Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "K"

 
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Kaczmarek, John A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal John A. Kaczmarek (MCSN: 1071916), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Crew Chief of a Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 17 to 21 September 1950. Voluntarily accompanying a helicopter pilot to rescue a carrier-based aircraft pilot who had been shot down behind enemy lines, Corporal Kaczmarek assisted the downed pilot in climbing aboard the hovering helicopter. On another occasion, he again volunteered to assist on a similar mission and, after arriving at the scene of the crash, immediately alighted from the helicopter and rushed to the aid of an injured fighter pilot. After helping the casualty out of his crashed aircraft and into the helicopter, Corporal Kaczmarek rendered first aid and assisted in making the injured pilot as comfortable as possible while en route to the hospital. His courage, initiative and concern for the safety of others reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Kaczmarek and the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Oaklawn, Illinois.

Kahaikupuna, Jacob B.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 267 - 18 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Jacob B. Kahaikupuna (ASN: RA-30107338), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Ign-dong, Korea, on 31 October 1950. During his company's attack on the village his squad was charged with protecting the right flank. Observing that heavy enemy fire was pinning down the company, he rose to his feet, secured his machine gun and advanced through a hail of withering fire to a position from which he was able to deliver fire upon the enemy. From his forward and exposed position he poured such a volume of accurate fire into the enemy's position that the defense crumbled and the company's assault continued. His unhesitant and fearless action was responsible for the successful completion of his company's mission and prevented undue casualties among his comrades. Corporal Kahaikupuna's gallant actions and devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Makapara, Hawaii.

Kahl, Leonard J. (posthumous)

Citation not yet found.

"A posthumous Silver Star award to Pfc. Leonard J. Kahl was made in a Sunday ceremony.  Relatives of the soldier who was killed in action in Korea Oct. 1, 1951 gathered at the Kahl home route 2 Glenwood when Capt. David Thyng, unit instructor of the Council Bluffs army reserve presented the award to Kahl's father Edward G. Kahl.  Pfc. Kahl entered the army in November 1950 and went overseas in March 1951.  According to a letter received from the first sergeant of Kahl's company, his death occurred near Chorwon.  "This battalion was attacking a hill above Chorwon when he was killed.  He was in the machine gun platoon attached to the rifle companies for supporting fire.  As his squad was moving forward they came under a heavy mortar barrage which caused his death."  Kahl's body was returned to the United States and was buried in Mineola cemetery."

Kakar, Abraham S.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 316 - 5 August 1953

Private Abraham S. Kakar, RA19426679, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 10 June 1953, in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, as contact with the enemy was made by Company "F", Private Kakar performed outstanding acts of heroism while under fire from enemy small arms, automatic weapons, grenades and mortars. Charging up towards an enemy held cave with grenades in his hands, under the devastating hail of fire from the position of the enemy force, Private Kakar hurled his grenades into the aperture of the position and partially neutralized it. He traversed an area exposed to enemy mortar fire to obtain more grenades. As he was returning to his initial position, an enemy mortar round exploded nearby. The fragments tore the helmet he was wearing from his head. Disregarding this completely, he returned to his position and proceeded to totally neutralize the enemy held cave. Private Kakar's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Arizona.

Kalinowski, Alfred M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Alfred M. Kalinowski (MCSN: 1179421), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 26 - 27 March 1953. With his platoon assigned the extremely hazardous mission of reconnoitering and harassing a vital friendly outpost position far forward of the main line of resistance that had been recently overrun by hostile troops, Sergeant Kalinowski repeatedly exposed himself to devastating enemy small arms fire and possible capture in order to harass the enemy, gallantly leading his squad to within fifty yards of the outpost trench line to deliver sniper and grenade fire. When detected by the enemy, he repeatedly withdrew to other positions to continue his harassing tactics which prevented the enemy from preparing a necessary defense of the outpost. Ordered to withdraw to the main line of resistance after eight hours of continuous action in the darkness, he slept for only two hours and again led his squad in a company-sized counterattack on the outpost. Skillfully maneuvering his unit through murderous enemy mortar and artillery fire, he reached a point approximately three hundred meters from the objective, where his squad sustained seventy-five per cent casualties. Although twice blown from his feet by exploding hostile mortar shells while evacuating his wounded comrades, he remained with his men until all had been returned to the forward aid station. Returning to the endangered area, he resumed his voluntary mission of evacuating the wounded until ordered to withdraw. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and aggressiveness, Sergeant Kalinowski contributed in large measure to the recapture of the vital position by friendly forces and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Buffalo, New York. Home Town: Holland, New York.

Kalmus, Stuart R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 503 - 30 October 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Stuart R. Kalmus, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action as pilot of a B-26 attack bomber over enemy territory in Korea on 26 June 1951. While the aircraft was still two miles from the target, enemy automatic weapons fire scored six direct hits, destroying two feet of the left wing tip, damaging the left engine and electrical system, puncturing both auxiliary fuel tanks, completely destroying the nose section and injuring the navigator. Despite the severe damage to the aircraft and the imminent danger of a fire, Lieutenant Kalmus continued on the bomb run and dropped his butterfly bombs on the airfield at Sariwon with excellent results. Upon leaving the enemy area, the propeller of the damaged engine ran away, necessitating feathering the engine. Because of severe damage, the aircraft was losing altitude from 300 to 500 feet per minute; at 1500 feet. Lieutenant Kalmus maintained that altitude by trimming the right wing low. He decided against bailing out because of the serious condition of the navigator, and proceeded to a friendly airfield. Upon arriving, Lieutenant Kalmus found that he could not contact the tower and circled the field twice on one engine before his request for landing was acknowledged. Despite severe handicaps, Lieutenant Kalmus made a successful crash landing without further injury to his crew. By his heroism and outstanding technical skill, Lieutenant Kalmus brought great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Kamanski, Charles W.P.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 152 - 10 April 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Charles W. P. Kamanski, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 10 December 1950. As pilot of a B-26 type aircraft on a low level attack mission against targets at Sariwon, Korea, Captain Kamanski displayed an extraordinary degree of determination, skill and courage. On his initial rocket pass, Captain Kamanski was painfully wounded and his aircraft severely damaged. Although completely blinded in the left eye by glass particles and streaming blood from face wounds, Captain Kamanski with the help of his navigator regained control of the aircraft and again attacked his target. He accurately fired his remaining rockets into the target in spite of a large hole in the cockpit windshield which caused a terrific wind blast on his face. Only after totally expending his armament did Captain Kamanski leave the target and fly toward friendly territory. His superior flying ability and bravery enabled him to safely return and land his heavily damaged aircraft at a friendly Air Base. Captain Kamanski's outstanding flying skill and extraordinary gallantry, despite great personal injury, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Kamin, Edward V.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Edward V. Kamin (MCSN: 1137851), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Patrol Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 January 1953. When the patrol he was leading to a designated ambush site forward of the main line of resistance was subjected to the fire of approximately 25 enemy soldiers, Sergeant Kamin courageously exposed himself to the devastating hostile fire and deployed his men to direct and control their actions more effectively. Although painfully wounded during the ensuing fire fight, he advanced under a heavy enemy small arms and hand grenade barrage and personally evacuated his point man who had been seriously wounded and was in danger of being captured by the enemy. Through his inspiring and effective leadership, the patrol successfully countered the hostile attack and inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy. After reorganizing the unit, he directed the withdrawal and personally led the covering force, refusing medical attention for his own wounds until the other casualties had been treated. By his outstanding courage, leadership and indomitable fighting spirit, Sergeant Kamin served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Maywood, Illinois. Home Town: Maywood, Illinois.

Kaminski, Raymond S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Raymond S. Kaminski (MCSN: 1331337), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 - 27 March 1953. Advancing with the forward elements of an outpost reinforcing unit when the group was pinned down by intense enemy mortar and artillery fire, Private First Class Kaminski stood in a trench line near the base of the objective in the face of devastating hostile fire and aggressively fired his weapon upon the enemy. In an attempt to gain fire superiority, he continued to throw hand grenades and fire his weapon throughout the action. Although painfully wounded, he refused treatment and evacuation to remain with his comrades. When contact with the enemy was broken, he assisted in removing the casualties from the impact area and subsequently covered the withdrawal. By his indomitable courage, aggressive fighting spirit and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Kaminski served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Providence, Rhode Island. Home Town: Providence, Rhode Island.

Kane, Eugene E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Eugene E. Kane (MCSN: 1201390), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Flame Thrower Operator of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. Severely wounded while his unit was engaged in the assault of a strongly defended enemy position forward of friendly lines, Corporal Kane observed another casualty lying in an exposed area and fearlessly crawled to the side of the stricken Marine in the face of intense enemy fire. Although sustaining two additional wounds from the hostile fire, he succeeded in removing his comrade to a covered position. When the stretcher group which was evacuating Corporal Kane was fired upon by an enemy sniper, he quickly drew his pistol and continued to fire at the enemy until his ammunition was expended. By his marked fortitude, courageous initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Corporal Kane served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.. Born: Norwalk, Connecticut. Home Town: East Norwalk, Connecticut.

Kappler, Lewis B.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 168 - 11 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal [then Private First Class] Lewis B. Kappler (ASN: RA-13282563), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 78th Tank Battalion (Medium), 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Yongsan, Korea, on 6 August 1950. During an attack, both the tank commander and Corporal Kappler, the ammunition loader, were severely wounded by enemy fire. Although painfully wounded in the face and neck by shell fragments, he refused evacuation and remained with the tank as its commander. Relieved of this duty, he continued to lend and direct the effective fire of the tank's 75-mm. gun. Through his courage and unselfish devotion to duty the encircled friendly troops were successfully brought back to the safety of their lines. His gallant actions although suffering severe pain, reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Kasfeldt, William L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William L. Kasfeldt (MCSN: 1151271), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Automatic Rifleman of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 June 1952. Although painfully wounded when the reconnaissance patrol became engaged with a large hostile force in enemy territory, Private First Class Kasfeldt fearlessly advanced with his fire team in the face of intense enemy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire to form a covering force for the evacuation of wounded. Refusing medical aid, he remained with the covering force for over four hours and repeatedly subjected himself to grave peril in order to draw enemy fire away from the evacuation party. During the withdrawal, he assisted in fighting a rear guard action and, upon reaching friendly lines, refused medical aid until all other wounded had been treated. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Kasfeldt served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Danbury, Connecticut. Home Town: Fairfield, Connecticut.

Kasler, James Helms

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 397 - 8 August 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant James Helms Kasler (AFSN: O-2221728/24551A), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Group, Far East Air Forces, on 15 May 1952. While on patrol in North Korea, Lieutenant Kasler sighted three MiGs and immediately attacked. He closed to one hundred feet and fired several short bursts, causing one MiG-15 to burst into flames. During this attack the other two MiGs had closed on Lieutenant Kasler, and he continued deliberately to draw their fire while directing his wingman so that he could destroy one of the attacking MiGs. The third MiG then ceased firing at Lieutenant Kasler and made one firing pass at his wingman. This maneuver permitted Lieutenant Kasler to fall in behind, pursuing the MiG at tree-top level through an extremely heavy concentration of ground fire. After a fifty-mile chase, Lieutenant Kasler was able to close on the MiG and destroy it. In employing these tactics of exposing himself to both air attack and heavy ground fire, Lieutenant Kasler and his wingman were able to destroy all three of the MiGs. Through his exceptional gallantry and keen airmanship, Lieutenant Kasler reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Kassebaum, Joseph S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Joseph S. Kassebaum (MCSN: 438299), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. During a company-size raid against two strongly defended enemy hill positions, Staff Sergeant Kassebaum led the right flank of the attacking force across a rice paddy and up the slope of the hill through heavy enemy fire, deploying his units in order that the final assault could be effected. After receiving the order to advance, he stood erect in the face of heavy and intense enemy mortar, artillery and small arms fire and, from his exposed position, shouted words of encouragement to his comrades, urging them forward in the attack. Upon reaching the enemy trench line, which was still partially occupied by the enemy, he discovered a wounded Marine and immediately rendered first aid before calling for a Corpsman. Although painfully wounded while advancing through the trench and killing the enemy to protect his fallen comrade and the Corpsman, he continued to direct his men in the assault until evacuated. By his outstanding courage, leadership and indomitable fighting spirit, Staff Sergeant Kassebaum served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sheridan, Indiana. Home Town: Warsaw, Indiana.

Kasterko, Walter Francis (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Walter Francis Kasterko (MCSN: 1015829), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. With his platoon forced to withdraw to a more favorable tactical position following a fierce counterattack by a numerically superior hostile force, Private First Class Kasterko voluntarily remained behind to engage the leading elements of the enemy group in close combat in order to cover the withdrawal of the platoon's outpost and the removal of casualties. By his courageous initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and unselfish devotion to duty, Private First Class Kasterko was directly responsible for the safe retirement of his platoon and undoubtedly contributed to saving the lives of three Marine casualties, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: May 5, 1927 at Johnston, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Johnston, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: December 2, 1950.

Katz, Lawrence S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Lawrence S. Katz (NSN: 2784189), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 May 1952. Hospitalman Katz, serving as Company Corpsman on a patrol deep in enemy territory, displayed outstanding courage and professional skill in the performance of his duties. Continually exposing himself to intense enemy automatic weapons, artillery, mortar and grenade fire, he calmly treated and evacuated wounded. Several times he shielded the wounded with his own body, sustaining wounds himself to save his comrades from further injury. He continued to treat the wounded until all had received medical attention, then assisted in their evacuation. His fearless initiative and selfless devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who served with him. Hospitalman Katz's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 22250 (August 1, 1952).

Kaufman, Alfred Leroy

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 35 - February 9, 19 51

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Alfred Leroy Kaufman (ASN: RA-57504747), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 19 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changyong, Korea. On that date, his company had launched an attack against high ground defended by well entrenched enemy forces. In the initial stages of the advance, the company sustained severe casualties. Corporal Kaufman, who was a cook, realizing that riflemen were urgently needed, left his safe position in the rear and joined the depleted ranks of his company. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his personal safety, he joined his comrades in a charge up the fire-swept slope. During the assault he killed four enemy soldiers at close quarters and was greatly instrumental to the success of his unit in overrunning the enemy positions. While engaged in the mopping-up operations which followed, he was killed by hostile artillery fire. The inspirational gallantry displayed by Corporal Kaufman reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.

Kauffman, John F. (1st award)

Headquarters 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 575 - 13 August 1951

Captain John F. Kauffman, 01341273, Infantry, United States Army, Commanding Officer of Company B, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division distinguished himself by courageous action near Sorak-san, Korea on 25 April 1951.  His company was in trucks and moving in a convoy as part of an organized regimental retrograde movement.  The convoy was suddenly ambushed by a well-organized and heavily armed enemy roadblock and it was extremely difficult to get the men organized into an effective fighting unit.  Although Captain Kauffman was wounded in the initial encounter, he succeeded in organizing a unit of about company strength from various units in the convoy.  He sent one platoon against the left flank of the enemy in an attempt to break up the roadblock.  As the platoon became pinned down by the intense enemy fire, he rallied the other members of his unit and personally led them in an assault.  Throwing grenades and firing his pistol, he personally accounted for one automatic weapon position and several enemy troops being destroyed.  Inspired by his actions, the members of his unit overran the enemy's position, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy.  He then deployed his men into positions that had the best field of fire.  As the friendly units had suffered heavy casualties in the initial contact with the enemy, this resulted in the opening of an avenue of evacuation for the wounded men.  He then assisted in administering first aid to the wounded men and moved among them instilling confidence in them.  Only after all the wounded had been treated did he allow himself to be treated for his own wounds.  At this time he noted a group of twelve enemy troops trying to infiltrate through his lines.  He unhesitatingly grabbed a box of grenades and intercepted them, killing or wounded all of them with his pistol and the hand grenades.  Captain Kauffman's conspicuous display of leadership and courage reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from Columbus, Ohio.

Kauffman, John F. (2nd award)

Captain John F. Kauffman, 01341273, Infantry, United States Army, Commanding Officer of Company B, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division distinguished himself by courageous action near Pangdangdong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951.  His company had the mission of attacking and securing an enemy-held objective.  As the friendly troops approached the enemy positions, they were subjected to intense mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire.  The platoon leaders and platoon sergeants were all wounded and evacuated, leaving the men disorganized and confused.  Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Captain Kauffman moved into a foremost position and, with complete disregard for his own safety, led his men through the devastating hail of fire to engage the enemy in clear combat.  Inspired by his fearless and skillful leadership, his men attacked with renewed aggression and captured their objective.  Captain Kauffman's courageous actions, exemplary leadership and outstanding performance of duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from Columbus, Ohio.

Kawahara, Masayoshi (posthumous)


Masayoshi Kawahara

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 88 - 13 February 1952

Private First Class Masayoshi Kawahara, US50000246, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 3 September 1951 in the vicinity of Mandeau-san, Korea.  On this date elements of Company L were defending their strategic positions on Hill 1181 against the attacks of a numerically superior and determined hostile force.  During this assault, Private Kawahara moved from one foxhole to another, shouting words of encouragement to the members of his squad.  Disregarding his personal safety, he continuously braved the intense hostile small arms, automatic weapons, and grenade fire to keep his squad a striking force. Through his fearless leadership all of the enemy's attacks were repelled successfully.  Private Kawahara's example of leadership and courage aided immeasurably to the successful operation for Bloody Ridge.  The gallantry in action and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Private Kawahara were in accordance with the esteemed traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from the Territory of Hawaii.

[KWE Note: Private Kawahara was seriously wounded in South Korea on March 15, 1951, returned to his unit on June 20, 1951, and was 27 years old when KIA in the Mundung-ni area, North Korea, on October 09, 1951.  Besides the Silver Star he was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster.]

Kaylor, Charles M. (POW)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles M. Kaylor (MCSN: 1109493), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When his convoy was ambushed by a numerically superior hostile force while en route to Hagaru-ri, Private First Class Kaylor bravely exposed himself to intense enemy fire and fired his carbine into the face of the close-in attackers from his position in the rear of the leading truck during a daring attempt to run an enemy roadblock. Exhausting his supply of ammunition, he promptly commenced a hand-grenade attack against the hostile troops, boldly retrieving the enemy grenades which landed within the vehicle and throwing them out before they exploded. Although painfully wounded when the truck was rendered inoperative by hostile fire, he succeeded in inflicting numerous casualties on the enemy before he and the driver of the vehicle were captured by the hostile force. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and forceful initiative, Private First Class Kaylor was greatly instrumental in saving the life of a driver and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Minneapolis, Minnesota. Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Kearns, John A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 234 - 24 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Armor) John A. Kearns (ASN: 0-1031183), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Pungong-ni, Korea, on 6 August 1950. During an attack his company was assigned the mission of supporting an infantry unit with small arms, mortar and tank fire. Soon after deploying his company in the village of Pungong-ni, the only available positions of relative safety and concealment, heavy enemy artillery fire shattered the buildings and set them on fire. Ordering his company to withdraw from the then untenable positions, he led it through the smoke and flames to an alternate position from where they could continue their mission of support. Realizing that one of his men had been left in the village during the hasty withdrawal, Captain Kearns left his position of relative safety, returned to the burning village and in spite of the intense artillery barrage still falling, sought out and carried his wounded sergeant to the relative protection of the company's new position. Although the enemy artillery by this time had located the company area, he remained in a dangerously exposed position so that he might gain the maximum observation and by radio contact directed the fire of his tanks. Through the accuracy and volume of his directed fire the infantry attack continued under the support of his company's weapons. His courage, unhesitant devotion to duty and superior leadership reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Army. Home Town: Jamaica, New York.

Keeble, Woodrow Wilson

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Master Sergeant Woodrow Wilson Keeble (ASN: NG-20711396), United States Army, for courageous action while serving with Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chuk-Tong, Korea, on 18 October 1951. Master Sergeant Keeble's company had the mission of taking and securing Objective "F," one of a series of steep, wooded, enemy-held hills. As he led the assault platoon into the attack, the enemy placed the unit under murderous automatic weapons and small arms fire, thereby halting their advance, and was on the point of securing the objective when the enemy counter-attacked. The friendly troops, being low on ammunition, were forced to withdraw. When the support platoon replaced them, Master Sergeant Keeble, with complete disregard for his own safety, volunteered to lead it into the attack. Advancing well ahead of the other men, he fired an enemy automatic weapon from the hip until it ran out of ammunition, and then continued to deliver marching fire with his own rifle. The platoon, inspired by his fearlessness, quickly overran the objective and forced the enemy to flee in wild disorder, leaving 15 dead behind. Master Sergeant Keeble's courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born in Waubay SD. Home of record: Wahpeton ND.

Keel, Clyde William (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Clyde William Keel (MCSN: 596471), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. Participating in a company-size raid on two strongly fortified and well-concealed enemy positions far forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Keel fearlessly charged up the slope in the face of intense enemy mortar, artillery and small arms fire, clearing out the enemy trenches and bunkers until he reached the top of the objective. During the withdrawal, he repeatedly ran up and down the hill to evacuate the casualties and personally carried some of them to positions of safety. From the base of the hill, he bravely led the evacuating teams across an exposed rice paddy, which was well-mined and faced with enfiladed fire, and then set up a perimeter of defense around the casualties until they could be further evacuated. By his aggressive fighting spirit, inspiring leadership and courageous initiative, Sergeant Keel was instrumental in saving the lives of many wounded Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: July 18, 1929 at Deming, New Mexico. Home Town: White Plains, New York. Death: KIA: July 17, 1953 - Buried at: Oak Hill Cemetery - Estherville, Iowa.

Keeler, John W.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 262 - May 26, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain John W. Keeler (AFSN: AO-811919), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy as a Pilot, 8th Fighter-Bomber Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 27 October 1952. On that date, Captain Keeler displayed outstanding airmanship and navigational skill in leading a squadron of twelve F-80 type aircraft through below marginal weather to a heavily defended troop billeting area southwest of Wonsan, North Korea. After sighting the target, Captain Keeler aggressively initiated an attack, during which his aircraft was hit several times by an intense and accurate flak barrage. Disregarding his own personal safety and displaying outstanding airmanship, Captain Keeler continued his attack, scoring two direct hits in the target area. When the squadron had completed its attack, thirty-five troop billets had been destroyed and an undetermined number of enemy troops had been killed. Captain Keeler then capably led the squadron back to the base, although his aircraft had sustained extensive damage from flak. Through his outstanding leadership and gallantry in the face of determined enemy opposition, Captain Keeler reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Keeling, William O.

First Lieutenant William O. Keeling, Battery D, 21st AAA AW Battalion (SP). On the night of 25 April 1951, near Uijongbu, Korea, during a powerful hostile attack, Lieutenant Keeling organized his half-track platoon to cover the displacement of friendly forces to more tenable positions. Although all the rifle elements had apparently passed through, he held his vehicles in place, despite the proximity of the onrushing foe, in the belief that others might still be at the front. His action enabled the rear guard of another platoon to withdraw to safety. Lieutenant Keeling's courage, resolute leadership and steadfast devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army. Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Keith, Page Larkin

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Page Larkin Keith (MCSN: 1174750), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tank Commander of Company B, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1953. When hostile forces launched a vicious assault against a group of outpost positions, Sergeant Keith immediately commenced to move his tank into its firing slot on the main line of resistance in order to provide supporting fire for the friendly troops engaged on the outpost. Unable to observe the trail through the periscope due to the darkness and the heavy dust caused by the intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage, he unhesitatingly opened the hatch on the turret of the tank to obtain better vision and direct the driver in moving the vehicle into its firing position. Despite the intensity of the hostile fire and many near misses on his tank, he bravely continued to direct the vehicle from his exposed position until he was mortally wounded while moving into the firing emplacement. By his outstanding courage, exceptional perseverance and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Keith served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 9, 1930 at Ralls, Texas. Home Town: Ralls, Texas. Death: KIA: May 28, 1953 - Buried at: Ralls Cemetery - Ralls, Texas.

Keleher, William P.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 116 - 24 December 1950

The First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel William P. Keleher, 035568, (then Major), Infantry, United States Army, Commanding 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 26 September 1950 in the vicinity of Namok-Tong, Korea. On that date, Colonel Keleher’s battalion was assigned the mission of seizing high ground against the determined opposition of well-entrenched enemy forces. The advance of the battalion was halted by heavy mortar and machine gun fire. Colonel Keleher immediately moved forward to the leading assault elements and made a personal reconnaissance of the situation. He then directed a rifle company to execute a flanking maneuver while he, shouting encouragement to his men, led another rifle company in a frontal assault. Displaying complete indifference for his personal safety, he dashed fearlessly up the fire-swept slope, leading his troops in a charge which drove the enemy from their defensive positions. As a result of his daring leadership, the battalion was successful in eliminating enemy resistance and securing its objective. The gallantry and inspirational leadership displayed by Colonel Keleher reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the fine traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Colorado.

Kelleher, Gerald C. (3rd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster) (1st, 2nd & 3rd awards received in WWII)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 294 - 24 May 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Silver Star to Colonel (Infantry) Gerald C. Kelleher (ASN: 0-310994/0-38750), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division in Korea. On 29 March 1951, while the Regiment was regrouping south of Chan-go, Korea, Colonel Kelleher organized a task force to strike an advance blow on the hostile force defending the village. Upon reaching the outskirts of the objective, he exposed himself to a devastating mortar barrage to lead a determined assault on the enemy positions. Advancing to the point of strongest resistance, he directed the movement and fire of his men so effectively that the enemy was thrown into a complete rout. Colonel Kelleher's exemplary courage, military ability and unremitting devotion to duty were an inspiration to his command and enhance the high traditions of the United States Army.

Kelleher, Gerald C. (4th Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 346 - 13 June 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Fourth Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fifth Award of the Silver Star to Colonel (Infantry) Gerald C. Kelleher (ASN: 0-310994/0-38750), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division in Korea. On the morning of 20 May 1951, friendly forces launched an attack on strong hostile positions near Kwang-song-ni, Korea. When devastating small arms and automatic weapons fire threatened to halt the advance, Colonel Kelleher moved to the front of the lead platoon personally to direct the assault. Reorganizing his force under the deadly fire, he led the way through bursting grenades to the objective. Engaging the entrenched enemy in close combat, he so inspired his men that they charged over the crest and drove the remaining foe into disorderly retreat. Colonel Kelleher's valorous leadership, indomitable spirit and exemplary devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.

Keller, Chester N.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 575 - 7 December 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Chester N. Keller, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action over enemy-held Korea as a B-26 Pilot, 730th Bombardment Squadron, 452d Bombardment Group (L), Fifth Air Force, on 16 February 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Keller flew under hazardous weather conditions to reach the target area of enemy troops and installations. Heavy ground fire damaged the right wing and tail section of his aircraft on the first rocket sweep over the target area. On the second pass, Lieutenant Keller received a severe head wound when his aircraft was riddled by enemy ground fire, but he refused to leave the area until he had obtained optimum results from his armament load. He personally destroyed one heavy anti-aircraft gun position, two automatic weapons positions and an estimated 200 enemy troops. Lieutenant Keller accomplished this despite persistent anti-aircraft fire, extensive damage to his B-26 and the pain from his wound. During the fourth attack, Lieutenant Keller's aircraft received a direct hit in the left engine which burst into flames and fell off completely due to intense heat and vibration. His technical skill and outstanding airmanship enabled him to control the aircraft long enough to reach friendly territory and make a successful crash-landing. The courage, relentless determination and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Keller reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Keller, George A.

First Lieutenant George A. Keller, a member of Battery B, B2nd AA AW Battalion (SP), displayed gallantry in action against on armed enemy in the vicinity of Singye, Korea, on 5 December 1950. On this date, Lieutenant Keller was proceeding south on the main line of supply in an M-19 self-propelled antiaircraft gun when he came upon an estimated enemy company, firmly entrenched in a village and the surrounding vantage points, attacking a friendly convoy. Lieutenant Keller organized elements of the convoy and deployed them as skirmishers while he dismounted and led the M-19 on foot against the enemy with the deployed troops following behind. In spite of the intensity of fire Lieutenant Keller immediately and with utter disregard for his personal safety moved forward down the road while directing the fire of his M-19 employing 40mm twin Bofors and a .50 caliber machine gun. The fight lasted twenty-five minutes. During this time Lieutenant Keller, still on foot, maneuvered his M-19 through the village and directed fire against the most concentrated enemy fire and positions. The heavy casualties suffered by the enemy as a result of Lieutenant Keller's act caused the enemy to disperse and prevented the remainder of the convoy from being ambushed by the enemy. His heroism and gallantry reflect great credit on the military service.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Keller, Robert P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Robert P. Keller (MCSN: 0-6855), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane and Commanding Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Fourteen (VMF-214) during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 November 1950. Assigned the mission of locating and attacking well-concealed enemy mortar and machine gun positions impeding the advancement of friendly forces in the vicinity of Yuha-ri and Ungi-gang, Major Keller boldly piloted his aircraft at brush top level in an attempt to draw the anti-aircraft fire and reveal their positions. After repeated efforts, he observed flashes of hostile guns directed against him and, immediately carrying out a series of attacks, personally scored direct hits with rockets and machine gun fire. Directing his strike group in a coordinated attack which covered the targets in a barrage of rockets, napalm and machine gun fire, he contributed materially to the success of friendly ground forces in advancing on their objective. His marked courage, skill and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: February 9, 1920 at Oakland, California. Home Town: Berkeley, California.

Keller, Stuard B.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 94 - 4 March 1953

Sergeant First Class Stuard B. Keller, RA16363695, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 32d Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Pokkae, Korea.  On 24 January 1953, Sergeant Keller led his platoon through heavy enemy fire and into the enemy trenches to engage the enemy in hand to hand combat.  Although wounded he ably directed his men until their mission was accomplished.  Then taking up a position from which he could most effectively hold off the enemy, Sergeant Keller provided covering fire for the evacuation of friendly casualties and the withdrawal of friendly troops.  Only after he had ascertained that all friendly troops had been removed did Sergeant Keller, carrying the last wounded man, withdraw from the area.  When he reached the bottom of the hill, Sergeant Keller, as a result of his own wounds, collapsed and was evacuated to the aid station by his comrades.  The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Keller reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Michigan.

Kelley, John A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 153 - 2 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John A. Kelley (ASN: RA-16308990), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery A, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy on 20 July 1950, near Taejon, Korea. During the withdrawal of Battery A from Taejon the company ran into an enemy roadblock leading into the city. Private Kelley who was driving an M-5 Tractor, went to the head of the column and pushed two burning vehicles off the road which enabled the convoy to proceed. About a mile farther an enemy tank was blocking the road and had its turret gun pointed perpendicular to the road upon which he was approaching with his tractor. Private Kelley with disregard for his own safety drove his tractor into the tank gun and disabled it to the extent that the turret could not be operated. The gallant act displayed by Private Kelley reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Rock Island, Illinois.

Kelley, Thomas W.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 156 - November 16, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Thomas W. Kelley (ASN: 0-61240), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company A, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy), attached to the 1st Cavalry Division, on 19 September 1950 near Waegwan, Korea. While furnishing fire support to an infantry unit, Lieutenant Kelley's tank and the lead tank in the column became disabled and immobile by intense enemy anti-tank fire. Although two of his crew had been hit by enemy fire, Lieutenant Kelley remained in his tank and continued to man all operating tank weapons in order to provide protective cover for the evacuation of the lead tank crew. Only when this had been accomplished did Lieutenant Kelley dismount from his tank and lead his own crew to safety. His disregard for his own safety and conspicuous devotion to duty under enemy fire enabled the other tank crew to be safely evacuated with a minimum of casualties. His gallant action provided an inspiring example to his men and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Kelley (Kelly), Virlen Elden (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 16 - 9 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Virlen Elden Kelley (Kelly) (ASN: RA-15427494), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Pyeru, Korea, on 14 October 1951. His company had the mission of securing a strategic terrain feature which was defended by an estimated battalion entrenched in well prepared, camouflaged positions. Sergeant Kelley, Squad Leader, led his men up the right flank of the objective. Advancing along the nearly veridical slope he directed the fighting, firing an accurate and devastating line of fire into the enemy hordes, and eventually forcing them to withdraw after a hard and bitter fight. As friendly infantrymen consolidated their new positions, they were subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage. Under cover of this barrage and heavy weapons fire, the fanatical enemy hordes launched a massive counterattack. As the weight of the charges reached overwhelming proportions, the order to withdraw was received. Sergeant Kelley voluntarily remained behind in an exposed position to cover the withdrawal of his unit. With utter disregard for his own safety, he ran to a fallen comrade's position and took his place at the machine gun, firing a deadly base of fire into the enemy. He killed 25 to 30 enemy troops and wounded many more before his position was overrun and he was mortally wounded as he was still attempting to protect his comrades. Sergeant Kelley's courageous actions, intrepid tenacity and self-sacrificing performance of a mission far beyond the call of duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: July 20, 1930. Home Town: Pikeville, Kentucky. Death: KIA: October 14, 1951.

Kellogg, Raymond H.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Staff Sergeant Raymond H. Kellogg (MCSN: 354988), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with the Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Mulsoeto, Korea, on 20 May 1951. On that date, the command post of the rifle platoon of which Sergeant Kellogg was platoon leader was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force, in an attempt to break through the position and reach United Nations installations in the rear. Sergeant Kellogg quickly organized his platoon and directed the defense of the position. Despite intense enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire, he repeatedly exposed himself in order to employ hand grenades effectively and to encourage his men. Through his courageous leadership, the attack was repulsed, and severe casualties inflicted on the enemy. The gallantry, initiative, and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Kellogg on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 176 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From California.

Kelley, Thomas W.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 156 - November 16, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Thomas W. Kelley (ASN: 0-61240), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company A, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy), attached to the 1st Cavalry Division, on 19 September 1950 near Waegwan, Korea. While furnishing fire support to an infantry unit, Lieutenant Kelley's tank and the lead tank in the column became disabled and immobile by intense enemy anti-tank fire. Although two of his crew had been hit by enemy fire, Lieutenant Kelley remained in his tank and continued to man all operating tank weapons in order to provide protective cover for the evacuation of the lead tank crew. Only when this had been accomplished did Lieutenant Kelley dismount from his tank and lead his own crew to safety. His disregard for his own safety and conspicuous devotion to duty under enemy fire enabled the other tank crew to be safely evacuated with a minimum of casualties. His gallant action provided an inspiring example to his men and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Kelly, Bernard T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Bernard T. Kelly (MCSN: 0-6697), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 August 1951. Assigned the mission of passing through the area of a friendly unit and continuing the attack against strongly fortified enemy hill positions, Lieutenant Colonel Kelly, while conducting his reconnaissance, was informed that it would be necessary for his battalion to cross an extensive, uncharted mine field, which had already caused many friendly casualties. To insure the success of his operations, he entered the mine field, reconnoitered and marked a safe route for the passage of his men. After overcoming this dangerous obstacle, it was necessary for him to ford his men across a torrential river swollen by recent heavy rains. Unhesitatingly entering the raging stream, he personally determined the most advantageous place for crossing, and then led his men to the opposite bank to continue the advance. Subsequently, in the face of withering enemy fire, he led his battalion in the attack against hostile positions, moving forward with the assault elements to coordinate his attack. By his inspiring leadership and outstanding courage throughout, Lieutenant Colonel Kelly contributed in large measure to the success of his unit in seizing objectives with a minimum of casualties. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Kelly, Carl (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 102 - 10 May 1951

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to First Lieutenant Carl Kelly, 02262336, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. On that date the 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry, was securing the withdrawal of a field artillery battalion along a mountain road while under heavy attack from the enemy who were occupying the high ground to the rear and along both sides of the withdrawing column. In spite of heavy enemy machine gun and mortar fire, Lieutenant Kelly reconnoitered the enemy weapon positions which were blocking the withdrawal. He then organized the driver and artillerymen, whose vehicles had been destroyed, into fighting groups and led them against the hostile positions. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he conducted repeated aggressive attacks, wiping out enemy forces and weapons which were trying to block the road and prevent further movement of the vehicles and artillery. Besides inspiring aggressiveness and instilling confidence in the groups of artillerymen and personnel from other units whom he led against the enemy, the conspicuous actions of Lieutenant Kelly served to center the fire of the enemy upon him. Although this fire became increasingly heavy he continued to expose himself in leading the assaults until finally he was struck by enemy fire and fell mortally wounded. The gallantry, aggressive leadership, and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Kelly reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Georgia.

Kelly, George E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major George E. Kelly (MCSN: 0-25155), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Operations and Training Officer of the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 and 21 March 1953. Assigned the hazardous and difficult mission of completely reorganizing and supervising the defense of a vital outpost which had been regained from the enemy after a savage and determined three-day struggle, Major Kelly fearlessly exposed himself to a devastating enemy artillery and mortar barrage to supervise the tactical reorganization of the key outpost. Although previously existing defensive installations had been obliterated by the surging battle, he skillfully organized his men into a strong defensive force and succeeded in establishing tactically sound positions. On several occasions, when hostile artillery fire caved in the sides of his trench and buried him in the debris, he managed to work himself free and continued his preparation of vital defensive positions. By his inspiring leadership, indomitable courage and gallant devotion to duty, Major Kelly contributed immeasurably to the successful defense of the outpost and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Allentown, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Washington, D.C.

Kelly, Hercules R. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Hercules R. Kelly, Jr. (MCSN: 0-48634), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Communications Officer of the Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yudam-ni, Korea, the early morning of 28 November 1950. When the enemy launched an intense assault under cover of darkness and pressed to within thirty feet of the battalion command post, Second Lieutenant Kelly quickly took command of a section of the headquarters and service company and organized a determined defense against the attackers. Although continually exposed to direct hostile fire, he maintained expert control over the entire section of his defense line and, bravely moving from one position to another, inspired his men in throwing back the enemy. By his marked courage, daring leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Kelly materially aided in preserving the security of the command post, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bennettsville, South Carolina. Home Town: Coronado, California.

Kelly, Walter J.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 192 - 26 September 1950

Sergeant First Class Walter J. Kelly, RA6982467, Infantry, Company A, 29th Infantry, United States Army.  On 18 August 1950 near Odang-dong, Korea, Sergeant First Class Kelly's platoon was serving as a wire party for an infantry battalion when the latter was attacked and flanked by the enemy.  Quickly organizing his men into an effective rifle team, Sergeant First Class Kelly led his unit, in conjunction with another platoon, in a spirited counterattack to attain objectives forward a mile and a half.  After withdrawing to battalion reserve for the night, he led them again on 19 August in another attack which, spurred by his personal example of courage and determination, was eminently successful.  Sergeant First Class Kelly's heroic leadership and will to fight to victory served as an inspiration to his men and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New Jersey.

Kelsh, Thomas F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Thomas F. Kelsh (MCSN: 0-54669), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 - 7 October 1952. Quickly moving his platoon forward of the main line of resistance to retake an outpost which had been overrun by enemy forces, Second Lieutenant Kelsh carried out a rapid and thorough reconnaissance of the unfamiliar terrain and an accurate estimate of the situation despite the handicaps of darkness and continuous enemy fire. Aggressively leading his unit in the assault of the position, he maintained expert control of his subordinate groups in the attack and, pressing his advantage as the assault progressed, moved his platoon through heavy mortar fire and neutralized enemy machine guns impeding the attack, successfully recapturing the outpost. Throughout the action, he supervised the evacuation of casualties to insure prompt medical aid for the wounded and actively engaged in grenade battles during the assault. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous leadership and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Kelsh served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Richmond, New York. Home Town: Richmond, New York.

Kelso, Jack William (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Jack William Kelso (MCSN: 1190839), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, from 13 to 15 August 1952. With the company engaged in supporting another company during the defense of a vitally important hill position far forward of the main line of resistance, Private Kelso carried out approximately twenty trips over hazardous terrain in the face of intense enemy mortar and artillery fire to bring urgently needed ammunition and supplies to the company and assisted casualties back on return trips. Despite the intense head and heavy enemy fire, he refused to be relieved and continued his courageous actions until he collapsed and was evacuated. By his resourceful initiative, marked fortitude and unyielding devotion to duty, Private Kelso served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Born: January 23, 1934 at Madera, California. Home Town: Caruthers, California. Death: KIA: October 2, 1952 - Buried at: Washington Colony Cemetery - Fresno, California.

Kendrick, John G.

Headquarters 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 167 - 16 June 1951

Sergeant First Class John G. Kendrick, RA39864143, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery A, 37th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Chaun-ni, Korea.  On this date Sergeant Kendrick was a member of a forward observer party helping to direct artillery fire in support of an infantry regiment.  The enemy launched a strong attack which forced the infantry to withdraw.  Sergeant Kendrick voluntarily and courageously elected to remain at his post to cover the withdrawal of the infantry.  In the meantime the enemy started an attack on the infantry battalion command post.  Changing the sector of fire to the enemy charging the battalion command post, he stopped the enemy attack long enough to enable the officers and men of the command post to withdraw.  Only after the withdrawal was successfully completed did Sergeant Kendrick, then under heavy machine gun and small arms fire, withdraw himself.  The gallantry and devotion displayed by Sergeant Kendrick reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Arizona.

Kennedy, Edwin L.

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 106 - 31 December 1950

First Lieutenant Edwin L. Kennedy, 062590, Infantry, Company "C", 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 29 November 1950, near Majon-ni, Korea, Lieutenant Kennedy's unit came under heavy enemy fire on a narrow mountainous road known as "Ambush Alley".  His unit sustained approximately 30 to 40 casualties.  When Lieutenant Kennedy was given the order to withdraw, he volunteered to remain behind to assist in evacuating the dead and wounded.  In spite of the intense enemy rifle and automatic weapons fire, Lieutenant Kennedy, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, organized the men to collect the casualties and personally assisted them in loading the casualties on vehicles.  The initiative, gallantry and leadership displayed by Lieutenant Kennedy reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Mississippi.

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Awarded Silver Star For Valor Against Enemy

The Silver Star for unusual display of courage in armed combat has been presented 1st Lt. Edwin L. Kennedy, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Kennedy, 821 2nd street, Gulfport, Mississippi, for his recent valor in action against the enemy in Korea. A copy of the citation was received this week from Korean headquarters for Kennedy's outfit, the 3rd Infantry, 15th Regiment.

The West Point graduate, who formerly attended Gulfport High school, received his star based on the following account:  The citation reads,

Kennedy's unit came under heavy enemy fire on a narrow mountainous road known as Ambush Alley, near Majon-Ni, Korea. His unit sustained approximately 35 casualties. When Lt. Kennedy was given the order to withdraw, he volunteered to remain behind to assist in evacuating the dead and wounded. In spite oŁ the intense enemy rifle and automatic weapons fire, the lieutenant, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, organized the men to collect the casualties and personally assisted them in loading the casualties on vehicles. The initiative, gallantry and leadership displayed by Lt. Kennedy reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

An account of other recent war maneuvers in which Kennedy has engaged appears in a copy of his outfit's newspaper, "The Front Line," which was mailed recently to his parents. Lt. Kennedy graduated from the National Military Academy in June and was promoted to first lieutenant. He was called into service to Korea on August 31. He was granted a leave following his departure from Korea during the Hamhung-Hungnam evacuation, and was able to telephone his parents from Japan on Tuesday night of this week. (Biloxi Daily Herald January 20, 1951)

Kennedy, Jack M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Jack M. Kennedy (MCSN: 384702), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 June 1951. Observing that leading elements of the platoon were pinned down by intense and accurate hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire, Sergeant Kennedy skillfully led his squad in a flanking movement, placing heavy fire on the enemy position. When his unit was subjected to withering hostile automatic weapons fire from two well-concealed bunkers, he directed his men to take cover and place fire upon the enemy. A brave and inspiring leader, he then led a fire team in a vicious assault against the hostile bunkers, neutralizing them by throwing hand grenades into the apertures. By his outstanding courage, resolute determination and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Kennedy contributed materially to the success of his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Glasgow, Scotland. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Kennelly, Robert t.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Robert T. Kennelly (MCSN: 0-55977), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 November 1952. With his platoon subjected to a hail of enemy small arms and grenade fire as they neared hostile trenches during a pre-dawn raid on a well-fortified hill position, Second Lieutenant Kennelly unhesitatingly exposed himself to the devastating fire to spur his men forward in the attack and, despite a painful wound, bravely continued to direct the unit, shouting words of encouragement while leading the group to the crest of the hill. During the ensuing action, he sustained a second wound but continued to direct his men in the assault. When overwhelming casualties forced a withdrawal, Second Lieutenant Kennelly steadfastly remained behind until all his men had left the area and, although he sustained another wound while en route to the main line of resistance, refused to be carried in order to permit the evacuation of other wounded Marines. By his valiant fighting spirit, courageous leadership and selfless efforts in behalf of his men, Second Lieutenant Kennelly served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Indianapolis, Indiana. Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana.

Kenyon, Eugene P.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Eugene P. Kenyon (ASN: RA-21270756), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Medical Detachment, Headquarters, (then attached to 2d Reconnaissance Company, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 21 September 1951 in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea. On this date friendly units were subjected to extremely heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire which resulted in numerous friendly casualties. Corporal Kenyon, with complete disregard for his personal safety, left his position of cover to administer first aid to his wounded comrades. He remained exposed to the intense hostile fire for a prolonged period of time treating men from both his own unit and those of the adjoining unit and in addition provided mental comfort which was so vitally needed by the many wounded. His outstanding courage and selfless devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who witnessed his deeds and undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades. The gallantry in action displayed by Corporal Kenyon on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  From Massachusetts.

Kerr, Monte W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Monte W. Kerr (MCSN: 1083464), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 September 1950. As the attacking enemy began to overrun his company's position near Kimpo Airfield early in the morning, Corporal Kerr observed a hostile soldier rushing a fellow Marine and, quickly grabbing his comrade, pulled his to safety. Fearlessly endangering his own life, he shot the hostile assailant twice at point-blank range and, engaging him in hand-to-hand combat, succeeded in killing the enemy. His prompt action, fearless conduct and indomitable fighting spirit reflect great credit upon Corporal Kerr and the United States Naval Service. Born: Liberty, Texas. Home Town: Douglas, Texas.

Kerr, Richard A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Richard A. Kerr (MCSN: 638504), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 February 1951. Assigned the mission of attacking a heavily defended narrow area leading to the company objective, Sergeant Kerr skillfully led his squad forward over the fire-swept ground and effectively deployed his men. When the unit was subjected to devastating enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire from concealed bunkers, he established the squad as a base of fire and personally assaulted the bunkers with hand grenades and rifle fire, killing three of the enemy and routing the remainder to assist the unit in advancing to the objective. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Kerr contributed materially to the success achieved by the company, and his selfless devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Kerr, Wayne H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Wayne H. Kerr (MCSN: 325372), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Headquarters Squadron, Marine Aircraft Group Twelve (MAG-12), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Korean Area on 8 November 1950. Voluntarily carrying out an urgent rescue mission from Wonsan to Majon-ni, Technical Sergeant Kerr flew a light observation aircraft which was unequipped for night or bad weather flying through winding mountain passes in darkness, thick haze and low hanging clouds, using a flashlight to illuminate his instruments. Reaching his destination after a flight of about twenty miles at tree-top level despite the constant threat of ground fire from the hundreds of guerrillas in the surrounding hills, he effected a skillful landing on a small hastily-improvised airstrip lighted only by headlamps of trucks and jeeps, picked up a critically wounded Marine and returned to Wonsan under the same precarious conditions. His skilled airmanship, loyal and heroic actions reflect the highest credit on Technical Sergeant Kerr and the United States Naval Service. Born: Canton, Ohio. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio.

Kerrigan, Hunt S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Hunt S. Kerrigan (MCSN: 0-55816), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1952. Volunteering to lead a reconnaissance patrol deep into enemy territory, Second Lieutenant Kerrigan immediately proceeded to reconnoiter an attack route for future use by his platoon. Informed that the point man of the patrol had been hit by enemy fire, he unhesitatingly advanced in the face of heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire to the forward point of the patrol. With his men providing covering fire, he crawled towards the stricken man and removed him down the slope of the hill through a withering hail of enemy automatic weapons fire. Although painfully wounded placing the casualty in a comfortable position, he refused to be evacuated and, in company with another Marine, remained in the area for approximately one hour to cover the evacuation of the casualty, fighting off several fanatical enemy attacks before he was subsequently evacuated to safety. By his inspiring leadership, courageous initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Second Lieutenant Kerrigan was instrumental in saving the life of the wounded Marine and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York.

Kerrigan, William E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant William E. Kerrigan (MCSN: 0-46501), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action while serving as Commanding Officer, Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Wonju, Korea, on 17 June 1951. Assigned the mission of assaulting Hill 907, then strongly defended by a well-entrenched enemy force, Lieutenant Kerrigan skillfully deployed his forces and led the attack. When the leading element was halted by intense, accurate, enemy automatic weapons fire, he quickly moved through the deadly hail of fire to reorganize the company and continue the attack. Inspired by their leader's courageous action, his men swept forward toward the objective, but again were forced to withdraw to positions of safety. When ordered to withdraw, Lieutenant Kerrigan repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire to assure that all casualties were evacuated, and that all weapons and supplies which could be of value to the enemy were withdrawn or destroyed. The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Kerrigan on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 178 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From New Jersey.

Kevin, Paul R. Jr.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 713 - November 13, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Paul R. Kevin, Jr. (ASN: US-56052248), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving as a member of Company H, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, on 23 August 1951, in the vicinity of Pis-ri, Korea. On that date Private Kevin's 81-mm. mortar platoon was attached to Company F which was holding positions on the rocky slopes of a strategic hill. The unit was suddenly attacked by a numerically superior hostile force, using artillery, mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire. During the heavy fighting that followed, one of the company's machine guns jammed, and was given up as useless. Private Kevin, realizing the pressing need for more fire power in that vicinity, left his mortar position and crossed the fire-swept area to the position of advancing hostile forces inflicting numerous casualties upon them. When the weapon again failed to function, Private Kevin defended his position with an automatic rifle until the enemy force was repulsed. The gallantry in action and devotion to duty displayed by Private Kevin on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Keyes, Charles L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Charles L. Keyes (MCSN: 669930), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 June 1951. Although severely wounded while leading his squad through a hail of hostile small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire in the attack against a knoll which was well defended by a strong enemy force, Corporal Keyes refused to be evacuated and continued to press the assault until the hostile position was overrun. After reorganizing the squad, he assured himself that all other wounded had been treated before allowing himself to be evacuated. By his outstanding courage, leadership and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Keyes served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Baltimore, Maryland. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.

Keyes, Edward B. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Edward B. Keyes, Jr. (MCSN: 0-46712), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observer of the Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 June 1951. Assigned the mission of searching for enemy artillery pieces which were delivering accurate and effective fire on friendly front-line positions, First Lieutenant Keyes, despite adverse weather conditions which necessitated flying the slow, unarmed aircraft at extremely low altitudes while subjected to withering hostile ground fire, fearlessly persisted in his search until he located two enemy gun positions. Although his aircraft was already damaged by enemy fire, he courageously dived low over the positions through heavy fire, located three additional camouflaged gun positions and, remaining in the area despite continued hostile fire, accurately adjusted friendly artillery fire which completely neutralized the positions. By his outstanding courage, exceptional skill and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Keyes contributed materially to the success of friendly ground forces and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bellingham, Washington. Home Town: Bellingham, Washington.

Khan, Ali M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Fireman Ali M. Khan (NSN: 7990389), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action when the U.S.S. Brush (DD-745) struck an enemy mine in North Korean waters on 26 September 1950. Fireman Khan distinguished himself by assisting in the removal of his shipmates from the severely damaged and flooded forward fire room, entering the space innumerable times, in complete disregard of his own safety. The forward fire room was in a wrecked state, filled with debris, smoke, fumes, fire, and in a flooded condition open to the sea. His repeated efforts resulted in saving seven men who had been on watch in the space. His fearless actions and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 4898 (May 20, 1951).

Kibler, Linn E. (posthumous)

Citation not yet found.

"The Silver Star medal has been posthumously awarded PFC Linn E. Kibler of Milltown [Montana] for braving heavy enemy fire to help a wounded comrade.  The son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Kibler was a member of the first cavalry division [7th Cavalry Regiment, C Co.] in Korea when he was fatally wounded last Nov. 11 near Kunu-ri.  The citation with the nation's third highest decoration for gallantry said Kibler "voluntarily and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, exposed himself to the deadly enemy fire to render emergency medical treatment to the wounded man.  Courageously, Private Kibler attempted to carry the wounded man to safety but in doing so he was "mortally wounded by the enemy machinegun fire." - Independent Record, 24 January 1951

Kiefer, Yale Sheldon (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Yale Sheldon Kiefer (MCSN: 1089515), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Runner of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 18 to 23 January 1951. With his company pinned down by enemy fire from a heavily fortified entrenchment while conducting a patrol mission near Chisa-dong on 23 January, Private First Class Kiefer promptly charged forward through a hail of hostile machine gun and small arms fire to an open area approximately twenty-five yards to the front of his platoon. After observing the strength and disposition of the enemy, he directed accurate and effective fire against the emplacement, remaining in his exposed position and continuing his bold efforts until he was mortally wounded. His daring initiative, aggressive determination and courageous devotion to duty throughout this period of intensive action served to inspire others to heroic endeavor in destroying the hostile force and in facilitating the completion of his company's assigned mission, thereby reflecting the highest credit upon Private First Class Kiefer and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 1, 1930 at Minneapolis, Minnesota. Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota. Death: KIA: January 24, 1951 - Buried at: Mount Nebo Memorial Park - Aurora, Colorado.

Kieferle, Ralph H.

Sergeant (then Corporal) Ralph H. Kieferle, Battery A, 3rd AA AW Battalion (SP), 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 6 December 1950 near Koto-ri, Korea, Sergeant Kieferle was on a mission to rescue a convoy that had been ambushed and was under a heavy concentration of enemy fire. Sergeant Kieferle immediately brought fire on the well emplaced enemy. In complete disregard for his personal safety. Sergeant Kieferle went out under heavy small-arms fire to remove a wounded man to cover where he could receive medical aid. Sergeant Kieferle then backed his vehicle out of a narrow mountain road and continued firing at the same time to allow the convoy to withdraw. Due to the coolness and leadership of Sergeant Kieferle, the mission was a success. The gallantry and intrepid action of Sergeant Kieferle reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Kiesling, Curtis James (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Curtis James Kiesling (MCSN: 1063170), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When enemy fire destroyed the vital communications line to a squad occupying an extremely important defensive position on high ground during a fierce attack by numerically superior hostile forces, Corporal Kiesling immediately left the command post and bravely ascended the dangerous ice-covered hill in an attempt to regain contact with the detached unit. Reaching the top of the hill, he boldly called down to his company commander to inform him of the enemy situation and while carrying out his search for the squad, was mortally wounded. By his marked courage, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, Corporal Kiesling served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 12, 1928 at Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois. Death: KIA' November 28, 1950.

Kilbarger, Norman M.

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Norman M. Kilbarger, 45034675, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for heroic achievement on 13 February 1951 while serving with Battery B, 15th Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. When our column was stalled heavy fire caused the personnel to take cover. After dismounting from the vehicle, he voluntarily returned to his vehicle and manned a .50 caliber machine gun mounted on the vehicle, returning the enemy fire. He made several trips to the vehicle returning to procure ammunition and spare parts for the weapon. During all this period he was in an exposed position and drawing enemy fire. His cool and accurate delivering of return fire destroyed at least one enemy machine gun and silenced the fire of several snipers allowing the personnel to remount and the column to move forward once more. The following night when the order to abandon vehicles was given, Sergeant Kilbarger stopped a tank and that was leaving the scene of the action and placed three wounded men on the back of the vehicle. He then placed himself over the wounded men in such a manner that they could not fall off and that he would be hit by any enemy fire before the wounded men. The act was outstanding in that all personnel had been ordered to take cover from the intense fire. He realized that unless the enemy machine gun and small arms fire were stopped our losses in vehicles and men would be greater and that our chances of escaping the trap would be comparatively less.

Killilae, Walter

Lieutenant Colonel Walter Killilae, Commanding 82nd AAA AW Battalion (SP), 2nd Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against on armed enemy on 30 November 1950 in the vicinity of Kunu-ri, Korea. On that date he was a member of the command group of a division convoy which was attempting to penetrate a roadblock which had been established by the enemy to cut of! the withdrawal of the division. The convoy was halted by intense hostile fire. Colonel Killilae immediately dismounted and proceeded on foot to investigate the delay. From an exposed position he directed the fire of an antiaircraft firing vehicle against an enemy machine gun emplacement. The fire destroyed the enemy position and enabled the column to continue. When the column was once more halted he again dismounted and, under the intense hostile fire which was raking the road, moved to the halted vehicles. Here he calmly fired his individual weapon on an enemy machine gun position, encouraging others to do likewise, until the enemy weapon and crew were destroyed. During the movement through the blocked area he displayed complete disregard for his personal safety as he directed the removal of wrecked vehicles which were impeding the progress of the column. As a result of his courageous actions, the convoy successfully penetrated the roadblock with a minimum loss of personnel and materiel.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Killilae, Walter (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

The First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel Walter Killilae, 025017, Artillery, United States Army, Commanding Officer, 82d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy from 17 to 30 May 1951 in the East Central Sector, Korea. During this period the enemy forces were fiercely and fanatically attacking the divisional front in an effort to breach friendly lines and destroy the 2d Infantry Division. Colonel Killilae found that his firing vehicles were needed in every part of the division's sector. He drove tirelessly from one end of the sector to the other to achieve the maximum tactical employment of his battalion and its tremendous fire-power. With complete disregard for his own safety, he traveled roads that were under observation by the enemy and under intense hostile artillery, mortar and small arms fire. His added duty as Acting Executive Officer of the 2d Infantry Division Artillery gave him the opportunity to check every phase of artillery operations and artillery gun positions. The gallantry, personal courage and contributions to the combat efficiency of all elements of his command displayed by Colonel Killilae reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.
 

Killingsworth, Lee E. (posthumous)

General Orders No. 46 - 20 July 1950

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Private Lee E. Killingsworth, RA18281743, Infantry, Army of the United States.  On the morning of 16 July 1950, the Second Platoon, Heavy Mortar Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, was in support of Company C which was subjected to a number of attacks by enemy infantry.  After a number of such attacks had been repulsed, the enemy succeeded in flanking the position of Company C and attacked between the rear of that organization and the heavy mortar positions.  Since the enemy was inside heavy mortar range, the platoon defended its perimeter position with small arms fire.  When the position became untenable, the Platoon Leader gave the order to withdraw.  Private Killingsworth, and three other soldiers, although unwounded and perfectly able to withdraw volunteered to remain in the platoon position and hold off the enemy while the rest of the platoon withdrew.  During the time the platoon was withdrawing, Private Killingsworth and his companions repulsed two assaults, killing at least nineteen of the enemy.  Defying odds of about thirty to one these soldiers enabled the main body of the platoon to withdraw and to take their wounded with them.  On the final enemy assault their position was overrun and all were killed. Home Town: Kuse, Oklahoma.

 Kimmel, Louis E.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 713 - November 13, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Louis E. Kimmel (ASN: 0-1317798), United States Army, for gallantry in action while Commanding Company B, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, on 11 October 1951, in the vicinity of Kongnae, Korea. On that date, Captain Kimmel was leading his unit in the attack upon a strategic and well fortified enemy-held hill. During the ensuing action the unit suffered heavy casualties and was on the verge of disorganization. Realizing the need for better control of his men, Captain Kimmel, with utter disregard for his personal safety, advanced to the most forward elements of the unit and led his men forward, personally inflicting numerous enemy casualties. Although the rest of his officers were wounded, Captain Kimmel successfully led his unit on to the final objective. After securing the hill he directed the establishment of a strong perimeter of defense for a possible hostile counterattack. His action and superb leadership were an inspiration to the entire unit and contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission. The gallantry in action displayed by Captain Kimmel on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Kincheloe, Iven Carl Jr.

Headquarters, Far East Asia Forces
General Orders No. 272 - 04 June 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, 09 JUL 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Iven C. Kincheloe, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as pilot, 25th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 51st Fighter-Interceptor Group, Fifth Air Force, on 01 APR 1952. While leading a flight of four F-86 type aircraft, Captain Kincheloe encountered sixteen enemy aircraft attempting to intercept friendly fighter-bombers, Captain Kincheloe quickly broke his flight into elements to engage the enemy, and boldly attacked although greatly outnumbered. He pressed attacks against two of the enemy, completely disregarding efforts of other aircraft to deter him. Displaying unusual aggressiveness, Captain Kincheloe severely damaged the aircraft of the enemy flight leader, forcing him to eject himself, and despite heavy damage to his own aircraft, attacked another and destroyed it completely. Captain Kincheloe's destruction of the two aircraft effectively broke up the enemy force and prevented their attack on the friendly fighter-bombers. Through his personal courage, outstanding airmanship, and devotion to duty, Captain Kincheloe reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Kindig, Jack C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Jack C. Kindig (MCSN: 1137312), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 June 1951. Corporal Kindig was assigned the mission of helping to lay down a base of fire to assist another platoon in the assault of a heavily fortified enemy hill position. While maneuvering into position, the unit was subjected to devastating enemy mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire, and he was painfully wounded and knocked from his feet. Despite the intense pain of his wound, he regained his feet, refused medical attention, and moved to an exposed position from which he could deliver accurate and effective fire on the enemy positions, materially aiding in the successful seizure of the strategic ground. His fearless devotion to duty and great personal bravery were an inspiration to all who observed him. Corporal Kindig's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 60174 (November 30, 1950).

King, Charley L. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 159 - 5 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Charley L. King (ASN: RA-38590812), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy on 11 August 1950 near Yongsan, Korea. While on outpost guard for his machine gun platoon, Private King was seriously wounded by small arms fire from the enemy who had infiltrated through the rice fields to within 200 yards of his position. Although painfully wounded and with the greatest effort he crawled back to his platoon's position to warn them of the impending enemy attack. By the accuracy and volume of their fire, the attack was successfully repulsed. In this gallant action Private King's wounds proved fatal. His exemplary actions contributed greatly to the defeat of the hard-pressing enemy and reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Born: August 26, 1923. Home Town: Gowen, Oklahoma. Death: KIA: August 11, 1950 - Buried at: Gowen Cemetery - Gowen, Oklahoma.

King, Leon A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Leon A. King, Jr. (MCSN: 663159), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 21 October to 29 November 1950. With his company completely surrounded by a numerically superior hostile force and subjected to repeated fanatical hostile attacks, Private First Class King, although suffering from frozen feet and unable to walk, dauntlessly continued to man his machine gun after the other members of his squad had been either killed or wounded. Placing accurate fire on the final protective lines and targets of opportunity, he succeeded in preventing an enemy penetration and contributed to the success of his company in maintaining an effective defense against the aggressors. By his indomitable fortitude, fighting spirit and his courageous and determined efforts throughout the furious action, Private First Class King inspired all who observed him to heroic efforts in defending the position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Carthage, Tennessee. Home Town: Carthage, Tennessee.

King, Raymond W. (1st citation)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 245 - 3 July 1951

First Lieutenant Raymond W. King, 01540868, Company "K", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 27 March 1951, near Hongbok, Korea, Company "K" was completely cut off from the remainder of the battalion by a superior enemy force. Lieutenant King, Weapons Platoon Leader, led his men in a bayonet assault on the hostile positions, completely routing and vigorously pursuing the enemy until the platoon came under intense automatic weapons and mortar fire from a ridge to the front. Lieutenant King, although in an exposed position on the forward slope, grabbed a light machine gun and placing fire on the enemy emplacements, drew fire on his own position, enabling a part of the company in his sector to withdraw to a place of safety. The complete disregard for his own safety, gallantry, and calmness under fire displayed by Lieutenant King reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Colorado.

King, 1st Lt. Raymond W. (2nd citation)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 576 - 26 December 1951

First Lieutenant Raymond W. King, 01540868, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 29 September 1951, Company "K" participating in the 3rd Battalion's attack on "Twin Peaks", near Chorwon, Korea, encountered a strong area of enemy resistance, resulting in numerous casualties to the unit, including the company commander. Observing a state of confusion and disorganization developing in the company, Lieutenant King, Assistant Battalion S-3 unhesitatingly made his way to the company through more than a quarter mile of terrain subjected to intense hostile fire. Arriving at the area, he immediately assumed command, reorganizing and encouraging the men by moving about fearlessly in the deluge of enemy missiles. The company's position again consolidated, he moved it forward and continued the attack. The exemplary gallantry, initiative, and fearless leadership displayed by Lieutenant King reflect high credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Colorado.

King, Walter S.

General Orders No. 80 - 1 March 1951

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul. 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority contained in Air Force Regulation 30-14, 22 August 1950 and Section VII, General Order Number 63, Department of the Air Force, 19 September 1950, the Silver Star for gallantry during the periods indicated is awarded to the following named officers:

Major Walter S. King, United States Air Force. Major King distinguished himself by exceptional gallantry in action on 15 October 1950 while piloting a B-26 attack bomber on a night intruder mission over enemy-held territory in Korea. On that night, Major King exhibited superb courage in demolishing a convoy which was heavily defended by small arms, automatic weapons and antiaircraft fire. In his initial attack, Major King destroyed five vehicles, despite the fact that the tail section of his plane was severely damaged by enemy action. In the face of continued intense enemy fire, Major King again attacked the convoy, destroying two more vehicles. As a result of damage sustained to his plane on this second attack, gasoline was sprayed over Major King's aircraft, and a serious fire hazard was created. Regardless of the dangers involved, Major King attacked the convoy a third time, demolishing the remaining vehicles. As he was leaving this scene of destruction, Major King observed a locomotive on a railroad track. Although his seriously damaged bomber was difficult to control, and the fuel supply was dangerously low, Major King destroyed the train was a direct bomb hit before proceeding to an air base for an emergency landing. The magnificent courage, relentless determination, and unswerving devotion to duty displayed by Major King on this occasion were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Kinney, Fay O.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 191 - 26 September 1950

1st Lieutenant Fay O. Kinney, 01686702, Infantry, Company A, 35th Infantry Regiment, United States Army.  At about 0400 hours 22 August 1950, near Haman, Korea, an enemy force penetrated between Lieutenant Kinney's platoon and the adjacent platoon, threatening to disorganize the friendly forces.  Although suffering from two shrapnel wounds in the back and white phosphorus burns, Lieutenant Kinney rallied his men and by his personal courage and steadfastness encouraged them to hold and fight until an orderly displacement to a more favorable position could be affected.  There they resumed the fight and inflicted heavy casualties on the hostile forces.  Lieutenant Kinney's heroic leadership and selfless devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Armed Forces.  Entered the military service from New York.

Kinney, John F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel John F. Kinney (MCSN: 0-5863), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Eleven (VMF-311), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 10 March to 27 July 1951. Responsible for welding his squadron into an efficient fighting team to provide air support for friendly forces, Lieutenant Colonel Kinney personally led strikes on enemy positions and, despite intense hostile ground fire, hazardous terrain and adverse weather conditions, aided his squadron in the infliction of destruction on the enemy. Spearheading a sixteen-plane attack on the hostile stronghold of Hyon-ni, he skillfully fought his plane in the face of enemy anti-aircraft fire and assisted in destroying five anti-aircraft guns and in damaging four others. His outstanding leadership, courage and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of personnel and logistical difficulties served to inspire his squadron in successfully completing its mission and reflect great credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Kinney and the United States Naval Service. Born: Endicott, Washington. Home Town: Endicott, Washington.

Kinseth, Arlis

Kinseth, Arlis L.

Headquarters, 2ID
General Orders No. 657 - 31 October 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Master Sergeant (then Corporal) Arlis L. Kinseth, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company E, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on May 18, 1951, in the vicinity of Chaun-ni, Korea. On this date, Sergeant Kinseth was a member of a rifle unit which was withdrawing to more tenable positions under heavy enemy small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. During the withdrawal, the rear column was subjected to accurate enemy machine gun fire, inflicting several friendly casualties. Sergeant Kinseth, without regard for his personal safety, immediately organized and led a frontal attack and successfully destroyed the machine gun and its crew. During this action the onrushing enemy force had encircled a number of his comrades, and Sergeant Kinseth again unhesitatingly returned to their approximate positions. Disregarding the intense enemy fire, he located his men and led them in a fighting withdrawal with a minimum of casualties. As a result of his courageous action the enemy suffered heavy casualties. The gallantry and outstanding leadership displayed by Sergeant Kinseth reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Bode, Iowa. (Kinseth also spent 2˝ years in the European Theater during World War II.)

Kinney, Oliver G. (2nd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster) (1st 2 awards in WWII)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 24 - 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Oliver G. Kinney (ASN: 0-32067), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. During the assault crossing of the Naktong River, Colonel Kinney displayed conspicuous gallantry in continually exposing himself to intense enemy fire in order to better direct his command in its attack. With complete disregard for his own safety he personally directed the attack, making the crossing with the leading elements of his battalion. His fearless example was an inspiration to his troops and aided immeasurably in their successful assault. Colonel Kinney's gallant actions and intrepid leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: San Leandro, California.

Kinsey, Edward D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Edward D. Kinsey (MCSN: 1103483), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of an Ammunition Platoon of Service Battery, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. When an enemy roadblock halted the advance of the regimental motor train on the treacherous ice-covered highway between Yudam-ni and Hagaru-ri, Private First Class Kinsey voluntarily manned a bulldozer which had been abandoned under the intense enemy fire and, although unfamiliar with the operation of the vehicle, succeeded in operating it successfully until he had cleared the roadblock. His daring initiative, cool courage and heroic efforts in the face of continuous small arms and automatic weapons fire served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Kinsey and the United States Naval Service. Born: Sheffield, Texas. Home Town: Houston, Texas.

Kipp, Kenneth Rumberger (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Kenneth Rumberger Kipp (MCSN: 513734), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Squad Leader in Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. When his company was pinned down by heavy hostile fire during his Battalion's advance guard action in sub-zero temperatures from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri, Sergeant Kipp climbed to the turret of a friendly tank and, despite hostile fire, pointed out targets of opportunity. Later, he skillfully led his squad to an enemy-held ridge dominating the route of advance, and overran the enemy positions. Observing that the leader of an adjacent squad was wounded, he immediately assumed command of the squad and directed accurate and effective fire on the withdrawing hostile troops. While reorganizing the squads and consolidating the positions, he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. By his courageous actions throughout, Sergeant Kipp served to inspire all who observed him and materially contributed to the successful accomplishment of his company's mission. His outstanding leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 15, 1925 at Millerstown, Pennsylvania. Home Town: East Petersburg, Pennsylvania.

Kirby, Phil H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Phil H. Kirby (MCSN: 830338), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 September 1952. When the patrol he was leading was ambushed by hostile troops, Corporal Kirby quickly ordered his men to drop back and, while engaging the enemy with small arms fire, skillfully regrouped and organized his unit into a defensive position. Although painfully wounded, he attempted to crawl forward to a seriously wounded comrade lying in an exposed position and bravely persisted in his efforts until forced back by the severe hostile grenade and small arms fire. Returning to his defensive position, he directed friendly mortar fire on the enemy which silenced a machine gun, a mortar and a rocket launcher. Maintaining firm control of his squad, he effectively directed its fire and assisted a Corpsman in administering aid to the wounded until the arrival of a relief unit. Refusing to be evacuated, he supervised the removal of casualties and assisted in positioning the relief forces into a defense. Before leaving the area, he again attempted to reach the body of his comrade and, although painfully wounded a second time, directed the evacuation of his unit to friendly lines. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Corporal Kirby served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pendleton, Oregon. Home Town: Pendleton, Oregon.

Kirchner, Charles A.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 167 - 19 September 1950

Private First class Charles A. Kirchner, RA17271464, Infantry, Heavy Mortar Company, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 24 July 1950 near Sanyang, Korea, a large enemy force penetrated the position of the company with which Private First Class Kirchner was serving.  Heedless of the intense, close range fire, he continued to direct mortar fire even when the enemy was within 25 yards of him.  Crawling to a hillcrest, he called fired within 60 yards of his already hazardous position; then he shifted fired a banzai attack, which threatened another area and broke up the enemy force.  By his conspicuous gallantry, great ability and dauntless dedication to duty, Private First Class Kirchner contributed vitally in saving the unit from being overrun and set an example worthy of emulation.  Entered the military service from  Missouri.

Kiser, Harrol

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Harrol Kiser (MCSN: 0-47874), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, from 22 December 1950 to 26 January 1951. With his platoon besieged by numerically superior hostile forces while fighting a rear guard action covering the reorganization of the company during its return to the battalion perimeter near Chisa-don, on 25 January, First Lieutenant Kiser boldly led his men in repulsing numerous fanatical enemy attacks. Although painfully wounded, he continually exposed himself to hostile fire to direct and supervise his unit, shouting words of encouragement to the men and helping to remove the casualties to a position of comparative safety. Through his daring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, he contributed materially to the success of his platoon in infliction of severe losses upon the enemy, thereby enabling his company to reach the battalion perimeter with a minimum of casualties. By his marked courage, fortitude and steadfast devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Kiser served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Eureka, Texas. Home Town: Denver City, Texas.

Kiser, Virgil L.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 13 -  January 18, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant [then Private First Class] Virgil L. Kiser (ASN: RA-15274713), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 25 July 1950, while serving with Company A, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action near Yongdong, Korea. During repeated attacks by numerically superior enemy forces on his company position, Sergeant Kiser was acting as forward observer for the mortar section of the weapons platoon. When all heavy weapons ammunition was expended, Sergeant Kiser volunteered to move through the heavy enemy mortar and machine gun fire to carry ammunition and hand grenades from the company supply dump to the forward elements. Disregarding his own safety, he continued his dangerous trips, at times fighting off the enemy with hand grenades, until all ammunition was exhausted and the company was ordered to withdraw. During the withdrawal, Sergeant Kiser organized stretcher bearers, assisted in the care of the wounded and helped evacuate them to safety. His selfless actions and devotion to duty enabled many wounded comrades to be safely evacuated and was an inspiration to all members of his company. Sergeant Kiser's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Kiss, Frank R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Frank R. Kiss (MCSN: 1178225), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 February 1953. While transporting wounded Marines from a forward area to an aid station in the rear, Corporal Kiss voluntarily remained on the exposed part of the tank to insure the safety of the casualties. When an estimated two squads of enemy infantry ambushed the tank, he courageously prostrated himself over the bodies of the wounded while passing through the ambush in an effort to shield the casualties from the enemy fire. Although painfully wounded, he steadfastly remained in his position to protect his comrades. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and indomitable fortitude in the face of extreme peril, Corporal Kiss served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Queens Village, New York.

Kissinger, George K.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman George K. Kissinger (NSN: 4288390), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 February 1953. Serving as a Platoon Corpsman, Hospitalman Kissinger displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the unit of which he was a member was engaged in fortifying a position on the mail line of resistance, they were subjected to devastating artillery fire. During the barrage, one of the Marines was mortally wounded and two others severely injured. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he fearlessly rushed over two hundred yards of open terrain and reached one of the stricken men. Although painfully wounded, he courageously administered aid to his injured comrade and then assisted in the evacuation. Refusing medical treatment, he returned to the exposed area to assure that there were no more casualties in need of aid. Only with the knowledge that his assistance was no longer urgently needed did he submit to treatment of his wounds. Hospitalman Kissinger's gallant and courageous actions together with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 18337 (May 30, 1953).

Kitchen, Milton S.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 208 - 28 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Milton S. Kitchen (ASN: 0-2262106), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Songju, Korea, on 24 September 1950. During an attack on a well defended enemy hilltop position, his platoon was temporarily halted by the intense hostile machine gun, mortar and anti-tank fire. Organizing a small group of men near his position, Lieutenant Kitchen led the attack against the concealed enemy, delivered effective small arms fire into their positions and successfully eliminated the harassing fire. Through his courage and superior leadership, the company gained its objective with a minimum of casualties. His gallantry and unhesitant devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Sand Springs, Oklahoma.

Kitchens, William M. Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class William M. Kitchens, Jr. (MCSN: 658413), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Assistant Gunner in a Machine Gun Squad of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. When a numerically superior enemy force penetrated several sectors of the line and gained positions on three sides of his platoon in a sudden, vicious onslaught, Private First Class Kitchens unhesitatingly volunteered to cross an open fire-swept area to obtain ammunition for the machine guns when the supply became low. Braving the heavy small arms, grenade and machine gun fire, he seized the ammunition and brought it back to his squad. Later in the action when the supply became almost depleted, he again crossed the fire-swept area to obtain replenishments and, on the return trip, encountered and annihilated four enemy soldiers. Mortally wounded as he delivered the ammunition, Private First Class Kitchens, by his bold initiative, great personal valor and heroic actions at great risk to his own life, contributed immeasurably to the repulsing of the enemy attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: July 8, 1929 at Asheville, North Carolina. Home Town: Asheville, North Carolina. Death: November 29, 1950 - Buried at: Calvary Episcopal Church Cemetery - Fletcher, North Carolina.

Klan, William F.X.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal William F. X. Klan (MCSN: 4069908), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader and Platoon Guide of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 and 14 September 1951. Observing a wounded man lying in an exposed area during an assault against a heavily fortified enemy hill position, Corporal Klan bravely rushed forward through a hail of hostile fire and carried the casualty to safety. Locating another wounded Marine lying in an unsheltered position, he again made his way forward, carried the stricken man to safety and, despite a serious wound in the leg, refused evacuation in order to remain with his unit. Although seriously wounded a second time on the following day, Corporal Klan, keenly aware of the shortage of leaders, insisted on remaining with his outfit and skillfully organized his squad in the defense of the positions seized from the enemy. Wounded a third time by an enemy sniper while assisting other casualties to the rear after his evacuation had been ordered, Corporal Klan, by his outstanding courage, exceptional fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, served to inspire all who observed him and contributed immeasurably to the success of the attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Bronx, New York.

Klein, Delbert W. Sr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Delbert W. Klein, Sr. (MCSN: 1027681), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. When the unit was subjected to murderous enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire during the attack on a strongly fortified hill position, Sergeant Klein remained exposed to the heavy fire to assist in directing the attack which completely routed the entrenched hostile force. Courageously leading two squads in a physical pursuit of the fleeing enemy, he secured a further position and supervised its consolidation. Although painfully wounded by enemy grenade fragments, he refused medical treatment and directed the establishment of the defense and the evacuation of casualties until he, himself, was ordered to be evacuated. By his aggressive leadership, daring initiative and steadfast devotion to duty, Sergeant Klein served to inspire all who observed him and materially aided in the success of the company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: North Vernon, Indiana. Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana.

Kliefoth, George C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant George C. Kliefoth (MCSN: 0-49460), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. With his company assigned the mission of securing a hill vital to the safety of the division supply route, First Lieutenant Kliefoth spearheaded the assault with his platoon and, upon reaching the crest of the hill, was pinned down by intense fire from small arms and machine guns. Realizing the seriousness of the situation and the importance of prompt action, he immediately exposed himself to the blistering fire to enable the remainder of the platoon to move forward and destroy the enemy troops. By his daring initiative, superb combat tactics and courageous actions in the face of grave peril, First Lieutenant Kliefoth served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bloomington, Illinois. Home Town: Janesville, Wisconsin.

Knecht, Edward D. Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Technical Sergeant Edward D. Knecht, Jr. (MCSN: 612575), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Patrol Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 July 1952. When his patrol was subjected to intense mortar and small arms fire from a large hostile force while reconnoitering an enemy outpost in an attempt to capture prisoners, Technical Sergeant Knecht immediately set up a base of counterfire to cover the assault element of his unit. Undeterred by the heavy hostile fire, he constantly exposed himself to the enemy to check his men's positions, direct their fire and administer first aid to the wounded. Placing himself at the rear of the patrol during its redeployment, he fearlessly directed covering fire for the movement until he was instantly killed by a hostile mortar shell. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and selfless devotion to duty, Technical Sergeant Knecht was greatly instrumental in saving the lives of several of his comrades and contributed materially to the patrol's safe return to friendly lines, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 10, 1928 at Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: July 3, 1952 - Buried at: East Wildwood Cemetery - Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

Knier, Aloysius M.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 89 - September 12, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Chaplain) Aloysius M. Knier (ASN: 0-931958), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Company, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy at Kunchon, Korea, on 2 August 1950. During the early morning hours, Chaplain Knier's unit was engaged with the enemy who were attempting to gain control of a main supply route. With complete disregard for personal safety Chaplain Knier made two trips across open ground which was under intense enemy automatic weapons fire to save two medical vehicles from the enemy. He then assisted in the evacuation of the wounded while under enemy fire. All wounded were evacuated safely, largely through his untiring effort and devotion to duty. Chaplain Knier's courageous actions in the face of enemy fire inspired the men of his unit and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Knight, Patrick D.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 51 - 25 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class [then Sergeant] Patrick D. Knight (ASN: US-55060191), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, near Chuktae-ri, Korea, on 20 October 1951. His company had the mission of attacking and securing an enemy-held objective. Sergeant Knight, Platoon Sergeant, led his men forward but as they reached the base of the hill, they were subjected to an intensely concentrated enemy mortar barrage and became pinned down by automatic weapons crossfire. Realizing the need for immediate action, Sergeant Knight charged the first enemy position, firing his weapon with devastating accuracy, and destroyed it with hand grenades, killing its five occupants. He continued his advance to the first emplacement but finding it impossible to approach within throwing distance, he circled the position. With concussion grenades jarring the ground all around him, he crawled to the bunker and as he came directly below it, armed a grenade and tossed it into the position, killing the enemy troops inside. With these key positions destroyed, the mission was completed with a minimum of casualties. Sergeant Knight's courageous actions, exemplary leadership and selfless performance of duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: East Chicago, Indiana.

Knox, Charles Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Charles Knox, Jr. (MCSN: 456334), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy, while serving with Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), FIRST Marine Aircraft Wing, at Kosan-ni, Korea. On 13 June 1951, Technical Sergeant Knox volunteered his services as Crew Chief and hoist operator on a rescue mission eighty miles behind enemy lines in a vulnerable, unarmed helicopter. The area in which the downed pilot was located was known to be infested with enemy troops of field army strength and was at such an extreme range that if any time was lost by the helicopter in locating the stranded aviator, there would not be sufficient fuel to allow it to return to its base. Fully cognizant of all the above facts, Technical Sergeant Knox unhesitatingly volunteered to act as hoist operator and crew chief on the helicopter assigned to his singularly hazardous mission. Upon reaching the area where the Marine aviator had reportedly gone down, it was necessary for the helicopter to search for twenty minutes before locating him. Because of the dense foliage, the aircraft was forced to hover at tree-top height, while Technical Sergeant Knox, exercising great skill lowered the hoist cable to the downed aviator. The difficulty of this operation required several attempts in the face of enemy fire. Finally, by skill, efficiency, and complete disregard for his personal safety, Technical Sergeant Knox succeeded in bringing the downed Marine aviator aboard, and a safe landing was subsequently made on a United States Navy ship just before the helicopter's fuel supply was exhausted. Technical Sergeant Knox's conspicuous gallantry, initiative, and tenacious desire to save the downed Marine pilot was exemplary and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing: Serial 8138 (September 4, 1951).

Knudtson, Paul W.

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant First Class Paul W. Knudtson, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Tank Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, for gallantry in action 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea.  On that date, Sergeant Knudtson was a tank commander of a tank platoon engaged jointly in the regimental security platoon in an effort to penetrate hostile lines in order to effect a linkup with the friendly forces encircled by the enemy.  The tank force was suddenly confronted by approximately 400 enemy seemingly expressing the desire to surrender by waving white flags.  When the ruse was discovered, a fierce firefight ensued.  The tank of the platoon leader received a direct hit which overturned the tank and pinned the platoon leader underneath the gun.  Sergeant Knudtson immediately moved his tank into position to cover his platoon leader and the withdrawal of the tank force from the trap.  In utter defiance of the close proximity of the enemy and the heavy fire all around him, he repeatedly dismounted from his tank to rescue wounded and to direct their removal to safety.  As both the security platoon leaders had fallen casualties, Sergeant Knudtson resolutely assumed command of the tank force and directed it in extricating itself from the trap with a minimum of casualties.  The gallantry in action demonstrated by Sergeant Knudtson reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Home of record: Eagle Grove and Humboldt, Iowa.

Koehler, Walter T. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Walter T. Koehler, Army Medical Service, United States Army, an aidman with Medical Company, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Koyangdae, Korea, on 28 July 1952. His unit manning a forward outpost on high ground, came under fierce attack from three sides by a hostile force of company strength and, in the initial burst of fire, the platoon runner was wounded. Hearing the stricken soldier call out, Private Koehler dashed fearlessly through the fire-swept impact area and quickly administered medical aid. Although the determined foe closed within 5 yards of friendly trenches and lobbed grenades into the position, Private Koehler ignored the imminent danger, continued to attend his wounded comrade, and refused to seek shelter when enemy fragmentation grenades landed nearby. He was mortally wounded during this action. Private Koehler’s fearlessness under fire and determined devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service. General Order: Department of the Army, General Order 37, 29 April 1953

Koenig, Roy Eugene (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Roy Eugene Koenig (MCSN: 635246), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Truck Driver in Headquarters and Service Company, First Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. With a heavily engaged battalion in need of vital supplies, Private First Class Koenig volunteered to drive his vehicle, loaded with materiel, to the forward area during hours of darkness. Although seriously wounded when the convoy was ambushed en route by a large hostile force employing automatic weapons, mortars and small arms, he bravely drove his vehicle toward the enemy in a determined attempted to return fire. Later mortally wounded by enemy fire, Private First Class Koenig, by his daring initiative and valiant fighting spirit, served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the mission. His heroic devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 10, 1930 at Evansville, Indiana. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri. Death: KIA: April 24, 1951 - Buried at: Blue Grass Cemetery - Daylight, Indiana.

Koerner, Clarence A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Chief Boatswain's Mate Clarence A. Koerner (NSN: 3288492), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to U.S.S. Cavalier (APA-37), during operations against the enemy during the amphibious assault landing at Inchon, in Korea, on 15 September 1950. As Wave Commander he led the tenth assault wave to the beach through severe sniper and mortar fire with the greatest skill, courage, and determination. When the coxswain and engineer of his boat were wounded he assumed the duties of coxswain while at the same time directing the unloading of vehicles and thereafter remained at the beach exposed to enemy fire in order to evacuate wounded. His outstanding bravery, initiative and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1183-B (July 31, 1951).

Koevenig, Donald J.

Second Lieutenont Donald J. Koevenig, Battery C, 3d AAA AW Bn. (SP), 3d Infantry Division,
United States Army. On 18 April 1951, in the vicinity of Chungsa-ri, Korea, while serving as assistant platoon leader on a mission to recover disabled tanks, Lieutenant Koevenig skillfully dispersed his men to positions which afforded maximum protective support to the recovery team from the 65th Infantry. With no regard for his safety and despite intense small arms and automatic weapons fire, Lieutenant Koevenig voluntarily left the comparative safety of his armored vehicle in order to point out enemy positions to his gun crews. When an enemy machine gun threatened the security of the mission, he unhesitatingly exposed himself to hostile fire, ran to a gun position, and personally directed a fire mission which silenced the machine gun and permitted operations to continue, Lieutenant Koevenig's complete command of the situation ensured the success of the mission and as a direct result of his actions, not one friendly casualty was sustained. The outstanding gallantry, leadership and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Koevenig reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Kohfield, Eugene C.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 75 - 13 February 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Eugene C. Kohfield, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy as Pilot, Detachment 1, Third Air Rescue Squadron on 13 September 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Kohfield flew into a concentration of enemy anti-aircraft fire in a valiant effort to rescue United Nations airmen shot down over the Korean battle line. While stationed at a forward air control post as a helicopter pilot, Lieutenant Kohfield learned from a radio report that a friendly aircraft has crashed behind enemy lines. To avoid delay in effecting the rescue, Lieutenant Kohfield took off immediately with his aero-medical specialist, met a fighter escort and proceeded to the site of the crash. While en route, Lieutenant Kohfield was notified by the suppression CAP that the fighter pilot had not survived the crash, but that a T-6 observation plane had been shot down in the same vicinity. Survivors of the second crash had been sighted. Lieutenant Kohfield flew his helicopter directly to the scene and began a descent, determined to land and complete a rescue. As he descended, the anti-aircraft fire became intense and accurate, resulting in several hits and major damage. He advised his fighter escort that he was losing control and would have to turn back. In spite of his personal dilemma, Lieutenant Kohfield called for another helicopter to complete the mission as he would attempt to fly his disabled aircraft to friendly territory. Lieutenant Kohfield's helicopter was observed to disintegrate in the air and crash over United Nations' terrain. Lieutenant Kohfield's determined effort to effect a rescue despite overwhelming odds, his courage and devotion to duty, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Kokoliadis, George T.

Headquarters 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 422 - 25 September 1953

Sergeant First Class (then Sergeant) George T. Kokoliadis, RA11184063, Infantry Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June 1953, in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, Company "E" launched a assault on enemy held Hill "412". Sergeant Kokoliadis was the leader of a squad forming a section of the assault element. As they approached the objective, the men came under intense enemy mortar, artillery and small arms fire and suffered several casualties. Although wounded in the action, he refused to be evacuated but, through words and actions, created a high spirit of aggressiveness and morale in the remaining members of his depleted squad. As his comrades fell wounded, he directed their evacuation to places of comparative safety. When his platoon leader was rendered a casualty, Sergeant Kokoliadis moved to his aid. Weakened from his wounds, he was unable to evacuate the officer, but remained there and administered aid and comfort to him until assistance arrived. While guarding the Lieutenant, he mortally wounded four enemy soldiers who attempted to close in on them. Shortly afterwards, friendly troops arrived and Sergeant Kokoliadis helped in the evacuation of his wounded leader. Sergeant Kokoliadis' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Massachusetts.

Kolling, Donald Eugene (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Donald Eugene Kolling (MCSN: 554821), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. Although stunned by the explosion of an enemy grenade during his platoon's attack on a strongly fortified hostile position, Corporal Kolling courageously refused to submit to medical treatment, continuing boldly forward with his men and exposing himself to vicious enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire to lead a fierce assault on the hostile positions. Steadfastly refusing to take cover from the increasing hail of fire, he persisted in his heroic efforts until he fell, mortally wounded. By his inspiring leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Kolling upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 18, 1927 at Brookville, Ohio. Home Town: Brookville, Ohio. Death: KIA: May 29, 1951 - Buried at: Parish Cemetery - Arlington, Ohio.

Kolofer, Edward A.

Headquarters, 8th US Army, Korea
General Orders No. 404 - 6 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Major Edward A. Kolofer, 0320190, Infantry, United States Army. Major Kolofer, a member of the United States Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea (NARA unit designation 8202), who distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Hoengsong, Korea. On 11 February 1951, the 21st Regiment, 8th Republic of Korea Division, was attacking along the Hoengsong-Hongchon road when it encountered a counterattacking force composed of elements of two Chinese Communist divisions. Major Kolofer, a United States Advisor with the regiment, immediately went to the front to aid and assist in the deployment of the troops. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved across the fire-swept areas from one position to another, giving encouragement to the leaders and men. When the friendly lines broke under the preponderant strength of the enemy attack, Major Kolofer withdrew to the rear and established a straggler collecting point. Organizing the stragglers into a defensive force, Major Kolofer, in the absence of Korean leaders, personally deployed his group in defensive positions which they were able to maintain throughout the night. At daylight on 12 February, the enemy occupied high ground overlooking the positions of Major Kolofer’s group and, delivering a tremendous volume of fire on the friendly positions, forced the group to withdraw. Reorganizing his group after the withdrawal, he led his men in an assault to regain the lost positions and successfully drove the enemy from the area. The aggressive leadership, courage and devotion to duty displayed by Major Kolofer reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the federal service from Chicago, Illinois. (St. Paul, MN during Korea)

Komoroski, Joseph

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Joseph Komoroski (MCSN: 1099372), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 27 to 29 November 1950. With the main assault concentrated on his squad's positions during a fierce and sustained enemy attack near a snow-covered pass on the road between Hagaru-ri and Yudam-ni on the night of 28 - 29 November, Sergeant Komoroski moved fearlessly through enemy machine gun, rifle and grenade fire to control and direct the fire of his unit and to encourage and reassure his men. Although painfully wounded during this action, he bravely continued to supervise the gallant defense of his sector until the enemy had been repulsed, before submitting to medical attention. His indomitable courage, inspiring leadership and steadfast devotion to duty throughout were contributing factors in the success of his company in holding its position and reflect great credit upon Sergeant Komoroski and the United States Naval Service. Born: Nanty Glo, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Passaic, New Jersey.

Konek, Edward A. (1st citation)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 215 - 22 June 1951

Captain Edward A. Konek, 01304913, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 2 March 1951, near Sokto, Korea, a patrol from Captain Konek's company was brought under withering enemy fire while in an assault boat attempting to cross to the north bank of the Han River. Captain Konek, on the south bank with a squad of men, set up and directed a base of fire to cover the withdrawal of his patrol. As the boat neared the south bank, the enemy placed heavy mortar fire on the landing site and the reserve squad, but Captain Konek, completely disregarding the enemy fire, walked among his men reassuring them and directing their fire. As the patrol was unloading, a man was wounded and Captain Konek immediately went to his aid and, assisted by an enlisted man, carried the wounded man to a place of comparative safety. Unable to make radio contact and realizing that he must have supporting fire in order to withdraw the squad with any degree of safety, he proceeded across the open terrain to the battalion observation post and requested tank support. Returning to his men, he supervised the withdrawal and assisted in evacuating the wounded man. The selfless gallantry and exemplary conduct displayed by Captain Konek reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Maryland.

Konek, Capt. Edward A. (2nd citation)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 245 - 3 July 1951

Captain Edward A. Konek, 01304913, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours on 27 April 1951 in the vicinity of Uijongbu, Korea, Company "K" was attacked and eventually outflanked by a numerically superior enemy force. Calmly organizing his unit, Captain Konek directed an orderly withdrawal to the adjacent "B" Company defensive perimeter, where he supervised the consolidation of positions before taking cover himself. Under the cover of darkness, the enemy succeeded in surrounding the friendly force, and subjected it to intense fire. Near dawn, approximately three hundred enemy reinforcements were observed approaching the unit's positions. Immediately deploying one platoon in a flanking movement, Captain Konek led the remainder of his men in a mass bayonet assault, driving a wedge through the enemy encirclement and enabling the beleaguered troops to begin a withdrawal. Although the enemy poured continual fire into the withdrawing companies from positions on a commanding ridge, Captain Konek's courageously remained in a completely exposed area, successfully directing his troops to safety with a minimum of casualties. Captain Konek's gallantry and aggressive leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Maryland.

Kontos, James A.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 303 - 31 July 1953

Private First Class James A. Kontos, US51012907, Company "B", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 8 July 1953, Private Kontos was assigned to a listening post of a strategic section of the friendly main line of resistance in the vicinity of Chungmoksil, Korea. As an enemy soldier approached his position, he remained concealed, waiting for the main body of enemy troops. Soon after, the enemy charged the listening post in platoon strength in a sweeping assault. Private Kontos braved the ensuing intense volley of fire and hurled grenades at the oncoming enemy troops, inflicting numerous casualties upon them. As the numerically superior enemy troops overran his position, he withdrew to a more tenable location. As he was moving back toward the friendly lines, he located a wounded comrade. He immediately rendered aid to the casualty and gave covering fire until help could be procured. When aid arrived, he assisted in evacuating the casualty through the intense fire to the friendly lines. Private Kontos' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Maine.

Kopp, Robert E. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 60 - September 30, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Robert E. Kopp (ASN: RA-16312942), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company C, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 15 August 1950, on Cloverleaf Ridge in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea. During the fanatical attack of the numerically superior enemy on 15 August 1950, whose purpose was to drive Company C from its positions on Cloverleaf Ridge, Private Kopp noticing that his comrades were running low on ammunition, and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, made his way back to the company command post, under a devastating barrage of enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire. Returning with the ammunition, he often exposed himself again to the enemy while distributing it to the members of his unit. Returning to his own position, he found it occupied by two of the enemy. He shot and killed one of the enemy, and when his rifle failed to fire again, he drove the enemy from his position and killed him with his bayonet. He then continued to fight the enemy with his bayonet, killing four of them before he himself was killed. The conspicuous devotion to his comrades, and his cool courage, exemplify the highest traditions of the American Soldier, and provide a lasting tribute to himself and the military service.

Koppelman, Marvin

Private First Class Marvin Koppelman, RA12302259, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 13th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action at Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. PFC Koppelman’s unit had been defending the air strip north of Taejon when it received orders to take its weapons and equipment through the town and to withdraw to new positions. During the passage through the town, which was then burning and partially in the hands of the enemy, the convoy was held up by a road block consisting of automatic weapons. PFC Koppleman dismounted from his vehicle and taking a 3.5 inch rocket launcher, fired it until the road block was completely reduced. The convoy again started down the street. After going one block, it was again held up by at least two automatic weapons firing from a bank building. Again PFC Koppelman dismounted and reduced the road block by fire from his rocket launcher. By his gallant actions under fire, he enabled his battery to withdraw through the town of Taejon with comparatively light casualties. He brought great credit to himself and to the military service. GO 79, 8 Aug 1950. Entered service from Brooklyn, NY.

Kostrey, George

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant George Kostrey (MCSN: 279587), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Leader of an 81-mm. Mortar Section of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. With large elements of enemy forces launching a strong and continuous attack against his unit's defensive position, Technical Sergeant Kostrey fearlessly placed himself in the midst of the heaviest fighting and, while defending his position with hand grenades, continued to direct his section in delivering effective mortar fire. Painfully wounded during this action, he persevered in controlling accurate fire which repulsed the hostile attack and restored the front lines. His indomitable courage, inspiring leadership and unswerving devotion to duty inspired all who served with him and reflect great credit upon Technical Sergeant Kostrey and the United States Naval Service. Born: Saint Clair, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Kozkowski, Robert D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert D. Kozkowski (MCSN: 394657), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Headquarters and Service Company, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. With two infantry battalions isolated from their source of supply and a bridge commanding the only route of approach blocked by inoperative vehicles, Private First Class Kozkowski fearlessly risked his life in an attempt to wipe out a machine gun emplacement delivering heavy fire on friendly units. Proceeding with a fellow Marine through intense small arms and machine gun fire, he assumed position on the road and, standing upright for a prolonged period of time, delivered accurate fire until the emplacement had been neutralized, the bridge cleared and the supplying vehicles again able to move forward to the infantry battalions. His daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and heroic actions in the face of grave danger served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Kozkowski and the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Paul, Minnesota. Home Town: St. Paul, Minnesota.

Kraemer, John

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 109 - September 27, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal [then Private First Class] John C. Kraemer (ASN: RA-13312844), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company A, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 26 July 1950 near Yongdong, Korea. Corporal Kraemer's platoon had prepared a bridge and a section of highway for demolition. Infiltrating enemy elements cut the wires to the demolition charges during the early morning. While the wires were being re-connected, the blasting machine came under heavy enemy machine gun fire. Corporal Kraemer and two comrades, with complete disregard for their own safety, moved the machine under heavy mortar fire, to a more tenable position and reconnected the wires for a second time. The bridge and highway section were then demolished, greatly retarding the advance of the enemy. Corporal Kraemer's gallant action reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Kraus, Gerald A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Gerald A. Kraus (MCSN: 669302), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 1 November to 1 December 1950. Skillfully and courageously performing his duties throughout this period, Private First Class Kraus contributed materially to his company's success against the enemy. When the hostile force launched a fierce counterattack on 26 November, subjecting his platoon to intense fire on its front and left flank, he voluntarily charged forward straight into the enemy lines in order to rescue a wounded Marine. Although painfully wounded in the face and temporarily blinded while carrying out this action, he made his way back to the platoon, bringing the wounded man safely back with him. By his daring initiative, gallant fighting spirit and selfless determination in the face of grave personal risk, Private First Class Kraus upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lake Itasca, Minnesota. Home Town: Lake Itasca, Minnesota.

Kraus, Louis Casper (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Louis Casper Kraus (MCSN: 633868), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Section Leader in an Anti-Tank Assault Platoon of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Ordered to attack a heavily fortified enemy position blocking his company's main supply route near Hagaru-ri, Sergeant Kraus employed his section as infantrymen and boldly led them in a successful seizure of the objective. With his unit subjected to a vicious counterattack by numerically superior forces while consolidating the position, he fearlessly exposed himself to hand grenades, automatic weapons and small arms fire and, quickly moving from position to position, encouraged his men and skillfully directed their fire until he was mortally wounded. By his inspiring leadership, heroic efforts and courageous devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Kraus contributed to the successful repelling of the hostile onslaught and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 31, 1921 at Louisville, Kentucky. Home Town: Louisville, Kentucky. Death: KIA: November 28, 1950.

Krause, Ralph A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Ensign Ralph A. Krause (NSN: 0-444090), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in the rescue of personnel and damage control work on board the U.S.S. Brush (DD-745), on 26 September 1950, when the Brush struck an enemy mine in the North Korean waters. Ensign Krause displayed exceptional courage in entering smoke and fume-filled compartments to determine the extent of damage, and by aiding to his utmost the evacuation of personnel casualties. He used great tenacity in remaining at the scene of the fire until it was extinguished, combating the most adverse conditions; and in the control of flooding, which, if unchecked, might have been progressive, resulting in the possible loss of the ship. He remained in the damaged area, tirelessly assisting in the control of flooding for a period of two days. Ensign Krause's valorous actions directly contributed to the prompt medical attention received by the wounded, and to the effective control of the damage sustained, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 4898 (May 20, 1951).

Kreidler, William R.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 872 - 22 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant William R. Kreidler, 0953780, Artillery, Army of the United States, a member of Battery C, 38 Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 30 July 1951 in the vicinity of Taeusan, Korea. On this date Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment was in the attack to secure a strategic enemy held hill. Lieutenant Kreidler was assigned to Company K as a forward observer. In this capacity, he repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire in order to accurately locate friendly units so accurate artillery could be adjusted accordingly. With further disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Kreidler personally directed effective fire from the most forward positions. Lieutenant Kreidler’s daring actions inspired the rifle companies to greater heights to carry the attack to its final conclusion and drive the enemy from his positions. Lieutenant Kreidler’s exemplary action materially aided in the success of the attack and the securing of the enemy hill. The outstanding devotion to duty and gallantry in action displayed by Lieutenant Kreidler reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Duluth, Minnesota.

[Lieutenant Kreidler enlisted first in 1941. He died in 1998.]

Krepps, Vincent A.

Private Vincent A. Krepps, RA13272331, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery D, 82d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against on armed enemy on 1 September 1950 in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea. On this date his battery was preparing to defend its position against on enemy attack. Private Krepps, observing that an abandoned antiaircraft firing vehicle was obstructing the road and preventing a tank from passing, voluntarily left the security of his perimeter and moved over several hundred yards of terrain which was exposed to hostile fire. He was successful in moving the vehicle to the side of the road, allowing the tank to pass and complete its mission of neutralizing on enemy road block. He then performed emergency repairs on the vehicle, displaying complete indifference to the enemy fire which was sweeping the area, and drove it through an enemy road block. He successfully drove the vehicle to the safety of his battery's perimeter, although the entire route was subjected to intense enemy antitank gun and mortar fire. He then organized a crew to man the weapons of the salvaged vehicle and commanded that crew in the ensuing fight in which his battery repulsed the enemy. His daring and quick thinking saved a valuable vehicle which was of immeasurable aid to his comrades in their successful stand against the enemy. The gallantry displayed by Private Krepps on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Maryland.

Kristanoff, George Walter

Headquarters 24th Division
General Orders No. 111 - 30 August 1950

First Lieutenant George W. Kristanoff, 01336515, Infantry, United States Army, a member of 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action near Taejon, Korea on 19 July 1950.  Lieutenant Kristanoff was given the mission of determining the strength and location of an enemy unit which was reported as operating 6 miles south of Taejon.  With a patrol of 10 men in 4 jeeps, he proceeded about 6 miles when he encountered an enemy road block.  During this time he maintained radio contact with his company command post.  His patrol engaged the enemy road block and during the engagement he reported that he was also attacked from the rear.  With complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Kristanoff remained at his radio and gave full information as to the enemy's disposition and location.  As a result of the information given by Lieutenant Kristanoff, reinforcements were dispatched to the scene of the action and held off the enemy during the night, thereby gaining valuable time in the defense and evacuation of Taejon.  This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of Lieutenant Kristanoff reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the service from Bovey, Minnesota.

Kritz, Leonard K.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Leonard K. Kritz (MCSN: 1118341), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving with an infantry company as a gunner in a heavy machine gun squad, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 September 1950. Concealing the fact that he had been seriously wounded in the leg and foot by bursting enemy hand grenades during the initial stages of an attack against his company's positions by a strong hostile force, Private First Class Kritz staunchly remained at his post and continued to man his machine gun. Although suffering from severe pain and loss of blood, he placed accurate and effective fire against the attackers from his exposed position, fighting gallantly on until the enemy had been repulsed and his company's positions restored before he would submit to evacuation. By his daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and fortitude, Private First Class Kritz served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Home Town: West Bend, Wisconsin.

Kriwchuk, Joseph (MIA)

Private First Class Joseph Kriwchuk, RA15283556, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Service Battery, 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star posthumously for gallantry in action on 20 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. He distinguished himself while driving a 1/4 ton vehicle in a convoy that was attempting to run enemy road blocks with badly needed supplies. The convoy was subjected to direct fire from enemy automatic weapons and rifle fire while passing through narrow streets. Even though mortally wounded, PFC Krichuk disregarded his wounds and personal safety, crawled from his jeep and attempted to fight on with other members of the convoy until he died as a result of his wounds. His outstanding courage, complete disregard for personal safety and extreme devotion to duty reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. GO 78, 8 Aug 1950. Entered service from Cleveland, OH. (PFC Kriwchuk is missing in action. Family DNA needed.)

Kroesen, Paul B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Paul B. Kroesen (MCSN: 250944), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yudam-ni, Korea, early on the morning of 2 December 1950. With his company deployed in hasty defenses on a snow-covered, mountainous ridge when two enemy companies attacked, threatening the unit's left flank, Technical Sergeant Kroesen, on his own initiative, personally positioned each man of an attached artillery provisional squad, working courageously in the face of heavy small arms fire. When his company was in danger of being overrun during one of the most intense periods of the assault, he stood up and skillfully threw several hand grenades which exploded among different groups of the enemy, causing approximately five deaths and wounding approximately ten. His bold initiative, coolness under fire and indomitable fighting spirit were contributing factors in disorganizing the hostile forces and repelling the assault, thereby reflecting great credit upon Technical Sergeant Kroesen and the United States Naval Service. Born: Fort Worth, Texas. Home Town: Tyler, Texas.

Kroll, David J.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 317 - 26 June 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Airman Second Class David J. Kroll, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as a member of Detachment 1, 3d Air Rescue Squadron, Fifth Air Force, on 27 March 1952. Accompanying a helicopter, Airman Kroll flew into North Korea to assist in the rescue of a pilot captured by enemy troops. Upon sighting the downed pilot and as the helicopter hovered over the area, Airman Kroll fired a carbine over the heads of the enemy, effecting the pilot's escape. In spite of enemy fire, Airman Kroll unfastened his safety belt, leaned far out of the cockpit and extended his hand to the downed pilot. The pilot grasped the litter bar with one hand and Airman Kroll's hand with the other, and as the helicopter gained altitude, Airman Kroll hoisted him into the cockpit. Through his complete disregard of personal safety, Airman Kroll's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Kromrei, Gunther E.

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Gunther E. Kromrei, RA16399840, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the 223d Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division, in action in the Punch Bowl, Korea, on 16 June 1953. When a numerically superior enemy force attacked his platoon's positions, Sergeant Kromrei was in the direct avenue of approach. As the enemy began to infiltrate the trenches of his company, Sergeant Kromrei unleashed a murderous fire into the onrushing enemy in bitter hand-to-hand combat. During the heat of the battle, Sergeant Kromrei was instrumental in the evacuation of friendly casualties, thereby being directly responsible for saving the lives of many of his comrades. The superior bravery displayed by Sergeant Kromrei inflicted innumerable casualties on the enemy and prevented a serious breakthrough, thereby saving the lives of many friendly soldiers. Sergeant Kromrei's complete disregard for his gallant performance and his inspiring devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Krueger, David P.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 292 - 13 July 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant David P. Krueger, 02021071, (then Second Lieutenant), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 24 November 1950 in the vicinity of Kujangdong, Korea. Company K was given the mission of defending Hill 333. Shortly after digging in, the company was attacked by approximately 400 enemy troops. Lieutenant Krueger, a rifle platoon leader, repulsed the attack until the ammunition for his machine gun and 57mm recoilless rifle was exhausted. It was then necessary for him to withdraw his platoon to a more strategic point. With utter disregard for his personal safety, he remained at his position delaying the enemy until he was wounded by grenade fragments. He was then forced to withdraw to the new lines where the ferocity of the enemy attack caused another withdrawal. Eventually, the enemy surrounded the platoon. Lieutenant Krueger, realizing it would be impossible to get through the enemy lines as a unit, proceeded to separate the men into small groups. He then led his men through the enemy positions and friendly artillery fire, without a casualty, to the safety of friendly lines. Lieutenant Krueger’s outstanding leadership and gallantry reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Kubasti, George

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry  Division
General Orders No. 108 - June 23, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class George Kubasti (ASN: RA-13335243), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company H, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 10 February 1951, near Konjiam-ni, Korea. A friendly company had been temporarily held up in an assault on enemy hill positions and was suddenly hit by a vicious counterattack. When the machine gun, for which Private Kubasti was an ammunition bearer, had a stoppage, he voluntarily initiated a one-man assault against the enemy. He moved toward the foe, firing his carbine and throwing hand grenades. By his selfless and courageous act, the Chinese were temporarily stopped and the friendly machine gun was repaired. When last seen, this heroic soldier was single-handedly engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. Private Kubasti's conspicuous gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Kubiak, Leo John (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Technical Sergeant Leo John Kubiak (MCSN: 260059), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with the Military Police Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. When his convoy was ambushed by a large hostile force during hours of darkness, Technical Sergeant Kubiak quickly organized nearby personnel to battle the viciously attacking enemy. Undaunted by intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire, he moved boldly among his men, shouting words of encouragement and directing their fire and, when the ammunition supply was exhausted, went forward of the defense line and secured ammunition from casualties. On one occasion, Technical Sergeant Kubiak entered an adjacent rice paddy, known to be occupied by enemy troops, in order to obtain vital first aid supplies. His initiative, courage and indomitable fighting spirit throughout the night-long engagement served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflect great credit upon Technical Sergeant Kubiak and the United States Naval Service. Born: April 15, 1916 at Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois. Death: KIA: November 29, 1950.

Kundtson, Paul W.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 122 - 28 May 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant First class Paul W. Kundtson, RAl7173087, Infantry, United States Army, a member cf Tank Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. On that date, Sergeant Knudtson was a tank commander of a tank platoon engaged jointly with the regimental security platoon in an effort to penetrate hostile lines in order to effect a link-up with the friendly forces encircled by the enemy. The task force was suddenly confronted by approximately 400 enemy seemingly expressing the desire to surrender by waving white flags. When the ruse was discovered, a fierce firefight ensued. The tank of the platoon leader received a direct hit which overturned the tank and pinned the platoon leader underneath the gun. Sergeant Knudtson immediately moved his tank into position to cover his platoon leader and the withdrawal of the task force from the trap. In utter defiance of the close proximity of the enemy and the heavy fire all around him, he repeatedly dismounted from his tank to rescue wounded and to direct their removal to safety. As both the security platoon leader and the tank platoon leader had fallen casualties, Sergeant Knudtson resolutely assumed command of the task force and directed it in extricating itself from the trap with a minimum of casualties. The gallantry in action demonstrated by Sergeant Knudtson reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Washington.

Kunkel, Melvin R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Melvin R. Kunkel (MCSN: 469417), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Light Machine Gun Section Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. When numerous machine gun stoppages occurred because of the bitter cold weather during a strong attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Sergeant Kunkel fearlessly moved form position to position under blistering shellfire to repair the machine guns and direct return fire against the attackers. Unable to bring fire to bear form his unfavorable position when a breakthrough occurred to the right of his sector, he boldly lifted a machine gun from its tripod and, with the ammunition belt strung over his shoulder, fired directly at the attackers from his hip, inflicting extensive casualties and forcing them to retreat. Although suffering from second degree burns, he courageously fought on until the original defense line was secured and the hostile attack repulsed. By his daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and bold actions against heavy odds, Sergeant Kunkel served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Pennsauken, New Jersey.

Kunz, Charles Murphy

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Charles Murphy Kunz (MCSN: 0-7470), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot and Commanding Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three, attached to the U.S.S. Sicily (CVE-118), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 21 June 1951. Participating in a determined strike against a strategic enemy railroad and ammunition supply depot at Kyomipo, Major Kunz skillfully led his flight to a position near the objective and directed the unit to orbit while he personally reconnoitered the target area. When his plane was subjected to heavy automatic weapons fire from three hostile gun emplacements, he quickly located the enemy positions and carried out a series of daring low- level rocket and strafing attacks. Although his aircraft was hit by hostile fire, he fearlessly pressed home his attacks at extremely low altitude and completely neutralized the enemy batteries before calling his flight to the assigned target. By his courageous leadership, outstanding ability as an airman and resolute devotion to duty, Major Kunz contributed directly to the success of his flight in destroying the hostile supply depot and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Dixon, Missouri. Home Town: Springfield, Missouri. Death: November 12, 1999.

Kupferer, Frederick B.


Frederick Kupferer
(Click picture for a larger view)

Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 234 - 22 August 1951

First Lieutenant Frederick B. Kupferer 01320844, Infantry, United States Army, Company I, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 25 April 1951, near Kapyong-ni, Korea. Lieutenant Kupferer was commanding a support platoon engaged in seizing and securing a hill held by fanatical enemy troops. As the leading squad attained an intermediate objective, a deadly volume of enemy small arms fire and grenades pinned it down in a precarious position. Realizing the peril of this squad, Lieutenant Kupferer led the other squads to positions of support. Disregarding his safety he crawled forward and with two well-aimed grenades silenced the enemy fire. Then leading the attack Lieutenant Kupferer dashed to the enemy-held position, hurling grenades with deadly accuracy. His fearless courage and personal leadership so inspired the men that they swept forward and overran the foe's position. Lieutenant Kupferer's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from New York.

Kures, Walter (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Walter Kures (MCSN: 1113915), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant in Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 26 March 1953. Participating in the defense of an outpost well forward of the main line of resistance during an assault by a numerically superior enemy force, Sergeant Kures moved about in the open from position to position, constantly rallying and shifting his men in order to repulse the attackers. Through his outstanding courage and leadership in the face of intense hostile fire, he was instrumental in the infliction of numerous casualties upon the enemy and materially aided in the defense of the outpost. Killed in action by enemy fire during the fierce encounter, Sergeant Kures served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.  Born: July 30, 1923 at Cleveland, Ohio. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio. Death: KIA: March 26, 1953.

Kutsugeras, Peter G.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 215 - 24 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal Peter G. Kutsugeras, ER15417545, (then Private First Class), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company M, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. Company M was moving in a vehicular column flanked by rifle elements on foot when a group of enemy hiding in a culvert ambushed the column and halted its forward movement. Corporal Kutsugeras, with complete disregard for his safety, crawled over other soldiers who were held down by the intense enemy fire and ran through direct small arms fire to the mouth of the culvert, where he engaged the enemy inside, killing or wounding all but three of them. Seeing that these three were about to escape, he ran to the other end of the culvert and killed them as they were attempting to escape. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Kutsugeras reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Indiana.

Kyzer, Aubrey E. Jr.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 49 - September 18, 1950 -Amended by G.O.  55 (1950)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Aubrey E. Kyzer, Jr. (ASN: RA-18166281), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company D, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 15 August 1950, near Yongsan, Korea, in the Naktong River Salient. On 15 August 1950, Sergeant Kyzer was the forward observer for an 81-mm. Mortar Platoon attached to Company C, 9th Infantry Regiment, which was in the most forward position of the 1st Battalion and occupied Cloverleaf Ridge, a dominating hill in the battle sector. At 2230 hours the enemy launched the first of five determined attacks to take the hill. Sergeant Kyzer assumed command of the forward or center section of the company when the platoon sergeant from Company C was wounded. He organized his sector, supplied ammunition and weapons to those men who needed them, exposing himself at all times to enemy mortar, artillery, and small arms fire, and placed individuals in better firing positions, in order to strengthen the company front. In the absence of a mortar man, Sergeant Kyzer placed a 60-mm. mortar in action, using it without sights, and delivered devastating fire upon the enemy who by this time were closing in hand-to-hand combat. After the mortar ammunition was expended, Sergeant Kyzer picked up a 57-mm. recoilless rifle and fired point blank at the attacking enemy. Sergeant Kyzer's actions were an inspiration to all the men of Company C, undoubtedly enabled the company to save its position and helped to retain the dominating ground in the 1st Battalion sector. Sergeant Kyzer's gallant actions and aggressive leadership reflect great credit upon himself and his organization and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

 

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