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Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "L"

 
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Laboa, Tony L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 43 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Tony L. Laboa (ASN: US-56056103), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 18 October 1951. Attacked by an overwhelming, numerically superior enemy force, his unit was forced to make a strategic withdrawal in order to regroup and reorganize. In order that this be done with as few casualties as possible, Private Laboa volunteered to remain behind and give covering fire with his machine gun. Remaining by himself, exposed to enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, he personally killed or wounded approximately thirty-five of the enemy during his valiant one-man defense. His devastatingly accurate fire was so successful that he held off the enemy hordes until his comrades were able to return and drive the attackers from the hill. Private Laboa's courageous action, tenacious determination and selfless performance of a mission far above the call of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Hanford, California.

Lackner, Clarence (3rd award)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 44 - July 26, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Clarence Lackner (ASN: RA-36294956/37294956), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company F, 35th Regimental Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, in action in Korea on 22 July 1950. While Company F, 35th Infantry Regiment, occupied a position near Mun-Gyong, a superior number of enemy forces attacked the right flank of the Second Platoon, making the company's position untenable and forcing its withdrawal. Rallying his comrades, Sergeant Lackner led his platoon in a successful counterattack, regaining the high ground and consolidated the position while under heavy artillery, mortar and small arms fire. When his company was forced to withdraw a second time, Sergeant Lackner remained in position and covered the withdrawal by delivering effective and deadly counter fire until every member of the company had withdrawn. The aggressiveness, undaunted courage, and outstanding leadership by Sergeant Lackner was an inspiration to his comrades and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Ladd, Earl Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Earl Ladd, Jr. (MCSN: 595369), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 March 1951. Assigned the mission of moving with the assault platoon in the company attack of a strongly fortified hill position defended by a determined enemy force, Private First Class Lass courageously exposed himself to devastating enemy automatic weapons, hand grenade and small arms fire to move his weapon continually forward in support of the advancing infantry. Remaining at his gun in exposed positions for a total of eighteen hours, he continually poured heavy fire on hostile positions and, when an air strike was called in on the enemy, remained at his gun although rockets landed perilously close to his position. Throughout the entire action, he rendered close fire support most effectively and contributed materially to the final successful seizure of the strategic ground. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, Private First Class Ladd upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Central Square, New York. Home Town: Central Square, New York.

Ladou, Edward M.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 32 - 16 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Edward M. Ladou, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy on 14 August 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Ladou piloted his unarmed SA-16 rescue aircraft over 50 miles into enemy-held North Korea to effect the rescue of a downed United Nations airman. As the pilot was swimming in the Taedong River near Chinnampo, Korea, Lieutenant Ladou landed his aircraft in the water, in spite of known heavy automatic weapons fire, floating debris and unknown shoals and rocks below the surface of the muddy river. With skill and tenacity, he completed the successful rescue of the pilot, preventing his capture by the enemy. Through his flying skill, courage, and devotion to duty, Lieutenant Ladou reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

LaFrance, Dale E. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Dale E. LaFrance (MCSN: 627705), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Although painfully wounded during the company attack on Hill 676 north of Yanggu, Sergeant LaFrance unhesitatingly assumed command when his squad leader became a casualty and, repeatedly exposing himself to fierce hostile fire, led the men in a daring charge which completely overran the enemy positions. Mortally wounded when he was again struck by hostile fire during the final assault, Sergeant LaFrance, by his courageous leadership, fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 7, 1928 at Saginaw, Michigan. Home Town: Saginaw, Michigan.

LaFrance, George A.

General Orders No. 713 - 13 November 1951
Headquarters 2d Infantry Division

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal George A. LaFrance (ASN: RA-19382831), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving as a member of Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, on 10 September 1951 in the vicinity of Songhyon-ni, Korea. On that date Corporal LaFrance was a Medical Aidman attached to a unit which was withdrawing from its positions after being relieved by elements of another friendly unit. Corporal LaFrance's unit was suddenly subjected to intense hostile mortar and artillery fire which inflicted several casualties among his comrades. Without hesitation, he advanced through the hostile fire to aid the stricken men. In the course of this, he was painfully wounded by an enemy mortar burst. Disregarding his own wounds and the intense enemy fire, Corporal LaFrance continued to administer aid to the wounded men. He remained with his fallen comrades until all of them were evacuated to positions of comparative safety and only then did he submit to treatment for his own wounds. His devotion to duty was directly responsible for saving the lives of many of his comrades. The gallantry in action displayed by Corporal LaFrance on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of Record: Washington

LaFrance, William J. (Posthumous)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 104 - 9 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded Posthumously to Private William J. LaFrance, RA17281678, Infantry, United States Army, Company B, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy of 4 February 1951 near Ochon-ni, Korea. The company was engaged in attacking the firmly entrenched enemy on Hill 402 and was halfway to the assigned objective when an extremely intense volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire pinned down the assaulting elements. Private LaFrance, quickly sizing up the situation, voluntarily made his way beyond his platoon’s position. In spite of heavy concentration of hostile fire, he, with two comrades, worked his way to within 50 feet of the emplacements. From this spot, he fired into the enemy’s midst, and when his ammunition was exhausted, he unhesitatingly arose, oblivious to the hail of fire, and fearlessly charged directly towards the Chinese. Although he was killed in this act, his aggressive and selfless act so surprised the enemy that they shifted their fire from the platoon, thereby allowing the friendly forces to continue forward and accomplish their mission. Private LaFrance’s conspicuous gallantry and supreme devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Velva, North Dakota.

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After 65 Years, Family of North Dakotan Learns Their Fallen Soldier was a Decorated Hero

(Submitted by Merry Helm) Fargo, North Dakota, November 6, 2015

It’s been almost 65 years since William Juel LaFrance was killed in action. But it wasn’t until this summer that the North Dakotan’s family learned he was highly decorated for the action that took his life.

“Willie” was a warm hearted and likable young man who overcame many hardships along the path that ultimately took his life. He was just learning to talk when his mother and newborn sister died from complications of childbirth. It was 1931, and the Great Depression was bearing down. But Willie’s father, Canute, a French Canadian pioneer, had been farming in Rolette County since 1883, and he knew how to survive.

Canute’s first wife, also French Canadian, had died after bearing their 9th child, and Canute spent the next 13 years raising his children by himself. Then, in 1915, he married Justine Lattergrass, a young Turtle Mountain Chippewa woman. Justine bore Canute nine more children, the last of which died several months after her mother. Thus, Willie was the 17th, and final, surviving child of Canute, who was now approaching his 70th birthday.

Young William attended schools in Rolette County during some portions of his childhood, but times being what they were, he and several sisters were also relocated to St Paul’s Indian Mission School in Marty, South Dakota, for periods of time.

Canute remained close to his children, however. Willie’s sister, Ella LaFrance, recalls, “Willie always helped Papa keep his farm machinery in top shape early in his life.” When he was 82, Canute moved his family to St. John, North Dakota, where William, now 13, attended high school. After their father died in 1947, Willie moved to Velva to live with Ella, who was five years older.

The Korean War started on June 25, 1950, and on July 1, President Harry Truman reported he would send American troops to aid the South Koreans. Even though his older brother, Charles, had been killed in action in World War II, Willie joined the Army that very day. When he arrived on the front lines six months later, U.S. troops in Korea had already suffered some 38,000 casualties, including killed, captured, wounded and/or missing in action. Communist China had now entered the war, and the current situation was dire.

Willie was assigned to B Company of the “Custer Regiment” – the 7th Cavalry – which was then holding a sector southeast of Seoul. Several weeks later, on February 4, 1951, Willie was killed in action during close-in fighting. The family received his Purple Heart, and that was the extent of what they knew about his death.

In 2014, Korean War historian Merry Helm, Fargo, learned LaFrance had been awarded a Silver Star, and she was interested in learning the wording of the award citation for an upcoming volume of her book series, Prairie Boys at War: Korea. Using a genealogy site, she located Danny Gailfus, Willie’s great nephew from Canute’s first family, and told him she was searching for the citation. Gailfus, a 28-year Army veteran of Desert Storm and Desert Shield, as well as two tours in Iraq and one in Afghanistan, was understandably pleased to help. He reached out to Gerald Thibert, the son of Willie’s sister, Ella, now living in California. It turned out nobody in the LaFrance family ever knew Willie was decorated, so Helm, Gailfus and Thibert contacted Randy Richards, from Rep. Kevin Cramer’s office, to see if he could help order the documents Helm was able to identify.

Several months later, the records arrived and revealed the full story of Willie’s action on that icy February day. The citation reads, in part:

[Company B] was engaged in attacking the firmly entrenched enemy on Hill 402 and was halfway to the assigned objective when an extremely intense volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire pinned down the assaulting elements. Private LaFrance, quickly sizing up the situation, voluntarily made his way beyond his platoon’s position. In spite of a heavy concentration of hostile fire, he, with two comrades, worked his way to within 50 feet of the emplacements. From this spot, he fired into the enemy’s midst, and when his ammunition was exhausted, he unhesitatingly arose, oblivious to the hail of fire, and fearlessly charged directly toward the Chinese. Although he was killed in this act, his aggressive and selfless act so surprised the enemy that they shifted their fire from the platoon, thereby allowing the friendly forces to continue forward and accomplish their mission. Private LaFrance’s conspicuous gallantry and supreme devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

After learning about her youngest brother’s heroism, Ella, now 90 years old, began opening up to her son, describing the heartbreak her family endured when he died. The family’s Catholic priest in Velva had held a memorial service for Willie soon after they learned he was killed. But when Willie’s remains were returned for burial seven months later, the priest refused to allow him to be buried in the church’s cemetery, saying Willie was “a hoodlum.” “My family was really hurt and angry when the church wouldn't bury my uncle in their cemetery,” Thibert relates. “When my Uncle William was killed, they were still dealing with the loss of my Uncle Charles, who was killed during World War II. And the people they should have been able to trust weren’t there for them. My Mother said it was like a slap in the face.”

The family reeled back but found an appropriate alternative. “Willie was buried with military honors on September 7, 1951, in the Black Hills National Cemetery in Sturgis, South Dakota,” says Gailfus. “He is where he belongs, with those other hoodlums who answered the call to serve and who served so proudly. Being in the military myself, I know how important it is to ensure that those who deserve to be recognized are, and I am proud to have helped Willie get his due.”

The cemetery has now added the Silver Star notation to Willie’s gravestone. And Representative Cramer’s office went on to obtain Willie’s missing Silver Star, as well as replacements of his other decorations. A shadow box was prepared and presented, along with a 48-star flag (as would have been used in 1951) to Willie’s sister Ella and her son Gerry during a ceremony in Sebastopol, California, on October 16.  Overcome with emotion, Ella wept, saying, “This means the world to me.”

Gerry had meanwhile added an extra medal to the shadow box; Willie’s original Purple Heart from 1951 now hangs beside its new replacement. “I have learned a lot about medals and citations and what they represent,” he said. “But when we first received William’s decorations, I opened one, and then another, and had to stop and sit down as I realized what I had in front of me. These were not just medals and documents. They represented the life and unselfish sacrifices my uncle made so that others could live. I felt humbled to have the Honor Guards present them to my mother.”

Helm has since reached out to the Catholic church to see if an apology to Ella LaFrance is in order, and the Fargo Diocese is presently studying the case. “In my research, I’ve learned something important about soldiers who were heroic on the battlefield,” Helm says. “Enlisted men who were highly decorated tended to have overcome tough challenges and hardships during their youth, including a surprising number who lost one or both of their parents. These boys became survivors. Some were scrappy, lacked opportunities and were labeled hoodlums. But history indicates many of these restless boys were heroes without a cause until they reached the front lines. Such was the case with Private LaFrance. North Dakota can be very proud of this tenacious young warrior."


Willie’s nephew, Gerald Thibert, and his mother (Willie’s older sister Ella LaFrance) receiving Willie's silver star.
(Click picture for a larger view)

Teenaged Willie in uniform with a couple of his “hoodlum” friends.
(Click picture for a larger view)

LaHue, Foster C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Foster C. LaHue (MCSN: 0-7721), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 September 1951. Assigned the mission of attacking and seizing difficult hill objectives defended by a stubborn enemy occupying heavily fortified installations, Lieutenant Colonel LaHue advanced his command post to successive exposed positions through devastating hostile mortar, automatic weapons and artillery fire and fearlessly directed the assault while moving forward with his men. When rugged terrain limited the use of organic supporting arms, he expertly employed the available arms and continued to press the attack despite fierce enemy resistance. By his outstanding bravery, determination and unyielding devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel LaHue was greatly responsible for the rapid seizure of the objectives with a minimum of loss to his forces. His valorous leadership was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: September 2, 1917 at Corydon, Indiana. Home Town: Corydon, Indiana. Death: February 12, 1996.

Lair, Herbert J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Herbert J. Lair (MCSN: 1242247), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rocket Gunner of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 July 1952. During a night raid by his unit on a heavily defended outpost, Private First Class Lair skillfully employed his rocket launcher to destroy a hostile machine gun emplacement which had pinned down the unit. When all of his rockets had been expended, he acquired a wounded man's automatic rifle and continued in the assault, killing several enemy snipers and providing covering fire that permitted the safe evacuation of the wounded. Although suffering severe wounds when the unit was again pinned down by hostile fire, he proceeded alone for thirty yards through a blistering hail of fire to kill an enemy automatic weapons operator, thereby allowing his unit to successfully complete its mission. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and resolute fighting spirit in the face of extreme peril, Private First Class Lair served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: McIntosh, Oklahoma. Home Town: Pekin, Illinois.

Laird, Charles W. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles W. Laird, Jr. (MCSN: 567039), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Headquarters and Service Company, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1950. When hostile machine gun fire from a well-entrenched position pinned down his company during an attack, Private First Class Laird bravely volunteered to seek out and destroy the enemy strongpoint. Boldly attacking the gun emplacement in the face of direct hostile fire, he killed eleven of the enemy with his rifle and hand grenades, thereby directly aiding his company in continuing the advance. By his marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Laird served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Uvalde, Texas. Home Town: Houston, Texas.

Lake, Jesse F. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 82 - 10 August 1950

Private Jesse F. Lake, RA13263958, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950 near Yongdong, Korea. A cook, Private Lake voluntarily manned a .50 caliber machinegun on the battery’s perimeter. By his accurate fire, he succeeded in destroying two enemy machineguns before they could be placed in operation. He deliberately placed his weapon in an exposed position so that he would have a clear field of fire. During his firing, Private Lake was severely wounded in the chest by an exploding enemy mortar shell. By his gallantry and voluntary exposure to danger, Private Lake brought great credit to himself and the military service. Entered service from Hagerstown, MD. Born: January 25, 1930. Home Town: Hagerstown, Maryland. Death: KIA: July 16, 1950 - Buried at: Mountain View Cemetery - Sharpsburg, Maryland.

Lakin, Elmer Clinton (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Elmer Clinton Lakin (MCSN: 1047151), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of an Anti-Tank Assault Squad of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. Attached to a combat patrol which was taken under heavy small-arms and machine gun fire from well concealed enemy troops, Corporal Lakin was wounded early in the fire fight. Determined to remain in action, he refused to be evacuated and, without regard for his own personal safety, fearlessly exposed himself to hostile fire to direct and control the fire of his squad. Succumbing to his wounds, Corporal Lakin, by his fortitude, courage and unwavering devotion to duty, inspired others of his group to heroic endeavor, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 19, 1930 at Mitchell, Illinois. Home Town: Granite City, Illinois. Death: September 24, 1950 - Buried at: Sunset Hill Cemetery - Edwardsville, Illinois.

LaMarr, Dexter H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Dexter H. LaMarr (MCSN: 605678), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Weapons Company, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. When hostile forces launched a fierce assault against the rifle company to which he was attached as a radio operator during the hours of darkness, Private First Class LaMarr bravely positioned himself at the foremost point of the defensive perimeter in a daring effort to direct and maintain communications to the mortar emplacement. Although subjected to withering enemy machine gun, grenade and small arms fire throughout repeated attacks on his exposed position, he transmitted clear and concise radio messages which enabled the mortar section to deliver four hundred mortar rounds upon the onrushing hostile troops, and steadfastly remained at his post until he was seriously wounded in the neck and in the chest. By his exceptional courage, outstanding initiative and selfless devotion to the fulfillment of a vital task, Private First Class LaMarr served to inspire all who observed him and greatly aided his unit in repulsing the attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sheldon, Washington. Home Town: Sacramento, California.

Lamb, Richard C.

Staff Sergeant Richard C. Lamb, United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for exceptional valor and gallantry in action while serving with the Joint Security Force Company, United Nations Command Security Force at Panmunjom, Korea, on 23 November 1984. In reaction to thirty attacking North Korean soldiers in pursuit of a Soviet defector, Staff Sergeant Lamb's aggressive actions were instrumental in defeating the enemy. Throughout the intense firefight, Sergeant Lamb displayed a complete disregard for his own personal safety while accomplishing his mission. Staff Sergeant Lamb's bravery and aggressive performance of duty under extremely hazardous circumstances are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect great credit upon him, the United Nations Command and the United States Army.

Lamb, William L.

Headquarters, 45th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 313 (1952)

Sergeant William L. Lamb (ASN: US-55117544), United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, on 12 June 1952, in Korea. During a G Company raid on Hill 191, Sergeant Lamb broke through the enemy's defending mortar, artillery, and machine-gun fire to assault enemy bunkers. While the enemy troops tried desperately to hit him with automatic-weapons fire and hand grenades, Sergeant Lamb quickly dodged from one place to another and succeeded in advancing so close to the enemy entrenchments that he was able to catch hand grenades thrown at him and hurl them back into the enemy positions. In this way, he destroyed several enemy bunkers. Then as he prepared to return to friendly positions with the raiding group, he discovered one of his comrades who had been seriously wounded by the hostile fire. Immediately and without consideration for his own safety, Sergeant Lamb placed the wounded man on his back and, still carrying his M1 rifle for protection, started back to friendly positions. Meanwhile he picked up an air panel and placed it so that supporting planes would not strafe the withdrawing raiders. He finally made his way back over the six hundred yard route, carrying his wounded comrade and firing his rifle continually to cover his withdrawal. By the outstanding bravery and determination displayed on this occasion, Sergeant Lamb inflicted severe losses on the enemy, protected his comrades from strafing by friendly planes while they raided enemy positions, and rescued a wounded comrade form enemy territory. This action reflects great credit on Sergeant Lamb and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the Infantry.

Lamers, Edward Francis (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Edward Francis Lamers (MCSN: 1254025), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. As the platoon moved into the final assault during a raid against two strongly defended enemy positions, Private First Class Lamers fearlessly led his unit through a heavy barrage of mortar and small arms fire into the hostile trenches. Aggressively pursuing the enemy, he constantly directed his fire team in the clearing of caves, bunkers and fighting holes and continued the attack until he was struck by fragments from a hostile mortar shell and fell, mortally wounded. By his courageous leadership, determination and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Lamers served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 10, 1928 at Bronx, New York. Home Town: Flushing, Long Island, New York. Death: KIA: February 3, 1953.

LaMonica, Anthony Daniel (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Anthony Daniel LaMonica (NSN: 3029383), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kudong, Korea, on the night of 15 - 16 September 1951. During his platoon's attack on a heavily fortified enemy hill position, Hospitalman LaMonica repeatedly braved intense hostile fire to administer expert treatment to the wounded, frequently going forward of the line to reach the casualties. When his unit withdrew to defensive positions for the night after a vigorous two-hour battle, he worked in the middle of the intense cross fire of enemy weapons, remaining until the last to insure that all casualties had been safely evacuated, and, while the new defenses were being consolidated, assisted in protecting these positions. With his platoon suffering approximately ninety per cent casualties during a series of concerted night attacks by a numerically superior hostile force, he moved calmly about the area under heavy fire and skillfully administered medical aid until mortally wounded shortly before dawn. His initiative, courage, and steadfast devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk inspired all who served with him, reflecting the highest credit upon Hospitalman LaMonica and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division, FMF, Serial 62972 (December 22, 1951). Born: October 25, 1930. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois. Death: KIA: September 16, 1951.

Landers, Joseph F.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 228 - 20 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Armor) Joseph F. Landers (ASN: 0-441971), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer of Company C, 6th Medium Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Pyong-yang, Korea, during the period 16 October to 19 October 1950. During the advance on the city he continuously remained with the forward elements, in an exposed vehicle, in order to better direct his company's assaults on strong enemy positions. With utter disregard for his own safety he exposed himself time and again to heavy fire from the determined enemy in directing his troops in their successful advance. Captain Landers' fearless example was an inspiration to his command and aided materially in the successful accomplishment of its mission. His gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Armor. Home Town: Roslindale, Massachusetts.

Landes, Robert Eugene

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 65 - August 21, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Robert Eugene Landes (ASN: RA-37745932), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company H, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action near Yongdong, Korea, on 25 July 1950. Sergeant Landes was acting as a forward observer for a section of an 81-mm. Mortar Platoon that was assigned a support mission to two Rifle Companies of Second Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry). The mission of the unit was to clear an enemy road block and seize a mountain pass, thereby allowing the rest of the Battalion to withdraw from a pocket. In order to accomplish his mission, Sergeant Landes had to expose himself to enemy automatic rifle, mortar and artillery fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Sergeant Landes stood on the crest of the hill, using himself for an aiming point, while directing the fire of his section. Although seriously wounded, Sergeant Landes remained at his position until such time as his gun crews had accomplished their mission in neutralizing enemy strong holds, thus allowing the surrounded battalion to withdraw. Sergeant Landes' heroic action reflects great credit upon himself and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Landis, James F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant James F. Landis (MCSN: 642183), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 April 1952. Although blown from his covered position twice, and his rifle rendered inoperable from extremely intense hostile fire during an attack against a strong enemy fortification, Staff Sergeant Landis bravely charged the hostile position with hand grenades and personally killed three of the enemy. Seriously wounded during the final assault, he continued to attack the opposition until his company moved to more favorable positions and, despite severe pain, returned to friendly lines without assistance, refusing medical aid until all other wounded members of the patrol had been treated. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Landis served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Landrigan, James M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain James M. Landrigan (MCSN: 0-41935), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 July 1953. Assigned the mission of counterattacking enemy forces which had overrun a friendly outpost position, Captain Landrigan courageously directed his company through devastating hostile mortar and artillery fire into an attack position. When the order to suspend the counterattack was received, he reconnoitered his position and the area forward of his unit although under persistent enemy fire. Observing that an exhausted force was precariously defending the main line of resistance, he assumed control of the local area and personally directed reinforcement to the main line from elements of his own command. Undeterred by the murderous hostile fire which was inflicting heavy casualties upon the unit, he continued to inspect his own line and the lines of the units over which he had assumed control, inspiring the men to greater efforts by his resourcefulness under fire. Throughout the following daylight ours, he continued to maintain a strong defense despite the devastating enemy fire directed upon the position and its stalwart defenders. By his courageous leadership, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Captain Landrigan served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Everett, Massachusetts. Home Town: Wakefield, Massachusetts.

Lane, Monty Jack (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Monty Jack Lane (NSN: 3515112), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Corpsman with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, during action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. Although still suffering from a recent illness, Hospitalman Lane voluntarily returned to duty in advance of his normal release date to accompany his unit in the attack on a strongly defended ridge in the vicinity of Hoengsong. Concerned only for the safety of others throughout the assault, he repeatedly exposed himself to the accurate hostile fire to render first aid to the wounded and, on three separate occasions, advanced under intense machine gun, small arms and mortar fire to treat fallen Marines and evacuate them to safety. Observing a casualty lying in an exposed fire-swept area during the final stages of the assault, he again braved the enemy barrage and, just as he reached the wounded man, was fatally struck down by a burst of enemy fire. His heroic actions, indomitable courage and steadfast devotion to duty at great risk to his own life served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon Hospitalman Lane and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 3, 1930. Home Town: Oilton, Oklahoma. Death: KIA: March 15, 1951.

Lane, William D. Jr.

Sergeant William D. Lane Jr., RA14311495, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of the Medical Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 20 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. The city of Taejon had been surrounded by enemy forces and road blocks had been established by the enemy on the routes of withdrawal from the city. The casualties of the friendly elements in the city had been moderately high. Under extremely heavy artillery, mortar, and automatic weapons fire, Sergeant Lane rescued the wounded and evacuated them to places of shelter and administered first aid to them. On one occasion, four men were pinned under an overturned vehicle and Sergeant Lane with disregard for his own safety, worked with some other men for several hours before they were freed. During the entire period he was in Taejon he aided in giving medical attention and evacuating over 30 wounded men. The act of gallantry displayed by Sergeant Lane reflects great credit on himself and the military service. GO 95, 16 Aug 1950. He entered the service from Loudan, TN.

Lang, Albert D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Albert D. Lang (MCSN: 1223633), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radioman of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 October 1952. When a numerically superior enemy force launched an intense mortar and artillery barrage and overran the strategic combat outpost well forward of the main line of resistance, reducing the defenders to a small group and trapping them in the command post bunker after several hours of bitter fighting, Private First Class Lang transmitted messages to the main line and called in artillery and mortar fire throughout the night in a brave attempt to keep the enemy away from the bunker. When a rescue force drew near the outpost, he immediately contacted their radio operator and described the location of hostile strong points and gun positions. Although suffering a severe concussion as enemy troops continually fired small arms bursts and threw grenades into the bunker, he persisted in carrying out his duties until the outpost was retaken by a friendly unit, whereupon he unhesitatingly assisted in evacuating the wounded Marines. By his outstanding courage, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Lang served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Berkeley, California. Home Town: Berkeley, California.

Langeberg, Lee W. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 109 - 18 December 1950

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to Sergeant First class Lee W. Langeberg, RA37755810, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company H, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 4 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea. On that date the light machine gun section which he commanded had the mission of providing supporting fire for a rifle company which was defending high ground against a fierce enemy attack. In the initial phases of the action, he moved one of his squads forward to a position from which they had an excellent field of fire. He then directed the fire of the squad, remaining exposed to heavy enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire, in order to locate targets for his gunners. At this time he was wounded, but disregarding his personal safety he moved his section forward once more and located an enemy machine gun emplacement. In order to direct the fire of his guns he deliberately remained exposed to the intense enemy fire until he was once more wounded, this time mortally. The fire he had directed on the enemy was instrumental in repelling the attack. The gallantry and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Langeberg reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service. Home of record: Britton, South Dakota.

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Find a Grave: :

Birth: September 3, 1925
Britton, Marshall County
South Dakota, USA
Death: September 4, 1950
Hwanghae-namdo, North Korea

Youngest son of Albert F. Ludwig and Mary Margaret (Buhring) Langeberg.
Lee served in the US Army and was listed as a Casualty of the Korean War, 1950-1957.

The following Obituary was kindly provided by David Didreckson:

BRITTON - Services were in the Presbyterian church here for Sfc. Lee W. Langeberg, 25, first Marshall County soldier to die in Korea. He was killed in action Sept. 4, 1950. 
The Rev. S.W. Gulsvig officiated and burial was in Britton Cemetery. The Erbe Funeral chapel handled arrangements.

Survivors include his former wife, Mrs. William Stanley, whom he married in 1947; two sons; seven brothers, Albert of Veblen, Art of Hillhead, Herman and Bert of Cornel, Wis., Ernest of Omro, Wis.; Jack of Eureka, Wis.; and Lawrence of Winnie Connie, Wis., and five sisters, Mrs. Mary Bushman of Kelso, Wash., Mrs. Agnes Castle of Ukia, Calif., Mrs. Elinor Doro of Winnie Connie, Wis., Mrs. Emma Hays of Neenah, Wis., and Mrs. Freda Ralston of Sioux Falls.

Military honors were conducted by the Britton American Legion.

Sfc. Langeberg served in the Army in Europe in World War II. He was discharged from the Army after the war but later re-enlisted and was sent to Korea in July, 1950, with the 23rd infantry, 2nd division. He was in front line combat from Aug. 18, 1950, until killed.

He was awarded the Bronze Star for service in Germany and the Silver Star and Purple Heart for Korean action. During World War II, he fought in the Battle of the Bulge and was among troops that crossed the Rhine river into Germany. He was born Sept. 3, 1925, in Marshall County.

- Aberdeen (SD) American News, Saturday, September 15, 1951, Page 8

Langenfeld, Eugene (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 210 - 22 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Private First Class Eugene Langenfeld, RA17281774, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company G, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 8 June 1951, near Najontyong, North Korea. On that date his company had secured its objective and had set up defensive positions, when it was suddenly subjected to a barrage of enemy mortar fire which wounded several men. During this action Private Langenfeld, with complete disregard for his personal safety, left his position of comparative safety and advanced to a forward position from which he could better observe the enemy. Locating the enemy mortar, he called for and directed friendly mortar fire upon the enemy’s position. While thus exposing himself, he was killed by a round from the enemy mortar. His courageous action undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades and was directly responsible for neutralizing the enemy mortar position. The gallantry of Private Langenfeld reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Lango, Samuel A.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Samuel A. Lango (ASN: 0-1842047), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company H, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 16 September 1950, near Sindong, Korea. During an engagement with a numerically superior enemy force, many of the men of his unit had, without orders, started withdrawing because of extremely heavy enemy mortar and small arms fire being directed at them. Realizing the urgency of the situation, Lieutenant Lango immediately exposed himself to the murderous hail of enemy fire to reorganize his troops and urged them to return to their positions. By continuously exposing himself, going from man to man, maintaining organization and encouraging each man individually, Lieutenant Lango inspired his men to the extent that the enemy failed to penetrate the lines and was forced to withdraw. His brilliant leadership and conspicuous courage, under direct enemy fire, were a great inspiration to his men. Lieutenant Lango's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Lanken, Walter J.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Walter J. Lanken, United States Army, a member of Medical Detachment, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy) attached to 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 19 September 1950 near Singdong, Korea. Corporal Lanken, a medical aid man, was attached to Company A, 70th Tank Battalion which was supporting an infantry attack on hill 202. When several friendly tanks in a river bed for repairs came under heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire, seven of the tank crewmen were wounded. Corporal Lanken, disregarding his own safety, moved from man to man in the impact area rendering first aid to the wounded. While engaged in this selfless consideration and treatment of others, Corporal Lanken lost his life when he was struck by a shell fragment. His voluntary and extreme devotion to duty on this occasion was an inspiring example and was responsible for saving the lives of many of the wounded men. Corporal Lanken’s conspicuous gallantry and selfless sacrifice reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. General Orders: General Orders number 155, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division, 15 November 1950. Home of Record: Iowa.

Lansil, Clifford L. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Clifford L. Lansil, Jr. (MCSN: 645901), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When his machine gun section suffered heavy casualties during an attack by his company against a strong hostile force, Corporal Lansil immediately assumed the responsibility of leader and reorganized his section. Bravely exposing himself to direct hostile small arms and machine gun fire, he moved along the front lines to locate and spot enemy gun positions so that accurate fire could be brought to bear. During a furious counterattack by the enemy, he continually moved from one gun position to another, supervising and directing effective fire to inflict heavy casualties among the fanatical aggressors. By his daring initiative, determined leadership and cool courage in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Lansil contributed materially to the successful repulse of the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Nashua, New Hampshire. Home Town: Boston, Massachusetts.

Lapham, Roy D. (posthumous)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 13 September 1957

Private First Class Roy D. Lapham, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Kumh-Wa, Korea, on 12 September 1951.  When two platoons of Private Lapham's company were pinned down by intense enemy fire his platoon joined the attack.  In attempting to capture a trench the third platoon also came under heavy mortar fire and was forced to scatter.  Private Lapham, with the platoon leader and a few other men reached a location from which the enemy position that was holding up the advance was visible  40 yards away.  In leading an attack on the position the platoon leader was killed and one soldier wounded, Private Lapham and two others were able to take cover.  In utter disregard of his own safety, Private Lapham stood up firing his rifle and throwing grenades as he ran to the enemy trench.  When he ran out of ammunition he jumped into the trench and used his rifle as a club.  Though mortally wounded, Private Lapham succeeded in silencing the enemy position and enabled the attack to continue.  Private Lapham's gallantry, devotion to duty, and self-sacrifice contributed immeasurably to the success of the attack and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

[KWE Note: Born at Nappanee, Indiana, his family moved to the Benton Harbor area of Michigan where he was buried in Cassopolis, Michigan.]

LaPointe, Walter Baptist (posthumous)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 345 - November 07, 1951

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to Private First Class Walter B. LaPointe (Regular Army, Infantry, U.S. Army, Company F, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, who is cited for gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 9 October Korea near Homang-ni, Korea. As Company F attacked Hill 347, Private LaPointe moved ahead of the company line, seeking out and firing on enemy emplacements. Ignoring the intense fire the foe was directing on the area, Private LaPointe displayed superb courage and determination by advancing whenever possible and setting up his weapon in unprotected but commanding positions. He bravely continued in this manner, providing much needed automatic weapons fire for his comrades, until mortally wounded. Private LaPointe’s gallantry reflects highest credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from South Dakota.

"Walter was the youngest of eight children born to Albert and Elizabeth Ringing Shield LaPointe.  Like so many Native Americans in South Dakota and across our country, Walter felt an obligation to serve his country. Walter enlisted at the age of 19 and was sent overseas in 1951. Just four months after arriving in Korea, Walter was killed in an intense firefight near Homang-ni. He was awarded a posthumous Silver Star for "gallantry in action'' and I would like to read from his citation. It says:

'As Company F attacked Hill 347, Private LaPointe moved ahead of the company line, seeking out and firing on enemy emplacements. Ignoring the intense fire the foe was directing on the area, Private LaPointe displayed superb courage and determination by advancing whenever possible and setting up his weapon in unprotected but commanding positions. He bravely continued in this manner, providing much needed automatic weapons fire for his comrades, until mortally wounded. Private LaPointe's gallantry reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service.'

Walter was buried at the Advent Cemetery near his home in Mosher [South Dakota]. His mother Elizabeth was touched by the warmth local veterans displayed at her son's passing. The following Spring, Elizabeth decided to serve lunch to the local American Legion Post. She decided to make it a tradition, and each year since the Legion Post in Mosher has enjoyed a luncheon served by the LaPointe family.

Even after Elizabeth's passing, the tradition continues, and still today the members of the local Legion Post know the enduring gratitude of the LaPointe family. Many friendships have been built over the years and a special connection between the family and Mosher's veteran community has grown. Speaking of the tradition, a family member recently said: 'In this manner, we will forever preserve [Walter's] memory.' Indeed, they have done much more than that. With their generosity, they have strengthened the ties of friendship between the citizens of South Dakota and the men and women who fight to protect them. They have shown our veterans that their service will never be forgotten."

[Source: Senate Session September 20, 2004, Congressional Record, Senator Daschle]

Lara, Steve C.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 340 - 15 August 1953

Sergeant Steve C. Lara, RA38341988, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June and during the early morning hours of 15 June 1953, Company "E" had the mission of raiding enemy held Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. Enemy artillery and mortar fire began falling in the area, causing numerous casualties. Sergeant LARA, leader of a section attached to the support element, placed his assistant in command and rushed toward the objective under intense enemy automatic weapons fire, making three trips between the objective and friendly lines, evacuating the wounded men. Although exhausted from these actions, Sergeant LARA found a wounded comrade and evacuated him to friendly lines. Sergeant LARA'S outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the federal Service from Texas.

LaRocco, Salvatore J.

General Orders No. 136 - 19 February 1951
25th Infantry Division

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant First Class Salvatore J. LaRocco, RA12123801, Infantry, Company H, 27th Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army. On 27 and 28 November 1950 near Ipsok, Korea, Sergeant First Class LaRocco’s battalion was heavily engaged by a series of hostile assaults. Although the enemy was directing a heavy volume of observed fire into his area, he moved about the position, pointed out hostile emplacements to his men and directed such an effective barrage of 75mm recoilless rifle fire that the enemy withdrew in disorder. On the following day, after alerting the battalion for a second assault, he moved his weapon to an adjacent road which provided a clear field of fire and, despite exposure to intense hostile attack, maintained his position until the enemy were again repulsed. Sergeant First Class LaRocco’s courageous leadership and selfless devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself, his unit and the American soldier. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Larsen, Charles Hans (1st award) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Charles Hans Larsen (MCSN: 326691), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant in Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. Unhesitatingly assuming command when his company commander was killed during an assault on the enemy, Staff Sergeant Larsen fearlessly led the platoon against the well-entrenched, heavily armed hostile forces on high ground and, undaunted by intense enemy fire, succeeded in seizing his assigned objective despite his depleted ranks. Encouraging the men by his exemplary actions, he directed them in returning accurate and effective fire which inflicted heavy losses on the enemy forces who fought desperately from three sides to defend their commanding positions. By his cool leadership, tactical ability and indomitable fighting spirit, Staff Sergeant Larsen contributed materially to the success of our forces in gaining an entrance to Seoul, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Larsen, Charles Hans (2nd award) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Charles Hans Larsen (MCSN: 326691), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant in Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 1 to 7 December 1950. When his company was subjected to a strong enemy attack while deployed in defensive positions near Yudam-ni on 1 December, Staff Sergeant Larsen repeatedly exposed himself to heavy hostile fire to move among his men, directing their fire and encourage them until the enemy attack was successfully repulsed. On 7 December, while under attack by a numerically superior enemy force which succeeded in overrunning several platoon positions, he exposed himself to the extremely heavy hostile fire to lead a hastily organized group of eight men in a counterattack on a hillcrest which had been lost to the enemy. After recapturing the hillcrest, he was fatally wounded as he was consolidating his position. By his outstanding leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Larsen contributed materially to the successful defense of his company's position, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: May 23, 1923 at Tomah, Wisconsin. Home Town: Tomah, Wisconsin. Death: KIA: December 7, 1950.

Larson, Curtis A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Curtis A. Larson (MCSN: 1130538), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Right Guide of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 - 28 October 1952. When the platoon commander and platoon sergeant were wounded during an assault to retake a sector of the main line of resistance that had been previously overrun by the enemy, Sergeant Larson immediately assumed command and organized his unit for the final assault. Despite intense enemy mortar and artillery fire, he fearlessly led his men to the crest of the objective and, when forced to withdraw because of numerous casualties, joined a second assaulting unit. When that platoon was also repelled by the intense enemy fire, he accompanied a third attack which succeeded in recapturing and securing the critical sector. After assisting in setting up a perimeter of defense, he unhesitatingly moved forward of the line to supervise the evacuation of wounded Marines in the face of continuing enemy artillery fire. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Larson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fargo, North Dakota. Home Town: Fargo, North Dakota.

Larson, Damon Juan (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Damon Juan Larson (MCSN: 0-49965), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Leader of a Machine Gun Platoon of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yudam-ni, Korea, on 28 November 1950. When fifteen of the enemy overran one of his machine gun positions during a strong hostile attack against the company's defensive line, Second Lieutenant Larson, in company with one of his men, immediately proceeded to attempt the recapture of the vital emplacement. Fired upon by two hostile soldiers as he neared the position, he succeeded in annihilating one of the enemy before he was mortally wounded by the other. By his superb leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the repulse of the hostile attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 5, 1926 at Wichita, Kansas. Home Town: Barney, North Dakota. Death: KIA: November 28, 1950 - Buried at: Eternal Hills Memorial Park - Oceanside, California.

Larson, Kenneth

Citation not yet found.

"The Silver Star, America's third highest combat award, and the Purple Heart were recently presented to M/Sgt. Kenneth J. Larson, in Japan.  He received the Silver Star for gallantry in action agains the enemy in Korea on Oct. 7, 1951.  He served with the 1st Cavalry Division." - Winona (MN) Republican-Herald April 9, 1952

Larson, Robert L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert L. Larson (MCSN: 1172706), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 April 1952. When a numerically superior hostile force rushed through gaps in the breached barbed wire to viciously attack his outpost position, Corporal Larson deployed his fire team to direct withering counterfire upon the enemy. With the attackers surrounding his unit on three sides, he hurled grenades at the hostile force and, although wounded in the arm, continued to throw the deadly missiles until again wounded by an enemy grenade. Unhesitatingly taking command when the squad leader was killed, Corporal Larson skillfully effected the withdrawal of the remainder of the unit to a newly organized platoon defense perimeter while under continuous hostile fire and carried one wounded comrade up a hill t the new position despite the suffering from his own painful wounds. By his outstanding courage, resourcefulness and self-sacrificing devotion to duty, corporal Larson contributed materially to the successful reorganization of the defense forces and to repelling numerous enemy assaults throughout the night until the exhausted hostile troops were forced to withdraw. His heroic leadership was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Des Moines, Iowa. Home Town: Des Moines, Iowa.

Lau, Richard Andrew

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Richard Andrew Lau (NSN: 9545726), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to an Infantry Company, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 September 1950. Stationed at the forward aid post during his battalions attack against enemy positions at Inchon, Hospitalman Lau repeatedly exposed himself to hostile fire to administer aid and expedite the evacuation of the wounded. Although he himself was painfully and seriously wounded in the leg during one of his trips to assist casualties, he continued to render medical treatment to the wounded and refused to be evacuated until he became so weak from loss of blood that he had to be carried to the aid station. His outstanding courage and initiative served to inspire all members of his unit and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Laudati, Nicola A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Nicola A. Laudati (MCSN: 369616), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Machine Gun Section in Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. When an engineer was wounded by enemy sniper fire while clearing mine fields in front of advancing friendly tanks, Sergeant Laudati ran forward from his firing position and, in the face of intense hostile fire, started to remove anti-tank mines from the path of the approaching tanks. Despite a lack of formal knowledge of mine removal operations, he continued to search out and disarm enemy mines, thereby greatly facilitating the advance of friendly tanks and infantry teams to their objectives. His outstanding courage and daring initiative reflect the highest credit upon Sergeant Laudati and the United States Naval Service. Born: Newark, New Jersey. Home Town: Newark, New Jersey.

Lauderdale, Charles W.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 297 - 16 July 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class Charles W. Lauderdale, RA18331507, Infantry, United States Amy, a member of Company I, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Saemal, Korea. Although wounded while his unit was fighting its way out of enemy ambush, Private Lauderdale refused to leave and requested permission to return to the fight as a rifleman. When that permission was refused because of his serious wound, he nevertheless insisted that his place in a litter jeep be given to a man who was more seriously wounded than himself. Private Lauderdale was solely responsible for seeing to his [comrade’s] evacuation and thus saving his life. When last seen, Private Lauderdale was returning to the scene of the fighting. The gallantry and selfless devotion to a wounded comrade displayed by Private Lauderdale reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Arkansas.

Laugen, Lawrence N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Lawrence N. Laugen (MCSN: 195867), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Command Pilot of a Transport Plane of Headquarters Squadron, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri and Koto-ri, Korea, from 1 to 5 December 1950. Braving a surrounding concentration of enemy troops estimated at seventy thousand, some of whom were entrenched within two hundred yards of the airstrip at Koto-ri, Master Sergeant Laugen carried out a series of vital transport missions from extremely small and hastily constructed airstrips. Executing all landings and take-offs in the face of intense hostile small arms fire, he successfully delivered eleven loads of urgently needed ammunition, medical supplies and food to beleaguered friendly ground troops in the Chosin Reservoir Area. Returning on each occasion with his aircraft dangerously overloaded with the sick and wounded, he carried all casualties safely to a rear area. By his outstanding airmanship, daring initiative and unfaltering devotion to duty throughout, Master Sergeant Laugen upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Nome, North Dakota. Home Town: St. Paul, Minnesota.

Laundry, William R. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class William R. Laundry (MCSN: 1314802), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 February 1953. When his squad was dispatched to assist in evacuating the casualties from a combat outpost subjected to heavy enemy mortar and machine gun fire, Private First Class Laundry, realizing that it was vitally necessary for his outfit to gain fire superiority over the hostile force before the wounded could be evacuated, unhesitatingly volunteered to man a machine gun in a position where three other gunners had previously been hit by intense enemy fire. Although mortally wounded while attempting to bring effective fire to bear on the enemy, Private First Class Laundry, by his bravery and aggressive fighting spirit, served to inspire his fellow Marines in their efforts to reduce the fire power of the hostile force, enabling the evacuation to be completed without further losses. His outstanding courage and exceptional initiative in the face of great odds were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: July 3, 1933 at Sault Saint Marie, Michigan. Home Town: Seattle, Washington. Death: KIA: February 1, 1953.

Lavergne, Paul

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 69 - 20 March 1951

First Lieutenant Paul Lavergne, 0928287, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 29 January 1951, at about half past midnight in the vicinity of Turung, Korea, Company "A" Command Post was surrounded by an estimated two hundred enemy who attempted a surprise attack. Their design was foiled by Lieutenant Lavergne, company executive officer, who gave the alarm and immediately sprang to an exposed position to engage the enemy with automatic carbine fire. This rapid and heroic action delayed the enemy attack, permitting his comrades to deploy, take up the battle, and eventually fight their way out. Lieutenant Lavergne lost his life early in the fire fight, but his heroic actions saved the lives of his comrades. His bravery and gallantry exemplify the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Lawler, Joseph F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Joseph F. Lawler (MCSN: 1170277), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 July 1952. Severely wounded by an enemy grenade while his squad was defending an outpost against a numerically superior enemy force firmly entrenched on high ground, Private First Class Lawler steadfastly continued to fire his machine gun and skillfully assisted a Corpsman in rendering aid to the wounded. Single-handedly manning the weapon after his assistant gunner was also wounded, he courageously engaged the enemy in intermittent fire-fights for over a one-hour period until his unit was reinforced and ordered to withdraw. Despite the intense pain of his wounds, he selflessly carried extra equipment and assisted other wounded to friendly lines in the face of enemy mortar fire before he collapsed and was evacuated. By his indomitable fighting spirit, marked fortitude and unyielding devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Lawler served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Pittston, Pennsylvania.

Lawrence, O.B.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 130 - June 2, 1951

Lieutenant Colonel O.B. Lawrence, 0450040, Artillery, Army of the United States, Commanding Officer, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 14 February 1951 in the vicinity of Kaejong, Korea.  Upon reaching the infantry command post, Colonel Lawrence found that there was no communication between the infantry and artillery.  The infantry was hard pressed and badly in need of artillery support.  Colonel Lawrence started back to locate the wire vehicles which he had previously sent out and found  them pinned down by enemy small arms fire.  With total disregard for his own safety, he carried a line to an artillery observation post from which he adjusted artillery fire until the small arms fire of the enemy was silenced.  He remained at his post adjusting fire until tanks arrived to relieve him.  The gallant conduct of Colonel Lawrence reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Oklahoma.

Lawson, Frank Joe

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Technical Sergeant Frank J. Lawson (MCSN: 275630), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces on Obong-ni Ridge, near Yongsan, Korea, on 17 and 18 August 1950. During the attack on a ridge, the platoon leader of the second platoon was killed. Sergeant Lawson, the platoon sergeant, immediately assumed command of the platoon and continued the attack in a highly aggressive manner. At darkness, having seized a portion of the company objective, Sergeant Lawson was ordered to defend that position for the night. At approximately 0230, 18 August 1950, a severe enemy counterattack was launched against Company A's perimeter of defense. During the ensuing action, intense small arms, automatic, machinegun, hand and rifle grenade fire was directed at the Company position. Sergeant Lawson, wounded painfully in the thigh by machinegun fire during the initial enemy onslaught, continued to move among his men, directing their fires and reforming the line against the attacking enemy. While moving about through this intense fire, he was wounded again by shrapnel in the head, arms, legs and body. Not until the enemy attack was repulsed, would he allow himself to be evacuated. Although badly wounded himself, Sergeant Lawson unselfishly assisted two severely wounded Marines back to the aid station. His outstanding leadership, devotion to duty and heroic actions were an inspiration to his men and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 200 (December 18, 1950). Entered Service From Oklahoma.

Lawwill, Hayes E.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 28 - 4 February 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Hayes E. Lawwill (ASN: RA-15223387), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy), 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 2 November 1950 at Unsan, Korea. Corporal Lawwhill's unit, moving to cover the withdrawal of an infantry battalion in danger of encirclement by the enemy, was confronted by an enemy road block which was strongly defended, causing the tank column to halt along the road. Simultaneously, with the halt, the column began to receive heavy enemy fire from both sides of the road. Without heed for his own safety, Corporal Lawwill voluntarily made himself a messenger between the commanding Officer's lead vehicle and the remainder of the column. Moving back and forth in the face of the vicious enemy fire, he was wounded by an enemy shell fragment. When the order to destroy equipment and retire to the rear was finally given, Corporal Lawwill, although wounded, volunteered to lead a group of men to safety through the enemy infested hills. Pursued by the enemy and continually in danger of ambush, he skillfully and successfully led the group to safety without a casualty. His initiative and fearless courage were directly responsible for the return of safety of thirty men who might otherwise have become casualties. Corporal Lawwill's gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Leach, Harold H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Harold H. Leach (MCSN: 1159508), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 April 1952. With his unit occupying a forward outpost during a fanatical enemy attack, Corporal Leach, although painfully wounded, bravely made his way through intense hostile artillery and mortar fire to inform the platoon commander of the squad's situation. When the numerically superior force overran the positions, he fearlessly rushed to the aid of another wounded Marine and repulsed the enemy with hand grenades and his bare fists. After skillfully reorganizing his squad, he set it in as part of a newly-formed defensive perimeter and directed his unit in repelling repeated hostile attacks for a period of three hours. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and gallant devotion to duty, Corporal Leach contributed materially to the successful defense of the outpost and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Silver Creek, New York. Home Town: Jamestown, New York.

Leachman, Mark M.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 151 - November 11, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant [then Corporal] Mark M. Leachman (Leachmen) (ASN: RA-12320140), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company I, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 16 September 1950 near Taegu, Korea. While stationed at the company command post on Hill 174 as a runner, Sergeant Leachman learned that a sergeant of his platoon was lying seriously wounded in an exposed position on the forward slope of the hill. Sergeant Leachman immediately left the command post and moved to where he could aid the wounded sergeant. Displaying extreme courage and selflessness, he asked for covering fire, and then moved aggressively down the forward slope, completely disregarding the heavy enemy small arms fire directed on him. When he found he could not carry the wounded sergeant due to the intensity of the enemy fire, Sergeant Leachman, protecting the sergeant's body with his own, crawled and dragged the wounded man to safety. Here, he dressed the sergeant's wound and organized a litter team to evacuate him without delay. Sergeant Leachman's gallantry saved the life of a wounded comrade at great risk to his own and reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Leakey, James R.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 12 - 8 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James R. Leakey (ASN: US-55112763), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Pangdangdong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. During its assault against determined enemy forces, his platoon was subjected to intense small arms and automatic weapons fire from an enemy bunker. Private Leakey, realizing that a continued advance depended on the destruction of the enemy strongpoint, moved forward, crawling over the extremely rugged terrain, until he reached a position at the rear of the bunker. From this point, he unleashed a barrage of grenades, destroying the emplacement and killing its occupants. As a result of his bold initiative, the platoon was able to advance and secure its objective with a minimum of casualties. Private Leakey's heroic action, aggressiveness and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Alexandria, Indiana.

Leal, Albaro Sr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 97 - 17 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Albaro Leal, Sr. (ASN: RA-39853995)United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company C, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy on 20 July 1950, at Taejon, Korea. Sergeant Lead and his squad upon approaching a railroad underpass were pinned down by intense fire from an enemy machine gun which was preventing passage on the road. Observing this and locating the machine gun position, Sergeant Leal voluntarily in the face of enemy fire advanced across an open area, assaulted the gun position using hand grenades to destroy the machine gun and killed five of the enemy. Sergeant Leal's bravery and action at great personal risk reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Home Town: Harlingen, Texas.

Lease, Gene Henry (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Gene Henry Lease (MCSN: 1057285), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 September 1950. When his platoon commander was wounded by intense hostile fire as the unit proceeded through Seoul, Private First Class Lease unhesitatingly ran forward to the officer's completely exposed position and, lifting him up, carried him toward the shelter of a nearby building. By his prompt and heroic action, he was responsible for saving the life of the wounded man although he himself fell, mortally wounded, after covering all but the last few steps to safety. His selfless determination in the face of grave personal risk reflects the highest credit upon Private First Class Lease and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 27, 1931 at Great Falls, Montana. Home Town: Fairfield, Montana. Death: KIA: September 26, 1950 - Buried at: Sunset Hill Cemetery - Fairfield, Montana.

LeBlanc, Freddie J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Freddie J. LeBlanc (MCSN: 659057), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 - 27 March 1953. When his unit was pinned down by devastating enemy small arms, mortar and artillery fire while participating in a counterattack on a vital enemy-held outpost, Sergeant LeBlanc courageously exposed himself to the intense fire to rally his unit and to keep it in order. Although painfully wounded while moving from man to man to reorganize the group and direct its fire, and handicapped by the scarcity of men able to assist him, he valiantly attempted to muster his squad for an enveloping maneuver before his painful wounds necessitated his evacuation. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless devotion to duty in the face of greave peril, Sergeant LeBlanc served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Marrero, Louisiana. Home Town: Marrero, Louisiana.

Ledbetter, Frank O.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Frank O. Ledbetter (MCSN: 1079717), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, 1st Marine Provisional Brigade, near Changallon, Korea, on 13 August 1950. As an automatic rifleman, Private Ledbetter was in a defensive position when a heavy enemy counterattack made it necessary for his platoon to withdraw to a better position close to the Company perimeter. During the withdrawal, under intense enemy machinegun fire, Private Ledbetter suffered a severe wound of the thigh. With total disregard for his wound, personal safety, and the enemy small arms and machine gun fire, Private Ledbetter succeeded in moving bout forty feet to the flank, located the enemy machinegun and put it out of action. By his courageous and skillful actions Private Ledbetter enabled his platoon to complete it's withdrawal without further casualties and repulse the counterattack. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 104 (October 7, 1950). Entered Service From Texas.

Lee, Calvin E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Calvin E. Lee (MCSN: 511010), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 December 1950. With the forward elements of his platoon pinned down by heavy and accurate hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire from three sides while spearheading a drive along the road south of Koto-ri, Staff Sergeant Lee courageously left his covered position and moved forward with his platoon leader under heavy fire to reconnoiter an avenue of approach to the enemy positions. Encountering a hostile machine gun nest, he assisted in knocking out the weapon with hand grenades and, during a later reconnaissance, when he was wounded and his platoon leader killed, he refused treatment and evacuation and remained with his group until the unit was reorganized and placed in charge of the leader of an adjacent platoon. Cool and courageous under fire, Staff Sergeant Lee, by his fortitude and indomitable devotion to duty, inspired all who served with him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cambridge, Iowa. Home Town: Omaha, Nebraska.

Lee, Charles W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles W. Lee (MCSN: 1336496), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 26 - 27 July 1953. Although painfully wounded during the early stages of the fierce fighting in defense of a vital friendly outpost, Private First Class Lee steadfastly remained with his platoon and continued to deliver devastating fire upon the hostile forces throughout repeated attacks on his position. When wire communications between the platoon and the company command post were urgently needed, he unhesitatingly volunteered to establish the line, gallantly exposing himself to intense enemy small arms, mortar, and artillery fire until the vital wire connection was established and later, when hostile artillery fire severed the line, again braved enemy fire to assist a wireman in locating and repairing the broken wire. Wounded a second time while voluntarily leading reinforcing elements to his position, he courageously remained as an effective part of the unit until the platoon was relieved. By his aggressive fighting spirit, resourcefulness under fire and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Lee served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of his platoon, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Emherst County, Virginia. Home Town: Lynchburg, Virginia.

Lee, Christian C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Christian C. Lee (MCSN: 0-7378), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Officer in Charge of the Close Air Support Section and Commanding Officer of Marine Tactical Air Control Squadron Two within the Pusan perimeter from 3 August to 5 September 1950, in the Inchon-Seoul invasion from 15 September to 12 October 1950 and in the Hagaru-Ri area of Korea from 20 November 1950 to 10 December 1950. Operating under extremely adverse conditions and often under enemy fire, through his personal courage and leadership he maintained continuous and unfailing control of Close Air Support aircraft. In North East Korea, Major Lee, realizing that his section could not carry out its mission of coordinating the Close Air Support for the First Marine Division and other elements of the Tenth Corps, U.S. Army in the Chosin Reservoir area from its position in a rear area, moved his section forthwith to Hagaru-Ri. This decision and his conduct of his unit's operations from this position contributed essentially to the successful withdrawal of the United Nations Forces from that area. Major Lee was directly instrumental in developing and sustaining the efficient, continuous, and devastating Close Air Support rendered the United Nations Forces during this critical period. His personal courage, determination, outstanding leadership and heroic actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Lee, Ernest F.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Ernest F. Lee (MCSN: 639043), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Anti-tank Company, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the period 3 November 1950 and 4 November 1950. On the night of 3 November 1950, Corporal Lee engaged an enemy T-34 tank at a distance of twenty yards. Although under intense small arms fire he scored two direct hits on the tank which burst into flames and was totally destroyed. During the morning of 4 November 1950, Corporal Lee's squad engaged the enemy in the town of Sudong, Korea, and Corporal Lee, coolly directing the attack, killed several of the enemy and forced the rest to withdraw. During the afternoon of 4 November 1950, his platoon engaged four enemy T-34 tanks and his accurate fire was instrumental in destroying two of them. The heroic actions of Corporal Lee were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 49 (December 2, 1950). Entered Service From Georgia.

Lee, Ernest S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Ernest S. Lee (MCSN: 0-44367), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 May 1952. Although subjected to heavy enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire during a tank supported combat patrol deep in enemy territory, First Lieutenant Lee positioned his command group close behind the leading platoon and aggressively directed a successful attack against a numerically superior, well-entrenched hostile force. When his unit was subjected to a series of well coordinated and heavily supported counterattacks, he skillfully directed the defense and often directly engaged the enemy. During the withdrawal, he supervised the movement of his company and was one of the last to leave the position. By his outstanding leadership, marked courage and unwavering devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Lee upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Santo Domingo City, Santo Domingo. Home Town: Washington, D.C.

Lee, Farrald E.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 154 - June 15, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Farrald E. Lee (ASN: RA-13257978), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company F, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 5 April 1951, near Sugu-dong, Korea. On that date he was a machine gunner in an infantry unit which was attacking an enemy held hill. After the unit had secured its objective the enemy counterattacked in large numbers, forcing the unit to withdraw. During the withdrawal, Private Lee voluntarily remained behind to cover the withdrawal of the unit with machine gun fire until the firing pin on his weapon broke. He remained in this exposed position and threw hand grenades at the oncoming hostile forces. His courageous action contributed materially in enabling the unit to withdraw with a minimum of casualties. The gallant conduct of Private Lee reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Lee, George Cabot Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant George C. Lee, Jr. (MCSN: 0-54718), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 August 1953. With his unit engaged in defending a section of a strategic hill against repeated assaults by numerically superior enemy forces, Second Lieutenant Lee constantly exposed himself to intense hostile fire to deploy his men in advantageous positions and directed withering counterfire on the attackers. Although partially blinded when he sustained multiple wounds during the intensive action, he bravely refused to be evacuated, maintained complete control of his platoon and continued to call in effective mortar and artillery fire which inflicted severe casualties upon the enemy. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and selfless devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Lee was greatly instrumental in the successful defense of a vital position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: London, England. Home Town: Westwood, Massachusetts.

Lee, James M.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 43 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) James M. Lee (ASN: 0-62578), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division (then a member of Company L, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division), near Tari-dong, Korea, on 3 August 1951. His platoon, acting as the assault element in an attack on enemy positions, was pinned down by intense bursts from an enemy machine gun nest. Realizing that his men were unable to move out of danger, Lieutenant Lee, Platoon Leader, unhesitatingly moved toward the critical emplacement. Exposing himself fearlessly to the murderous fire, he took an unprotected position and fired his pistol with devastating accuracy into the enemy emplacement, effectively pinning down its occupants and enabling his men to advance unopposed and destroy the strongpoint. With this key obstacle removed, the platoon was then able to capture the objective. Lieutenant Lee's courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless performance of duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Scotts Hill, North Carolina.

Lee, Kurt Chew-een

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Kurt Chew-Een Lee (MCSN: 0-48880), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 27 November to 8 December 1950. Although sick and in a weakened condition from a previous combat wound, First Lieutenant Lee refused hospitalization and unflinchingly led his unit across trackless, frozen wastes of rocky mountain ridges toward a beleaguered Marine company. Through his indomitable spirit, he contributed materially to the success of the epic night march of his battalion which resulted in the relief of the isolated Marine unit and the securing of vital ground. On 2 December 1950 when the leading elements of his company were pinned down under intense enemy fire from a rocky hill mass, he skillfully maneuvered his platoon forward in an attack in the face of the heavy fire, personally accounting for two enemy dead and providing such aggressive and inspirational leadership that fire superiority was regained and the enemy was routed. On 8 December 1950, First Lieutenant Lee's platoon was pinned down by intense hostile fire while attacking south on the main service road from Koto-ri. Observing that the heavy fire was inflicting numerous casualties, he exposed himself to the deadly fire to move among his troops, shouting words of encouragement and directing a withdrawal to covered positions. Assured that the last of his wounded was under cover, he was seeking shelter for himself when he was struck down and severely wounded by a burst of enemy machine gun fire. By his daring initiative and great personal valor throughout, First Lieutenant Lee served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Francisco, California. Home Town: Sacramento, California.

Lee, Ted J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Aviation Electronicsman Third Class Ted J. Lee (NSN: 3453688), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in aerial flight while in Korean waters on 5 August 1952. Aviation Electronicsman Third Class Lee was serving as a member of a helicopter crew called upon to perform the rescue of the downed pilot deep in enemy held territory. Knowing the scene of the proposed rescue was beyond the normal operating range of their helicopter, he professed his willingness to take this chance. Upon reaching the downed pilot, Aviation Electronicsman Third Class Lee exposed himself to enemy small arms fire in manipulating the hoist into the grasp of the downed pilot. Because of terrain features and treacherous air currents in the valley, the rescue would have been impossible without his skillful assistance. On the return trip, although the helicopter was hit on three occasions, he remained perfectly calm and assisted the passenger to protect him from further injury. He repeatedly demonstrated his concern for the safety of his passenger. Aviation Electronicsman Third Class Lee's cool courage and zealous devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and was at all times in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 2814 (February 27, 1953).

Lee, Warren E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Warren E. Lee (MCSN: 588478), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 November 1951. When his detail was immediately subjected to a heavy concentration of enemy fire upon its arrival at a designated equipment rendezvous area, Private First Class Lee, although painfully wounded by the initial burst of fire and bleeding profusely, unhesitatingly drove a jeep to a covered position and returned to the impact area time after time to personally evacuate five wounded Marines. Despite the intense hostile fire, he persisted in his brave efforts until all his wounded comrades had been evacuated. By his outstanding courage, selfless efforts in behalf of others and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Lee served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Joplin, Missouri. Home Town: St. Helens, Oregon.

Lee, Willard H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 195 - 22 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Willard H. Lee (ASN: RA-14271155), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Okchon, Korea, on 27 September 1950. During an attack he voluntarily moved forward under intense tank and machine gun fire to an exposed position in an attempt to eliminate two enemy tanks which were retarding the advance. Armed with a 3.5 rocket launcher he advanced through a hail of enemy fire to a point where he could direct effective fire and disabled both tanks permitting the continued advance of his company. His gallant actions with utter disregard for his own safety reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Apopka, Florida.

Lee, William G.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 114 - 31 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class William G. Lee (ASN: RA-33676303), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the Pioneer and Ammunition Platoon, Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 20 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. The 34th Infantry Regiment was defending the town of Taejon and the enemy had caused several casualties among his men. After locating the machine gun position Sergeant Lee armed only with his carbine advanced on the position and killed all of its crew. When his unit was ordered to withdraw later he was riding on a weapons carrier which was taken under enemy machine gun fire. Sergeant Lee with disregard for his own safety manned a .50 caliber machine gun which was mounted on the vehicle and by using his accurate fire was able to destroy the machine gun. During this action he was wounded by fire from the machine gun. The act of gallantry displayed by Sergeant Lee reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: McKeesport, Pennsylvania.

Leek, Billy J.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Hospitalman Billy J. Leek (NSN: 2562611), United States Navy, for gallantry in action against the armed enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near the Naktong River Sector, Korea, on 17 August 1950. Hospitalman Leek, a Company Aid Man, while under intense small arms, machine gun and mortar fire, without regard for his own safety, fearlessly endangered his own life while making repeated trips through this fire to attend wounded Marines of his company. While performing these acts he was wounded three times but refused evacuation of himself until all the wounded had been cared for. His unselfish devotion to duty and personal heroism were responsible for the saving of the lives of several Marines and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 187 (December 5, 1950.

Leeper, Offie L. Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 167 - 1951

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to First Lieutenant Offie L. Leeper Jr., 02209127, Infantry, U.S. Army, Company L, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, who is cited for gallantry in action against the enemy on 2 September 1951 near Kamgo-ri, Korea. As the platoon moved cautiously over the rugged terrain, deep in hostile territory, it was ambushed by a numerically superior enemy. Lieutenant Leeper, without regard for his personal safety, fearlessly charged the foe, firing his carbine and throwing grenades. Courageously maintaining a one man stand until mortally wounded by small arms fire, his action enabled his men to withdraw to a stronger defensive position. His dauntless aggressiveness and selfless devotion to duty inspired his fellow soldiers to greater efforts, thus inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and crushing the effectiveness of the ambush. Lieutenant Leeper’s gallantry reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Iowa.

LeFaivre, Edward N. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Edward N. LeFaivre (MCSN: 0-30579), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), in Korea on 21 October 1951. Observing an unusual amount of activity in the center and environs of a small village while carrying out a night intruder mission in company with a flare-dropping aircraft, Captain LeFaivre carried out a low-altitude reconnoitering pass in the face of intense hostile fire and discovered an extremely heavy concentration of enemy vehicles and supplies. Immediately initiating a series of daring bombing, strafing and napalm attacks, he scored several direct hits and, although his starboard engine was ablaze after being hit by anti-aircraft fire, continued to execute determined and effective attacks at levels which barely cleared the terrain. Finally forced to bail out when his damaged engine and nacelle blazed completely, he landed in an area teeming with hostile troops and successfully evaded capture until rescued on the following day. By his superb airmanship, outstanding courage and resolute determination, Captain LeFaivre was responsible for the destruction of at least twenty-one loaded enemy trucks and a large quantity of materiel, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

LeFaivre, Edward N. (3rd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Second Gold Star in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Captain Edward N. LeFaivre (MCSN: 0-30579), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action while serving as Pilot of a fighter Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen  (VMF(AW)-513), in Korea on 21 October 1951. Discovering a large enemy motor convoy near Kosan-ni during his initial reconnaissance of the sector while engaged in a night intruder mission deep in hostile territory, Captain LeFaivre skillfully directed the accompanying flare-dropping aircraft in illuminating the objective and initiated a series of daring attacks on the target. Quickly assessing the mountainous terrain in the immediate vicinity and selecting the only feasible lane of approach and recovery, he carried out repeated bombing, napalm and staffing attacks until all his ordnance was expended, destroying ten vehicles, including two fuel-laden tankers, and inflicting extensive damage on the hostile convoy. By his marked courage, superb airmanship and unswerving devotion to duty in the face of grave hazards, Captain LeFaivre was directly instrumental in dealing a damaging blow to the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Baltimore, Maryland. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.

Leforte, Joseph

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 404 - 15 September 1953

Sergeant Joseph Lefort, RA18386796, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June 1953, in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, Company "E" made an attack on Hill "412". Sergeant Lefort was a squad leader in the 1st platoon of the assault element. As they left the friendly lines, the unit came under intense enemy mortar and artillery fire. As they approached the objective, enemy machine gun fire forced the unit to take cover. Realizing that the delay would endanger the entire company, Sergeant Lefort immediately moved forward despite intense machine gun and small arms fire, and effectively returned the fire, enabling his comrades to leave their cover and resume the assault. A short while later, he was seriously wounded, but courageously continued his advance until rendered unconscious. Sergeant Lefort's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Louisiana.

Leeper, Offie L. Jr.

lowan Presented Son's Silver Star

SEATTLE - A tearful military father of an Iowa soldier, who fell in Korea, Wednesday received a silver star for his son’s bravery. Capt. Offie L. Leeper, Sr., of Leon, lA, received the decoration for 1st Lt. Offie L. Leeper Jr. [O-2209127], who was killed in action [28 September 1951] while "courageously maintaining a one-man stand" to cover a withdrawal of his men.

Lt. Leeper, 23, was graduated from the University of Iowa in 1950. He was with the First Cavalry Division [5th Cav]. Capt. Leeper is stationed at the Portland office of the Seattle port of embarkation. The Leepers also have another son, Lt. John Leeper, 26, in Korea with the Second Infantry Division."  Council Bluffs Nonpareil, Feb 7 1951

LeGarie, Warren George

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman First Class Warren George LeGarie (NSN: 2045377), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Artillery Battalion of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 7 December 1950. When his battery was subjected to heavy enemy mortar, grenade and automatic-weapons fire, Corpsman LeGarie repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire to render first aid to wounded Marines who were still in unprotected positions. Although seriously wounded himself, he refused medical aid and continued to treat and evacuate other casualties. By his courageous actions in saving others at the risk of his own life, Corpsman LeGarie served to inspire all who observed him. His fortitude, daring initiative and selfless devotion to duty throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division, Serial 2783 (January 25, 1951).

Leggette, William L.

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army
General Orders No. 6 96  - November 13, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William L. Leggett (AFSN: AO-1909734), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action while serving with an Infantry Regiment as Tactical Air Control Officer, in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Hambungni, Korea. Late on the night of 26 September 1950, Lieutenant Leggett was a member of a task force moving rapidly northward through enemy-held territory. Suddenly a group of ten hostile tanks attacked the motorized column, halting its advance, destroying its equipment, and killing and wounding its personnel. Although the tanks were firing constantly at ranges from ten to thirty-five yards, Lieutenant Leggett remained in his exposed position, radioing for night fighter aircraft and liaison planes. Early the following morning, when one of the tanks rolled over his jeep, smashing it and destroying his radio, Lieutenant Leggett provided close supporting fire for infantry tank-killer teams, assisting in the destruction of two of the hostile armored vehicles. The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Leggett on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Legursky, Carval

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Carval Legursky (MCSN: 1295440), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 26 to 29 March 1953. Assigned the mission of reconnoitering and determining the enemy strength on a combat outpost which had been overrun by hostile troops a few hours earlier, Corporal Legursky skillfully maneuvered his squad to within fifty yards of the enemy position and reported a hostile force of company size. Fearlessly exposing himself to intense enemy fire, he advanced to within extremely close range of the enemy positions and delivered accurate rifle and grenade fire, materially aiding his unit in denying the enemy seven hours of defensive preparation. While withdrawing from the area, he was painfully wounded and, after receiving medical treatment, gallantly led his men through a devastating barrage of hostile fire to recapture and hold the outpost. Severely wounded again on the following day while defending a portion of a flank of the newly won outpost, he refused evacuation and maintained his defensive position for a period of eight hours despite continuous enemy mortar fire. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked courage and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Legursky served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Raleigh, West Virginia. Home Town: Mabscott, West Virginia.

Lehman, Charles Francis (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Charles Francis Lehman (MCSN: 1153589), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Forward Observer of the 4.2" Mortar Company, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1951. Refusing to seek cover from a hail of enemy shells during a heavy and accurate mortar and artillery barrage on his company, Corporal Lehman remained steadfast at his post and, while attempting to locate the hostile weapons, was struck by fire and fell mortally wounded. His courageous initiative and indomitable fighting spirit served to inspire all who observed him and reflect great credit upon Corporal Lehman and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 24, 1931 at Dallas, Texas. Home Town: Dallas, Texas. Death: KIA: September 25, 1951 - Buried at: Calvary Hill Cemetery - Dallas, Texas.

Leister, Robert J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Robert J. Leister (MCSN: 0-55820), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 26 to 30 March 1953. Assigned the mission of reconnoitering and determining the enemy strength on a combat outpost that had been overrun by hostile troops a few hours earlier in the evening, Second Lieutenant Leister skillfully maneuvered his platoon to within 50 yards of the position and proceeded to harass the enemy with grenades and sniper fire. Throughout the remaining eight hours of darkness, he personally led small groups to within grenade range of the hostile position and directed effective fire which prevented the enemy from preparing adequate defensive positions, safely withdrawing his platoon at daybreak to the main lines. Later in the morning, when assigned the mission of counterattacking the same outpost as an integral part of the company, he fearlessly continued to move forward under a murderous barrage of enemy fire until relieved by another unit. Throughout the entire period, he exposed himself to hostile fire to offer advice and encouragement to his men. By his inspiring leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Second Lieutenant Leister contributed directly to the success of his platoon and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Leitensdorfer, Roland B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Roland B. Leitensdorfer (MCSN: 653130), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 February 1953. With his unit occupying a position well forward of the main line of resistance to protect a group of tanks which were in support of another unit's activities, Corporal Leitensdorfer skillfully positioned his fire team in their sector of the defensive perimeter. Immediately afterwards, when the enemy launched a savage assault on the perimeter position, he exposed himself to the murderous hostile small arms fire to direct his men in delivering a large volume of deadly accurate fire upon the enemy. Although the brunt of the hostile attack was directed toward his fire team's sector and he was painfully wounded, Corporal Leitensdorfer stubbornly continued to fire until the vicious assault was repulsed. When the action had subsided, he assisted in bringing his seriously wounded comrades to a Corpsman where they received medical attention. After returning to his position to prepare for another enemy attack, he fell unconscious from loss of blood and was evacuated. By his forceful leadership, indomitable courage and gallant devotion to duty, Corporal Leitensdorfer served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Louis, Missouri. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri.

Lemay, Leland P.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 81 - August 25, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Leland P. Lemay (ASN: RA-32850127), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company A, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in Korea. On 29 July 1950, Company F was attacked by enemy forces in the vicinity of Yongchong, Korea. The company was without artillery or heavy weapons support because of severed communications lines. When his platoon leader was seriously wounded, Sergeant Lemay moved forward under heavy enemy machine gun and rifle fire and, while returning to his position with the wounded officer, was himself wounded. Sergeant Lemay's courage and heroic devotion to duty reflect highest credit on himself and the military service.

Lemons, George C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Third Class George C. Lemons (NSN: 2291960), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 31 August 1951. When the platoon was suddenly brought under a devastating burst of fire from a well-concealed enemy bunker during an attack against strongly defended hostile positions, Hospitalman Third Class Lemons observed four wounded comrades lying in front of friendly lines and immediately crawled forward under enemy observation to administer first aid to the most seriously wounded man. With another burst of enemy fire shattering the immediate area and mortally wounding the stricken Marine while he was being treated, Hospitalman Third Class Lemons courageously refused to seek cover and fearlessly moved throughout the danger area, rendering medical treatment to the three other casualties and assisting them to safety. By his daring initiative, outstanding bravery and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Hospitalman Third Class Lemons served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. First Marine Division, Serial No. 60757 (December 4, 1951).

Lender, Charles W.

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 14 - 29 January 1954

Second Lieutenant Charles W. Lender, 01881783, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the night of 24 May 1953, in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, Lieutenant Lender was the leader of an 18 man ambush patrol in position on the slope of an enemy held hill. The group was soon attacked by a reinforced enemy platoon. Lieutenant Lender immediately deployed his men to combat the attack and bravely directed their fire. During the encounter, Lieutenant Lender courageously advanced forward of the patrol perimeter to retrieve a radio dropped in the initial action. Ignoring the heavy enemy fire, he succeeded in reaching the radio and carried it back toward the patrol. Lieutenant Lender was mortally wounded, however, before he could utilize the radio. His valiant actions and heroic disregard for his personal safety enabled the men to contact friendly lines and direct reinforcements to the scene of action. Lieutenant Lender's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Illinois.

Lenz, Leo L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 689 - 7 November 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class Leo L. Lenz, US55068294, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company K, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 22 September 1951 in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea. On this date, Private Lenz was an assistant machine gunner with a unit which was defending its position against the fanatical attacks of a numerically superior enemy force. Private Lenz occupied an emplacement in the direct path of the onrushing enemy with his machine gunner and squad leader. During the course of this action, hostile fire fatally wounded his two comrades and he, himself was wounded. Despite the painful wound and the hostile force, who at times advanced to several yards from his position, Private Lenz tenaciously maintained his emplacement, firing devastating fire on the enemy troops. He continued his courageous action, inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy, until reinforcements arrived. As a result of Private Lenz’s determination and devotion to duty the enemy was forced to withdraw. The gallantry in action displayed by Private Lenz on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Leon, Estanisledo

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army
General Orders No. 589 - July  26, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Estanisledo Leon (ASN: RA-39757048), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Inje, Korea. On 29 May 1951, Corporal Leon's company was moving forward in an attack against Hill 425 when it was pinned down by intense automatic weapons fire from an enemy emplacement at the base of the slope. Seeing that his unit was helplessly stalled and in danger of annihilation, Corporal Leon voluntarily moved forward alone in the face of the intense fire to assault the enemy emplacement. Using hand grenades and his rifle, he moved steadily forward until he had destroyed the position, killing four of the enemy and capturing five others. This action relieved the pressure on his unit and allowed his comrades to continue the assault and successfully secure the objective. The outstanding courage and determination displayed by Corporal Leon reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Leon-Gonzalez, Rafael

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 460 - 26 October 1953

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Rafael Leon-Gonzalez, 0-1685766, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 28 September 1951, in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, elements of Company I were assaulting a strategically valuable enemy held hill. Although subjected to an intense enemy artillery, mortar and small arms barrage, Lieutenant Leon-Gonzalez courageously guided his platoon up the slope, rapidly firing his automatic weapon. Moving to within 20 yards of the well-entrenched defenders, he aggressively led his group into the forward positions and bunkers, constantly giving clear instructions to the men. He then directed a final drive over the crest of the hill, forcing the enemy from the objective. Lieutenant Leon-Gonzalez' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Leonhard, Donald M. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 158 - 6 May 1953

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to Private First Class Donald M. Leonhard, RA17332828, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 26 December 1952 in the vicinity of Hyon-Chon, North Korea. On that night, Private Leonhard was serving as Reconnaissance Sergeant in a forward observation position, directing artillery fire in support of a patrol from Company F, 38th Infantry Regiment. This patrol was ambushed by the enemy and at approximately 2000 hours, wounded men from the patrol began staggering up the hill toward the observation post seeking safety and medical aid. Realizing that the hill was heavily mined and booby-trapped, Private Leonhard shouted to the men not to move, but in spite of his warning one severely wounded soldier continued to crawl toward the position. With complete disregard for his own personal safety and with full knowledge that the hill was infested with mines and booby traps, Private Leonhard leaped from his position of comparative security and started down the slope to assist the wounded infantryman. While running down the hill, he detonated one of the booby traps, mortally wounding him. He sacrificed his life to aid a helpless comrade without concern for danger and when obviously not required to do so. The heroism displayed by Private Leonhard reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Mandan, North Dakota.

Lepore, Virginio Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Virginio Lepore, Jr. (MCSN: 1092525), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Headquarters and Service Company, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. When the assault companies were pinned down under intense hostile small arms, machine gun, mortar and artillery fire, and one of them called the battalion for ammunition, Private First Class Lepore unhesitatingly drove his jeep from the battalion ammunition dump to the front line unit to deliver the urgently needed supply. Although wounded by enemy fire while unloading the ammunition, he courageously completed the operation, dragged his trailer from a ditch and secured it to the jeep. Observing many casualties awaiting evacuation, he drove his jeep forward to their assistance. Placing the wounded in the jeep and trailer, he then drove them back to the battalion aid station. By his daring initiative, personal valor and selfless devotion to duty in the face of grave danger, Private First Class Lepore upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Morristown, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Morristown, Pennsylvania.

Lerner, Robert A.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 494 - 20 November 1953

Private First Class Robert A. Lerner, RA12420690, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 9 July 1953, in the vicinity of Chung-Mok Sil, Korea, Private Lerner was in charge of a listening post 750 yards forward of the main line of resistance when the position was attacked by a large enemy force. In the action, Private Lerner immediately directed accurate fire upon the advancing foe to delay the attack until friendly reinforcements could arrive. Despite the intense fire of the defenders, the enemy moved up the slope and seriously wounded Private Lerner with automatic weapons fire and grenades. Disregarding his wounds, Private Lerner courageously continued to defend the outpost until the enemy overran his position. Private Lerner evaded capture by moving from the hilltop and rolling down the slope. His brave actions in delaying the foe contribute materially to the success of the ensuing counterattack and defeat of the assault. Private Lerner's outstanding heroism and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the Federal Service from New York.

Lescantz, Lawrence J.

Citation not yet found.

"Lawrence J. Lescantz, 24-year-old Anaconda student at Carroll who received a battlefield commission as an army frontline medic in Korea, has been named registrar for the 396th station hospital of the army reserve here.  Lescantz joined the reserve as a first lieutenant in the medical service corps and was assigned to the 396th, Helena, newest reserve unit commanded by Maj. Raymond O. Lewis.  The 396th registrar is a graduate of the medical service school, army medical center, San Antonio, Lescantz served as an automatic rifleman with the second infantry regiment of the first U.S. Marine Division from 1948 until 1950.  He enlisted in the army medical corps in 1951 and was a frontline medic with the 3rd Infantry Division in Korea.  He received his battlefield commission July 27, 1951.  Lescantz holds the Silver Star, won for gallantry; the Purple Heart, the combat medic's badge, the Korean presidential unit citation and the meritorious unit citation.  He served in the Chinese Communists-intervention campaign, the United National counteroffensive, the Chinese Communists spring offensive and the UN spring and fall offensive.  These campaigns were commonly known to the American troops as Operation Yo-Yo."

Lesney, Eugene G.

General Orders No. 14 - 10 July 1951
Headquarters I Corps

Corporal Eugene G. Lesney, ER15404129, Infantry, United States Army Reserve, a member of I Corps Headquarters Public Information Office while on temporary duty with the 73D Heavy Tank Battalion, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Koyang, Korea, on 6 April 1951.  At approximately 1400 hours on this date, the enemy placed intense mortar and small arms fire on the tank in which Cpl. Lesney was riding as bow gunner.  During the fire fight which insued, Cpl. Lesney sighted four enemy soldiers with pole charges crawling towards the exposed right flank of his tank.  Unable to bring fire on them with his machine gun from within the tank, Cpl. Lesney, unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, opened his hatch and fired on them with his pistol.  His accurate fire hit a pole charge which exploded killing three and wounding the fourth enemy soldier.  Cpl. Lesney's quick thinking, prompt action, and great courage undoubtedly saved the lives of the crew of his tank and the tank itself from destruction.  The gallantry and heroic action of Cpl. Lesney on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered Federal Service from Michigan.

Lett, Lawrence Everette (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Lawrence Everette Lett (MCSN: 1106261), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 12 and 13 August 1952. When his fire team was cut off by an enemy attack during a patrol forward of friendly lines while the company was engaged in defending a vitally important hill position against a fanatical enemy force, Corporal Lett fearlessly led his patrol through a hostile trench and boldly engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat, inflicting heavy casualties on the opposition. Leading his men back to friendly lines, he reorganized his team and moved into positions on the platoon front, directing and encouraging his men throughout the remainder of the night in repelling a numerically superior enemy force. On the following morning he aggressively led his group in an assault on an enemy bunker and, although twice painfully wounded during the ensuing hand-to-hand struggle, steadfastly remained in command throughout the successful assault on the enemy fortification, effectively covering the tactical withdrawal to friendly lines. Refusing medical aid until the more seriously wounded were attended, Corporal Lett, by his skilled leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and courageous initiative in the face of heavy odds, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: August 21, 1932 at Fountain City, Tennessee. Home Town: Fountain City, Tennessee. Death: KIA: October 27, 1952.

Levesque, Josephat N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Josephat N. Levesque (MCSN: 129429), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Ammunition Carrier of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 - 27 March 1953. When a Marine fell seriously wounded after the unit was pinned down by a devastating hostile mortar and artillery barrage during a counterattack on a vital enemy-held outpost, Private First Class Levesque removed his helmet and put it on the head of the wounded man. In order to shield his comrade from further wounds, he covered the man with his body until he himself was wounded and rendered unconscious. By his indomitable courage, quick initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Private First Class Levesque was directly responsible for saving the man's life and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Van Buren, Maine. Home Town: Lewiston, Maine.

Levin, Philip

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Philip Levin (NSN: 0-482912), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy during mine sweeping operations at Wonsan in the Korean theater during the period 10 to 31 October 1950. As Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Soprey (AMS-28) and while sweeping enemy mine fields in the face of heavy fire from enemy coast defense batteries, by his inspiring leadership and professional competence, he contributed directly to the efficient operation of his ship and the successful clearance of mine free channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1073 (November 17, 1950).

Leviner, Paul

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Paul Leviner (MCSN: 1210779), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 - 7 September 1952. While relieving a strategic outpost well forward of the main line of resistance, the unit was brought under an extremely heavy enemy artillery and mortar barrage followed by an aggressive assault by a numerically superior enemy force, Courageously placing his machine gun well in advance of the outpost defense line, Private First Class Leviner brought devastating fire to bear upon the charging enemy, accounting for a great number of enemy dead and wounded. Although his weapon became inoperative due to mechanical failure, he quickly corrected the difficulty and brought his gun to bear upon the enemy once again. Repeatedly exposing himself to hostile fire, he kept moving the weapon to gain better fields of fire as the direction of the hostile attack changed. Severely wounded by enemy fire while attempting to place the machine gun in a bunker, Private First Class Leviner, by his exceptional courage, daring initiative and selfless devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Laurinburg, North Carolina. Home Town: Laurel Hill, North Carolina.

Lewis, Darrel W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Darrel W. Lewis (MCSN: 1167765), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Runner of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 March 1953. With only one radio in the platoon, and the leader a casualty when the unit was subjected to a vicious attack by a strong enemy force, Private First Class Lewis moved about the platoon's position, shouting instructions received from his superiors. Exposing himself to intense hostile mortar and artillery fire, he moved along the extremely long platoon front, lending words of encouragement to the men and pointing out directions of fire. He carried out several exhausting trips, running the entire length of the unit's front carrying vitally needed ammunition to replenish the fighting positions. Displaying exceptional stamina, he carried wounded Marines off the hill and, afterwards returned up the steep and devastated slopes to his platoon's bitterly defended position. During one of these trips, he was critically wounded and unable to continue. By his indomitable courage, initiative and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Lewis served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Yakima, Washington. Home Town: Yakima, Washington.

Lewis, George H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade George H. Lewis (NSN: 456181), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry in action and outstanding devotion to duty as a member of the rescue party which entered the demolished living compartments on the U.S.S. Walke (DD-723) when that ship was heavily damaged due to enemy action on the morning of 12 June 1951. Knowing that a large number of wounded men were trapped in the debris and wreckage in the damaged area he voluntarily entered on of the compartments to find and rescue them. With complete disregard for his own safety, he made his way through the wreckage, and in almost complete darkness, sought out the wounded men trapped there. He helped to extricate them from the wreckage and bring them to safety. He remained in that compartment until all of the wounded had been rescued and all of the dead who could be extricated had been recovered. His personal courage, determination and devotion to duty saved the lives of several men who would otherwise have perished, and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1676 (October 18, 1951).

Lewis, James Mark

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class James Mark Lewis (MCSN: 1309392), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 26 March 1953. Participating in the defense of an outpost well forward of the main line of resistance during an assault by a numerically superior hostile force, Private First Class Lewis repeatedly assumed a position from which he could effectively delay the enemy and thereby give the defenders of the outpost sufficient time to reorganize and repulse the attack. Killed in action by an enemy demolition charge while voluntarily defending the entrance to a cave, Private First Class Lewis, by his outstanding courage and valiant fighting spirit, served to inspire all who observed him and materially aided in the defense of the outpost. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 5, 1931 at Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois. Death: KIA: March 26, 1953.

Lewis, Lyle D. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Lyle D. Lewis, Jr. (MCSN: 624192), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 13 to 15 August 1952. Reaching his position during a heavy enemy mortar and artillery barrage while the unit was engaged in defending a strategically important hill position far forward of the main line of resistance, Corporal Lewis skillfully deployed his squad and immediately proceeded to carry ammunition and supplies to them. Later, while carrying a tremendous amount of supplies, he fell unconscious from the effects of heat and exhaustion and, after being revived, continued to supervise the defense of his squad's sector. During the ensuing fanatical enemy attacks, he personally manned a machine gun and, although blown away from the gun, wounded and rendered unconscious, steadfastly remained at his weapon after recovering consciousness, continuing to inflict heavy casualties upon the hostile force. Between enemy attacks, he constantly checked his squad and assisted in evacuating the wounded, remaining with the rear elements when the company was relieved to insure the safe return of all his men. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked fortitude and courageous initiative, Corporal Lewis served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tacoma, Washington. Home Town: Tacoma, Washington.

Lewis, Price Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Price Lewis, Jr. (NSN: 0-226644), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. LSMR-525 in combat against an armed enemy of the United Nations in the Korean conflict. During the engagement with the enemy in Wonsan Harbor, North Korea, on 17 July 1951, he distinguished himself by his gallantry and intrepidity in maneuvering his ship amongst the plumes of the enemy's fire from shore batteries all the while delivering aggressive rocket and counter-battery fire against these enemy batteries at a time when the enemy was making his most determined effort to drive United Nations Naval Forces from Wonsan Harbor. In total disregard of his own safety, while his ship was being hit by shell fragments from near misses, and while he was exposed to a type of enemy plunging fire which made the ship's exposed conn extremely dangerous, he conned his ship skillfully and delivered rocket and counter-battery fire accurately and assisted greatly in silencing the enemy's guns. His superb seamanship, daring tactics and cool courage in the face of a heavy volume of enemy shell-fire throughout this engagement reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet, Serial 1818 (November 6, 1951).

Lewis, Richard Stanley (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Richard Stanley Lewis (MCSN: 490697), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. When a large hostile force employing small arms, mortars and automatic weapons succeeded in gaining a strategic point leading to ground overlooking the company positions during a night assault, and the main enemy thrust was directed against his machine gun post blocking further advance, Corporal Lewis boldly kept his gun in action, delivering accurate and effective fire on the attackers. Although wounded early in the engagement, he bravely remained in position, enabling his comrades to maneuver and meet the attack until he was fatally wounded. BY his marked courage, valiant fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty, Corporal Lewis served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 24, 1931 at Richmond, California. Home Town: Chico, California.

Lewis, Warren G.

General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

Second Lieutenant Warren G. Lewis, 0-1686698, Infantry, a member of Company "M", 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 9 and 10 July 1950, north of Chochiwon, Korea.  During the afternoon of 9 July, Lieutenant Lewis volunteered to go to an exposed position where he could adjust mortar fire on enemy machinegun positions.  His conduct of the fire, in the face of heavy enemy fire, was successful and enabled the Battalion to repulse an enemy attack and remain in their positions longer than would otherwise have been possible.  The next morning, a full scale attack was launched on the Battalion position.  With complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Lewis took position with the flank machinegun section.  He personally moved from gun to gun directing the fire.  When two men were wounded, he carried them to defilade positions where Medical Department personnel were able to treat them.  When one of the Section's guns was destroyed,  Lieutenant Lewis redistributed the remaining ammunition and directed the activities of the living crew members.  He shifted his remaining gun so that it protected the Battalion Observation Post as well as the flank of the position.  Upon the position's being overrun, he directed the withdrawal of his men and did not leave until all survivors had gotten to safety.  He covered the withdrawal by personally firing his machinegun.  By his gallant actions and outstanding leadership Lieutenant Lewis brought credit to himself and to the military service.

Lewis, Warren W.

General Orders No. 47 - 20 January 1952
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

By direction of the President, Private Warren W. Lewis, RA17315497, Infantry, a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry near Kumsong, Korea, on 8 December 1951. His platoon was defending a strategic hill against a savage enemy attack when a squad leader was seriously wounded. Private Lewis immediately took command and inspired his comrades to make a determined stand against the attacking hordes. The infantrymen soon ran out of ammunition and were ordered to withdraw to the new defense perimeter. The enemy overran the squad’s former position and were threatening the safety of the entire platoon. Realizing the need for immediate action, Private Lewis led his squad in a powerful bayonet charge against the enemy. He personally killed the leader of the hostile forces, throwing them into confusion and temporarily halting their charge. Ordering his men to rejoin the platoon, he picked up an abandoned machine gun, moved to the top of a nearby bunker and began firing into the enemy mass. His fire was so effective that he accounted for an estimated 20 enemy casualties, forcing the hostile forces to retreat in wild panic. After exhausting all available ammunition, he called in mortar fire on the enemy’s supporting elements. Private Lewis’ courageous action, versatile initiative and selfless performance of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit’s defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered military service from Finlayson, Minnesota.

(Private Lewis was seriously wounded in this action.)

Lewis, William G. Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal William G. Lewis, Jr. (MCSN: 648165), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. Although suffering from a hand wound and loss of blood, Corporal Lewis led his men in a determined assault against a well-fortified enemy stronghold. Refusing to be evacuated, he skillfully positioned his men in order to deliver the most effective fire upon the hostile fortification, but was fatally wounded by an enemy hand grenade while moving to his own position. His courage, leadership and loyal devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Corporal Lewis and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 21, 1925 at Pulaski Township, Pennsylvania. Home Town: New Wilmington, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: September 24, 1950 - Buried at: Neshannock Cemetery - New Wilmington, Pennsylvania.

Libbert, Loran K.

General Orders No. 481 - 16 November 1953
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Private First Class Loran K. Libbert, US55298681, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the afternoon of 16 July 1953, in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, Private Libbert was a radioman accompanying a combat patrol on a mission near enemy lines. Approaching the objective, the force was subjected to heavy barrages of enemy artillery and mortar fire which inflicted several casualties and prevented further advance. The unit rapidly deployed in protected positions and Private Libbert sent a message requesting medical aid and reinforcements. Following this, he courageously left his position and exposed himself to the exploding rounds to administer first aid to the wounded and assist in their evacuation. He then bravely answered a call for volunteers to return to the main line of resistance and guide the reinforcements to the scene of action. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he valiantly moved toward friendly lines but was mortally wounded while moving through the intense enemy bombardment. Private Libbert's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Missouri.

Lightcap, Ralph M.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 266 - 18 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Ralph M. Lightcap (ASN: RA-32594510), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 6th Medium Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chongkodong, Korea, on 1 November 1950. Leading the advance of an infantry battalion he observed a camouflaged enemy tank and brought the fire of his cannon and machine guns to bear on the tank. His effective fire was returned by the entire enemy force consisting of nine tanks, a self propelled gun and infantry estimated at well over company strength. His tank, far forward of the remainder of his company, was immobilized as the result of direct hits and set afire. Completely unmindful of personal safety he continued to engage the enemy. His effective fire destroyed two of the enemy's tanks, killed or wounded many dismounted troops and enabled the remainder of the company to move to positions from which they engaged the enemy and forced his withdrawal in disorder. Sergeant Lightcap's courageous actions and unhesitant devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Armor. Entered Service From New Jersey.

Liles, Jacky W. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Jacky W. Liles (NSN: 2970460), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 July 1953. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Liles displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He was serving with a friendly combat patrol that had penetrated deep into enemy territory when it was suddenly subjected to devastating hostile small arms and grenade fire. Although painfully wounded, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety, by gallantly refusing evacuation and continuing to render medical aid to his wounded comrades. Only after assuring himself that all of the wounded had been cared for and evacuated, did he treat his own serious wounds and allow himself to be evacuated. Through his outstanding courage and indomitable spirit he was directly responsible for the saving of two Marines' lives. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Liles' gallant and courageous actions throughout served as an inspiration to all who observed him and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 3237 (January 30, 1954).

Liles, Jacky W. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Jacky W. Liles (NSN: 2970460), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 25 July 1953. With his company subjected to devastating enemy mortar and artillery barrages while occupying a friendly outpost position far forward of the main line of resistance, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Liles unhesitatingly crossed an open area in the face of the murderous hostile fire to assist a seriously wounded Marine. After administering medical treatment to the casualty, he remained in the position for over an hour until the intensity of the hostile barrage decreased and then safely evacuated the wounded man. By his inspiring initiative, marked courage and selfless devotion to duty, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Liles was directly responsible for saving the life of another and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 3238 (January 30, 1954).

Lilley, John R. II (USMC)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant John R. Lilley, II (MCSN: 0-51061), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 31 May 1951. Although painfully wounded when the platoon he was leading in an attack on a strongly defended enemy hill position was subjected to withering hostile mortar, automatic-weapons and small-arms fire, causing numerous casualties, Second Lieutenant Lilley quickly reorganized his platoon and personally led his men in a vicious assault that overran the enemy position. Refusing to permit himself to be evacuated, he remained with his men throughout the night, skillfully directing the defense of his sector, until the following morning when he accepted medical treatment after the security of the position was assured. By his courageous leadership, exceptional fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Lilley served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Worcester, Massachusetts. Home Town: Worcester, Massachusetts.

Lilley, Leonard W.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 330 - 20 January 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Leonard W. Lilley, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 18 November 1952. On that date while leading a flight of four F-86s near the Chong Chon River in North Korea, Captain Lilley went to the aid of friendly fighter aircraft under attack from enemy MIG aircraft. Sighting one of the enemy MIGs pulling up from a firing pass, Captain Lilley, flying at maximum speed, closed to fire. Suddenly the enemy's aircraft stalled, making imminent a crash with the on-rushing F-86. Reacting instantly, Captain Lilley, in one motion, fired an accurate lethal burst and skillfully maneuvered past the right wing of the MIG, successfully avoiding a collision. At the moment he pulled past the MIG, it exploded, rocking Captain Lilley's aircraft violently and sending it temporarily out of control; but with superb airmanship, he regained control and rejoined his flight. A later check disclosed that Captain Lilley had expended only one hundred and eighty rounds of ammunition in downing this, his fifth enemy aircraft. Through his high personal courage in going to the aid of friendly fighters and his keen airmanship, marksmanship and devotion to duty, Captain Lilley upheld the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Lindborg, PVT Willard T.  (posthumous)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 101 - June 06, 1951

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to Private Willard T. Lindborg, Infantry, U.S. Army, Company B, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 4 February 1951 near Ochon-ni, Korea. The company was engaged in attacking the firmly entrenched enemy on Hill 402 and was halfway to the assigned objective when an extremely intense volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire pinned down the assaulting elements. Private Lindborg, quickly sizing up the situation, voluntarily made his way beyond his platoon’s position. In spite of heavy concentrations of hostile fire, he, with two comrades, worked his way to within 50 feet of the emplacements. From this spot he fired his weapon into the enemy’s midst. When his ammunition was exhausted, he unhesitatingly arose, oblivious to the hail of fire, and charged directly towards the Chinese. Although he was killed in this act, his aggressive and selfless action so surprised the enemy that they shifted their fire from the platoon, thereby allowing the friendly forces to continue forward and accomplish their mission. Private Lindborg’s gallantry and supreme devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Home of record: Randall, Minnesota.

Lindley, Billy D.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Billy D. Lindley (MCSN: 617589), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongsan, Korea, on 3 September 1950. On this date, the First Battalion, Fifth Marines was in the attack to seize Objective TWO, a high ridge line about one and one-half miles west of Yongsan. As a Fire Team Leader, Private First Class Lindley was with one of the assault squads when an enemy mortar shell exploded killing two and wounding four of the squad. Although Private Lindley suffered shrapnel wounds in the neck, face and shoulder, he refused evacuation, assisted in rallying the remainder of the squad which continued the assault and assisted in the seizure of the objective. Only after the position was organized for the night defense did Private Lindley accept evacuation. Private Lindley's heroic actions contributed to the seizure of the objective. The gallantry displayed by Private Lindley reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 151 (November 1, 1950). Entered Service From Colorado.

Lindquist, Donald Clarence (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 92 - 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Donald Clarence Lindquist (ASN: RA-17248989), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Battery D, 82d Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, in action against the enemy on 28 September 1950, in Korea. On that date, Sergeant Lindquist voluntarily joined a section of his battery, composed of two anti-aircraft firing vehicles, which was supporting a rifle company in a patrol along a mountain road. While moving forward on vehicles the entire column was ambushed by the enemy who was located on high ground along the road. From this position the enemy was able to drop grenades into the vehicles and spray the personnel with automatic weapons and small arms fire, at point-blank range. The riflemen on the vehicles had deployed to the sides of the road upon initial contact with the enemy. Sergeant Lindquist immediately realized that the entire patrol would be annihilated unless reinforcements could be contacted. He remained exposed in the vehicle, manning his radio, and attempted to contact friendly forces. Finally the anti-aircraft gunners had to abandon the vehicles when their guns were neutralized by the severe enemy fire. Still, Sergeant Lindquist refused to abandon his post and, displaying complete indifference for his personal safety, remained at his radio until he successfully contacted a near-by rifle company who by proper maneuver forced the enemy to withdraw. When the enemy had been driven off Sergeant Lindquist's body was found near the vehicle. His unselfish sacrifice saved the entire patrol from annihilation and allowed several severely wounded men to be evacuated. The manifest courage displayed by Sergeant Lindquist on this occasion was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Lindseth, John Marlin (1st award) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant John Marlin Lindseth (MCSN: 0-50729), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When a numerically superior enemy force attacked a vital section of the company's position and inflicted extremely heavy casualties on his unit during the initial assault, Second Lieutenant Lindseth continually moved among the men in his platoon in the face of intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire, shouting words of encouragement and directing effective counterfire on the attackers. Deliberately placing himself at the most critical point of action in the line, he personally killed one of the enemy in a desperate hand-to-hand encounter. By his inspiring leadership, marked courage and resolute devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Lindseth was greatly instrumental in the successful defense of the position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Lindseth, John Marlin (2nd award) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant John Marlin Lindseth (MCSN: 0-50729), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 June 1951. A daring and resourceful leader, Second Lieutenant Lindseth unhesitatingly assumed the mission of deploying his platoon on a narrow ridge line in support of the unit on his flank subjected to a fierce counterattack by a large hostile force and, skillfully positioning his squads and automatic weapons on the steep slope, delivered heavy and effective fire on the enemy until the attack was repulsed. Observing two casualties lying in an exposed position in advance of the front line, he bravely made his way through a hail of hostile fire to rescue the stricken men and persevered in his attempt to reach them until he was mortally wounded by the enemy. By his marked courage, unswerving devotion to duty and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Second Lieutenant Lindseth served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 10, 1926 at Minneapolis, Minnesota. Home Town: Duluth, Minnesota. Death: KIA: June 6, 1951 - Buried at: - Duluth, Minnesota.

Lindsey, Robert T. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 168 - 11 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Robert T. Lindsey (ASN: 0-1321427), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near O'Hang Hill, Korea, on 10 August 1950. During an attack his platoon was held up by machine gun fire from an enemy strong point and suffered heavy casualties. Seeing that the platoon was being disorganized by this fire, he exposed himself without regard for his own safety to direct its fire. Unable to be heard over the noise of battle, he advanced to the lead squad while laying down an effective base of fire, enabling the squad to remove its wounded. He then personally assaulted a machine gun nest with his weapon and grenades. When last seen, Lieutenant Lindsey was covering the ordered withdrawal of his platoon. His gallant actions were an inspiration to his men and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: 1920. Home Town: Tucson, Arizona. Death: KIA: August 10, 1950.

Lindstrom, Robert T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert T. Lindstrom (MCSN: 1174260), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tank Driver of the Anti-Tank Company, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 April 1952. When his tank was hit by an enemy artillery shell and began to burn while he was participating in an attack against heavily fortified enemy positions, Corporal Lindstrom, realizing that the fire was getting out of control, quickly emerged from the vehicle, pried open the assistant driver's hatch And pulled his wounded assistant form the tank to the safety of a nearby bunker despite heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire. Although the flaming vehicle was laden with gasoline and ammunition, he bravely drove it to a defiladed position and extinguished the fire with sand. By his courage, quick thinking and resolute determination, Corporal Lindstrom was directly responsible for saving the life of another and salvaging valuable equipment, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Paul, Minnesota. Home Town: Hibbing, Minnesota.

Link, Harry L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Engineman Third Class Harry L. Link (NSN: 3730516), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a Fireman in the Forward Engine Room on board the U.S.S. Pledge (DD-745), during minesweeping operations in densely mined areas subjected to enemy gunfire off Wonsan, Korea, on 12 October 1950. Although painfully injured and dazed, he heroically assisted a semi-conscious shipmate who was unable to help himself to escape from the rapidly flooding engine room, and when clear of the ship, cared for him until picked up by a passing boat. His outstanding courage and steadfast devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 262 (February 20, 1951).

Linzmeier, Robert J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 12 - 8 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert J. Linzmeier (ASN: US-55032775), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Masagu-ri, Korea, on 18 May 1951. His machine gun section was firing in support of a rifle company in its attack on strongly defended enemy positions. Corporal Linzmeier, First Gunner, was firing deadly bursts into the enemy hordes when his weapon stopped firing due to a faulty feeding mechanism. He unhesitatingly left his position and crawled approximately seventy-five yards, over extremely rugged terrain in direct view of the enemy, to retrieve an abandoned machine gun. When he returned to his position with the weapon, although continuously harassed by enemy fire, he took parts from it to repair his own machine gun, and once again resumed fire. As a result of his indomitable determination, his comrades were afforded essential covering fire and were able to secure their objective with a minimum of casualties. Corporal Linzmeier's courageous action and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Depre, Wisconsin.

Lippman, Gordon Joseph

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 186 - 31 March 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Gordon Joseph Lippman (ASN: 0-60536), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. During the early morning hours of 27 November 1950 near Ipsok, Korea, a strong hostile force attacked the supply train of Lieutenant Lippman's battalion. Despite exposure to intense hostile fire, he organized the supply troops in a perimeter defense and led the machine gun crew to vantage points from which they could direct effective counterfire on the attacking enemy. Advancing through a deadly small arms and mortar barrage, he contacted the supply area of an adjacent unit, thus enabling the two forces to combine their strength and repel the hostile incursion. Lieutenant Lippman's valorous actions are in keeping with the high traditions of the United States Armed Forces.

[NOTE: Lippman was KIA in the Vietnam War on December 11, 1965.]

Lister, William A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William A. Lister (MCSN: 613096), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 February 1951. When the unit was subjected to devastating enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire from concealed positions on commanding ground while he was moving as lead man with the platoon on a patrol into enemy territory, Private First Class Lister continued forward through the heavy enemy fire and climbed over precipitous terrain to gain a position from which he could bring fire to bear upon the enemy. Although painfully wounded in the course of the action, he quickly treated his own wound and continued forward until ordered to withdraw, whereupon he carried a wounded comrade back through the withering enemy fire to the safety of friendly lines. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Lister served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Jamaica, New York. Home Town: Belmar, New Jersey.

Little, Donald J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 195 -22 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Donald J. Little (ASN: RA-38403998)United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Ambulance Company, 24th Medical Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Waegwan, Korea, on 20 September 1950. During the crossing of the Naktong River, the enemy was shelling both banks of the river and inflicting many casualties. Realizing that some of the wounded on the far side were exposed to concentrated enemy fire he crossed the river by boat in the face of withering fire and safely evacuated the wounded. His complete devotion to his comrades, with utter disregard for his own safety, reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Army Medical Service. Home Town: Columbus, Ohio.

Little, James C.*

General Orders No. 61 - 22 July 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

First Lieutenant James C. Little, 0-1342282, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, Third Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action.  On the morning of 8 July 1950, at Chonan, Korea, the entire Battalion had been surrounded by superior enemy forces which had launched a tank-infantry attack.  The Battalion was not equipped with adequate weapons to face such an attack.  Lieutenant Little voluntarily took command of a 2.36 inch rocket launching team and a rifle grenade launcher.  With these inadequate weapons he destroyed two of the enemy tanks.  Noticing that a platoon which was operating without an officer was preparing to prematurely withdraw from position, Lieutenant Little organized the men and placed them in firing positions where they were able to inflict severe casualties on the enemy.  When the order was given to withdraw, Lieutenant Little picked up an M-1 rifle and personally destroyed a machinegun position which was holding up the movement.  He moved from place to place insuring that all men withdrew in an orderly and effective manner.  Throughout the entire action, he displayed a complete disregard for his own safety and repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy fire.  By his example, outstanding leadership and high courage he inspired those around him to properly perform their duties.  By his actions, our casualties were held to a minimum and the Battalion was able to retain its effectiveness as a fighting unit.  Lieutenant Little, by his acts of gallantry, brought great credit to himself and to the military service.

*[KWE Note: General Orders #63, HQ24Div, 31 July 1950, revoked this Silver Star Medal and upgraded it to a Distinguished Service Cross.]

Little, James H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 199 - 23 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James H. Little (ASN: RA-13274821), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy in the vicinity of the Naktong River, Korea, on 10 August 1950. During an attack on a well defended enemy position, the enemy succeeded in securing high ground on the right flank of the battalion and directed concentrated fire into the friendly units. With complete disregard for his own safety, Private Little left his position of relative security, crossed the open ground and attacked the enemy with two hand grenades. Failing to eliminate the hostile forces in this attempt, he returned for an additional supply of grenades. Again exposing himself to the withering fire, he advanced closer to the enemy positions and succeeded in silencing the harassing fire by the accuracy of his thrown grenades. Through his actions the friendly troops successfully accomplished their mission. His courage and gallantry reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Entered Service From Florida.

Litzenburg, Homer Laurence Jr. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Army Award) to Colonel Homer Laurence Litzenberg, Jr. (MCSN: 0-3959), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commanding Officer, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 12 November 1950 to 19 November 1950. During this period Colonel Litzenberg, though frequently exposed to enemy mortar, automatic and small arms fire, continually visited and supervised the movements of his front line units in their advance along the Hamhung-Hagaru-ri road to the Chosin Reservoir area in North Korea. The route of advance was over a narrow, mountainous road with the enemy being well entrenched and possessing excellent observation thereby making movement difficult. The constant display of personal courage and aggressive leadership by Colonel Litzenberg were instrumental in the rapid advance of his unit to assigned objectives. The actions by Colonel Litzenberg reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 40 (November 22, 1950).

Litzenburg, Homer Laurence Jr. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in addition to a Previously Awarded Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Colonel Homer Laurence Litzenberg, Jr. (MCSN: 0-3959), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 October 1950. While his regiment was advancing from Seoul to Uljongbu in an advance guard formation, the leading battalion was opposed by an estimated infantry battalion reinforced by anti-tank guns, tanks and heavy mortars. With the enemy unit entrenched in well-camouflaged positions and delivering heavy fire on the friendly elements, Colonel Litzenberg unhesitatingly moved forward to determine first-hand the nature and strength of the hostile forces. When the enemy launched a concerted counterattack supported y heavy mortar and anti-tank gun fire, he skillfully directed the employment of his units in the face of the heavy fire and effectively called for and controlled supporting fires to repulse the counterattack, thereby allowing his forces to continue their attack. By his aggressiveness, courageous leadership and unwavering devotion to duty, Colonel Litzenberg served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: January 8, 1903 at Steelton, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Death: June 27, 1963.

Lively, Edwin J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Edwin J Lively (MCSN: 661838), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Driver of an Ammunition Truck of Headquarters and Service Company, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When his truck was fired upon by hostile forces employing machine guns during the return from Yudam-ni, Corporal Lively boldly continued his drive through the fire until he found the road blocked. Volunteering to cover the two Marines with him in returning to friendly units for assistance, he remained with his truck and provided covering fire until his passengers returned in an abandoned one-quarter ton truck and, during one phase of the action, advanced alone and killed two hostile soldiers who had manned one of the machine guns that had damaged his vehicle. Continuing his valiant efforts, he remained alone for over three hours, successfully driving off repeated attacks until a force of more than two hundred enemy approached his position and forced him to abandon his truck. By his daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and heroic actions in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Lively served as an inspiration to his comrades and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Readsboro, Vermont. Home Town: Rowe, Massachusetts.

Livingston, Gerald E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Gerald E. Livingston (MCSN: 1087535), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1951. Seriously wounded by enemy machine gun fire and shrapnel while leading his squad in a vigorous charge against a strongly defended hill position, Sergeant Livingston steadfastly refused to be evacuated and bravely inched his way forward, shouting directions and words of encouragement to his men. Despite agonizing pain, he continued to move with his unit until the position was overrun and the defense was consolidated, before submitting to medical aid and evacuation. By his stamina, courageous initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Livingston contributed materially to the success of his company's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Attalla, Alabama. Home Town: Attalla, Alabama.

Lizardi, PFC Victor

Headquarters 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 166 - 29 April 1952

Private First Class Victor Lizardi, NG29153835, Infantry, Company "L" 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the morning of 16 February 1952, a patrol from Company "L" was dispatched with the assignment of contacting the enemy on Hill 153 near Tongchon, Korea. As the patrol advanced toward its objective, it was subjected to intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire from a well-entrenched bunker. The initial burst of fire inflicted four friendly casualties and pinned down the remainder of the patrol, preventing its further progress. Private Lizardi, realizing the necessity for neutralizing this enemy position, completely disregarded his personal safety as he dashed through a withering hail of enemy bullets directly toward the bunker and, when approximately twenty yards from the foe, he accurately hurled two hand grenades into the hostile emplacement, forcing its occupants to flee. The inspirational heroism displayed by Private Lizardi in single-handedly destroying an enemy position reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Lober, William J. Jr.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 107 - 31 December 1950

First Lieutenant William J. Lober, Jr., Infantry, Company "C", 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 29 November 1950, near Majon-ni, Korea, Lieutenant Lober's unit came under heavy enemy fire on a narrow mountainous road known as "Ambush Alley."  The platoon leader of the 3d platoon was severely wounded and Lieutenant Lober immediately assumed command of this platoon in addition to his own.  He repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire in his efforts at reorganizing the platoon into a fighting unit.  In spite of the intense enemy rifle and automatic weapons fire, Lieutenant Lober, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, assisted in the successful evacuation of the wounded and dead.  Lieutenant Lober volunteered to remain behind to clear the road of disabled vehicles in order to allow movement of the convoy to their destination.  His initiative, fearlessness, and heroic leadership reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Pennsylvania.

Lockart, Lilburn L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 209 - 29 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Lilburn L. Lockart (ASN: RA-19296072), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery B, 13th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Kwan-gok, Korea, on 6 August 1950. During a withdrawal, his unit was held up by intense accurate enemy machine gun fire. Without regard for his own safety, Private Lockart voluntarily climbed a high ridge overlooking his battery's position, to draw fire from the hostile gun emplacement. By the accuracy and volume of his BAR fire two machine gun nests were destroyed. Continuing to expose himself to the enemy fire, he subsequently supervised the evacuation of eight wounded soldiers to a truck, loaded them on and then personally drove them through the withering fire to the safety of a rear area. His gallant actions contributed greatly to the withdrawal of his unit with a minimum of casualties and the evacuation to safety of wounded comrades. His unhesitant devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Ukiah, California.

Lockerman, Julian F.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 69 -  20 March 1951

First Lieutenant Julian F. Lockerman, 01039443, Infantry, Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 29 January 1951, near Sanuisil, Korea, Lieutenant Lockerman was in command of a company that received a sudden attack by a strong enemy force. The command post was destroyed and one platoon was forced to withdraw. Lieutenant Lockerman, with complete disregard for his personal safety, immediately manned a jeep-mounted machine gun and opened fire on the advancing foe. Despite his exposed position and the fact that the enemy's attention was directed solely at him, Lieutenant Lockerman remained with the gun and fought off four enemy attacks. His murderous fire inflicted so many casualties on the enemy that he was forced to retreat. The courage and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Lockerman reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Georgia.

Lodge, Orlan R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Orlan R. Lodge, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Headquarters Battery, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 - 4 December 1950. As assistant officer in charge of the howitzers and tractors of the battalion during the movement from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri, Captain Lodge placed himself at the scene of all difficulties and hazards resulting from enemy fire, road blocks, icy roads, and mountainous terrain. Although suffering from a painful shoulder injury received in preventing a vehicle carrying wounded Marines from overturning, and a serious head wound from enemy mortar fire, he continued to lead his men and equipment through heavily interdicted areas. When the column was halted by a shortage of fuel, and was also confronted with a road block manned by a vastly numerically superior enemy force, he obtained a volunteer driver to accompany him in running the gauntlet of hostile positions to obtain assistance from the perimeter at Hagaru-ri. Negotiating a blown-out bridge under heavy fire, he succeeded in moving through the fire-swept enemy territory to the perimeter. Through his courageous efforts, fuel and aid were dispatched to the beleaguered column before he collapsed from injuries sustained the previous day. Captain Lodge's outstanding professional skill, resourcefulness and inspiring actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Columbus, Ohio. Home Town: Orville, Ohio.

Loflen, Lester A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 15 - 2 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Lester A. Loflen (ASN: RA-7081204), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy on 9 July 1950, at Noechan-ri, Korea. The 1st Battalion Command Post was under heavy small arms and mortar fire when Sergeant Loflen received a telephone call that an attached heavy mortar company was being attacked from its flanks. Without hesitation he organized and led a group of approximately fifteen men through enemy fire to the heavy mortar positions. He then led a counterattack against the enemy. Though dazed and bruised by an enemy grenade he continued to lead and direct his men, forcing the enemy to withdraw, leaving many dead and wounded. Because of his complete disregard for personal safety, his outstanding bravery and courageous leadership the heavy mortars and their positions were saved and continued to deliver vitally needed fire. Master Sergeant Loflen's action reflects credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Mount Airy, North Carolina.

Logan, Edward O. (1st award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 153 - 2 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) Edward O. Logan (ASN: 0-36610), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy in the vicinity of the Kum River line, Korea, on 16 July 1950. The reconnaissance party of which he was a member was held up by intense fire from a well-fortified road block. In this action the Regimental Commander and several others were wounded. Seeing that the remainder of the group was being disorganized by this fire, he swiftly established an effective defense exposing himself repeatedly to the withering machine gun and rifle fire. Realizing that the party's position was untenable and that contact with elements in the rear was essential to the safe withdrawal of the regiment he determined to attack with a force of two tanks and a small body of men. This attack was repulsed by the well dug in and numerically superior enemy. Another attack in greater strength and personally led by Major Logan was launched destroying an enemy machine gun, however the advance could not continue. In a final effort to break out of the position he led a force of 20 men in a flanking movement and succeeded in establishing contact with a force being sent to destroy the enemy road block. His gallant actions reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

Logan, Edward O. (2nd award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 242 - 2 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) Edward O. Logan (ASN: 0-36610), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action in Korea during the period 16 to 18 October 1950. His battalion spearheaded the drive of the 24th Infantry Division from Kaesong toward the city of Pyongyang. During the advance Major Logan was continuously with or ahead of the leading elements of his battalion. Although subjected to intense small arms, mortar and artillery fire on numerous occasions he remained exposed to better direct the operation. On one occasion during the swift advance, he personally reconnoitered far forward of his unit to ensure safe crossing of a bridge for his tanks and other vehicles. His continual presence at the head of his command was an inspiration to his troops and aided materially to the success of the operation. Major Logan's fearless example reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

Lombardi, Arthur P.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 116 - 3 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery) Arthur P. Lombardi (ASN: P 0-2007730), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery A, 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 14 July 1950, along the Kum River, Korea. While engaged in a fire mission on the enemy across the Kum River, the battery was attacked by enemy infantry from three sides. Displaying complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Lombardi continued to direct the action of the firing battery until it was overrun by enemy infantry. For a period of about five hours he directed his men through an escape corridor to safety. During this period he was under heavy enemy fire, but despite this he was able to effect an orderly withdrawal of personnel and equipment that could be carried. After an all-night march through enemy territory he brought them to the safety of our lines. This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of Lieutenant Lombardi reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Canton, Ohio.

Long, Kenneth J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Kenneth J. Long (NSN: 4255632), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 August 1952. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospitalman Long displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. While participating in an assault on two enemy held hills, he unhesitatingly advanced through the intense enemy artillery and mortar fire. He moved dauntlessly over the skyline of a ridge and down the forward slope of the hill, in the face of automatic fire, in an effort to administer aid to a seriously wounded Marine. Upon completion of the medical treatment, he again braved the deadly enemy fire and carried the wounded man approximately 75 yards back over the ridge. Realizing the need for further protection, he assembled four other men, needing treatment, and set up a perimeter of defense around the wounded Marine. Moving from man to man, he attended their needs and then continued on to other casualties. Throughout the engagement, he administered aid to nineteen wounded Marines and issued words of encouragement to his fighting comrades. Hospitalman Long's gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 852 (January 8, 1953).

Long, Louis C. Jr.

Master Sergeant Louis C. Long Jr., RA6390084, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Service Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 20 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. During the withdrawal from Taejon an evacuation train was stopped by an enemy machinegun emplacement. MSGT Long organized and led a patrol which knocked out the machinegun post enabling the train to proceed. When MSGT Long’s patrol reached the main highway, he found the driver of the lead truck of a convoy wounded. The truck was evacuating twenty-six wounded men. Without hesitation MSGT Long placed rifleman on the truck and personally drove it a distance of nine miles through heavy mortar and machinegun fire to the established defensive positions of his organization. This act of outstanding courage and leadership on the part of MSGT Long reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service. GO 74, 7 Aug 1950. Entered service from Richmond, CA.

Longbotham, Ralph M.

General Orders No. 16 - 3 January 1951
25th Infantry Division

The Silver Star is awarded to Captain Ralph M. Longbotham, 01332982, Infantry, Company D, 27th Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army. On 6 September 1950 during an attack by an estimated 300 enemy on the battalion assembly area in the vicinity of Chirwon, Korea, Captain Longbotham ran through the heavy volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire to the 75mm recoilless rifle position and from an exposed position personally directed the fire of the guns. Later, while bringing up vitally needed ammunition, he was painfully wounded but refused medical aid, continuing, despite the severe action to direct the fire of the guns until the enemy attack was repulsed. Captain Longbotham’s exemplary courage and steadfastness under fire reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered military service from Minnesota.

Longfellow, William J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major [then Captain] William J. Longfellow (MCSN: 0-28580), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 April 1951, while serving with Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Fourteen (VMF-214). Answering an urgent call for volunteers to make a hazardous strike flight late in the afternoon under marginal weather conditions, Major Longfellow, as flight leader, was assigned the mission of escorting a helicopter deep into enemy-occupied territory to effect the rescue of a pilot shot down by hostile anti-aircraft fire. Upon reaching the objective, he flight was subjected to extremely heavy anti-aircraft fire, resulting in the crash-landing of the helicopter in the vicinity of the downed pilot. After calling for another helicopter and dispatching one section of the flight to escort this helicopter to the scene of action, Major Longfellow and his wingman remained over the three downed airmen and repeatedly made dangerously low-level strafing attacks to prevent enemy forces from closing upon the airmen on the ground. Remaining in the area for the next hour and a half until another helicopter arrived, Major Longfellow coordinated the rescue operations and was instrumental in destroying six anti-aircraft gun positions and a large number of enemy personnel. On 14 April 1951, he returned to the scene of the rescue and destroyed the downed helicopter which was in the process of being removed by enemy forces. During this action, an antiaircraft position was destroyed, and a number of enemy personnel killed. Major Longfellow's skill, courage, and devotion to duty throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Seattle, Washington. Home Town: Seattle, Washington.

Longo, August P. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant August P. Longo, Jr. (MCSN: 1136179), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 December 1952. Although painfully wounded while leading his unit in a night raid on heavily fortified enemy positions, Sergeant Longo refused medical care and continued in the assault, firing his weapon and shouting words of encouragement to his comrades. After entering the enemy trenches, he was wounded again and rendered unconscious. Upon regaining consciousness, he refused evacuation until the rest of his comrades were safely removed to a defiladed area and, during the evacuation, uttered words of encouragement which greatly enhanced the morale of the other Marines. By his outstanding courage and daring initiative, Sergeant Longo served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Paterson, New Jersey. Home Town: Paterson, New Jersey.

Longstaff, Robert A.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Robert A. Longstaff (MCSN: 0-35023), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), by successfully rescuing two pilots and one enlisted man who had crashed behind enemy lines. On 21 September 1950, Lieutenant Longstaff intercepted a radio message that a fighter pilot had been shot down behind enemy lines near the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, and that a helicopter had crashed in the same area while attempting a rescue. Without regard of the personal danger involved in landing behind enemy lines, Lieutenant Longstaff immediately requested a fighter escort and proceeded to the scene of the crash. Upon arrival he assisted in getting the injured pilot aboard his helicopter and insisted on taking the other two people even though it meant taking off and flying in a dangerously overloaded condition. As a result of his actions, three people were saved from capture by the enemy. His display of gallantry greatly reflects credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 5 (September 27, 1950). Home Town: Jersey City, New Jersey.

Longstreet, Roger B.

Private Roger B. Longstreet, RA13397184, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 18 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. PVT Longstreet’s platoon was on a combat patrol in a village four miles west of Taejon when it was ambushed and brought under heavy small arms and automatic rifle fire. The platoon was forced to withdraw from the village. Knowing that a member of his patrol had been seriously wounded and unable to withdraw, PVT Longstreet voluntarily re-entered the village with was occupied by the enemy and assisted the wounded man to a place of safety. Inspired by this courage act on the part of PVT Longstreet, his patrol reentered the village and succeeded in driving the enemy out. This conspicuous act of gallantry on the part of PVT Longstreet reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. GO 74, 7 Aug 1950. Entered service from Norfolk, VA.

Longwitz, John W. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 240 - 2 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant John W. Longwitz (ASN: RA-36809435), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, in action near Chinnampo, Korea, on 18 October 1950. When the motor convoy, racing to secure ferry sites across the Taedong-gang River encountered an enemy vehicle approaching from its left flank, Sergeant Longwitz immediately approached the vehicle and demanded the surrender of its occupants. Taking a position to the rear of the vehicle after the enemy had indicated that they intended to surrender, he came under fire from additional hostile vehicles approaching from out of the night. By the volume and accuracy of his returned fire, the enemy was forced to take cover and the friendly troops warned of the approaching force. In the ensuing fire fight, Sergeant Longwitz was killed. His gallant actions and unhesitant devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Minocqua, Wisconsin.

Lopez, Conrad F. (1st award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 78 - 8 August 1950

Sergeant First Class, then Sergeant, Conrad F. Lopez, RA39841486, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 10 July 1950 at Wonsan, Korea. When the machinegun squad of which SFC Lopez was the leader was attacked from the rear by about 200 of the enemy he realized that the fire from the rear would knock out his machinegun unless it was moved immediately. Without regard for his personal safety and in the face of intense small arms and artillery fire, SFC Lopez stood up and covered the withdrawal of the gun crew with rifle fire. SFC Lopez remained in the completely exposed position, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and sought cover only after the machinegun was emplaced and he resumed firing. This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of SFC Lopez reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. Entered service from Berkeley, CA.

Lopez, Conrad F. (2nd award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 116 - 3 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Conrad F. Lopez (ASN: RA-39841486), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 8 August 1950 along the Naktong River, Korea. During a withdrawal by Company A, a group of men became separated from the main body. This group including Sergeant Lopez set itself up in a security position. After daylight the group was detected by the enemy who dispatched two companies to attack the group. Sergeant Lopez organized the group to repel the enemy attack and in the face of heavy enemy fire he carried a machine gun to an advantageous position and although wounded he continued to deliver heavy fire at the attacking enemy. He ordered the group to withdraw but he remained at his position to cover the withdrawal. After the group had withdrawn, he left his position and despite his weakened condition due to his wounds he carried the machine gun with him. This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of Sergeant Lopez reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Berkeley, California.

Lopez, Jose D.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 559 - 13 December 1951

Master Sergeant Jose D. Lopez, RA10402606, Infantry, Company "L", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 3 July, 1951, Company "L" attacked enemy-held positions on Hill 581, near Pyon-Gang, Korea. Sergeant Lopez, as field first sergeant, was with the Third Platoon in the initial stage of the attack; however, upon observing the First Platoon in trouble and with casualties, he quickly attached himself to the Second Platoon and led them to relieve pressure upon the First Platoon. While fearlessly moving about under heavy enemy fire, Sergeant Lopez suffered three serious wounds, but continued encouraging the men to hold their positions and to direct fire on the enemy emplacements. He received first aid two hours after being wounded and remained three more hours in the area, coordinating platoon fire and inspiring the men until hostile forces withdrew. The gallantry, leadership and resoluteness displayed by Sergeant Lopez reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Lopez, Phillip

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 116 - 3 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Phillip Lopez (ASN: RA-38704460), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 2 August 1950 at Chinju, Korea. His unit had been hastily placed in a defensive position and was without sufficient ammunition on hand at crew-served weapons. When the enemy launched a savage attack and with his unit under heavy fire, Corporal Lopez launched a savage attack and with his unit under heavy fire, Corporal Lopez without regard for his personal safety took a jeep and made several trips back and forth to the battalion ammunition dump. This supply of ammunition permitted his company to repel the enemy attack. When the enemy withdrew beyond small arms fire, Corporal Lopez voluntarily went forward of friendly lines and recovered an M-18 scout car that had been abandoned. His fearless example and courage reflect high credit on Corporal Lopez and the military service.

Lopez, Thomas

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Thomas Lopez (MCSN: 1054994), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner in a Machine Gun squad of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 and 16 September 1951. When the enemy carried out a series of fierce attacks in strength during the hours of darkness while his squad was positioned on the extreme point of the company's defensive perimeter, Corporal Lopez bravely manned his gun in the face of intense hostile fire until the weapon was rendered inoperable, and continued to defend his sector with a rifle and hand grenades. Although forced to withdraw, he unhesitatingly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to exchange the tripod of his weapon with another and succeeded in maintaining one gun in action against the onrushing hostile force. With all the supporting troops killed or wounded over a distance of 100 yards to the rear of his section and his supply of ammunition and grenades completely expended, he boldly hurled rocks at the advancing enemy and, in company with three survivors of his squad, steadfastly maintained his position, thereby aiding immeasurably in the successful defense of the sector and in killing 187 of the enemy. By his exceptional courage, outstanding initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Lopez served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Oakland, California. Home Town: San Leandro, California.

Lopez, Trinidad M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Trinidad M. Lopez (MCSN: 1115746), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 September 1950. Acting as flank security while his company advanced along the Inchon-Seoul highway, Private First Class Lopez discovered a well-concealed hostile machine gun position and, aiming his weapon at the enemy emplacement, attempted to fire. Unable to deliver more than one round due to mechanical difficulty, he threw his gun a the enemy and engaged them in hand-to-hand combat. By his quick initiative and bold action, he startled the hostile troops, preventing them from manning their weapon, and continued to engage them in personal combat until other members of his squad came to his aid. His indomitable fighting spirit, personal courage and staunch devotion to duty in the face of great personal risk reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Lopez and the United States Naval Service. Born: Dallas, Texas. Home Town: Dallas, Texas.

Lorey, John J.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

Corporal John J. Lorey, RA13257181, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company I, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 10 November 1950 in the vicinity of Sunchon, Korea.  He was a member of a reinforced platoon given the mission of patrolling an area where enemy troops were reported to be operating.  As the patrol moved up the road, it was attacked by an undetermined number of well-dug-in and well concealed enemy.  Corporal Lorey, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved forward and charged up the hill to the enemy position.  His quick, aggressive action caused the enemy position to be neutralized and allowed the patrol to move forward and inflict many casualties upon the enemy.  The gallant conduct displayed by Corporal Lorey reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Lorigan, Robert E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Major Robert E. Lorigan (MCSN: 0-12658), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy during the period 29 November 1950 to 4 December 1950. His actions contributed materially to the successful breakthrough in the Chosin Reservoir area and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 66 (December 15, 1950).

Loring, Earl E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 209 - 29 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Earl E. Loring (ASN: RA-35376889), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company E, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. When his platoon was attacking strong enemy positions he observed that one of his comrades had been wounded by a machine gun and was still exposed to its fire. Without regard for his own safety, he unhesitatingly charged the enemy gun and although seriously wounded, succeeded in destroying it and its crew. Corporal Loring's actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Cassville, West Virginia.

Lougheed, Melville J.

Dakotan Gets Silver Star At Review Ceremonies

WITH U.S. 24TH DIV, Apr. 11, 1953 - Maj. Gen. B. M. Bryan, commanding general of XVI Corps, presented the Silver Star to 1st Lt. Melville J. Lougheed, Jamestown, N.D., commanding officer of Company E, 21st Infantry Regiment, before 3,000 of the regiment's soldiers in review ceremonies held recently at Martin Field. Lougheed received the award for conspicuous gallantry in action near Majon-ni, Korea, Apr. 23, 1952, while a platoon leader with Company A of the 3d Division's 15th Infantry Regiment. - Pacific Stars And Stripes April 11, 1953

(From his West Point obit): Melville John Lougheed, known as “Jack,” was born in Jamestown, ND, to Melville John and Johanna Middelman Lougheed. Jack's mother was from the Netherlands, having immigrated to the United States with her mother, four sisters, and two brothers. They had come to North Dakota to take advantage of land offered by the state government. Jack's father met Johanna in Jamestown, and that is where they were married. On the occasion of Jack's birth, a relative remarked how proud they were to have a son born in the United States. Jack lived in Jamestown and attended the public schools there until 14 Jun 1945, when he enlisted in the Army Specialized Training Program and reported for duty at South Dakota State College. He subsequently sought and received an appointment to West Point from Senator Milton Young. In December of 1945, Jack was called to active duty and ordered to report to Ft. Snelling, MN. Afterwards, he spent several months at Amherst College, Amherst, MA, attending the Academy preparatory training conducted there. In March 1946 he reported for duty at Ft. Benning, GA, but was discharged from the Army on 25 Jun 1946, just prior to reporting as a new cadet at West Point on 1 Jul l946 as a member of the Class of 1950. Jack's familiarity with the military helped him take cadet life in stride. A true son of the West, he was known to his classmates as someone who was always ready to extol the virtues of North Dakota and his hometown of Jamestown. His fellow cadets also regarded him as a level-headed and self-assured cadet who would go on to make a fine officer. During his cadet years, Jack earned the Expert Rifleman Badge and participated in the Camera Club and Model Railroad Club, activities which reflected his boyhood experiences on the prairie.

At graduation, Jack was commissioned in the Infantry, and his first duty station was at Ft. Ord, CA. In 1952, he was sent to Korea, where he served with the 15th Infantry and the 19th Infantry of the Eighth Army. In Korea, Jack braved enemy fire while leading a platoon in an attempt to recover the bodies of two fallen comrades. As his platoon approached the bodies, small arms fire was concentrated on them. Exposing himself to this fire, Jack led an assault against the entrenched enemy force. Only when their ammunition was exhausted did he give the order to fall back. For these actions, he received the Silver Star, and as the citation that accompanied the medal reads, “he supervised this move with such calmness and confidence that he effected an orderly withdrawal through heavy artillery and mortar fire with a minimum of casualties.” For his outstanding combat service in the Korean War, Jack was awarded not only the Silver Star, but also the Purple Heart and the Combat Infantryman Badge.

Jack’s assignments after Korea included service in Japan; Camp Atterbury, IN; and Camp Carson, CO. In January 1954, Jack married his first wife, Clara M. Van Arsdall, at Camp Atterbury. Three sons and a daughter were born to Clara and Jack before their marriage eventually ended in divorce. In July of 1954, after serving as a company commander with the 24th Infantry Division, 21st Regiment, in Honshu, Japan, Jack resigned his commission as a first lieutenant.

During his civilian career, Jack held several positions with industry, including one with managerial responsibilities with the St. Regis Corporation in 1967. Subsequently, in 1972, he accepted a position in Dallas, TX, with the United States Government in the Department of Housing and Urban Development. For HUD, Jack specialized in home inspections and home appraisals. He retired from this career in 1991.

In 1975, Jack married his second wife, Dorothy Mebane Earle. Following his retirement, they enjoyed a lifestyle in which travel played a large part. They took several trips overseas and many trips stateside, visiting New England and other places, including a visit to Jack's hometown of Jamestown to celebrate its centennial. Their global travels included visits to China (where they walked the Great Wall), Germany, Italy, Scotland, and France. His children, all of whom lived close to Jack and Dorothy, also helped make their life in retirement even more enjoyable. The regard Jack had for his West Point classmates was clearly evidenced in his submissions to the Class of ’50 10-Year Book. These entries stressed that he and Dorothy would gladly welcome any classmates to stop and visit with the Lougheeds in Dallas. Unfortunately, this idyllic existence came to an end in 2003. As a result of heart failure, death came for Jack on 21 Jun 2003. Dorothy passed away about a year later. Jack is survived by three sons, two daughters, seven grandchildren, and one great-grandchild. He will be remembered as a wonderful and loving parent, grandparent, and great-grandparent who, as a loyal son of West Point, also served his country well in time of war.

Love, Robert J.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 337 - 10 July 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Robert J. Love, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Group, Fifth Air Force, on 21 April 1952. While leading a flight of F-86s protecting fighter-bombers, Captain Love sighted a battle, and, singling out an enemy element, initiated an attack. Intercepted by four enemy fighters before his element could complete the attack, Captain Love split the flight and attacked its leader. Despite numerically superior opposition, Captain Love maneuvered into position, scoring hits on the MIG which caused the pilot to eject himself. Captain Love then broke from the remaining MIG to aid his wingman who was being fired upon as he pressed an attack. Intercepting the enemy's threat, Captain Love closed to within two hundred yards, holding his fire to conserve his limited ammunition. Captain Love's skillful attack resulted in destruction of another enemy aircraft, and provided protection while his wingman completed destruction of the MIG he had engaged. Through his extraordinary valor and outstanding airmanship in the face of determined opposition, Captain Love reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Love, Wallace K.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 482 - 17 November 1953

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Wallace K. Love (RA19396825), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company K, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in Korea. During the early morning hours of 24 June 1953, in the vicinity of Chat-Kol, Korea, the main line of resistance positions of Company K were attacked by a numerically superior enemy force supported by heavy barrages of mortar and artillery fire. Sergeant Love rapidly moved from man to man, giving instructions and fire orders. Later, he was informed that the attackers had overrun adjacent defensive fortifications. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he courageously ran across the shell-torn terrain and, utilizing a machine gun, directed accurate fire upon the foe until they were forced to retreat. Despite the enemy concentration, he then commenced to treat and evacuate the wounded. His brave actions were instrumental in the successful defense of the sector and alleviated much suffering. Sergeant Love's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Low, 1LT James Frederick

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 80 - June 3, 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant James Frederick Low (AFSN: FR-23194/NSN: 5598369), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy as Pilot of an F-86 aircraft, 4th Fighter Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 2 December 1952. Lieutenant Low was flying wingman in a flight of four F-86s on a fighter sweep deep in North Korea when his flight sighted enemy aircraft attacking a friendly flight. He was given permission to attack the enemy craft and immediately launched a vertical diving attack, breaking away from his flight. Although outnumbered two-to-one, Lieutenant Low attacked the enemy aircraft with such ferocity that they were forced to break off their action against the friendly aircraft and take the defensive. By superb airmanship, he retained the initiative, and closing to 2,000 feet range of the leading MiG-15, commenced firing. Relentlessly pursuing his objective in spite of the imminent threat from the other MiG in flight, he followed the enemy through violent evasive maneuvers and scored numerous hits in the engine section of the craft. The MiG-15 began to smoke profusely, and went into a steep dive, with Lieutenant Low still in pursuit. At 2,000 feet the enemy pilot ejected and the MiG crashed and exploded on a hillside. By his extreme daring in the face of numerically superior odds, and by his unusual skill and aggressiveness, Lieutenant Low was credited with the destruction of one enemy MiG-15, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces and the United States Air Force.

Lowry, Leonard (2nd award)

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 11 - January 14, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Leonard Lowry (ASN: 0-1302026), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while Commanding Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, on 31 August 1950, in the vicinity of Hyondpung, Korea. On that date his company, after an extended enemy mortar and artillery barrage, was subjected to a fierce attack by numerically superior enemy forces. The company perimeter was breached and several positions were overrun. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain Lowry rushed to the critical position where the fighting was fiercest. Rallying and encouraging his men he inspired them by his unconcern for the hostile fire sweeping the perimeter. Under his skillful and courageous leadership his company stiffened and hurled the enemy back with severe casualties. As a result of his superb leadership and tactical ability an enemy force of estimated regimental strength was prevented from penetrating through and enveloping the fight flank of the Division. The gallantry displayed on this occasion by Captain Lowry reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Lubka, Basile

Headquarters X Corps
General Orders No. 175 - 16 August 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Basile Lubka (MCSN: 0-50285), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against the enemy near Wonju, Korea, on 11 June 1951. Serving as a rifle platoon leader, First Lieutenant Lubka was given the mission of assaulting Hill 721, then occupied by a large enemy force which had successfully repulsed several previous attacks. Skillfully deploying his platoon, Lieutenant Lubka led his men through an intense hail of enemy fire, until the accurate fire from a hidden enemy machine gun forced his unit to seek cover. Without regard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Lubka exposed himself in order to locate the gun emplacement, and quickly destroyed it. This action enabled the platoon to continue the assault and seize the objective. The gallantry and courageous leadership displayed by Lieutenant Lubka on this occasion contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission, and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered service From Ohio.

Lucas, Velmer Ray

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 108 - June 23, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class [then Sergeant] Velmer Ray Lucas (ASN: RA-13330854), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force on 10 February 1951, near Waegwan, Korea, while serving with Company I, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. While Company I was engaged in an attack upon enemy hill positions, a heavy volume of automatic weapons and small arms fire from an emplacement pinned down the assaulting platoon. Sergeant Lucas, despite the intense fire, voluntarily charged forward and single-handedly assaulted the position. Accurately hurling hand grenades at the hostile embrasure, he succeeded in destroying the machine gun nest and silencing the harassing fire. As a result of this action, the platoon was enabled to resume the assault and ultimately aid in capturing the assigned objective. Sergeant Lucas' gallantry and aggressive deed reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Cavalry Division and the United States Army.

Lucas, William R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain William R. Lucas (MCSN: 0-33079), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of an unarmed Observation Plane in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 March 1951. Spotting a well-concealed hostile force strategically located on a ridge and commanding an area occupied by friendly forces, Captain Lucas immediately radioed the location of the positions and informed the advancing units that he would endeavor to neutralize the hostile emplacements by air strikes. After contacting and briefing close support aircraft, he executed low altitude dives to pinpoint and mark the locations by dropping smoke grenades and, despite heavy enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, remained over the target area to direct the planes in their rocket and strafing runs to rout the enemy from the hill. By his superb airmanship, cool courage under fire and heroic actions throughout, Captain Lucas was directly instrumental in the continued forward advance of friendly troops, and his zealous devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Evanston, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Lucid, Edward (MIA-KIA)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 88 - 13 August 1950

Private Edward Lucid, RA12299728, Infantry, United States Army, a member of the Heavy Mortar Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star Medal for gallantry in action against the enemy on 20 July 1950 at Taejon, Korea. As a member of a road block, Private Lucid on two occasions moved his rocket launcher within ten yards of enemy tanks an destroyed two of them by direct fire. Without hesitation Private Lucid would advance to meet the enemy whenever possible and his display of courage was an inspiration to other members of the road block team. The cool, calm display of courage, and initiative exhibited by Private Lucid is in keeping with the highest traditions of the Armed Forces and reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the service from New York, NY.

Lueddeke, Gustave F. Jr.

Source: www.arlingtoncemetery.net

Marine Gets Silver Star

The Silver Star has been won by Marine First Lieutenant Gustave Lueddeke, Jr., who is back in the United States after almost a year in Korea.  The son of Mr. and Mrs. Lueddeke of 112 Oakview Avenue, Maplewood, New Jersey, the Marine officer was cited for heroic action with the First Marine Division. He also holds the Distinguished Flying Cross and gold stars in lieu of third and fourth Air Medals for other actions in Korea.  His wife is the former Gertrude Marsh of Maplewood. The couple, who have two children, a son, and an infant daughter, make their home in Quantico, Virginia.  The citation for his awards reads:

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Observation Squadron in Korea on 27 and 28 September 1950. As the pilot of an unarmed helicopter, First Lieutenant Lueddeke made seven flights over enemy held territory to evacuate fourteen United States Army personnel that were isolated from friendly forces by an enemy ambush. Upon learning that a unit of the First Army Cavalry Division had been ambushed and sustained several serious casualties, he volunteered to fly to the area and aid in their evacuation. Although the area was forty-five air miles from his base, and regardless of his own personal safety, he successfully completed his voluntary mission, thereby saving the lives of the wounded United States Army personnel. His actions and devotion to duty were an inspiration to all members of his squadron. First Lieutenant Lueddeke's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."

Luering, Carel Mathija Cornelis Leuring

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Carel Mathija Cornelis Leuring, Netherlands Army, a member of the Netherlands Expeditionary Force to Korea, for gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Kumwa, Korea. On 22 December 1941, Lieutenant Leuring led his men forward in an attack on strategically located enemy positions. Displaying aggressive leadership, he skillfully directed their fire as they seized one enemy emplacement, and then moved in the forefront of the assault as the friendly troops charged a second more heavily-fortified position located on commanding ground. The hostile force resisted fanatically, showering hand grenades on the attacking troops and calling in a murderous mortar bombardment which inflicted several casualties. Disorganized by the ferocious resistance, the friendly platoon fell back to the previously captured position. Although he had been painfully wounded in the attack, Lieutenant Leuring skillfully reorganized his men and led them forward again in a sweeping assault. Only when his platoon's mission had been accomplished did he allow himself to be evacuated for medical treatment. The heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Leuring on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the Netherlands Army.

Lugo, Enrique Vega


Enrique Vega Lugo receiving the Silver Star medal
(Click picture for a larger view)

16 April 1952 - Cpl Enrique Vega Lugo (right) Co. "G", 2nd Bn., 65th INF REGT, 3rd U.S. INF. DIV., receives the Silver Star medal from Col. Juan Cesar Cordero, CO 65th INF REGT, during ceremonies held at REGT HQS, Korea. U.S. Army photo by PFC Philip Perrone (SK) 3rd SIG CO.

Lugo, Oscar Roman

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 144 - 23 May 1953

Private First Class Oscar Roman Lugo, US50114547, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of  23 February 1953, a patrol of Company "C", of which Private Roman Lugo was a member, was assigned the mission of destroying an enemy patrol in the vicinity of Chich-on, Korea, and to capture prisoners for intelligence purposes. When the patrol was ambushed by a hostile force, the patrol leader was seriously wounded in the initial burst of fire and lay within yards of the enemy position. After the friendly elements withdrew from the engagement to reorganize, Private Roman Lugo volunteered to accompany another member of the patrol to search for the wounded officer. He was subjected to intense hostile fire, but continued in the search until the wounded officer was located. Private Roman Lugo then assisted  the other volunteer in dragging him back through the enemy fire to safety. Private Roman Lugo's outstanding gallantry, initiative and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Luiz, Carl G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Carl G. Luiz (MCSN: 63077), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 March 1951. Wounded in the hand by shrapnel from an enemy grenade while leading his squad in a daring attack against a strong, well-entrenched hostile position, Sergeant Luiz staunchly refused to be evacuated and continued in the assault. Struck in the back a few minutes later by shrapnel from a second bursting grenade, he again refused to leave his men and drove fearlessly on until the objective was secured. By his daring and forceful leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and extraordinary courage against heavy odds, Sergeant Luiz served as a constant inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Bedford, Massachusetts. Home Town: New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Lukas, Edward

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Edward Lukas (MCSN: 0-54738), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Outpost Commander of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 and 5 September 1952. When the outpost was subjected to heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire and was attacked by a numerically superior hostile force, Second Lieutenant Lukas fearlessly moved about the perimeter to check his men's positions, direct their fire and encourage them. Searching out the wounded men, he personally evacuated them to the aid bunker, thereby materially aiding in saving several lives. On one occasion, he located an enemy machine gun position firing on the outpost and quickly silenced it with his carbine. When the enemy had withdrawn, he reorganized the position and set up evacuation teams to remove the wounded as soon as possible. Although painfully wounded himself, he assisted in carrying the casualties to positions of safety. By his inspiring leadership, marked courage and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Second Lieutenant Lukas upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bloomington, Indiana. Home Town: Bloomington, Indiana.

Lund, Arnold A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Arnold A. Lund (MCSN: 0-9029), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot and Tactical Air Coordinator of Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three (VMF-323), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 August 1950. Locating a long column of armed enemy vehicles hurriedly withdrawing from rapidly advancing ground forces west of Kosong, Major Lund led repeated attacks in the face of intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire which caused the loss of two of the five aircraft under his control. Skillfully directing the remaining aircraft, he continued the strike, immobilizing the retreating column so that subsequent flights were able to select the stationary vehicles and, by sealing both ends of the column, assisted materially in the final destruction of ninety percent of the remaining vehicles. By his superb airmanship, ability as a leader and courageous devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Major Lund contributed directly to the ultimate rout of enemy troops in the southern sector of the Masan front, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. George, Utah. Home Town: McPhee, Colorado.

Lundgren, Oscar B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Oscar B. Lundgren (NSN: 0-73023), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer of U.S.S. DeHaven (DD-727) in Korea, from 13 to 15 September 1950. Commander Lundgren navigated his ship through an enemy mine field, engaged enemy shore batteries at close range, and contributed greatly to the successful amphibious landings at Inchon. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 918 (October 14, 1950).

Lundin, William M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major William M. Lundin (MCSN: 0-7998), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Division Leader and Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Fourteen (VMF-214), attached to the U.S.S. SICILY (CVE-118), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 August 1950. Assigned to seek and destroy the enemy troops holding up the advance of our ground forces, Major Lundin braved intense and accurate hostile fire to launch repeated runs at tree-top level and at dangerously low speed in order to pinpoint the enemy positions. Leading his division in daring attacks, he assisted in inflicting severe casualties on the hostile force, causing them to retreat, and, personally scored a direct hit with a 500 pound bomb on a vital mortar emplacement, thereby further aiding the continued advance of friendly forces. Later, he observed a friendly platoon, unaware of their immediate danger, moving toward a well-concealed and heavily concentrated enemy force and, ordering his flight to circle overhead, he executed several runs over the friendly troops and dived on the hostile positions at a sufficiently low altitude to blow away their camouflage with his propeller blasts. Undeterred by small arms fire which damaged his plane, he remained until our forces had taken cover and directed the other planes to make passes on the enemy until they started to retreat and the friendly forces were able to continue. His superb airmanship, quick initiative and aggressive devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Major Lundin and the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Lupher, Robert D.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 12 - 8 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert D. Lupher (ASN: US-52001271), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Pangdangdong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. During his platoon's assault against determined enemy forces, the Platoon Leader and Platoon Sergeant were seriously wounded, leaving the unit without leaders. Immediately sizing up the situation, Sergeant Lupher assumed command of the unit. He skillfully organized his comrades and led them into close combat with the overwhelming, numerically superior enemy force. With complete disregard for his own safety, he exposed himself to the devastating enemy fire, directing the fire and tactical disbursement of his men and leading the fighting. As a result of his fearless initiative, heavy casualties were inflicted upon the enemy and the platoon was able to secure its objective. Sergeant Lupher's courageous action, outstanding resourcefulness and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Frazeyaberg, Ohio.

Luther, James B.

The Silver Star is awarded to Master Sergeant James B. Luther, RA16280926, (then Sergeant First Class, United States Army, a member of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Pungchonni, Korea. On that date, when the company was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force, Sergeant Luther, weapons platoon sergeant, personally led his machine gun section to exposed positions in order to direct accurate fire on enemy emplacements. Disregarding his personal safety, he remained exposed to intense enemy fire while directing the machine gun fire of his men and designating targets for the 57mm recoilless rifle crew. Sergeant Luther’s control of the supporting fire, on this occasion, was a significant factor in the successful defensive action of his company, was a significant factor in the successful defensive action of his company, and inflicted numerous casualties upon the attacking enemy forces. The gallantry in action displayed by Sergeant Luther reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Coldwater, Mason City, and Ankeny, Iowa.

[KWE Note: He retired as a Captain and died in 1986.]

Luther, James B. (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

The First Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Second Lieutenant James B. Luther, RA16280926, (then Master Sergeant), United States Army, a member of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action 29 July 1951 in the vicinity of Taeusan, Korea. On that date during an assault upon enemy positions, all the officers of Company I were casualties due to intense hostile fire. Lieutenant Luther was ordered by the battalion commander to assume command of the unit and continue its attack. He immediately reorganized the men and led them in a successful, assault upon enemy positions. Having secured the objective, Lieutenant Luther directed his men in setting up a defensive perimeter and led them in repulsing an enemy counterattack. As a result of his outstanding leadership, numerous casualties were inflicted upon the enemy. The gallantry in action displayed by Lieutenant Luther on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Lykens, Johnson A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Johnson A. Lykens (MCSN: 1013477), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces during a reconnaissance mission in the vicinity of Yanggu, Korea, on 15 July 1951. When the forward elements of his platoon unknowingly entered a hostile minefield and the platoon leader and numerous others became casualties, Sergeant Lykens immediately assumed command during the absence of the platoon sergeant and, quickly establishing a defense guard against possible enemy attack, repeatedly scouted for a safe route through the minefield while supervising the treatment and evacuation of casualties. Although seriously wounded by an exploding mine, he steadfastly remained in the danger area until all other wounded had been evacuated and the platoon sergeant reassumed command. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and zealous devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Port Matilda, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Altoona, Pennsylvania.

Lyman, Henry M.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 204 - 20 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant First Class Henry M. Lyman, RA20848525, Armor, United States Army, a member of Tank Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 11 February 1951 in the vicinity of Ch'owon-ni, Korea. On that date he was a commander of one of the tanks in a task force which was supporting Republic of Korea Forces. The friendly lines crumbled during an attack by numerically superior enemy forces, and the enemy established a roadblock cutting off the task force. While attempting to break through the roadblock his tank was hit by a rocket type anti-tank shell and was immobilized. He then fired his .90 caliber machine gun maintaining a covering fire for one of the tanks following his, which enabled the tank to break through the roadblock and reach safety. Not until the flames forced him did he abandon his tank, and when last observed by his comrades he was still attempting to stem the onslaught of the enemy. The courage and gallantry displayed by Sergeant Lyman reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Texas or Washington.

[KWE Note: Sgt. Lyman was captured. RTMC August 1953.]

 

Lyman, William J.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 219 - 23 June 1952

Captain William J. Lyman, Jr., 0537620, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 18 January 1952, Captain Lyman led a patrol from his company up Hill 167, near Sangnyong-Myon, Korea, to establish an outpost from which he could direct the attack of the remainder of the company on the assigned objective. As the lead squad of the patrol neared the top of the hill it was suddenly subjected to an intense barrage of enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire and was effectively pinned down. Observing that the remainder of the patrol was becoming confused and disorganized, Captain Lyman fearlessly exposed himself to the withering hail of hostile fire as he moved among his men, encouraging, reorganizing, and leading them in an assault on the enemy positions so as to allow the lead squad to withdraw. During the vicious battle which ensued, Captain Lyman was mortally wounded, but his courageous initiative and leadership enabled the pinned down squad to withdraw with a minimum of casualties. Captain Lyman's outstanding gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from South Carolina.

Lynch, Billie W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Billie W. Lynch (MCSN: 1120740), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 1 November 1952. When a numerically superior hostile force launched a savage assault which forced the withdrawal of his men from a vital outpost position forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Lynch, although painfully wounded by enemy fire, immediately prepared his unit for a counterattack. With grim determination, he fearlessly led the assault, succeeded in reoccupying the outpost and, after forcing the enemy to withdraw, led a group of Marines in pursuit of the attackers. Upon returning to his position, he aided in rescuing a severely wounded Marine who had been thrown from a high ledge. By his valiant leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Lynch contributed materially to the successful defense of the outpost position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Arnoldsburg, West Virginia. Home Town: Belle, West Virginia.

Lynch, Joseph M.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 16 June 1951

Corporal Joseph M. Lynch, RA13273224, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 17 May 1951 in the vicinity of Panmagi-ri, Korea.  On that date the positions of Company A were attacked by a strong enemy force.  When the company withdrew to better positions, Corporal Lynch volunteered to remain behind and delay the enemy until his comrades had withdrawn.  During this action Corporal Lynch pointed out enemy positions to his squad leader, who, in turn, called for artillery strikes.  Delivering a steady stream of fire with his automatic rifle, Corporal Lynch held down any enemy who dared expose himself.  After the company had completed the withdrawal, Corporal Lynch and other members of his squad destroyed all supplies and equipment they could not take with them in order to prevent their falling into enemy hands.  The heroism in action demonstrated by Corporal Lynch on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Lynn, Francis L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 16 June 1951

Sergeant First Class Francis L. Lynn, ER16289472, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company A, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 17 May 1951 in the vicinity of Panmegi-ri, Korea.  On that date Sergeant Lynn acted as a rear guard, delaying the enemy sufficiently to enable his company to withdraw to better positions when it was attacked by a large group of enemy.  While holding his position, Sergeant Lynn called in heavy firing missions to the artillery forward observer, enabling the friendly troops to hold the area.  When Sergeant Lynn finally withdrew, he destroyed all supplies and ammunition that could not be removed.  The gallant conduct displayed by Sergeant Lynn on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Lyon, SGT Lindsey D.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 80 - 12 April 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant Lindsey D. Lyon, RA6654395, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. On that date a portion of his company’s defensive perimeter was attacked and overrun by the enemy. Sergeant Lyon was a member of a squad which was given the mission to secure the top of a hill to cover the area penetrated by the enemy. While the squad was moving to positions along a covered route, enemy troops less than 200 yards distant opened heavy automatic weapons and small arms fire on the area which the squad was to seize. Sergeant. Lyon voluntarily and with complete disregard for his personal safety moved quickly into position facing the hostile forces. Standing fully upright, under a hail of enemy fire, he engaged the enemy with accurate rifle fire killing three and wounding an unknown number of them. He continued firing from his exposed position until the enemy withdrew, thus enabling his squad to seize its objective. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Lyon reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Kentucky.

Lyons, Robert C.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal [then Private] Robert C. Lyons (ASN: RA-15203254), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company F, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 13 October 1950 near Kumahon, Korea. When his company was pushing northward, over rugged, mountainous terrain, it was suddenly subjected to extremely heavy machine gun and small arms fire from concealed positions in a wooded area. During the ensuing skirmish, five enemy soldiers were killed or wounded, and ten captured. His presence of mind and quick, aggressive action undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his companions. Corporal Lyons' gallantry and outstanding courage reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Lyons, Thomas F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Thomas F. Lyons (MCSN: 1097382), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. Although subjected to heavy enemy small arms and mortar fire during the final stage of a company raid on two strongly fortified hill positions, Staff Sergeant Lyons fearlessly exposed himself to the hostile fire to lead his men up and onto the objective, aggressively searching out the enemy in the trenches, bunkers and tunnels. Moving continuously through the hostile positions, he directed his unit in the delivery of accurate interdiction fire which was instrumental in repelling an enemy counterattack. During the withdrawal to the base of the hill, he again exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to assist in recovering the bodies of a friendly machine gun crew and, upon reaching the bottom of the hill, directed the evacuation of the wounded in the face of continuous enemy sniper fire. Although painfully wounded while leading a stretcher party with the last casualty across a rice paddy under a barrage of artillery fire, he maintained control of the situation and carried the wounded Marine to safety on his back. By his exceptional courage, fortitude and indomitable fighting spirit, Staff Sergeant Lyons served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

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