made a right turn to intercept them. While making his move, four more MiG's were sighted in the formation, one of which moved under Colonel Jones in an attacking position. Skillfully maneuvering his aircraft, he dropped down and climbed under his would-be attacker. Utilizing his extensive knowledge of tactical gunnery, Colonel Jones closed to 800 feet and fired a burst that covered his target with hits, and caused a profusion of smoke and flame. As the MiG began to disintegrate, the enemy pilot ejected, as his flaming aircraft crashed to the ground. The tactical skill, and peerless gunnery Colonel Jones employed in attaining this distinction reflect great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Jones, Gordon R.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 215 - 24 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant Gordon R. Jones, ER17184520, (then Corporal), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company F, 38 th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Kunmul-gol, Korea. A numerically superior enemy had infiltrated through the front lines and had set up a road block in rear of the battalion. Sergeant Jones, who as company armorer artificer was located in the rear, learned that a number of seriously wounded, including his battalion commander, were forward and that the road block prevented their evacuation for urgently needed medical attention. Asking for a driver, Sergeant Jones volunteered to man the .50 caliber machine gun of a jeep and drive through the roadblock in order to remove the wounded. Fully exposed, he sped through the ambush area, firing his weapon in all directions as the enemy directed concentrated fire on the jeep. He thus traveled this hazardous route back and forth three times, picking up the wounded and protecting them with his fire until they had reached safety. His daring action was responsible for saving the life of his battalion commander and a number of other comrades. The gallantry and utter disregard for his personal safety demonstrated by Sergeant Jones reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: St. Paul, Minnesota.

Jones, Harley N.

PFC Harley N. Jones, son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul N. Jones, has been awarded the Silver Star, the nation's third highest combat decoration for gallantry in action. Jones has been a member of Company H in the Third Division's Seventh Infantry Regiment. The citation accompanying the decoration declares:

"On Oct. 4, 1951, near Paksan-dong, Korea, the machine gun section of company H was firing overhead support for the attack of company A's riflemen when an intense barrage of enemy artillery shells began falling in the area of the machine gunners. Jones, a gunner in the supporting section, observed a group of hostile soldiers approaching the riflemen from the flank. Although his section was withdrawing to more tenable positions at this time, Jones, with complete disregard for his own safety, advanced to a forward exposed position where he could obtain an open field of fire on the advancing foe. While enemy fire continued to fall, he inflicted casualties on the foe, pinning them down and enabling the riflemen to complete their mission. This voluntary and courageous action saved the riflemen from a surprise attack while inflicting casualties upon the enemy."

- Waterloo Daily Courier. Jan 7 1952

Jones, Jack Robert

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Jack Robert Jones (MCSN: 0-18117), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 10 November 1950. When the reinforced rifle platoon which he was leading on a combat patrol was suddenly ambushed by a numerically superior hostile force and caught in a murderous hail of enemy automatic-weapons cross fire, Captain Jones skillfully organized a defensive perimeter and exposed himself to the devastating hostile fire to move from one man to another, shouting words of encouragement and directing their fire. On one occasion, when an enemy thrust threatened to force a penetration, he rushed to the dangerous area, personally killing four of the enemy with his pistol and accurately throwing hand grenades until the charge was repulsed. By his indomitable courage, inspiring leadership and resolute determination, Captain Jones contributed materially to the success of his unit in fighting its way out of a dangerous situation with minimum casualties and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: October 18, 1921 at Eureka, Utah. Home Town: Elberta, Utah.

Jones, James E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal James E. Jones (MCSN: 1168557), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 25 - 26 July 1953. Although severely wounded during the initial stages of an enemy attack, Corporal Jones refused medical aid and fearlessly exposed himself to murderous hostile artillery, mortar and small arms fire in order to lead his squad in repulsing the vicious enemy attack. After personally supervising the evacuation of his wounded comrades, he moved through the devastating barrage of enemy fire to assume an exposed position in a weakened portion of the defensive line. When the communications line was severed by enemy fire, he carried out two trips through the entire trench line in the face of the intense fire in order to inform his platoon leader of the situation in his sector. On numerous occasions during the night, he left the comparative safety of his position and stationed himself in an exposed area to observe and adjust friendly mortar fire and to report its results, consenting to medical treatment only after the battle had ceased and his men had received proper medical care. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked fortitude and courageous devotion to duty, Corporal Jones contributed in large measure to the successful defense of his platoon sector and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Smithfield, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Akron, Ohio.

Jones, John H.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 86 - 2 April 1951

Sergeant First Class John H. Jones, RA33721420, Infantry, Heavy Tank Company, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 30 January 1951, in the vicinity of Wonch'on-ni, Korea, at approximately 1030 hours, the Heavy Tank Company was assaulting an enemy road block with twenty-seven supporting Infantry troops. Sergeant Jones, a tank commander, moved his tank to a forward position one hundred yards beyond a heavily wooded bend in the road to neutralize enemy fire coming from the north and from the west. Four Infantrymen advancing with Sergeant JONES' tank were taken under terrific fire from the two positions. One man was immediately killed. The enemy allowed the other three Infantrymen to group together in an attempt to recover the body of the dead soldier and his weapon, but then commenced firing with machine guns, rifles, and mortars. Sergeant Jones faced his tank to the west and ordered his crew to fire on enemy fortifications in that direction. He in complete disregard for his own personal safety, climbed outside of his tank and standing exposed to the enemy commenced firing with his heavy machine gun. He stood exposed in this position for more than ten minutes while receiving a terrific amount of small arms fire over the turret of his tank. The machine gun he was firing was hit several times, the ammunition box destroyed, and baggage fastened to the turret of the tank was riddled by enemy bullets. He remained in his position until the three Infantrymen withdrew to a safe position with the body and weapon of their fallen comrade. Sergeant Jones' display of skill and courage reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Maryland.

Jones, Lowell E. (1st award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 208 - 28 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry), [then Master Sergeant] Lowell E. Jones (ASN: 0-2212073), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Changyong, Korea, on 10 August 1950. The enemy, from positions on high ground was pouring deadly fire into Lieutenant Jones' company area, inflicting heavy casualties and threatening the entire Second Battalion. With utter disregard for his own safety he advanced through a hail of withering fire to an exposed position in order to locate an enemy machine gun imperiling the rear of the battalion's position. Observing the gun emplacement he directed the fire of a recoilless rifle into the enemy position until it was destroyed. His gallant actions were in great part responsible for the successful withdrawal from the untenable position and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Cushing, Oklahoma.

Jones, Lowell E. (2nd award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 245 - 6 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Lowell E. Jones (ASN: 0-2212073), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Anju, Korea, on 6 November 1950. A numerically superior enemy force attacking his platoon's position succeeded in breaking the line at several points and endangering the company's position. Realizing the necessity of holding the position he called for close artillery support. During the effective barrage which followed he moved among his troops insuring that they remained in the relative safety of their dug in positions. Completely disregarding his own safety he exposed himself again to direct the artillery's fire. In this action Lieutenant Jones was wounded. His gallant actions and outstanding leadership were responsible for the successful defense of his position, the withdrawal of the strong enemy force and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Cushing, Oklahoma.

Jones, Marion E. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Marion E. Jones, Jr. (MCSN: 660345), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 September 1950. Observing many wounded Marines lying at the base of a hill on which there had been a fierce assault, Corporal Jones voluntarily exposed himself to intense hostile fire to go to the assistance of the casualties. Procuring a jeep, he hastened to the hill, where he proceeded to evacuate the wounded, driving through heavy enemy rifle, machine gun and mortar fire on his way back to the aid station. Unable to obtain another vehicle after his jeep was demolished by a land mine, he organized a civilian stretcher bearing party, leading and directing it until all wounded had been removed from the danger area. By his daring initiative, outstanding courage and selfless determination in the face of grave personal risk, Corporal Jones upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Gadsden, Alabama. Home Town: Glencoe, Alabama.

Jones, Robert E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert E. Jones (MCSN: 335319), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with an 81-mm. Mortar Platoon of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 27 to 29 November 1950. Observing four hostile soldiers who had broken through the line and were advancing on his mortar position during a heavy enemy attack on the morning of 28 November, Corporal Jones instructed his men to continue delivering ammunition, moved forward despite grave personal risk and, obtaining an automatic rifle from a wounded Marine, delivered accurate and effective fire which destroyed the invaders. Braving intense enemy fire, he continued to man the borrowed rifle and repelled several hostile attacks on his position, thereby preventing an enemy breakthrough and assisting his mortar section in supporting the successful defense of the rifle company during its assigned mission. His quick and courageous initiative and indomitable fighting spirit throughout inspired those who served with him and reflect great credit upon Corporal Jones and the United States Naval Service. Born: Omaha, Nebraska. Home Town: Omaha, Nebraska.

Jordan, Byron L. (POW)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 139 - 21 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Byron L. Jordan (ASN: US-56075033), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Sangnyong-dong, Korea, on 7 November 1951. His unit was established in defensive positions when it was subjected to a prolonged savage attack by a numerically superior enemy force. Serving as an ammunition bearer for a machine gun crew, Private Jordan worked incessantly, in order to furnish vitally needed ammunition. Upon returning from one of his trips, he discovered that the machine gunners had been forced to abandon their weapon because of the dangerously changing situation. With complete disregard for his own safety, he unhesitatingly jumped into the emplacement and began sweeping the rapidly approaching enemy hordes with devastatingly accurate bursts of fire. Operating the two-man weapon by himself, he kept the hostile masses at bay long enough to enable his comrades to withdraw to more strategically defensible positions. When last seen, he was still holding his valiant stand, fighting with determined aggressiveness against overwhelming numbers despite the inevitable threat of being overrun. Private Jordan's gallant action, intrepid tenacity and selfless performance of a mission far above the call of duty reflect highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: October 17, 1929. Home Town: Alameda, California.

Jordan, Charles E.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 132 - March 12, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel Charles E. Jordan, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as Leader of a group of forty-four F-84 type aircraft, 58th Fighter-Bomber Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 8 December 1952. Immediately after taking off with his group on a mission against enemy bridges in North Korea, Colonel Jordan encountered very adverse weather conditions which would have justified his aborting the mission and returning to his base. Colonel Jordan quickly evaluated the situation and elected to continue the mission. Penetrating the far below marginal weather, Colonel Jordan demonstrated expert navigational ability, breaking out of the overcast in the immediate target area, which was at near maximum distance. Immediately positioning his aircraft, Colonel Jordan attacked, despite the accurate automatic weapons and heavy anti-aircraft fire in the target area, scoring direct hits with his bombs which destroyed a large section of one of the bridges. The danger of enemy aircraft being imminent, Colonel Jordan immediately proceeded to altitude with his flight to protect the remaining attackers and to coordinate the rest of the strike. After the two bridges had been destroyed, Colonel Jordan again exhibited superb navigational skill in safely leading his group back to the base. Through his outstanding professional skill, high personal courage and devotion to duty, Colonel Jordan reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Jordan, Lambert Aaron Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Lambert Aaron Jordan, Jr. (MCSN: 1300198), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. With his unit assigned the mission of maintaining direct support fire for the platoon while participating in a raid against a strongly fortified hostile position, Private First Class Jordan delivered withering fire on the enemy as the assault elements advanced up the hill to the objective. Fearlessly exposing himself to intense enemy small arms fire, he placed his machine gun in an open area and maintained constant deadly fire on the position to keep the hostile forces pinned down while his comrades cleared the enemy trenches, thereby greatly aiding the friendly troops in completing their mission with a minimum of casualties. Mortally wounded by enemy sniper fire while fulfilling this vital mission, Private First Class Jordan, by his indomitable courage, valiant fighting spirit and self-sacrificing devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 10, 1930 at Manila, Arkansas. Home Town: Troy, Tennessee. Death: KIA: February 3, 1953.

Jorgenson, Donald J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 60 - September 30, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Donald J. Jorgenson (ASN: RA-16300269), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company D, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 31 August 1950, near Changyong, Korea. On the night of 31 August 1950, during the enemy break-through in the Naktong River Salient, when his Company's position was being overrun by the enemy, Corporal Jorgenson voluntarily and in the face of almost certain death, drove a lead vehicle of the mortar section from its position, which was under the murderous enemy artillery, mortar, machine gun, and small arms fire to a road junction in the rear, thereby evacuating two mortars and their ammunition from certain capture or destruction. He then returned to the same position, which was still under devastating enemy machine gun and small arms fire, and drove to safety a second vehicle. By his cool leadership, and courageous example, he encouraged two other drivers to follow his lead vehicle, which resulted in all of the vehicles being returned with no loss of life or property. Corporal Jorgenson's heroic actions on this occasion were an inspiration to all who observed them, and reflected great credit both upon himself and the military service.

Joseph, Edwin N.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 16 June 1951

Captain Edwin N. Joseph, 028522, Artillery, Headquarters, 37th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 18 May 1951, in the vicinity of Chaun-ni, Korea.  Captain Joseph, while in a position he knew to be cut off by the enemy stayed in position firing many artillery missions, and aided his forward observers in their own missions.  Though under extremely heavy small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire, Captain Joseph went in search of his men to pass on the order to withdraw.  Not finding them in their previous location he assisted in removing the wounded from the area at which time he was wounded.  His vehicles were immediately brought under machine gunfire and he was forced to abandon them, thus halting his fire missions.  At this point, he brought his men through the enemy lines and safely into friendly areas.  The inspiring leadership and gallantry in action displayed by Captain Joseph reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New York.

Joyce, William K. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant William K. Joyce, Jr. (MCSN: 0-53838), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 - 7 September 1952. When his squad was subjected to an intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage while preparing to relieve an outpost forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Joyce skillfully and expeditiously assisted in calling down supporting arms. With an overwhelming number of determined enemy troops assaulting the outpost defense perimeter before the destructive barrage had subsided, he quickly combined forces with the unit he was relieving and established a perimeter of defense on the reverse slope. From this position, he effectively directed defensive fires, inflicting heavy casualties upon the attackers and hurling them back in complete disorder. Although painfully wounded by flying shrapnel, he refused medical aid until all other wounded had been attended. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous leadership and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Joyce served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Petoskey, Michigan. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Judd, John C. (posthumous)

Sergeant John C. Judd, RA27345269, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Co. A, Fifth Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by courageous action near Chuktoe-ri, Korea, October 19, 1951.  As his platoon moved in their assault on strongly defended enemy positions, it was pinned down by intense small arms, automatic weapons and machinegun fire.  Sgt. Judd, platoon sergeant, with complete disregard for his own safety, exposed himself to the murderous enemy fire as he moved into a foremost position to spot the enemy strong point.  In his advance, however, he was seriously wounded by enemy machinegun fire.  Even though he was suffering extreme pain, he did not falter in his mission but continued his advance until wounded a second time.  He then painfully crawled back to his platoon and told his men the location of the enemy weapon before succumbing to his wounds.  As a result of his heroic action the enemy machinegun was destroyed and the platoon was able to secure the objective.  Sgt. Judd's courageous action and self-sacrificing devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from Austin, Minnesota.

"A posthumous award of the Silver Star will be made to Mrs. Mary C. Judd, 311 S. Franklin, mother of Sgt. John C. Judd, who was killed in action in Korea Oct. 19, 1951.  The presentation, open to the public, will be in the armory at 8 p.m. Monday.  A Veterans of Foreign Wars color guard, two reserve units and the state guard will hold a formation in honor of Mrs. Judd and her son.  The Silver Star is the third highest decoration that can be awarded a serviceman and ranks next to the Congressional Medal of Honor and the Distinguished Service Cross.  Maj. Charles Knoblauch, Mankato, will make the presentation as the highest field officer in this vicinity.  Sgt. Judd is the brother of Verne Judd, 200 S. Chatham, and of Mrs. Katherine Burroughs and Mary Jane Judd, both of 311 S. Franklin." - Austin Daily Herald, front page, March 29, 1952

Jung, Gordon C.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 177 - 22 September 1950

Captain Gordon C. Jung, 01333221, Infantry, Company B, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  When the 1st Battalion was attacking on 2 September 1950 in the vicinity of Haman, Korea, a strongly fortified ridge in Company B's sector presented a formidable obstacle to the advance of the battalion.  Despite  intense hostile small arms and machine gun fire, Captain Jung led his company up the fire-swept slope in three successive charges which culminated in the rout of enemy forces and permitted the battalion to advance.  Throughout the biter two-hour battle, Captain Jung exhibited outstanding courage and leadership and so inspired his men that they were able to accomplish their mission despite overwhelming odds.  Captain Jung's heroic actions exemplify the highest ideals of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Ohio.

Jung, Walter (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Walter Jung (MCSN: 0-49172), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Fourteen (VMF-214), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 May 1951. Carrying out a close air support mission against a deeply entrenched hostile troop concentration in the northern Korea area, First Lieutenant Jung executed a daring target run through intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire and scored a direct napalm bomb hit on his objective, killing at least twenty of the enemy and forcing the remainder to withdraw. Mortally wounded during this bold low-level attack, First Lieutenant Jung, by his superb courage, aggressive determination and unfaltering devotion to duty, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 16, 1925 at Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Death: KIA: May 18, 1951.

Justice, Thomas McMaster (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Thomas McMaster Justice (MCSN: 1098516), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 15 - 16 September 1951. During a night-long series of furious counterattacks by numerically superior hostile forces, Private First Class Justice repeatedly exposed himself to hurl grenades and fire his rifle at the onrushing enemy. Emplacing his men within 20 yards of the attackers, he bravely maintained his hazardous position and succeeded in killing eight of the enemy before he himself was mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his marked courage, inspiring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Justice greatly aided his unit in successfully repulsing the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 1, 1930 at Springfield, Missouri. Home Town: Springfield, Missouri. Death: KIA: September 16, 1951.

 

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