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Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "M"

 
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Mabry, Clarence J. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Clarence J. Mabry (MCSN: 0-8420), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of the Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. With the assault units of his battalion pinned down by intense fire during an attack against strongly defended and well-entrenched hostile position in the vicinity of Son'ga-ri, Major Mabry fearlessly moved forward to an exposed position under the heavy enemy small arms, mortar and machine gun fire and, after conducting a hasty reconnaissance of the area, directed the company commanders in the assault. After establishing a first aid station, he personally supervised the evacuation of approximately 25 wounded Marines and, although suffering from concussion from the blast of an exploding mortar shell, continued his courageous efforts until all casualties had received treatment and had been evacuated. By his forceful and determined leadership, outstanding heroism and grave concern for others at great personal risk, Major Mabry contributed materially to the success achieved by his battalion, and his inspiring actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Gaffney, South Carolina. Home Town: Union, South Carolina.

Mabry, Clarence J. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major Clarence J. Mabry (MCSN: 0-8420), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of the Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 and 10 June 1951. Assuming command of the battalion when his commanding officer became a casualty during the initial stages of an attack against strong enemy positions, Major Mabry displayed exceptional skill and resourcefulness in directing his unit in the ultimate seizure of the day's objective and, on the following morning, formulated plans for and directed a daring assault on a large hostile force occupying heavily fortified and camouflaged positions on the slopes and summit of a hill mass with almost vertical approaches. Despite the severe handicaps imposed by communication failures, adverse weather conditions and a tortuous supply and evacuation route over rugged terrain exposed to heavy enemy fire, he succeeded in overcoming these difficulties and relentlessly pressed the attack. Although authorized to effect a withdrawal of the battalion at sundown, Major Mabry unhesitatingly elected to continue the attack despite numerous casualties within his command, and constantly exposed himself to devastating enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire while directing the progress of the assault companies. His maximum and effective use of supporting arms and sound tactical judgment in committing his reserve at the crucial moment of the action were decisive factors in the ultimate achievement of the objective. When the objective had been secured, he skillfully directed the reorganization of the battalion and the preparation of a defense line, enabling his unit to successfully repel a vicious enemy counterattack. By his courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to the fulfillment of a vital mission, Major Mabry served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Gaffney, South Carolina. Home Town: Union, South Carolina.

Mabson, Oliver R.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 45 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant [then Corporal] Oliver R. Mabson (ASN: US-52060249), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company F, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Sangsan-ni, Korea, on 19 October 1951. His company had the mission of taking and securing Objective KING, a steep and rugged mountainous terrain feature held by a well-entrenched enemy force. As a member of the assaulting element, Sergeant Mabson was advancing up a ridge when the group was subjected to a tremendous volume of enemy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire. Nevertheless, the friendly troops continued to advance until an increased concentration of flanking fire pinned them down. Several casualties were suffered and could not be evacuated. Completely disregarding his own safety, Sergeant Mabson advanced into the withering enemy fire and set up his recoilless rifle in an exposed position on the skyline, obtaining an unrestricted view of the enemy emplacements. Firing round after round into the hostile bunkers and communication trenches, he enabled his comrades to withdraw. However, he drew heavy enemy fire upon himself. Undaunted, he remained exposed, destroying three enemy automatic weapons positions, killing at least thirteen hostile soldiers and wounding five others. Not until his ammunition was exhausted did he leave to rejoin his unit. Corporal Mabson's courageous action, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to his comrades reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Lexington, Kentucky.

MacAllister, Everett

Private Everett MacAllister, RA 17242023, Infantry, US Army, a member of Company D, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action near Chonui, Korea on 10 July 1950. Private MacAllister had just returned from the Regimental Ammunition Dump to the First Battalion Motor Pool with a load of mortar and machine gun ammunition that was desperately needed at the front. He was informed by the Company Motor Corporal that a road block had been effected by the enemy between his position and the company location. He knew that four other drives who had attempted to get through had been killed. Voluntarily, Private MacAllister started to drive his load of ammunition to the company weapons positions. During the trip, Private MacAllister’s truck received a direct hit which destroyed the truck and injured him. He was blown into a roadside rice paddy and had to be evacuated by medical personnel. By his gallant actions, Private MacAllister displayed a complete disregard for his own life and high devotion to duty. His attempt to take badly needed ammunition to his comrades reflect the highest credit on himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.GO 55, 24 Jul 1950.(Home unknown)

MacAskill, Malcolm Angus (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Malcolm Angus MacAskill (MCSN: 1213016), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Automatic Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 July 1952. During the temporary withdrawal of his platoon to fresh positions after being subjected to intense enemy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire, Private First Class MacAskill voluntarily remained at his post to provide cover for the platoon and for an automatic rifleman who also chose to remain. Undeterred by a virtual hail of hostile fire, he brought his own rifle to bear on the enemy positions and, together with his comrade, succeeded in sufficiently neutralizing the opposition to allow his platoon to withdraw and establish a new base of fire. Mortally wounded while courageously staving off the enemy counterattack, Private First Class MacAskill, by his valiant stand in the face of heavy odds, served to inspire all who observed him. His outstanding bravery, determined fighting spirit and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of his comrades were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 6, 1928 at Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan. Death: KIA: July 5, 1952.

Macaulay, Alan B.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 247 - 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Alan B. Macaulay (ASN: 0-228603), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Yong-ri, Korea, on 11 August 1950. His company had been attacked by a numerically superior enemy force and withdrew to more tenable positions. Organizing a group of five soldiers he voluntarily attempted to return to the company's former position to recover the wounded. Leading the group into the town he was located by the enemy and in the fire fight that followed the patrol killed four of the enemy and dispersed the remainder. Aware that the enemy now knew of his presence in the area he aggressively led his men into the town and located three wounded soldiers. Returning to the company's positions, over a new route, the patrol was again fired upon by an enemy group. With utter disregard for his own safety Lieutenant Macauley ordered the patrol to proceed and falling back he engaged the enemy in a running fire fight. His accurate fire kept the enemy at bay and permitted the patrol to reach the relative safety of friendly lines. His courageous actions, complete devotion to duty and superior leadership reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

MacDougall, John B.

Headquarters. 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 689 - 7 November 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Master Sergeant John B. MacDougall, NG27342117, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company L, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 7 October 1951 in the vicinity of Mundung-ni, Korea. On this date, during an attack on enemy positions, friendly forces met heavy resistance from well fortified enemy bunkers and trenches. Sergeant MacDougall skillfully deployed his men and led them in an assault upon the hostile emplacements, throwing hand grenades. He succeeded in destroying many of these bunkers, inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy. After the objective had been secured, Sergeant MacDougall, with complete disregard for his personal safety, continually exposed himself to hostile fire to direct his men in the withdrawal, and though painfully wounded remained in his position until all of them had reached positions of safety. The gallantry in action and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant MacDougall on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Mackert, John R.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 46 - 20 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) John R. Mackert (ASN: 0-59146), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division (then a member of Company F, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division), near Ori-Tong, Korea, on 5 November 1951. His platoon had the mission of moving up a valley, between enemy-held hills, on a combat patrol. Having reached the destination without incident, Lieutenant Mackert, Platoon Leader, was leading his men back to friendly lines when the group was suddenly subjected to an intense concentrated enemy mortar barrage. As the riflemen tried to escape from the explosions, the enemy pinned them down with murderous machine gun crossfire. The numerically superior enemy force then launched a savage attack. But under Lieutenant Mackert's skillful leadership, the friendly troops repelled the charge and began to withdraw. The enemy pressed harder, however, and attempted to outflank his unit, making it virtually impossible for it to disengage. With complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Mackert ordered his men to withdraw and remained to provide covering fire. Taking an exposed position, he fired with devastating accuracy into the enemy hordes, wounding many and forcing the others to seek cover. He then rejoined his men, who had escaped from the trap only to be stopped by an enemy force which had moved to their rear. Lieutenant Mackert fearlessly attacked the key hostile machine gun position, killing all three gunners. Meanwhile, all his men fought their way through except for one wounded soldier. Oblivious to the enemy fire, he picked the man up and carried him to safety. Lieutenant Mackert's courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless performance of duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: San Fernando, California.

Mackin, Alvin F.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Captain Alvin F. Mackin (MCSN: 0-27603), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a member of the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 June 1951. On that date, the rifle company Captain Mackin commanded was ordered to seize objective "Eight", a critical terrain feature north of Songnimchon, Korea. For two days the enemy had fanatically defended this hill despite a heavy bombardment by all available supporting arms. Patrols to the hill were twice driven back by small arms fire, automatic weapons fire, grenades and enemy mortars and artillery. The assault elements of his company moved forward, but due to extremely heavy resistance were forced to seek cover and reorganize. During this period, Captain Mackin moved forward to his assault elements, continually exposing himself to small arms and automatic weapons fire. He personally led the second and third attacks. His skillful leadership and sound tactical decisions enabled his company to secure its objective with a minimum of casualties. The gallantry and outstanding devotion to duty displayed by Captain Mackin on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 225 (October 7, 1951). Entered Service From Ohio.

Mackrall, SGT 1C Blaine E.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 8 - 9 January 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant First Class Blaine E. Mackrall, RA6573917, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 31 August 1950 and 1 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea. On 31 August 1950, his company was in defensive positions along the Naktong River and was under heavy attack by a numerically superior enemy force. After an all night battle the company was forced to begin a withdrawal to a more tenable position. During the withdrawal, which began in the early hours of 1 September 1950, Sergeant Mackrall was a member of a group crossing a rice paddy, when a sudden cross fire from enemy automatic weapons and small arms forced the members of the group to take cover. With the enemy force between his group and its objective, Sergeant Mackrall charged directly up the hill in the face of extremely heavy hostile fire and diverted the enemy’s attention from the remainder of his unit long enough for his men to circle the hill in an attempt to flank the enemy force. Superior fire power and possession of commanding ground enabled the enemy to avert this flanking action, but the group was able to withdraw to is selected position. The courageous action of Sergeant Mackrall was responsible for saving the majority of his men. His gallantry on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the fine traditions of the military service. Home of record: Stewart, South Dakota.

[KWE Note: Mackrall was captured on this date, was released 26/27 September 1950, one of three POWs released.]

MacLeod, Duncan A.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 102 - 10 May 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant Duncan A. MacLeod, 01693138, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company A, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Changbong-ni, Korea. Company A was involved in a rear guard action against large hostile forces. While the company was surrounded and subjected to intense enemy mortar, heavy, weapons and small arms fire, Lieutenant MacLeod calmly walked from man to man rallying the members of the company to keep up the firefight and to hold the enemy at bay. Inspired by his courage and resolute leadership, the company fought fiercely and with complete disregard for the overwhelming odds against them. After breaking through the enemy encirclement, the company was forced to fight through a series of roadblocks. In order for the company’s column, with its wounded, to pass it was necessary to secure a hill on which the enemy was firmly entrenched and from which withdrawal of the entire battalion was blocked. Calling for volunteers to follow him, Lieutenant MacLeod fearlessly advanced into the face of heavy fire toward the hostile entrenchments. Inspired by his intrepid action, his men forthwith followed him in the assault and, after bitter close-in fighting, secured the commanding ground which enabled the vehicular column to proceed to safety. The gallantry and inspirational leadership displayed by Lieutenant MacLeod reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Virginia.

MacNamara, George R.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 454 - 28 November 1952

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class George R. MacNamara, US55144139, Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 19 September 1952 in the vicinity of Chura (Chuna?) -dong, North Korea. On that date, Private MacNamara was attached to a supporting platoon of Company E who, mounted on tanks, were following the advance guard. Shortly after entering disputed territory, sounds of a vicious firefight were heard from the direction of the advance platoon. Realizing the leading platoon had been ambushed, Private MacNamara jumped from the tank in which he was riding and amid a heavy barrage of enemy mortar, made his way forward, moving up the road that was being swept by the deadly fire of eight enemy machine guns, and began to cooly and skillfully trat his wounded comrades. Even though an enemy platoon on the left was hurling grenades into their midst, Private MacNamara, with complete disregard for personal safety, continued to risk his life as he moved through the curtain of fire time and again, giving words of encouragement, treating and evacuating the wounded. He remained at his duties, insuring that all casualties had been evacuated to the relative safety of the company position, and when the last elements of the rear guard withdrew, he treated their wounded as they moved. Private MacNamara’s extreme gallantry in action and consummate devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Minnesota.

Macy, Jack E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Jack E. Macy (MCSN: 1086690), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 September 1950. When an outpost from his platoon was attacked by approximately twenty-five of the enemy armed with automatic weapons, Sergeant Macy ran forward from his elevated defensive position to an area where he could bring fire from his carbine to bear upon the enemy. Although wounded while temporarily pinning the enemy down, he continued to fire until all the men in the outpost had returned to the platoon area. His courage, daring initiative and outstanding leadership reflect the highest credit upon Sergeant Macy and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Oakland, California. Home Town: Oakland, California. Death: February 11, 2009.

Maggard, Charles B.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 108 - June 23, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Charles B. Maggard (ASN: RA-15379549)United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company F, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 28 November 1950, near Samao-ri, Korea. While the 2d Battalion was proceeding by motorized convoy toward Sunchon, it suddenly encountered an enemy roadblock. Corporal Maggard and his platoon quickly deployed to counter attack the hostile positions on a nearby hill, but midway to their objective, they were fired on by snipers from the right flank. Corporal Maggard moved aggressively against the harassing Chinese and killed three. When the unit started to advance and drew fire, he went forward a second time to eliminate the snipers. During this action he was wounded by the hostile fire, but his aggressiveness and outstanding devotion to duty were an inspiration to his comrades and aided them to capture their objective with a minimum of casualties. Corporal Maggard's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Maglione, Ralph J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 413 - 1 June 1951

First Lieutenant Ralph J. Maglione, 21535-A, United States Air Force, Tactical Air Controller, a member of the 27th Fighter Escort Wing, 522d Fighter Escort Squadron, Far Eastern Air Force, attached to the 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division distinguished himself by courageous action in the vicinity of Sanghong-jong-ni, Korea on 27 May 1951.  During an attack by an estimated 1500 enemy force, Lieutenant Maglione voluntarily took command of a small group of men and led them in a counter-attack up a ridge, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and taking many of them prisoner.  Although unfamiliar with small unit infantry tactics, he led and employed his men in such a manner as to keep their losses very low, encouraging and inspiring them to a superior performance during the fight.  His sound judgment, his reckless exposure to a numerically superior enemy and his willingness to risk death several times, when it would have been more prudent to shoot instead of talking the enemy into giving up the fight, inspired his men to greater efforts and earned him the solid respect of all who were near him during the battle.  Though wounded while arranging the surrender of approximately 150 prisoners, he directed them to crawl down a stream bed leading them to safety.  He then made his way to a tank and directed fire upon the enemy until they fled in disorder.  He then accompanied a squad from another regiment to where some enemy were hiding, pointing out positions for them to engage.  Only when he was ordered back to the command post area did he seek medical treatment for his wound.  During the action, the enemy suffered over 325 known killed, over 400 wounded and several hundred taken prisoner.  Lieutenant Maglione's outstanding courage against an overwhelming enemy force, in the face of the withering fire he was subjected to and his adept direction of the men who were with him were greatly responsible for the heavy losses sustained by the enemy.  His gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Air Force.  Entered federal service from Akron, Ohio.

Maguire, Frank J.

Master Sergeant Frank J. Maguire, a member of Battery D, 82nd AAA AW Battalion (SP), 2nd Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. Sergeant Maguire's battery, in vehicular column, was withdrawing through a series of hostile fire-blocks. When the vehicle in which he was riding was destroyed by enemy fire, he was ordered to proceed through the hills on foot, to safety, Under cover of darkness, Sergeant Maguire and a comrade became separated from the main group and, at daylight, joined a small group of Republic of Korea soldiers. When the group was subjected to enemy fire from the high ground on its right flank, Sergeant Maguire immediately organized the men and led them in an assault on the enemy position. Under his fearless leadership the group aggressively charged the enemy forcing them to break and run, abandoning two machine guns, two rocket launchers and a large amount of ammunition. He directed the fire of the machine guns upon the enemy and inflicted heavy casualties upon them as they fled. He then led his men back to the road and joined a friendly convoy that was moving south. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Maguire reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the service from Washington.

Magana, Charles B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles B. Magana (MCSN: 1053534), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Cannoneer of Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 4 December 1950. Although not on duty when an enemy mortar shell landed in the gun pit, killing or wounding all personnel and starting a fire which threatened one hundred rounds of high-explosive ammunition stored in an adjacent pit, Private First Class Magana immediately emerged from his tent and, despite the danger from exploding ammunition and continued enemy mortar fire, voluntarily entered the pit in his bare feet and proceeded to smother the fire with his parka. By his daring initiative, prompt action and cool courage in the face of grave danger, Private First Class Magana prevented serious injury to the remaining men and materiel of his organization and permitted his battery to keep its gun in action during a critical phase of the operation. His bold initiative and personal heroism were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Los Angeles, California. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Magness, Byron L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Byron L. Magness (MCSN: 0-50330), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. With his company ordered to reinforce a friendly infantry company, Second Lieutenant Magness boldly led his platoon into position under heavy enemy fire and, when directed to attack, skillfully deployed his platoon on the enemy's right flank, despite darkness and unfamiliar terrain, and personally spearheaded an assault against the heavily fortified positions on high ground. Immediately placing his men in defensive positions when the enemy opened fire at close range with automatic weapons and small arms after the objective had been seized, he coordinated their effective fire and effected a reorganization, placing two machine guns where they could deliver effective enfilade fire on routes of attack employed by the aggressors. Under repeated counterattacks by a numerically superior hostile force, Second Lieutenant Magness fearlessly moved among his positions throughout the day, supervising the fire of his units and shouting orders and words of encouragement to his men. On two separate occasions, he advanced alone approximately twenty-five yards in front of his lines and, in direct view of the attacking force, evacuated wounded Marines from the adjacent company to the reverse slope. By his daring initiative, determined and inspiring leadership and grave concern for others at great risk to his own life, Second Lieutenant Magness contributed to the saving of many lives and to the success achieved by his company. His heroic actions and staunch devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Born: Ladelle, Arkansas. Home Town: De Vall's Bluff, Arkansas.

Magness, Woodrow W.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 32 - 16 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Woodrow W. Magness, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action while flying as lead Shoran Operator on an aerial strike against the railroad marshalling yard at Sinmak, Korea on 28 May 1951. After completion of the bomb run, Colonel Magness discovered that a malfunction had occurred in the bomb release mechanism and a bomb, partially hung and armed, had failed to leave the aircraft. The cluster adapter on the front shackle had not released and the non-delay tail fuse had armed the bomb when the arming vane wound off the tail fuse in the slip stream. When the bomb doors were closed the fin of the bomb touched the doors and was subject to vibration. Realizing that the extreme sensitivity of the armed fuse and its position against the bomb bay doors presented imminent danger to the aircraft and its crew, Colonel Magness, with complete disregard for his own safety, removed his parachute and entered the bomb bay. While maintaining a precarious hand hold in the bomb bay, he removed the deadly fuse from the bomb and had the bomb bay doors opened so he could successfully dispose of the live fuse. By this action Colonel Magness undoubtedly saved the lives of his fellow crew members. The courage, aggressiveness and devotion to duty displayed by Colonel Magness were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Magolan, Henry J. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Henry J. Magolan (MCSN: 572424), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 February 1953. When the defensive perimeter was subjected to a murderous hail of enemy automatic weapons fire while his platoon was engaged in supporting another unit's activities far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Magolan fearlessly exposed himself to the deadly fire and delivered accurate rifle fire upon the hostile troops, thereby enabling his platoon to organize and prepare for the expected second assault. Mortally wounded by hostile fire while engaging the enemy during the ensuing attack, Private First Class Magolan, by his aggressiveness, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 29, 1927 at Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan. Death: KIA: February 23, 1953.

Mahaffey, William G.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 149 - November 10, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William G. Mahaffey (ASN: RA-14330989), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company E, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 3 September 1950 near Ponamdong, Korea. When an enemy attack forced his platoon to withdraw from their defensive position on Hill 483, Private Mahaffey refused to give up his BAR position on the forward slope of the hill. Although exposed to enemy fire, he, with the aid of two machine gunners on his left, delivered such accurate and intense fire that the enemy attack was repulsed. Private Mahaffey then joined his platoon in a successful counterattack during which he killed several more enemy and was himself seriously wounded. Private Mahaffey's gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Mahl, Robert A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 65 - 28 January 1952
General Orders No. 131 - 1952
General Orders No. 139 - 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert A. Mahl (ASN: US-52086074), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 26th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self-Propelled), 24th Infantry Division, (then a member of the 52d Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self-Propelled), 24th Infantry Division), near Paegyangni, Korea, on 8 November 1951. His unit dispatched a platoon of weapons carriers to give close fire support to infantry elements attacking an enemy held objective. As the platoon was maneuvering into position, it was subjected to an intensely concentrated enemy mortar barrage which disabled two vehicles and forced the others to withdraw temporarily. When informed of the two critical weapons abandoned in enemy territory and the possibility of wounded crewmen still being on or near the vehicles, Private First Class Mahl volunteered to direct his tank recovery crew in the recovery operations. With calm disregard for murderous sniper and mortar fire bursting about him, he continually exposed himself to direct the maneuvering of the retriever to the first half-track and towed it out of the area. Once this vehicle and the wounded crewman inside were brought to safety, he unhesitatingly returned through the concentrated mortar barrages and small arms fire for the other disabled carrier and towed it out of danger. As a result of his fearlessness, several lives were saved and valuable equipment was prevented from falling into enemy hands. Private First Class Mahl's courageous action, daring initiative, and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Norwalk, Ohio.

Mahoney, Daniel Thomas

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 82 - September 2, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry), [then Second Lieutenant] Daniel Thomas Mahoney (ASN: 0-2200438), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy near Yongdong, Korea, on 24 July 1950. During the early morning dawn, Lieutenant Mahoney's platoon was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. Without regard for personal safety although continually under intense enemy fire, he went from one squad to another which were located on three different peaks, giving encouragement and directing their action against the enemy. He slowed the enemy action at one squad position by personally throwing hand grenades at the enemy. When almost completely surrounded, Lieutenant Mahoney withdrew his platoon to the next hill where the enemy was stopped in their advance, and heavy casualties were inflicted on the enemy. Lieutenant Mahoney's courageous acts and superior leadership was responsible for a minimum of casualties in his platoon and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Mahoney, James R. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman James R. Mahoney, Jr. (NSN: 5583836), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 February 1952. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospitalman Mahoney displayed exceptional valor and devotion to duty in the face of grave danger. Although painfully wounded in action and evacuated two days earlier, he returned to his unit shortly before it was taken under intense enemy artillery and mortar fire. In the midst of the barrage he rushed to the aid of several wounded Marines. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he began treating the casualties and, although severely wounded again, refused medical aid for himself until all other casualties had been cared for. His fearless initiative and dauntless spirit were an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospitalman Mahoney's courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 24097 (August 17, 1952).

Mahowald, Robert A.

Headquarters, 25ID
General Orders No. 444 - 29 November 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Captain Robert A. Mahowald, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, United States Army.  On 20 September 1950, a heavy barrage of artillery delayed one company in a battalion attack toward Chungam-ni, Korea.  To prevent further delay and possible disastrous losses, Captain Mahowald moved forward 1,000 yards through the intense hostile fire, contacted the company commander and assisted in an alternate attack.  As enemy resistance increased, a mine sweeping detail was pinned down, thereby delaying movement of supporting tanks.  Again Captain Mahowald braved severe enemy action to reach the lead tank, reorganized the mine sweeping detail which, inspired by his example of determination and courage, moved out so that the attack could be pursed to successful conclusion.  Captain Mahowald's gallant leadership and exceptional military ability are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Mahue, Aurius J. Jr.

Sergeant Aurius J. Mahue Jr., RA11195062, (then Corporal), Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 25 May 1951, in the vicinity of Inje, Korea.  On that date Company L, to which Sergeant Mahue was attached as a medical aidman, was assaulting well defended enemy positions and had suffered numerous casualties.  Under cover of an intense mortar concentration the enemy counterattack had forced the friendly unit to make a tactical withdrawal.  During this act, many of the wounded men were left behind in the fire-swept area and in the path of the advancing hostile force.  Noticing this, Sergeant Mahue, immediately and without thought for his own safety, returned over the hazardous terrain to the aide of the wounded man and carried him to the safety of the company's defensive perimeter where he administered first aid.  He made repeated trips until all of the wounded men were safely evacuated and treated.  The gallantry in action and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Mahue on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Massachusetts.

Main, Stanley Wilbert

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Stanley Wilbert Main (MCSN: 0-76635/669798), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 November 1952. When the unit contacted the enemy during a raid far forward of the main line of resistance, Staff Sergeant Main courageously led his men through devastating enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire into the hostile defensive positions. As the enemy continued to pour accurate fire into the ranks of the assaulting Marines, he moved from man to man, pointing out targets and directing the fire of his men in order to neutralize the hostile fire. When an attempt was made to encircle the unit, he personally killed four of the enemy soldiers and, by skillfully maneuvering his forces, caused the enemy reinforcements, consisting of two squads approaching from different directions, to fire into each other's ranks. After two Marines were seriously wounded by enemy fire, he successfully directed their evacuation although the area was under intense enemy mortar fire. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, Staff Sergeant Maine served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Francisco, California. Home Town: Modesto, California.

Mainor, Charles L.

Corporal Charles L. Mainor, RA14147240, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950, near Taip-yong-ni, Korea. Corporal Mainor distinguished himself against an overwhelming number of enemy when the right flank of Company B was being overrun. Company B was in a defensive position along the south flank of the Kum River. After several hours of intense fighting, Company B was being attacked from three sides and the enemy had gotten into foxholes in the company position. Corporal Mainor was assistant gunner for a 3.5 rocket launcher. A shell from an enemy tank exploded in his foxhole destroying his rocket launcher and wounding him. Corporal Mainor using his M-1 rifle began firing on an enemy machine gun position approximately twenty feet from his foxhole. A bullet strike on the top of Corporal Mainor’s helmet dazed him and even though dazed and bleeding, he continued to fire into the enemy machine gun nest until he had killed all the enemy there. He then took cover in a rice paddy and continued to fire at the oncoming enemy. When he began to “blackout” and could not see for intervals of time his platoon leader ordered him to the aid station but he refused to leave his platoon. After part of the platoon had withdrawn corporal Mainor withdrew only to return with a message. He then guided the platoon over a safe route of withdrawal. The outstanding courage and devotion to duty by Corporal Mainor reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. GO 60, 25 Jul 1950 Home or county of record: Duval, FL.

Maldonado-Matos, Luis E.

Headquarters - 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 298 - 22 July 1951

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Luis E. Maldonado-Matos (RA30409759), Corporal, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division. On 26 - 27 April 1951, near Ckugyo, Korea, Company A launched an attack against a well-defended enemy hill position. Corporal Maldonado-Matos, attached to Company A for this operation, saw an enemy soldier attempt to stab a friendly infantryman. Fearlessly rushing to his comrade's assistance, he overpowered the enemy soldier and killed him with a pistol. When the enemy launched a surprise counterattack a short time later, Corporal Maldonado-Matos directed accurate machine gun fire into the attacker's ranks and momentarily checked the enemy's advance. When the unit received orders to withdraw, he courageously remained behind and fired round after round of ammunition at the assaulting troops. Only after he was assured that his comrades had reached more tenable positions did he rejoin the unit. Corporal Maldonado-Matos' gallant and aggressive actions reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.

Malinowsky, Peter W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Peter W. Malinowsky (MCSN: 667473), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of an Anti-tank Squad of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 May 1951. Occupying a position forward of the defense line in an attempt to observe an approaching large enemy force which had launched a savage attack against the squad's position during the hours of darkness and was attempting to maneuver to the squad's flanks, Corporal Malinowsky exposed himself to intense and accurate hostile automatic weapons fire while engaging the approaching enemy. Although sustaining painful wounds during the early stages of the assault, and armed only with a pistol and hand grenades, he killed at least twenty of the enemy and so effectively disorganized the hostile attack that his comrades were able to repel the flanking movement and completely rout the enemy. By his outstanding courage, resolute determination and indomitable fighting spirit, Corporal Malinowsky served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Johnstown, Pennsylvania.

Malnar, John M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant John M. Malnar (MCSN: 528234), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 17 September 1950. When sudden fire from a well-entrenched and numerically superior enemy force was directed on his squad and an adjacent tank-infantry team, Sergeant Malnar, unable to contact the nearby tank crew because of disrupted communications, climbed upon the tank in full view of the enemy and loaded its machine gun. Courageously firing on the hostile force, whose fire was then striking the tank, he succeeded in destroying an enemy machine gun and killing its crew, constantly encouraged his squad to continue the attack and steadfastly remained exposed to the intense enemy fire to better his direction of the squad. By his daring initiative, outstanding leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Malnar upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Benld, Illinois. Home Town: Sawyerville, Illinois. Death: KIA: May 2, 1968.

Malone, James F.

1Lt. James F. Malone, 0451344, (then Second Lieutenant), Artillery, Army of the United States, a member of Company B, 2d Engineer Combat Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 28 November 1950 in the vicinity of Kujang-dong, Korea.  In the early morning hours of that date one flank of his company's defensive position was subjected to a fierce attack by a numerically superior enemy force.  When one of the platoons withdrew through the company command post area, Lieutenant Malone immediately reorganized the men and led them in a counterattack to regain their former positions.  He fearlessly advanced to a forward foxhole and furnished covering fire for his men as they moved up on a defensive line with him.  His inspiring leadership enabled the troops to remain at their post and resist the strong enemy attacks.  He further exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to help four wounded men to a position of cover and, after scouting for a safe route of evacuation, assisted in carrying them to another company.  When ammunition was almost exhausted and the company was forced to withdraw, he was in command of the rear guard and was one of the last to leave the area.  Later that day he waded back across the icy Chongchon River and assisted in evacuating a seriously wounded soldier.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Malone reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Arkansas.

Manchester, Guy G. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 849 - 12 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Private First Class Guy G. Manchester, US55084079, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company C, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 31 August 1951 in the vicinity of Taeusan (BLOODY RIDGE), Korea. On this date, after crossing the line of departure, Private Manchester’s platoon was pinned down by a heavy concentration of hostile small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire. Private Manchester, realizing the seriousness of the situation and with complete disregard for his personal safety, advanced to the most forward and exposed position of his unit. From this point he engaged the hostile forces and successfully repelled their counterattacks, inflicting numerous casualties upon them. When his unit was ordered to withdraw to more tenable positions, Private Manchester voluntarily remained in his position and covered the withdrawal of his comrades until they had reached positions of safety. In his attempt to rejoin his unit, Private Manchester was fatally wounded by the enemy fire. His courageous actions were an inspiration to his comrades and were highly responsible for the successful withdrawal of his unit with a minimum of casualties. The gallantry in action and self-sacrificing devotion to duty displayed by Private Manchester reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Mc Gregor, Minnesota.

Mandel, Abraham Isaac (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Abraham Isaac Mandel (MCSN: 879470), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Tank Section of Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 June 1951. During a determined attack against strongly defended enemy positions, Staff Sergeant Mandel skillfully led his tank unit well forward of the advancing infantrymen in a bold attempt to engage hostile forces moving up to commanding ground. Quick to realize the serious threat to his section and to the attacking troops when his tanks were subjected to intense enemy automatic weapons fire from well-concealed positions to the rear, he bravely emerged from the turret of his vehicle to locate the hostile strong points and delivered devastating counterfire with the turret gun. Mortally wounded by enemy fire during the intensive action, Staff Sergeant Mandel, by his courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 13, 1919 at Cleveland, Ohio. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio. Death: KIA: June 1, 1951 - Buried at: Glenville Cemetery - Cleveland, Ohio.

Mandra, Philip Vincent (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Philip Vincent Mandra (MCSN: 1150419), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 and 6 July 1952. When a numerically superior hostile force launched a determined assault while he was participating in the defense of a combat outpost in advance of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Mandra bravely maintained his position in the face of intense enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire, seized an automatic weapon and delivered effective counterfire on the hostile troops, inflicting heavy casualties on the attackers. Encountering one of the enemy armed with an automatic gun while he was maneuvering his fire team in a tight defensive perimeter around the outpost, Sergeant Mandra immediately charged and killed the intruder with his bayonet. Throughout the remainder of the night, he rendered invaluable assistance to the outpost commander, constantly encouraging the men and administering first aid to the wounded. By his outstanding courage, exceptional leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Mandra served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: May 2, 1931 at Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: College Point, New York. Death: KIA: August 7, 1952.

Manipon, Pascual M.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 45 - 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Pascual M. Manipon, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Tank Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 27 August 1950 on Hill 409 near Hyong-pung, Korea. On 27 August 1950, Sergeant Manipon was serving as Tank Commander in a tank-infantry reconnaissance in force on Hill 409 with the mission of recovering U.S. dead and evacuating wounded. As the patrol moved forward to close with the enemy, which were strongly entrenched on the hill and had complete observation of the terrain over which the movement was made, they were subjected to heavy concentrations of mortar, 51-mm. anti-tank rifle and small arms fire. Sergeant Manipon, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, deliberately exposed himself on the tank in order to draw this withering fire and so enable the other tanks and infantrymen to accomplish their mission. As a result of Sergeant Manipon's gallant action, the patrol was successful in rescuing and evacuating several wounded comrades and recovering the bodies of U.S. dead. Sergeant Manipon's courageous action is in keeping with the highest standards and traditions of the military service.

Manke, Conrad F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Conrad F. Manke (MCSN: 1179450), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 3 October 1952. When it was discovered that two members of his unit were missing after a counterattack to retake an important hill outpost was halted and the unit forced to withdraw, Private First Class Manke unhesitatingly volunteered to return to the farthest point of advance to locate the men. Although the route of withdrawal was under constant enemy mortar fire, he returned to the base of the enemy-held hill where he found the men who were wounded and unable to walk. After rendering first aid, he assisted the stricken Marines on the dangerous return trip to safety. By his exceptional courage and indomitable spirit in the face of extreme peril, Private First Class Manke was instrumental in saving the lives of his comrades and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Buffalo, New York. Home Town: Buffalo, New York.

Manley, Merle J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Merle J. Manley (MCSN: 492141), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tank Commander of Company A, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 June 1951. Advancing his tank up a draw in support of attacking rifle companies when intense plunging enemy fire from the slopes on either side of the draw pinned down the accompanying infantrymen and seriously wounded one Marine, Sergeant Manley quickly dismounted from his tank, ran across one hundred yards of fire-swept terrain to the wounded man and carried him to a covered position. Returning to his tank, he skillfully maneuvered it in order to afford cover for the remaining infantrymen and, again moving through the devastating hostile fire to reach the wounded man, succeeded in evacuating him to the battalion aid station, thereby undoubtedly saving the life of his comrade. By his outstanding bravery, daring initiative and self-sacrificing devotion to duty, Sergeant Manley served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Inglewood, California. Home Town: West Covina, California.

Mann, Lowell A.

Citation not yet found.

""The third highest U.S. decoration for gallantry has been awarded Pfc. Lowell A. Mann, 22, of Wayne, Neb.  The U.S. 45th Division Monday announced that Mann and three other soldiers had been awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action in Korea.  Although wounded, [12 January 1952] Mann provided cover with his automatic rifle first for the withdrawal of his own platoon and then another when an attack on a Communist-held hill failed, a citation said, 'Only after the last man had reached safety did Private Mann leave his exposed position and finally consent to medical attention for his wound,' the citation concluded." - Beatrice Daily Sun, 18 February 1952

Manning, Douglas R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Douglas R. Manning (MCSN: 1139103), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radio Operator of Headquarters and Service Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 June 1951. Although he sustained painful wounds in the leg when enemy shrapnel knocked him to the ground and rendered his radio inoperative during an assault against heavily fortified hostile emplacements, Corporal Manning quickly repaired his equipment and continued to sustain vital communications throughout the attack, contributing materially to the success achieved by his company. When his unit seized its objective, he accepted first aid but refused to be evacuated. By his outstanding courage, fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Manning served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Santa Ana, California. Home Town: Santa Ana, California.

Mantalas, John G.

Headquarters - 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 207 - 8 June 1952

Captain (then First Lieutenant) JOHN G. MANTALAS, 063064, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 4 June 1951, Captain MANTALAS led his platoon in an attack on well-fortified enemy position near near Anu, Korea. The hostile force commanded excellent observation and fields of fire of the surrounding territory and for several days had repulsed heavy attacks by friendly troops. Despite intense hostile fire, the platoon advanced to a strip of open terrain that was covered by devastating enemy automatic weapons fire. Fully exposing himself to the lethal hail of fire, Captain MANTALAS dashed across the fire-swept terrain, firing his carbine at a rapid rate. This aggressive and unexpected action took the foe by surprise and forced him to temporarily seek cover, enabling the friendly force to cross the open terrain. The advance continued to the base of a huge boulder, from which the enemy rained down a terrific barrage of hand grenades. After an attack from both the right and left flank had failed and realizing that immediate action must be taken to prevent his platoon's annihilation, Captain MANTALAS completely disregarded his personal safety as he climbed over the great obstruction, shouting, and firing his weapon with deadly accuracy. Inspired by their leader's courageous actions, the friendly troops rose from their positions and, with renewed spirit, surmounted the boulder and completely routed the foe. Captain MANTALAS' outstanding gallantry and initiative were directly responsible for the capture of the strategically important position and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Wisconsin.

Maple, Laverne (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 309 - 17 July 1951

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Private Laverne Maple, US55022227, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company K, 38 th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action on 17 May 1951 in the vicinity of Pungchon-ni, Korea. During a counterattack launched by his company on that date Private Maple, with complete disregard for his own safety, fiercely charged enemy positions in the face of point-blank small arms and automatic weapons fire. In a final assault on the enemy strong points, he attacked the enemy with fixed bayonet and drove them before him, clearing the position and inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy. The gallantry displayed by Private Maple reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Clearbrook, Minnesota.

[Private Maple was killed in action the following day.]

Marcatante, Anthony (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Anthony Marcatante (MCSN: 604130), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman in Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1950. When his platoon was ordered to withdraw to a more favorable position after being subjected to heavy hostile fire and threatened envelopment by numerically superior enemy forces, Private First Class Marcatante voluntarily remained in position to deliver a covering fire for the consolidation of his platoon's position and the evacuation of the many casualties. Ignoring the extreme danger of the situation, he continued to deliver accurate and effective fire on the enemy until his position was overrun. By his courageous actions, he served to inspire all members of his platoon and contributed materially to the successful evacuation of the wounded Marines. His fortitude, aggressive fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty throughout reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Marcatante and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: September 26, 1928 at Long Island City, New York. Home Town: Long Island City, New York. Death: MIA: October 27, 1950.

Marcus, Gerald R.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 204 - 24 June 1953

First Lieutenant Gerald R. Marcus, 02208661, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 13 June and during the early morning hours of 14 June 1953, in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, Lieutenant Marcus led Company "G" in an attack on an enemy outpost known as Hill "412". During the assault, his company was subjected to extremely heavy enemy artillery, mortar, grenade, and small arms fire. Lieutenant Marcus moved through the barrage, constantly encouraging his men and, by his personal actions, inspiring his company. Upon reaching their objective and inflicting heavy casualties upon the foe, his company was subjected to heavy enemy artillery and mortar concentrations. After effecting an orderly reorganization, two more assaults were made under increasing enemy fire. Although wounded, when ordered to return to friendly lines, he refused to leave until the last man had been evacuated. His display of superior leadership under intense fire and his determination and eagerness to accomplish his mission with complete disregard for his personal safety, inspired the men about him and accounted for many enemy casualties. Lieutenant Marcus' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Connecticut.

Marini, Daniel James

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Daniel James Marini (MCSN: 0-286221), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action with operations against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 13 September 1951. Serving as Commander of a Rifle Platoon, First Lieutenant Marini displayed outstanding courage and professional skill in leading his platoon in the attack of a series of heavily fortified and strongly defended enemy hill positions. Disregarding at all times his own personal safety in the face of devastatingly accurate enemy fire, he expertly maneuvered his squads in the attack, seizing the base of the company objective. While plans were being formulated for the attack of the main portion of the objective, he skillfully deployed his men in the defense, and then, on order, he pressed forward in the attack once again, despite the handicap of increasing darkness. His coolness under enemy fire and unswerving devotion so inspired his men that they swept irresistibly forward and overran the critical terrain. First Lieutenant Marini's heroic leadership, determined effort, and impressive dedication to duty reflected great credit upon himself an were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. Born: Cleveland, Ohio. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio.

Mark, Hubert David (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Hubert David Mark (MCSN: 655454), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radio Operator and Jeep Driver in Headquarters and Service Company, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. Assigned the mission of driving to an area where a large motor convoy was being attacked by a numerically superior hostile force and to radio information on the situation back to Regimental Headquarters, Corporal Mark carried out his task with great speed and efficiency. Ambushed by an enemy patrol and wounded while returning to headquarters, he took cover beside his jeep and delivered pistol fire on the enemy until his ammunition was exhausted. Despite the hostile fire, he obtained a rifle from the jeep and placed accurate and effective fire on the enemy, aiding the other members of the jeep in seeking covered positions. Although mortally wounded by hostile machine gun fire, he continued to bring fire to bear upon the enemy until he lost consciousness. By his courageous actions, he served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the subsequent repulse of the hostile attack. His outstanding courage, initiative and aggressive fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Mark and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: July 1, 1930 at New Castle, Indiana. Home Town: New Castle, Indiana. Death: KIA; November 29, 1950 - Buried at: South Mound Cemetery - New Castle, Indiana.

Markle, Floyd A. (posthumous)

Sgt. Floyd A. Markle, Battery A, 3rd AAA AW Bn. (SP), 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army. On 10 February 19S1, near Majukko-ri, Korea, two half tracks were sent to rescue two squads of infantry, cut all and pinned down by withering small arms and automatic weapons fire. Sergeant Markle moved his half track into position and immediately directed a machine gun fire on the enemy. When he sow a wounded man stranded in an area raked by heavy small arms fire, Sergeant Markle left the half track and with complete disregard for his own personal safety dashed thirty yards to the wounded man, carried him across the bullet-swept terrain to the half track. As he was climbing back onto the vehicle, Sergeant Markle was mortally wounded. The gallantry and concern for his comrades displayed by Sergeant Markle reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military from Pennsylvania.

Marks, Billy C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Billy C. Marks (MCSN: 0-10913), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observer attached to the Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kimpo, Korea, on 28 September 1950. While flying in an unarmed aircraft over enemy lines, Second Lieutenant Marks braved intense hostile anti-aircraft fire to successfully coordinate friendly ground and air forces in the destruction of the opposition. Discovering camouflaged enemy guns firing on our forces, he directed accurate artillery fire which forced the hostile troops to disperse. Undaunted by severe ground resistance, he remained over the retreating convoy to keep it under constant surveillance while he contacted a flight of close air support planes by radio. Despite a shortage of fuel, he boldly continued to direct air strikes on hidden enemy troops and equipment until the destruction of the hostile force was completed. His marked courage, professional skill and unswerving devotion to duty were contributing factors in the elimination of ten hostile trucks, four heavy artillery pieces and approximately fifty of the enemy, thereby reflecting the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Marks and the United States Naval Service. Born: Seattle, Washington. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Marks, Don D. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 96 - 17 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Don D. Marks (ASN: RA-15283468), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a member of Company C, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 209 July 1950 at Taejon, Korea. During the battle for Taejon, several American soldiers were wounded by sniper and machinegun fire coming form buildings and alleys. Private Marks, without regard for his own safety and under intense sniper and machinegun fire began carrying these men to sheltered positions. Although severely wounded in the chest, he continued to assist wounded men to safety. In performing these acts, Private Marks became separated from his unit. This conspicuous act of gallantry on the part of Private Marks reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. Born: 1932. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio. Death: KIA: July 20, 1950.

Marks, Franklin D.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No.63 - 28 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Franklin D. Marks (ASN: NG-24003533), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kojingmong-ni, Korea, during the night of 18-19 December 1951. His Grenadier Platoon had the mission of destroying an enemy roadblock, capturing and killing hostile soldiers, and making a reconnaissance of a prescribed area. During the operation, his squad branched out to clear a series of bunkers and houses. Advancing toward their destination, the friendly troops were suddenly subjected to intense enemy grenade, small arms and automatic weapons fire. The squad immediately took cover and returned the fire. Sergeant Marks, Squad Leader, was seriously wounded in the ensuing conflict but, with complete disregard for his own welfare, remained in a foremost, exposed position to lead the fighting. Realizing that his small group was ineffective against the numerous, firmly entrenched hostile soldiers, he ordered a withdrawal and remained behind alone to provide protective fire. Not until all his men were out of danger did he move out to join them. He then directed them back to friendly lines with valuable information about the location of enemy positions. Sergeant Marks' courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Selines Grove, Pennsylvania.

Marks, Sidney M.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 242 - 2 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) Sidney M. Marks (ASN: 0-36977), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Songju, Korea, on 24 September 1950. During the establishment of Naktong River bridge-head, his battalion was ordered to attack enemy positions in the Songju sector, where the enemy was stubbornly resisting the advance of other United Nations forces and threatening the entire operation. With only the vaguest of information concerning the enemy available and without any previous reconnaissance of the area, Major Marks personally moved ahead of the battalion to reconnoiter and select the best route of advance. After contact with the enemy had been made he continually exposed himself to heavy enemy fire in reconnoitering for the improvement of company positions. The information secured through his gallant actions aided immeasurably in the successful accomplishment of the battalion's mission. Major Marks' gallantry and devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Ponca City, Oklahoma.

Marlink, Marvin

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Marvin Marlink (MCSN: 272307), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a 80-mm. Mortar Section Leader of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kojo, Korea, on 28 October 1950. When elements of his company were temporarily thrown back by a vicious enemy attack during the night, Technical Sergeant Marlink continually exposed himself to heavy and accurate enemy small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire to re-dispose the available men and boldly led them in halting the enemy penetration. Fearlessly entering the enemy lines in the face of point-blank fire and grenades, he worked tirelessly in locating the Marine casualties, remaining with them and providing covering fire until additional Marines reported to carry the wounded to the rear. By his daring initiative, cool courage and grave concern for others at great risk to his own life, Technical Sergeant Marlink contributed to the saving of many lives and served as an inspiration to all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Holland, Michigan. Home Town: Holland, Michigan.

Marple, James Atterson

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 65 - August 21 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class James Atterson Marple (ASN: RA-6565657), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company E, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division, in action near Yongdong, Korea, on 25 July 1950. Sergeant Marple's platoon was assigned the mission of attacking an enemy road block. While he was assisting his platoon leader in directing the attack, Sergeant Marple was in all areas of danger and was constantly exposing himself to enemy fire. At this time Sergeant Marple was wounded in both legs by enemy machine gun fire. As he arose from the ground, he located the enemy machine gun nest that had fired on him, and although seriously wounded, Sergeant Marple attacked the machine gun nest, killing two enemy machine gunners with his bayonet. Sergeant Marple's heroic and gallant act reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Marquat, William Frederic (Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, Far East Command
General Orders No. 67 - November 23, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major General William Frederic Marquat (ASN: 0-6533), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Anti-Aircraft Officer for the United Nations Command in Korea during the period 29 September to 4 October 1950. Following the restoration of the capital of the Republic of Korea to its President and before the Seoul area was free of enemy activity, General Marquat, completely disregarding his own safety, toured the region by vehicle to obtain first-hand information vital to planning effective anti-aircraft installations necessary to forestall surprise enemy air attacks. Later, in anticipation of increased enemy air activity, General Marquat traveled over terrain harassed by sniper fire and endangered by land mines to inspect anti-aircraft installations. His personal concern for his troops, aggressive actions in ground surveillance, and presence in the forward areas inspired his units to a high degree of efficiency and contributed materially to the United Nations effort in Korea. General Marquat's inspirational courage and his unfaltering devotion to duty as a leader upholds the highest traditions of the military service.

Marquez, Leo

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Leo Marquez (MCSN: 669851), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When a large hostile force succeeded in penetrating a portion of the defense line during a series of violent night attacks, Corporal Marquez skillfully maneuvered his fire team to repel the enemy, moving among his men shouting words of encouragement and directing effective fire. Frequently engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat throughout the night-long attack, he aided materially in limiting the hostile penetration and in assuring the security of the position. By his outstanding courage, gallant fighting spirit and zealous devotion to duty, Corporal Marquez served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fowler, California. Home Town: Selma, California.

Marquis, Leo H.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal [then Private] Leo H. Marquis (ASN: RA-11191511), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 6 September 1950, near Tabu-dong, Korea. During the ordered withdrawal of the 1st Battalion from positions on Hill 824 to a position 4,000 yards to the rear, it was necessary to attack an enemy force astride the route of withdrawal. An enemy machine gun, which had excellent cover and concealment, was pinning down the attack force with a murderous hail of fire. Realizing that, unless the enemy gun emplacement was destroyed, many of his comrades would be wounded or killed, Corporal Marquis, at great risk to his life, fearlessly exposed himself to the hazardous fire. With the enemy bullets literally churning the dirt around him, Corporal Marquis worked his way close enough to the machine gun nest to knock out the crew with hand grenades. Although wounded by grenade fragments during this action, he painfully maneuvered himself to a position to kill an enemy sniper who was protecting a hostile position and harassing friendly troops. His coolness under fire and the unhesitating manner in which he assaulted the enemy, made it possible for his battalion to continue its march and assume new positions. Corporal Marquis' outstanding devotion to duty and gallant actions reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Marrero, Luis M.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 196 - 17 June 1951

Sergeant Luis M. Marrero, RA6674836, Army Medical Service, Medical Company,  65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 19 November 1950, in the vicinity of Toogoni, Korea, the company to which Sergeant Marrero was attached as an aid man was engaged by a numerically superior enemy force. In the ensuing action several men of the company were critically wounded. Sergeant Marrero, with complete disregard for his own safety, went forward, braving strong enemy fire, and administered the necessary first aid. Despite freezing weather, exposure to the enemy, and a shortage of appropriate medical supplies, he continued to care for the wounded to the best of his ability until they could be evacuated. Sergeant Marrero's gallant devotion to duty under hazardous conditions alleviated much suffering and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Marsh, Kenneth C.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No.807 - 3 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant Kenneth C. Marsh, RA1729444l, (then Corporal), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 2 September 1951 in the vicinity of Mandeau-san, Korea. On this date, the platoon of which Sergeant Marsh was a member had infiltrated the enemy lines and was immediately encircled by a numerically superior enemy force. During the ensuing action, the hostile force launched several counterattacks in an attempt to overrun the friendly positions. Sergeant Marsh, with complete disregard for his personal safety, left the security of his emplacement and faced the intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons, and grenade fire so as to better employ effective fire on the enemy. He remained in his position and inflicted numerous casualties upon the enemy until friendly reinforcements arrived. His courageous actions and devotion to duty were highly responsible for the success of his unit on this occasion. The gallantry in action displayed by Sergeant Marsh on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Marshall, Benjamin H.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 155 - November 15, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Benjamin H. Marshall (ASN: RA-35131459), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy as a member of Company C, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy), attached to the 1st Cavalry Division, on 22 September 1950 near Naktong-ni, Korea. While his unit was spearheading the attack of Task Force Lynch with the mission to seize and hold the crossing of the Naktong River near Naktong-ni, Sergeant Marshall, serving as Tank Commander, was riding in the fourth tank in the column. During the night movement when his column of tanks ran into the rear of a fleeing enemy column, Sergeant Marshall, completely disregarding his own safety, exposed himself to the enemy's fire in order to more effectively direct the fire of his tank. During this engagement, a tank which was protecting the enemy column was engaged by Sergeant Marshall and destroyed by the first round fired. Seeing that the enemy infantry was swarming over the leading tank in his column, Sergeant Marshall, under intense enemy fire, climbed out of his tank to more effectively direct his driver and gunner in maneuvering and firing on the enemy. The enemy losses, as a result of the entire platoon's action, amounted to approximately 500 killed, 53 vehicles and 10 field guns destroyed or captured without our forces suffering a single casualty. Sergeant Marshall's selfless courage and aggressive leadership was responsible for saving the leading tanks and contributed materially to the success of the assigned objective. His gallant actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Marshall, Joe E.

Sergeant Joe E. Marshall, a member of Battery A, 50th AAA AW Bn. (SP), is cited for heroism in action against the enemy in Korea on 2-3 December 1950. While in the vicinity of Majon-dong Sergeant Marshall, in command of an M-16 half track (.50 caliber quadruple mounted machine gun), was given the mission of supporting a rifle company. Shortly before midnight the enemy attacked the perimeter which he was defending and simultaneously blew a nearby highway bridge. Acting entirely on his own initiative he located the enemy and proceeded to move his weapon to a more advantageous firing position about 50 yards down the road and outside the defense perimeter. In accomplishing this mission he exposed himself to heavy enemy automatic weapons fire inasmuch as it was necessary for him to move ahead of his half track vehicle in order to guide it through the darkness. From his new position, effective fire was delivered on the enemy with the result that they were driven off with no casualties to friendly troops. His heroic actions were entirely voluntary and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Kansas.

Marshall, Robert D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert D. Marshall (MCSN: 1095821), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radio Operator of Headquarters and Service Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. With air support urgently needed during his company's attack against a numerically superior hostile force employing machine guns, small arms and hand grenades, Private First Class Marshall carried out repeated trips across the fire-swept enemy terrain to relay messages from his unit commander to the tactical air control party officer in calling down air support. When the radio attached to the tactical air control party became inoperative, he skillfully maintained radio control for both units, killing three of the enemy with his pistol during their attempt to overrun his position. By his marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Marshall contributed materially to the success of the mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Gorman, Texas. Home Town: Gorman, Texas.

Marshall, Winton W.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 33 - 17 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel Winton W. Marshall, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action in aerial combat over North Korea on 30 November 1951. While leading a squadron of twelve F-86 aircraft on a combat air patrol, he sighted nine TU-2 enemy bombers headed southward in the area of Namsi-Dong, North Korea, escorted by large numbers of fighter aircraft. Although realizing that the friendly forces were greatly outnumbered and were faced with intense and accurate cannon fire, Colonel Marshall displayed outstanding courage and tactical skill in leading his squadron in an immediate and aggressive attack on the enemy bombers. He coolly and skillfully deployed his forces to obtain the maximum tactical advantage and then led them in on the initial attack, during which he personally destroyed one TU-2 bomber. Expertly regrouping his force, he launched successive and continuing attacks affording the enemy no opportunity to reorganize. On the third pass, his F-86 sustained major damage from two direct hits by enemy cannon fire. One hit was in the leading edge of the left wing, the projectile exploding in the area of the fuel cell. The second projectile exploded against the head rest, destroying the canopy completely and badly damaging his parachute. He received numerous lacerations about the face, head, neck and back. Partially stunned from the force of the second explosion he recovered control of his aircraft but found himself separated from his flight. Although bleeding profusely and suffering from severe shock and exposure to sub-freezing temperatures and despite the sluggish reactions of his damaged aircraft, he rejoined his comrades in battle, against overwhelming odds. Totally disregarding his own safety, Colonel Marshall continued to carry the offensive, and largely through his own inspiring leadership and heroic personal example, the enemy formation was completely disrupted. When he has expended his ammunition and was low on fuel, he was forced to break off the attack and return to home base. Despite his wounds and the adverse flight conditions imposed by loss of his canopy, complicated further by the fact that he was without radio communication or radio compass as a result of battle damage, he managed to land his F-86 safely. At the time of this deed, Colonel Marshall had flown a total of 64 missions in the Korean campaign. The gallantry and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Colonel Marshall in this action of high personal courage reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Marsili, Arnold J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Arnold J. Marsili (MCSN: 647338), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Patrol Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 and 6 July 1952. During an attack by a numerically superior fanatical enemy force, Staff Sergeant Marsili alerted the friendly outpost to a hundred per cent watch when the hostile artillery increased. After the enemy succeeded in infiltrating into the trench lines of the position, he drew his force into a tight perimeter around the command post and insured that all wounded were safe, continually moving from one position to another around the perimeter, aiding and encouraging his depleted forces and supervising the care of casualties. When the hostile attack was repelled, Staff Sergeant Marsili cared for the wounded the remainder of the night and, on the following morning, suffered a painful wound himself from enemy artillery fire. After relief was effected for his small force, he was concerned only with the welfare of his men and the reconstruction of the position, refusing medical aid until all of his men had been treated. By his indomitable courage, leadership and unyielding devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Marsili served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Peckville, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Peckville, Pennsylvania.

Marson, Richard W. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Richard W. Marson (MCSN: 1187211), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 September 1951. After returning from a dangerous patrol which had moved through enemy-infested territory in order to procure urgently needed mortar ammunition to repel hostile counterattacks, Private First Class Marson learned of two comrades who lay critically wounded in an outpost some two hundred yards forward of his position and subjected to accurate enemy fire. Voluntarily, he moved forward through the heavy enemy mortar and small arms fire, reached the besieged outpost and succeeded in returning to friendly lines with one of the wounded Marines. Once again he exposed himself to the hostile fire to go to the rescue of the other Marine and, while returning with him to safety, was struck by enemy fire and fell, mortally wounded. By his exceptional courage and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Private First Class Marson upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 24, 1927 at Boston, Massachusetts. Home Town: North Charleston, South Carolina. Death: KIA: September 15, 1951.

Martin, Billie W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Billie W. Martin (MCSN: 508088), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company D, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. When a tank was disabled by an enemy mine while participating in a combat patrol and a retriever was also disabled by a mine while approaching the damaged tank, Technical Sergeant Martin courageously exposed himself to intense hostile mortar and small arms fire to repair the retriever and send it back to a defiladed position. Guiding three patrol tanks to the scene, he directed the proper cable connections and guided the column back to a covered position. Although constantly exposed to heavy enemy fire, he worked calmly and skillfully for two hours to retrieve the valuable tank. By his indomitable courage, initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Technical Sergeant Martin served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Nashville, Tennessee. Home Town: White Bluff, Tennessee.

Martin, Charles E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Charles E. Martin (MCSN: 1056477), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Section Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 March 1951. With his company suffering heavy casualties and pinned down by accurate fire during an engagement with numerically superior enemy forces, Sergeant Martin fearlessly moved through approximately 75 yards of terrain swept by heavy small arms, mortar and machine gun fire to evacuate a seriously wounded Marine to a covered position where first aid could be administered. Again risking his life, he advanced across the same area and brought another casualty back to the covered area. By his daring initiative, exceptional courage and grave concern for others in the face of extreme danger, Sergeant Martin was directly instrumental in saving the lives of his two comrades, and his heroic efforts throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Paul, Minnesota. Home Town: Benicia, California.

Martin, Floyd R.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 208 - 28 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) Floyd R. Martin (ASN: 0-299916), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. Serving as Executive Officer during the assault crossing of the Naktong River, he displayed conspicuous gallantry in the midst of heavy artillery, mortar and small arms fire. When the supply route became clogged he left the battalion command post and with utter disregard for his own safety directed the flow of supplies from a forward position under direct enemy fire. Although wounded in this action he continued to direct the river crossing activities aiding materially in accomplishing his battalion's mission. Major Martin's heroic example and fearless actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Terewana, New York.

Martin, Glen Edward (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Glen Edward Martin (MCSN: 0-8218), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, from 22 to 29 April 1951. Leading his battalion in a highly complicated and difficult retrograde movement forced by the exposure of his flanks to attack by numerically superior enemy forces, Lieutenant Colonel Martin fearlessly exposed himself to intense and accurate enemy mortar, artillery, automatic-weapons and small-arms fire to direct the defense of successive blocking positions, inspiring his men to greater efforts in inflicting heavy casualties on the hostile forces. Displaying an excellent knowledge of military tactics, he devised intricate plans of maneuver to delay and confuse the enemy, and worked untiringly to insure adequate medical care for casualties. By his aggressive leadership, sound judgment and unwavering devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel Martin aided immeasurably in the success of the regiment and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Martin, Glen Edward (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Glen Edward Martin (MCSN: 0-8218), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 29 May 1951. When the leading platoon was pinned down by an estimated enemy battalion during an attack on a series of heavily defended hostile hill positions, Lieutenant Colonel Martin fearlessly moved forward through withering small-arms, automatic-weapons and mortar fire to the beleaguered unit. Despite the intense enemy fire, he continually moved from one position to another, shouting words of encouragement to his men. After gaining first- hand information about the hostile force, he skillfully directed air strikes on the enemy emplacements, effectively neutralizing them and permitting the battalion to continue in the attack and rout the enemy without sustaining additional casualties. By his aggressive leadership, inspiring courage and unswerving devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel Martin contributed materially to the success of his battalion in securing the difficult objective and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Council Bluffs, Iowa. Home Town: Council Bluffs, Iowa.

Martin, Glen Edward (3rd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Second Gold Star in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Glen Edward Martin (MCSN: 0-8218), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 2 June 1951. When his unit was subjected to withering automatic-weapons and small-arms enfilade fire and was temporarily unable to advance during an attack against strong enemy hill positions, Lieutenant Colonel Martin courageously moved forward in the face of the devastating fire and personally directed the assault against the hill, succeeding in placing one platoon at a vantage point on the high ground. Bravely moving through an area heavily interdicted by enemy mortar fire, he skillfully placed another element in position to relieve the pressure on the assaulting unit and continued to move along the entire front throughout the fierce battle, shouting words of encouragement to his men. By his aggressive and inspiring leadership Lieutenant Colonel Martin contributed materially to the success of his battalion in routing the entrenched enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Council Bluffs, Iowa. Home Town: Council Bluffs, Iowa.

Martin, James F. (1st award)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 278 - June 6, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major James F. Martin, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as a leader of a flight of twelve F-86 type aircraft, 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Group, Fifth Air Force, on 3 January 1952. Escorting an unarmed RF-80 over North Korea, Major Martin's flight was attacked by approximately thirty MIG-15s. With two of his three flight engaged, only his own flight was left to give the RF-80 close cover. He successfully repulsed the constant attacks being made on the RF-80 until it completed its mission. Four MIG-15s then made a determined assault on his element leader and were driven off by Major Martin's aggressive counterattack. When the element leader of his second flight called for assistance, Major Martin discovered six MIG-15s pursuing the lone F-86. With complete disregard for his own safety, he engaged this superior force, insuring the safe withdrawal of the friendly aircraft. His extraordinary aggressiveness was a source of inspiration to his pilots, and through his skillful airmanship and gallantry in the face of fierce opposition, Major Martin reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Martin, McDonald Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 112 - 30 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) McDonald Martin, Jr. (ASN: 0-9582121), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 6 August 1950 at Yongsan, Korea. Though moving into the attack, his company had not deployed into fighting formations when it suddenly came under heavy enemy fire from front to rear. Utilizing the best possible positions Lieutenant Martin directed the firing of his mortar squad until his position became untenable. During this firing he was seriously wounded. After moving to another position he directed fir and by his personal display of bravery and disregard for safety rallied the men to repulse an attack coming from two directions. Although wounded he volunteered to cross 900 yards of exposed terrain to secure help. When the firing became so intense he had to take cover he remained alone until he heard the approach of a friendly tank. He again exposed himself to enemy fire by going to meet the tank in order to point out his troops so they would not come under tank fire. His display of courage, leadership, and selfless actions reflect the highest credit on Lieutenant Martin and the military service. Home Town: College Park, Georgia.

Martin, Paul A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Paul A. Martin, Jr. (MCSN: 330562), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as First Sergeant of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. When part of his company came under intense hostile mortar fire and sustained heavy casualties while acting as rear guard for the battalion in its attack to break out of an enemy encirclement, Master Sergeant Martin unhesitatingly remained behind to aid in the evacuation of the wounded. Courageously exposing himself to the vicious hail of enemy mortar and machine gun fire, he administered first aid to one wounded Marine and helped carry him to safety across an open, fire-swept valley and up the exposed face of a steep hill. By his daring initiative, valiant determination and selfless devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Master Sergeant Martin served to inspire all who observed him and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Akron, Ohio. Home Town: Dayton, Ohio.

Martin, Samuel F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Samuel F. Martin (MCSN: 0-27068), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6) in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 October 1951. Volunteering to fly his slow, unarmed observation plane over a sector where a fierce battle was in progress, Captain Martin bravely searched the area at extremely low altitude during a heavy artillery barrage in an effort to locate a downed airman. Undeterred by intense enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire, he continued his search until he had spotted the downed pilot and carried out a series of daring low-level passes over the hostile positions to draw the enemy's fire away from a rescue helicopter operating at the scene. When the helicopter failed in its efforts to pick up the airman, Captain Martin continued to cover the area and, although subjected to persistent hostile fire, attempted to direct a rescue patrol to the downed aviator. Observing a group of the enemy preparing to ambush the rescue party, he immediately warned the patrol of the impending danger, enabling the friendly force to deploy without suffering casualties. Continuing his mission until darkness forced him to return to his base, Captain Martin, by his exceptional courage, superb airmanship and selfless efforts in behalf of a fellow aviator, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Yakima, Washington. Home Town: Longview, Washington.

Martin, W.L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant W. L. Martin (MCSN: 298134), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Section Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. With his company assaulting a heavily fortified and numerically superior hostile force deeply entrenched on Hill 659 near Inje, Sergeant Martin unhesitatingly maneuvered his section forward and joined the point platoon. Braving intense small-arms, grenade, and automatic-weapons fire, he skillfully deployed his men and supervised their attack against the outnumbering force and, in addition, voluntarily undertook the observation and direction of the 60-mm. mortar platoon's fire. By his decisive and aggressive actions, courageous leadership and heroic efforts, Sergeant Martin was in large measure responsible for the success of his company in the infliction of many casualties upon the aggressors, and his staunch devotion to duty throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Division, Serial 23888. Born: Troup, Texas. Home Town: Troup, Texas.

Martindale, James J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James J. Martindale (MCSN: 1138606), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of the Air and Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, First Signal Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 May 1952. As a member of a platoon accompanying a tactical air control party on a reconnaissance mission in enemy territory, Sergeant Martindale displayed outstanding courage and initiative when the officer in charge of the group sustained serious wounds. Fearlessly exposing himself to the intense hostile grenade, small arms and mortar fire which fell on the area, he gallantly covered the officer with his body and, demonstrating remarkable presence of mind during the extremely hazardous situation, succeeded in killing two of the enemy attackers. Painfully wounded during this action, Sergeant Martindale, by his indomitable determination and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of another, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Syracuse, New York. Home Town: Syracuse, New York.

Martinell, Harold F.

Corporal Harold F. Martinell, a member of Battery D, 15th AAA AW Battalion (SP), distinguished himself with heroism near the Chosin Reservoir in Korea, from 29 November 1950 to 2 December 1950. During this period, Corporal Martinell, who was a cook in the battery mess until it was lost on 2B November as result of enemy action, voluntarily disregarded his own personal safety to assist in bringing wounded personnel from their positions to the aid station. He also assisted in caring for the wounded after they had received first aid. On 30 November 1950 while assisting a wounded soldier to the aid station, Corporal Martinell was wounded in the leg by an enemy mortar shell fragment. Despite his own wound, he continued to expose himself in order to aid others until he was evacuated by air to be treated for his wound. As a result of his courageous and unselfish devotion to his comrades, many men were successfully evacuated from danger areas to the aid station, and his assistance measurably lightened the burden of medical personnel. His heroism during this period reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Washington.

Martinez, Alfonso Rodriguez

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 93 - 5 March 1952

Corporal Alfonso Rodriguez Martinez, US50104347, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 11-12 December 1951, elements of Company "E" assaulting a well-entrenched foe on Hill 168 near Toyon-ni, Korea, were subjected to heavy hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire. Corporal Rodriguez Martinez, a machine gunner, immediately selected a position from which he could deliver maximum fire into the enemy positions, and from this advantageous but exposed location, he laid down such an effective volume of fire that his comrades were able to continue their advance. Later during the engagement, due to the enemy's numerical superiority, the friendly forces were ordered to withdraw. Choosing to remain in his position, Corporal Rodriguez Martinez continued to fire this weapon with devastating results, forcing the enemy to concentrate all their fire power upon him. With such a lethal hail of fire directed at him, he was struck and mortally wounded. His courage and determination were instrumental in the safe withdrawal of his platoon and undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades. Corporal Rodriguez Martinez's selfless gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Martinez, David

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class David Martinez (MCSN: 1107585), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 April 1951. Participating in the defense against a night attack by a hostile force of estimated battalion strength, Private First Class Martinez constantly exposed himself to a withering hail of enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire to supervise and consolidate the defensive fire of his unit. Calmly directing the team in delivering effective fire on the hostile force, he moved from man to man, encouraging them by his own example while actively participating in the fire fight. When a member of his squad became a casualty, Private First Class Martinez dashed forward to his fallen comrade, drove the close-in enemy back with hand grenades and succeeded in carrying the wounded Marine to the safety of friendly lines. By his valiant fighting spirit, indomitable courage and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Martinez served to inspire all who observed him and was directly instrumental in saving the life of the wounded man, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Antonio, Texas. Home Town: San Antonio, Texas.

Martinez, Federico

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 124 - 7 May 1951

Master Sergeant Federico Martinez, RA6674819, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 31 January 1951, Company "G" was assigned the mission of attacking Hill 262, south of Chungson-gok, Korea. The enemy was well entrenched in concealed positions along the crest of the hill. With mortars and heavy machine guns the enemy had successfully held up the advance of another company of this battalion for several hours. Sergeant Martinez's platoon was designated the assault platoon during this attack. As the platoon was neared the top of the hill, the enemy fire became so intense that the advance faltered. Completely ignoring his personal safety, Sergeant Martinez rushed to the front of his platoon and charged a machine gun nest alone. He killed the crew with his rifle and hand grenades. Quickly catching the spirit of the attack from Sergeant Martinez his platoon rallied and soon secured the hill. His inspiring action gave his platoon the spark of aggressiveness that made a second assault of the enemy positions unnecessary and consequently saved many lives. The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Martinez reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Martinez, Fernando

Private Fernando Martinez, RA18353717, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Battery, 13the Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16-17 July 1950 north of Taejon on the Kum River, Korea. The Field Artillery Battalion had been overrun by enemy forces and had been forced to withdraw causing disorganization among the personnel. Private Martinez volunteered to remain behind with a small group of men from other unit of the battalion and get as many men as he could together and lead them to safety. With disregard for his own safety, Private Martinez, with the small group of men he had, knocked out two enemy road blocks with their carbines and hand grenades, which had been holding up their withdrawal. He was under heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire during the time he was leading the group of men to safety. The gallant act displayed by Private Martinez reflects great credit on himself and the military service. GO 79, 8 Aug 1950. Entered service from San Antonio, TX.

Martinez, Jacabo Luis (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Jacabo Luis Martinez (MCSN: 611696), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 June 1951. Manning his post in the company defensive perimeter in the vicinity of Yanggu during the hours of darkness, Corporal Martinez spotted an enemy group attempting to infiltrate the sector and immediately sounded the alarm. Fearlessly dashing through intense hostile fire to take over and put into action the point machine gun after its operator was wounded, he skillfully manned the weapon despite a heavy barrage from enemy small arms and automatic weapons and contributed materially to the infliction of many casualties and to the disruption of the attack. Remaining steadfast at his strategic post, he was struck by enemy fire and fell mortally wounded. His skilled marksmanship, courageous initiative and indomitable fighting spirit reflect great credit upon Corporal Martinez and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: December 22, 1930 at Terrero, New Mexico. Home Town: Santa Fe, New Mexico. Death: KIA: June 9, 1951.

Martinez, Jose R.

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 216 - 22 June 1951

First Lieutenant Jose R. Martinez, 01339897, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 26 April 1951, the 2d Battalion was ferociously attacked by two enemy regiments in the vicinity of Ilbisang-ni, Korea. In the ensuing battle, the battalion command post was brought under heavy fire from automatic weapons and mortars. From his position in the post, Lieutenant Martinez saw that panic was beginning to spread among the friendly troops and revealing himself constantly to enemy fire he moved forward to rally the men. Working his way among them, he encouraged and reorganized the soldiers into a stable defense line. In spite of the fierce continuing engagement, he successfully controlled the line, thus releasing the pressure of the attack and enabling the men to hold their positions. Lieutenant Martinez' fearless action and exemplary initiative reflect the highest credit upon himself and are in keeping with the most gallant traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Martinez, Julio

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 80 - 27 March 1951

Sergeant First Class Julio Martinez, RA10403720, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 14 December 1950, near Oro-ri, Korea, Sergeant Martinez was in charge of a listening post situated approximately one mile in front of his company's positions. During the night he observed a strong enemy force moving toward the company area. Immediately he calmly notified the company and instead of withdrawing he remained at the listening post until the fire fight began. Then, of his own volition and initiative, he led his men in attacking the rear of the enemy. By this bold and fearless action he caused the enemy to become so disorganized and confused as to allow the company time to strengthen its flanks. Sergeant Martinez's movement was repelled by heavy enemy automatic weapons fire forcing his small group to withdraw to more covered positions. From the new positions he and his men continued to harass the enemy's rear. Not until the situation became unbearable did he withdraw to friendly lines, and while withdrawing he again risked his life in caring for a wounded comrade. The daring leadership and courage displayed by Sergeant Martinez on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Martinez, Oliver G. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Oliver G. Martinez (MCSN: 1202806), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 August 1952. With his unit defending a strategic sector of "Bunker Hill" against repeated enemy assaults, Private First Class Martinez constantly exposed himself to intense hostile mortar, small arms and artillery fire to deliver effective counterfire on the attackers. Although mortally wounded by an enemy shell fragment during a heavy hostile artillery bombardment between assaults, he refused to be evacuated and bravely continued to fire his rifle and hurl grenades at the enemy, greatly aiding his unit in the defense of the hill. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Martinez served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 23, 1931 at Cerrillos, New Mexico. Home Town: Santa Fe, New Mexico. Death: KIA: August 13, 1952 - Buried at: Santa Fe National Cemetery - Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Martinez, William E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Second Class William E. Martinez (NSN: 3726155), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 April 1951. Hospital Corpsman Second Class Martinez, attached to a rifle platoon, displayed outstanding courage, aggressiveness and ability in the performance of his duties. During an assault against a well-entrenched enemy, he noted that several Marines in the assault platoon were wounded. Unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he moved forward in the face of intense enemy fire and administered first aid to the wounded. Although continually subjected to enemy fire, he painstakingly stopped the hemorrhage of one man whose jugular vein had been severed by shrapnel and subsequently treated a total of six men. With admirable professional skill, he remained with the wounded until all could be evacuated. His outstanding ability and courage were directly instrumental in saving the life of one Marine and minimizing the wounds of five others, thereby serving as an inspiration for all who observed him. Hospital Corpsman Second Class Martinez's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 60174 (November 30, 1951).

Martz, John A.

Headquarters, X Corps
General Orders No. 49 - 2 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class John A. Martz (MCSN: 1079320), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Rifle Company of the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor near Hamhung, Korea, on 3 November 1950. As an Automatic Rifleman in a rifle squad, Private First Class Martz was defending a sector of his squad's position against a fierce enemy attack shortly after midnight when he was painfully wounded in the neck and face. Refusing to be evacuated Private First Class Martz continued to defend his position and killed six of the enemy before his weapon jammed. He then sought the aid of his platoon sergeant for help in clearing the weapon. It was hopelessly jammed however and no other weapon was available, but Private First Class Martz attempted to return to his former position without a weapon and it was necessary to forcibly restrain and evacuate him because of his wound. The example of courage and tenacity set by Private First Class Martz greatly encouraged the other men of his unit to successfully repel the enemy attack. Private First Class Martz's heroic action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Entered Service From California.

Marx, Edmund N. Jr.

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Sergeant Edmund N. Marx, Jr., United States Marine Corps, for service as set forth in the following citation:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tank Commander of Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 24 to 27 July 1953.  With his vehicle surrounded and physically assaulted by hostile troops during a vicious enemy attack on a friendly outpost position, Sergeant Marx called down fire upon his own position in an attempt to halt the savage attack.  On another occasion, when an enemy attack was impending, he volunteered to act as a gunner on another vehicle in an attempt to aid two disabled tanks located on the same strategic position.  Upon arriving at the area, he unhesitatingly dismounted from his tank under a murderous hail of hostile mortar and artillery fire in order to attach towing cables to the disabled vehicles.  After ground-guiding the tanks to a position of safety, he remounted his vehicle and proceeded to deliver devastating fire upon the attackers.  When the assaulting enemy attempted to climb on his vehicle, he opened the hatch and fearlessly exposed himself to enemy fire to accurately hurl hand grenades and disperse the hostile troops.  By his indominable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Sergeant Marx served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Mason, Robert D.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 43 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert D. Mason (ASN: US-55103949), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Pangdangdong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. As his platoon attacked firmly entrenched forces, its members were pinned down by devastating automatic weapons and small arms fire from a strategically placed enemy bunker. Corporal Mason, with utter disregard for his own safety, exposed himself to the murderous fire as he maneuvered around the hill to a point behind the enemy emplacement. Firing with deadly accuracy from this position, he destroyed the enemy strongpoint single-handedly, thus enabling his comrades to continue the assault and ultimately secure the objective. Corporal Mason's courageous action, aggressive initiative and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Sandoval, Illinois.

Masterpool, William J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant William J. Masterpool (MCSN: 0-47041), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Machine Gun Platoon Commander of the First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. With his battalion engaged in a difficult retrograde movement in the vicinity of Hwachon, and his platoon assigned the mission of acting as rear guard, Second Lieutenant Masterpool skillfully deployed his guns and directed a withering hail of fire against the rapidly advancing enemy. Although subjected to intense small arms and automatic weapons fire, he coolly moved from one position to another, encouraging his men and directing their fire at targets of opportunity. When all other elements of his battalion had successfully withdrawn and all wounded had been evacuated, he broke contact and effectively displaced his unit to the rear with a minimum of casualties, thwarting all enemy attempts to advance. By his outstanding leadership, inspiring courage and unswerving devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Masterpool contributed materially to the success of his battalion's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Solvay, New York. Home Town: Solvay, New York.

Mastin, James C.

Headquarters, 24ID
General Orders No. 579 - August 14, 1951

Corporal James C. Mastin, US52003556 (then Private), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by courageous action near Chin'Wach'or, Korea, on May 27, 1951.  His company was moving off Objective C when it was suddenly attacked by a numerically superior enemy force.  The enemy utilized the element of surprise to the fullest, catching the company without defensive positions from which to operate.  Corporal Mastin, an acting machine gunner, realized how serious the situation was and immediately set up his machine gun in a good position that afforded a good field of fire.  His deadly fire soon relieved the pressure from the rest of his platoon, but transferred the enemy attention to himself.  Disregarding the fact that everyone else was pinned down, he sat in the exposed position with complete disregard for his personal safety, bringing fire to bear on the enemy until his whole platoon was able to withdraw to the recently vacated prepared positions.  Only then did he take his weapon out of action and withdraw to his assigned defensive position.  It is estimated that he single-handedly killed 12 enemy soldiers in this engagement.  Corporal Mastin's courageous action and deep devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  He entered service from Corinth, KY.

Masuda, Kivoshi

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 42 - September 1, 1950), Amended by G.O. 55 (1950)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Kiyoshi Masuda (ASN: RA-30102205), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Headquarters, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 22 August 1950 about ten miles north of Taegu, Korea. On 22 August 1950, Corporal Masuda was attached to a rifle platoon of Company G which was holding a defensive position on the right flank of the Second Battalion's sector, approximately ten miles north of Taegu. Corporal Masuda's mission was to act as interpreter and liaison between American troops and Republic of Korea forces which were in the defensive position in the vicinity of the American forces. At approximately 1330 hours, the positions were attacked by a superior enemy force. The platoon leader and platoon sergeant were casualties in the first few minutes of this action. Republic of Korea troops assisting the American forces were forced off their sector of the hill by a heavy concentration of enemy fire, and became disorganized during the ensuing withdrawal. Corporal Matsuda, acting on his own initiative and displaying great qualities of leadership, reorganized the Republic of Korea forces, directing them to the most advantageous positions, in spite of the hail of machine gun, small arms fire, and bursting hand grenades. Corporal Masuda's continued to direct the Republic of Korea forces until the objective was gained and reinforcements arrived. Corporal Masuda's actions in starting the attack and regaining lost ground protected the right flank of the battalion from enemy penetration, and enabled the battalion to complete its mission successfully. Corporal Masuda's leadership, courage and resourcefulness reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Matas, Emil J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Emil J. Matas (MCSN: 0-49015), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 September 1951. When a numerically superior hostile force launched a violent night attack against his platoon which was positioned on a narrow ridge line under constant fire from enemy mortar and artillery on three sides, First Lieutenant Matas fearlessly exposed himself to the withering hostile fire to direct his platoon in the defense. Although the enemy forced a penetration, he led his men forward in a frontal attack until he was seriously wounded by an enemy hand grenade. By his outstanding courage, determination and selfless devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Matas served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to a successful withdrawal from the untenable position. His heroic leadership was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Paterson, New Jersey. Home Town: Clifton, New Jersey.

Matasovsky, Francis John (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Francis John Matasovsky (MCSN: 665091), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1950. Volunteering to accompany a tank ordered to neutralize an enemy roadblock subjecting forward elements of his company to intense and accurate automatic weapons fire, Private First Class Matasovsky bravely moved forward to give the tank effective support until he was struck by a burst of enemy fire and fell mortally wounded. By his courageous actions, he was greatly instrumental in neutralizing the roadblock, thereby permitting his company to continue its advance. His daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: May 14, 1930 at Bayonne, New Jersey. Home Town: Bayonne, New Jersey. Death: DOW: December 10, 1950 - Buried at: National Memorial of the Pacific Cemetery - Honolulu, Hawaii.

Matejov, Stephen A.

First Lieutenant Stephen A. Matejov, while a member of Battery A, 15th AAA AW Battalion (SP). distinguished himself by gallantry in action against on armed enemy near Sagu-ri, Korea, an 17 November 1950. On this date, the platoon which Lieutenant Matejov commanded was providing close support for the 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry. He led a section of his platoon at the head of a column which was advancing north against the enemy. At about 0950 hours, the point was fired upon from positions on both sides of the road. This intense fire came from automatic weapons and small arms. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Lieutenant Matejov immediately left the relative security of his M-19 and proceeded under heavy fire to a forward position from which he was better able to spot the sources of the enemy fire. He remained in his exposed position for a period of one and a half hours spotting enemy targets and placing his 40mm and .50 caliber fire thereon. His coolness and heroism under fire enabled his platoon to mass its fires on numerous enemy targets, and the destruction thereof allowed the column to continue its northward attack with dispatch. His display of gallantry reflects great credit an himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Matheney, Richard

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Corporal Richard Matheney, United States Marine Corps, for service as set forth in the following citation:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving with a Marine infantry company in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 September 1951.  When the forward observer was mortally wounded during a night long enemy counterattack, Corporal Matheney immediately assumed command and skillfully called down artillery fire upon the attackers.  Bravely moving through a hail of rifle and grenade fire until he was among the defending infantrymen, he capably adjusted fire to within sixty yards of friendly lines and, continuing to move from one position to another, gathered hand grenades from the wounded to assist in defending the area.  By his outstanding courage, inspiring initiative and zealous devotion to duty, Corporal Matheney contributed materially to the successful defense of his company's positions and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Matson, Arthur A. Jr.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 74 - August 27, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Arthur A. Matson, Jr. (ASN: RA-14280297), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a member of Headquarters Company, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Infantry), in action against the enemy near Kunchon, Korea, 2 August 1950. The Command Post of the Regiment was under attack by the enemy who was repelled with numerous casualties. Sergeant Matson led his squad in a counter attack and drove the enemy back into the hills approximately one mile and a half. At this point he realized that the retreating enemy had drawn his squad into a trap. Although wounded and with total disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Matson ordered his squad to withdraw while he covered them, which allowed all the men of his squad to withdraw safely. During this action Sergeant Matson was hit several times but continued his firing until mortally wounded. His courageous action and devotion to duty reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Mattes, George J.

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul. 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority contained in Air Force Regulation 30-14, 22 August 1950 and Section VII, General Order Number 63, Department of the Air Force, 19 September 1950, the Silver Star for gallantry during the period indicated is awarded to Captain (then First Lieutenant) George J. Mattes, United States Air Force.

Captain Mattes distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an enemy on 30 August 1950 while flying as pilot of an unarmed T-6 type aircraft over enemy territory in the vicinity of Chukchon-ni, Korea. Captain Mattes, while on a visual reconnaissance flight deep in enemy territory, observed 22 camouflaged enemy vehicles, two of which were tanks, situated in patches of foliage in a dry river bed, and numerous supplies hidden in an orchard. Although he was being fired upon by an enemy 20 millimeter anti-aircraft battery and 50 calibre machine guns, Captain Mattes, with complete disregard for his own safety, personally directed three friendly fighter strikes against these targets which resulted in the destruction of the anti-aircraft battery. By his professional skill, aggressiveness, courage under fire, and devotion to duty, Captain Mattes upheld the highest traditions of the military service, thus reflecting great credit upon himself, the United Nations' Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Matthews, Merlin T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Merlin T. Matthews (MCSN: 0-30437), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 and 8 March 1951. Leading his company during an attack against a heavily fortified enemy hill position when his unit was subjected to withering automatic weapons, mortar and small arms fire from well-concealed log and earth bunkers, First Lieutenant Matthews constantly moved with the assault elements in the face of the heavy fire, directing the attack and encouraging his men. Resuming the attack on the following morning, he again was at the forefront and continually braved devastating hostile fire to direct an air strike on the enemy emplacements. Although painfully wounded by enemy fire, he refused to seek medical aid, aggressively leading his company forward in the final assault and completely routing the entrenched enemy. Subsequently evacuated after he directed his men in securing the vital ground, First Lieutenant Matthews, by his inspiring leadership, courageous initiative and heroic devotion to duty, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Amery, Wisconsin. Home Town: Baraboo, Wisconsin.

Matthias, Howard E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Howard E. Matthias (MCSN: 0-54794), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 August 1952. When a reinforced squad was ambushed and pinned down during an encounter with a numerically superior hostile force, Second Lieutenant Matthias unhesitatingly led a squad from his platoon to evacuate the wounded and to assist in repelling the enemy. After directing the removal of the casualties, he skillfully deployed his men to cover the withdrawal of the ambushed squad to the outpost line of resistance and succeeded in maneuvering his own unit back to safety. During the afternoon of the same day, although he and his men were exhausted from the previous intense action, Second Lieutenant Matthias again directed his group in assisting elements of a friendly assaulting force which were pinned down and unable to withdraw after suffering heavy casualties. Expertly positioning his unit to draw the enemy's attention while casualties were being evacuated, he continually participated in every phase of the engagement and, on one occasion, grappled with the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. By his valiant fighting spirit, outstanding leadership and indomitable devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Matthias served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago Heights, Illinois. Home Town: Crete, Illinois.

Mattox, Charles Henry (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Charles Henry Mattox (MCSN: 0-49977), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 September 1950. Assigned the mission of personally contacting the unit on the right flank when his Battalion was ordered to attack, Second Lieutenant Mattox repeatedly exposed himself to heavy hostile small arms and machine gun fire to carry out his assignment. After completing his mission and learning that there were also no communications with the left flank unit, he obtained a supply of ammunition and proceeded to the unit on the left. As he moved along the front lines under intense enemy fire, he disclosed hostile positions to his own troops and boldly directed the fire of a friendly tank upon an enemy stronghold which was impeding the advance of an ambulance. By his courageous actions, he materially aided in destroying the hostile position and assisted the assault units in reaching their objectives. His courage, daring initiative and steadfast devotion to duty throughout reflect great credit upon Second Lieutenant Mattox and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: August 2, 1922 at Darlington County, South Carolina. Home Town: Laurenburg, North Carolina. Death: KIA: November 30, 1950 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Mauritz, Lawrence F.

Sergeant First Class Lawrence F. Mauritz, RA36849733, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery C, 82d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 17 September 1950 in the vicinity of Chobi-gok, Korea. On this date he was commanding a self-propelled antitank gun. As the vehicle was advancing along a narrow road that ran through open country, it was fired upon by several enemy antitank guns and suffered two direct hits which immobilized it. Although the vehicle had been stopped in on exposed position, Sergeant Mauritz did not seek cover, but remained with the crew and continued to deliver effective fire upon the enemy. With complete disregard for his safety, he led his squad in wiping out by small-arms fire the crew of an enemy machine gun which opened fire on their flank. His gallant and determined action was a vital factor in eliminating the enemy and clearing the way for the advance of the infantry. The intrepid gallantry displayed by Sergeant Mauritz on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Wisconsin.

May, Leslie T. (aka George A.)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Leslie T. (AKA: George A.) May (ASN: RA-15260638), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 9 October 1950, near Kaesong, Korea. After Company C had been assigned the mission of crossing the 38th Parallel, the attacking elements were pinned down by a hail of automatic weapons and small arms fire, delivered by an enemy who occupied well-fortified positions and commanding terrain. Corporal May, an automatic rifleman, upon seeing his assistant squad leader killed while pointing out a good firing position, heedlessly moved forward, under scorching fire, to the designated spot where he began delivering effective counter fire on the North Koreans. When his weapon suddenly jammed, Corporal May dauntlessly picked up some grenades and crawled fearlessly toward the enemy emplacements. When within throwing distance, and under a stream of hostile fire which ripped and tore at the ground around him, Corporal May courageously hurled his grenade at the fanatic enemy until he was wounded. Despite his injury he inched his way back to friendly positions where his exemplary spirit and rousing words encouraged his comrades onward to great heights. Corporal May's intrepid bravery, conspicuous courage and extreme gallantry reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the military service.

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"Leslie T. May, who won the Silver Star for heroism at 15, is looking forward to retiring when he's 34.  The 17-year-old Wayne, Michigan youth re-enlisted yesterday on the second leg of what's planning as a 20-year hitch in the Army.  May enlisted in 1948 at the age of 13 by using a false birth certificate.  By the time he was 15, he was a corporal and in combat at Kaesong in Korea.  He was wounded and won the Silver Star for valor.  But his older brother obtained his release a year ago and Leslie hasn't been happy since.  When he reached the legal recruiting age of 17 last  month, he went to sign up." - The Winona Republican-Herald (MN) - 18 December 1951

May, Phillip B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Phillip B. May (MCSN: 0-6680), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Commanding Officer of a Marine Attack Squadron in action against the enemy. On 16 February 1952 he led his squadron on a six-plane close air support strike in support of the First Marine Division against the enemy. Palomino TWO, an airborne controller, was contacted and the controller directed the flight to the target which was a concentration of bunkers, mortar positions and enemy troops near the village of Munsan, Korea. With complete disregard for personal safety, he made three reconnaissance runs at dangerously low altitudes and through intense small arms fire to identify positively the positions of enemy and friendly forces. On one of these reconnaissance runs his plane was damaged in the right wing by enemy anti-aircraft fire; however, he called the remainder of the flight down and led them in a series of napalm, bombing and strafing runs, scoring direct hits on bunkers and mortar positions. After all planes had expended their ordnance the airborne controller assessed the damage inflicted by the flight at 95 percent coverage of the target area, forty enemy troops killed in action, three to five mortars destroyed, fifteen bunkers destroyed and four secondary explosions. Lieutenant Colonel May's outstanding leadership, unswerving devotion to duty, and exemplary conduct throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Richmond, Virginia. Home Town: Richmond, Virginia.

Mazuca, Joe G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Joe G. Mazuca (MCSN: 1083888), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. Boldly manning his gun when his company, proceeding in truck convoy, suddenly came under intense enemy small arms and mortar fire during the advance from Koto-ri to Hagaru-ri, Private First Class Mazuca delivered accurate and effective fire against the entrenched forces on both sides of the road and, to keep his gun in action, repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy barrage to climb into the open bed of a truck to procure a re-supply of ammunition and spare parts. Observing three wounded Marines lying in an exposed fire-swept area, he fearlessly evacuated them to a defiladed area and loaded them in a jeep and, when the driver became a casualty, personally drove the vehicle through heavy enemy fire to friendly lines. By his daring initiative, determined fighting spirit and heroic efforts throughout the furious action, Private First Class Mazuca materially aided the convoy in reaching its assigned destination, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Braunfels, Texas. Home Town: San Antonio, Texas.

Mead, Lee N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Lee N. Mead (MCSN: 1112709), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as a member of a forward observer team of an infantry company, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 September 1951. When the enemy launched a night counterattack, Corporal Mead volunteered to repair a damaged communications line and, despite intense fire and complete darkness, succeeded in completing his task in time for devastating fire to be called down on the hostile forces. Although nearly exhausted, he bravely moved from one position to another along the firing line, encouraging his comrades and materially aiding the defense. When illumination was needed, he manually set off a trip flare and, despite painful wounds sustained during this act, refused to be evacuated, continuing to ignite flares to assist his unit. By his outstanding courage, aggressive skill and unswerving devotion to duty, Corporal Mead served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Meade, Robert L.

The President of the United States takes pleasure In presenting the Silver Star medal to Corporal Robert L. Meade, United States Marine Corps Reserve, for service as set forth in the following citation:

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 October 1952.  When the enemy launched a concentrated attack against his platoon's outpost position, Corporal Meade skillfully directed his team in delivering effective and devastating fire upon the hostile forces.  After the numerically superior enemy troops surrounded and overran some sectors of the position, he unhesitatingly left the safety of his fighting hole in an effort to obtain better fields of fire and to drive the attackers from the penetrated areas.  Fearlessly advancing through the exposed terrain, Corporal Meade patrolled the defensive perimeter and, shouting words of encouragement to his men, valiantly continued to direct his unit in routing the hostile forces until he was seriously wounded by the intense enemy fire.  By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous and determined leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, Corporal Meade contributed materially to driving the hostile forces from the outpost and served to inspire all who observed him.  His dauntless actions while under heavy enemy fire were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."

Meado, Jess E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Jess E. Meado (MCSN: 1167536), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 17 - 18 April 1953. When an overwhelming hostile force launched a violent attack on his platoon-size patrol far forward of the main line of resistance under cover of darkness, mortally wounding the patrol leader, Sergeant Meado assumed command of the unit and, despite the heavy casualties sustained by the patrol, succeeded in keeping confusion to a minimum. Although painfully wounded, he reorganized the patrol and assigned sectors of fire to his men, bravely directing them in delivering devastating counterfire until the hostile troops were forced to withdraw. Because over half of his men were casualties, he organized the remainder of the unit into a perimeter of defense and, when help arrived, assisted in evacuating his wounded comrades, accepting medical treatment for his own wounds only after all his men had been given aid. By his gallant fighting spirit, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, Sergeant Meado served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Meradosia, Illinois. Home Town: Jacksonville, Illinois.

Means, James A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class James A. Means (NSN: 3399046), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 September 1951. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Means, a Company Corpsman, displayed outstanding skill, courage, and devotion to duty when the company was in the attack at night. As the leading elements moved forward against well entrenched and bitterly defended enemy positions, he fearlessly and with absolute disregard for his own safety advanced throughout the area swept by enemy machine gun, mortar and artillery fire, treating and comforting the wounded. Although painfully wounded by a mortar burst, he refused to let it be known and only after all the other wounded had been cared for by him and removed to safety, would he allow himself to be evacuated. His selfless conduct in caring for and comforting others while in extreme pain himself was an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Means' heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 60722 (December 4, 1951).

Means, John J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John J. Means (MCSN: 1311775), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 21 March 1953. With five members of his patrol wounded when ambushed by a well-concealed enemy force while returning from a reconnaissance far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Means unhesitatingly moved to the side of the patrol path and delivered a deadly hail of covering fire which enabled the patrol to evacuate the wounded and retire. Although painfully wounded, he continued to fire his weapon and refused to retire until assured that the remainder of the patrol had withdrawn to a safe position. Returning alone to the scene of the ambush to locate a missing Marine, he observed the unconscious victim being dragged across a rice paddy by a hostile soldier, whom he quickly dispatched. Painfully wounded a second time while carrying the wounded man back to the patrol through intense enemy small arms and grenade fire, Private First Class Means, by his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and inspiring efforts in behalf of others, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Everett, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Ohiopyle, Pennsylvania.

Mechanic, David

Citation not yet found.

"After visiting the graves of their loved ones this Memorial Day, a lot of people are going to ask themselves: 'Isn't there something I can do for our live heroes, too?'  There is.  You can sit down and write a letter to some boy in Korea.  That'll be nice.  He'll be glad to get it.  There's an even nicer thing you can do.  You can go visit a blood bank and contribute a pint.  You'll find some other people have had the same thought--but not enough of them.  You won't find the blood bank crowded.  You can get in and get out in an hour.  David Mechanic, 27, a sailor, didn't wait until Memorial Day.  Sitting in the Brooklyn Red Cross blood center Monday, he explained why: 'I got back from Korea myself two days ago.  I went to a navy hospital this morning.  I saw a friend there I hadn't seen since last December.  He had lost both legs--frostbite.  I came here from the hospital.'  Mechanic himself is still under medical treatment from battle wounds.  'They gave me two pints of blood in Korea,' he said matter-of-factly.  'I just want to pay it back.  My folks are going to give blood, too this week--my father, sister and brother-in-law.  My mother wants to, but she isn't well.'  The young sailor was wounded in the evacuation of Hungnam last winter.  He was piloting a Higgins boat loaded with troops being taken off the beach.  'A mortar shell hit us,' he said.  'There were 17 soldiers killed in my boat.  I got hit in the face, arm, leg and shoulder by shrapnel.  I too off their dog tags.  Then I pulled two wounded soldiers ashore, and collapsed on the beach.'  For that he received a Silver Star for bravery.  Altogether, however, the public response to the national blood program has been pretty apathetic.  If you give your blood on this Memorial Day, it might help save an American soldier wounded 8,000 miles away on this same day.  The blood you give this afternoon can reach him this weekend.  It goes by air."

Mechanic, Richard Lee (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Richard Lee Mechanic (MCSN: 1113808), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman in Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. With his company engaged in assaulting a hill position which was strongly defended by well-entrenched hostile troops, Corporal Mechanic fearlessly advanced into the trenches and boldly engaged the enemy at close range. Despite intense mortar and small arms fire, he bravely charged up and down the trench line, firing rifle grenades and hurling hand grenades into the bunkers and continuing in his daring one-man assault until he fell, mortally wounded by enemy mortar fire. By his courageous initiative, aggressive fighting spirit and unyielding devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Mechanic served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 4, 1931 at Cleveland, Ohio. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio. Death: KIA: February 3, 1953.

Medeiros, Joseph R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Joseph R. Medeiros (MCSN: 668526), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rocket Section Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 30 November 1950. Voluntarily exposing himself to intense hostile machine gun, small arms and mortar fire to move 50 yards across an open field during a fierce enemy counterattack, Corporal Medeiros succeeded in reaching a position from which he could deliver accurate rocket fire on two enemy machine guns which were subjecting his company to a vicious barrage. After destroying one of the hostile guns, he steadfastly remained exposed to the intense fire, moving 100 yards across the open area to a point from which he was able to destroy the second machine gun. By his exceptional courage, outstanding skill and staunch devotion to duty in the face of heavy hostile opposition, Corporal Medeiros contributed materially to the success of his company in repulsing the enemy attack, and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bristol, Rhode Island. Home Town: Bristol, Rhode Island.

Medina, Loy L. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 90 - August 28, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Loy L. Medina (ASN: RA-17092776), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Medical Aidman with the 3d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division in Korea. While serving as Aidman to Company B, 27th Infantry Regiment, on 24 July 1950 near Yongdong, Korea, Private First Class Medina, accompanied by a rifleman, went forward to rescue a wounded man. Despite the heavy enemy fire, the two soldiers were able to remove the man to relative safety. However, realizing that the man required immediate evacuation Private First Class Medina rushed out into the open yelling and firing in order to attack attention to himself and permit the safe withdrawal of the wounded man. As a result of his gallant actions he was mortally wounded. The supreme sacrifice of Private First Class Medina saved the life of a comrade and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Medina-Olivera, Heriberto

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 470 - 15 October 1951

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Heriberto Medina-Olivera (RA30452231), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 4 June 1951, Company A was assaulting its objective, Hill 466, near Unchon-ni, Korea, when the Third Platoon became pinned down by the severe fire of an enemy automatic weapons position. Sergeant Medina-Olivera, a squad leader in this platoon, instructed his squad to cover him and, without being ordered to do so, aggressively crawled forward through the open ground which the hostile machine gun was spraying with lethal fire. Immediately sighted by the enemy gun crew as he approached their position, Sergeant Medina-Olivera faced the full fury of their weapon's firepower, but quickly moving into a small depression, affording scant cover, he continued to advance. When he was in range, Sergeant Medina-Olivera threw hand grenades into the emplacement, destroying it and killing three of the occupants. With the weapon silenced, he signaled for his platoon to move forward and press its attack, finally securing the objective. Sergeant Medina-Olivera's outstanding gallantry and courageous determination reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Medina-Pineiro, Pedro

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 361 - 27 August 1953

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Pedro Medina-Pineiro, (US50114797), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On the night of 20 July 1953, a squad of an Antitank and Mine Platoon, led by Sergeant Medina-Pineiro, set out on a mine detecting mission forward of the friendly main line of resistance in the vicinity of Kundong-Myon, Korea. As they began their duties, an enemy artillery and mortar barrage began, seriously wounded several men, mortally wounded another and created a state of disorder among the rest of the squad members. Exercising exceptional command presence, Sergeant Medina-Pineiro calmly organized his men and directed the evacuation of the casualties from the stricken area back to the friendly lines. He then went back alone to the perilous area to search for more wounded. Finding another casualty, he carried him back to safety. Sergeant Medina-Pineiro's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Meehan, Michael J.

Headquarters II Corps
General Orders No. 95 - 14 May 1952

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul. 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following-named enlisted man:

Private Michael J. Meehan, Infantry, United States Army, while serving as a member of Company “A”, 17th Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy at Chup’a-ri, North Korea on 31 August 1951. On this date, Company “A” was engaged in the assault of strategic enemy held positions. The unit proceeded smoothly to within 75 yards of the ridge-line, when suddenly they were subjected to intense enemy fire, which forced them to partially withdraw and take positions of safety. Two grenades were thrown into a hole, where one man was taking cover. Private Meehan immediately left his position of safety and dashed through a gauntlet of enemy fire. With no regard for self, he scooped up the two grenades, hurled them at an enemy emplacement and effectively silenced it. Private Meehan then returned to his former position and when the order was given to assault, unhesitantly leaped from his hole and stood upright, completely exposed to heavy enemy fire. He utilized his automatic rifle with speed and deadly accuracy, and accounted for many casualties. Private Meehan courageously remained exposed and moved forward aggressively greatly inspiring the men about him. He continued to deliver deadly fire until the strategic position was attained. The extraordinary heroism displayed by Private Meehan reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. He entered the Federal service from New Jersey.

Meeker, Merle R.

[KWE Note: Meeker, Des Moines, Iowa, served with the 15th Infantry Regiment.  He received the Silver Star for action on June 10, 1953 at Outpost Harry, located northeast of Chorwon on the east-central front.  The following citation was published in part in a local newspaper in Iowa.  Lieutenant Meeker also received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star Medals.]

.... When the men on the outpost were in need for reinforcements, Lieutenant Meeker, Third battalion adjutant, volunteered to organize and lead a counterattack force. With, complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved forward through the barrage of mortar and artillery fire, rallying his men to follow. Although wounded in the initial action, he continued on his mission with firm determination. When he reached the summit of the hill, he again braved the enemy enfilade to take command of the situation. Shouting orders, supplying ammunition and helping with the wounded, his intrepid actions were a source of inspiration to those about him and were highly instrumental in the successful defense of the outpost. Lieutenant Meeker's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service."

Mehlhorn, Dale B. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Dale B. Mehlhorn (MCSN: 1107631), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 July 1951. Although he was painfully wounded when his platoon was ambushed by a strong hostile force while advancing on a reconnaissance mission near Yanggu, Corporal Mehlhorn steadfastly remained in an exposed position and directed intense accurate fire at the enemy. Successful in killing three of the enemy and wounding several others before he himself was struck by a burst of hostile fire and mortally wounded, Corporal Mehlhorn, by his courageous fighting spirit and heroic devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 27, 1932 at Tulsa, Oklahoma. Home Town: Tulsa, Oklahoma. Death: KIA: July 7, 1951.

Melnicki, Joseph F.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Hospitalman Joseph F. Melnicki (NSN: 7185810), United States Navy, for gallantry in action as a Medical Corpsman attached to the First Marine Division (Reinforced), on 1 June 1951, while conducting a tank-infantry reconnaissance patrol in the vicinity of Yanggu, Korea. When his unit suddenly came under heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire, several casualties were inflicted on the foremost elements of the patrol. Hospitalman Melnicki, heedless of his own personal safety, exposed himself to the intense shelling in order to hasten the aid of several wounded Marines. While treating one, Hospitalman Melnicki suffered a painful shrapnel wound in the leg from a near by explosion. Although bleeding profusely and suffering severe pain, he courageously completed administering to the wounded men; then crawled to the aid of other wounded Marines in the area. Due to heavy fire throughout the area, it was impossible to evacuate the wounded by ambulance or litters. Therefore, Hospitalman Melnicki contacted two nearby tanks, then assisted and supervised the evacuation of the critically wounded by this means. It was only after all the wounded men in the area had been treated and evacuated, that Hospitalman Melnicki, nearing the point of exhaustion, did himself submit to medical aid and evacuation. His devotion to duty and self-sacrificing courage under vicious fire were directly responsible for saving the lives of many of his fallen companions, and served as an inspiration to all who observed him. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 182 (August 16, 1951). Born: January 1, 1931 at at Bronx, New York. Home Town: Bronx, New York. Death: October 9, 1973.

Melonson, Harold C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Gunnery Sergeant [then Private First Class] Harold C. Melonson, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Machine Gunner serving with Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. Participating in the defense of part of his Division's perimeter around the vital supply and assembly area of Hagaru-ri when a fanatic night attack on this position was made by an estimated enemy force of 250 troops, Gunnery Sergeant Melonson steadfastly remained at his post and delivered devastating machine gun fire on this force until wounded in the face and right hand by an enemy grenade. After he was evacuated and received first aid, he voluntarily returned to the platoon front despite concussion and the severe pain from his wounds. Locating a light machine gun that was not being used, Gunnery Sergeant Melonson organized a machine gun squad from several stragglers and moved the gun to the flank where he could fire laterally into the masked positions of the enemy. With the enemy preparing for an assault against his sector, he succeeded in delivering accurate and deadly fire against them through his skillful placement of the machine gun, thereby contributing immeasurably to the successful defense of the entire Division perimeter. Gunnery Sergeant Melonson's outstanding courage, initiative, and inspiring devotion to duty throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: Westwego, Louisiana.

Melvin, Karl M.

PARTIAL CITATION - Found in Pacific Stars & Stripes, May 4, 1952

Silver Star Awarded 224th Reg't Medic

Sgt. Karl M. Melvin, Phoenix, Arizona, has been awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action in Korea.  Melvin, a medical aidman with the 224th Infantry Regiment, was given the decoration by Maj. Gen. Daniel H. Hudelson, 40th Division Commander, in a brief ceremony at regimental headquarters.  During an infantry attack against a heavily fortified Communist hill, Melvin moved "with complete disregard for personal safety to the top of the hill to administer first aid to a wounded infantryman."  After the wounded man was evacuated, Melvin continued treating the wounded despite enemy machine gun and mortar fire.  While treating one casualty, a barrage of artillery fire fell into the immediate area, and Melvin threw his body over the helpless infantryman, shielding him from shell fragments.  "The gallantry, selfless devotion to duty, and the disregard of personal safety displayed by Sergeant Melvin reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army."

Mengler, Clarence Stanley (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Clarence Stanley Mengler (MCSN: 1180182), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 June 1952. Volunteering to serve as a machine gunner of a combat patrol which was almost certain to contact the enemy, Corporal Mengler spotted the first of the hostile troops and shot him at close range with a pistol before opening fire with his machine gun on the rest of the enemy. Critically wounded during the ensuing fire fight, he steadfastly refused to leave his gun and continued to fire the weapon until contact with the enemy was broken. By his aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Mengler served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 5, 1931 at Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Cicero, Illinois. Death: DOW: June 25, 1952.

Mentch, Delmer H.

Citation not yet found.

"The Silver Star has been awarded to First Lieutenant Delmer H. Mentch of Thermopolis for gallantry in action in Korea.  The order commends Lieutenant Mentch for outstanding action while acting as an artillery observer with two platoons of the Tenth Regiment, Republic of Korea army last October 27.  Lieutenant Mentch is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Mentch of Red Lane.  His wife and two children live in Thermopolis." - Billings Gazette, 6 January 1952

Mentrie, Joseph L.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 436 - 29 September 1951

Private First Class Joseph L. Mentrie, RA12307346, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 29 April 1951, near Seoul, Korea, a squad of "C" Company's Third Platoon, led by Private Mentrie, was ordered to secure a commanding hill upon which the enemy was entrenched. As the squad moved forward, it was temporarily pinned down by the hostile fire, but under Private Mentrie's fearless direction, it was able to place devastating counterfire upon the foe and continue on. Meeting an enemy counterattack, whose component greatly outnumbered the squad, it fell back expediently and Private Mentrie covered the withdrawal, completely ignoring the proximity of the hostile force. Later in the action, during a general assault, he ordered the men to fix bayonets and charge enemy positions along a narrow ridge, leading the attack and moving forward to personally destroy four hostile entrenchments with accurate throwing of hand grenades. Ignoring his exposed position and the concentrated enemy fire, he then placed his men in advantageous positions, distributing ammunition to them. The neutralization of the hostile emplacements and the favorable location of his squad inflicted many casualties on the enemy and enabled the company to win the engagement. Private Mentrie's outstanding tactical skill, aggressive leadership and gallant courage reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Menzies, Henry D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Henry D. Menzies (MCSN: 0-23941), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Command Pilot of an R4D Transport Plane in Headquarters Squadron, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korean Area from 1 to 7 December 1950. Although thousands of hostile troops were concentrated around the airfield at Hagaru-ri and additional thousands wee entrenched within two hundred yards of the strip at Koto-ri, Captain Menzies effected skillful landings at both of these extremely small and hastily constructed airstrips. Braving hostile small arms fire and immediate attacks from enemy aircraft on each occasion, he successfully delivered twelve loads of urgently needed ammunition, food and medical supplies to the FIRST Marine Division and other elements of the TENTH Army Corps which were surrounded by overwhelming hostile forces in the Chosin Reservoir area. Despite the hazards involved, he took off each time with his plane dangerously overloaded with sick, wounded and frost-bitten comrades and delivered them safe to a rear area. His skilled airmanship, cool daring and gallant devotion to duty throughout this period reflect great credit upon Captain Menzies and the United States Naval Service. Born: Strathmore, California. Home Town: Middletown, California.

Merchant, Martin L.V.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 60 - August 16, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Martin L. V. Merchant (ASN: 0-1313113), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company F, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division in Korea. On 27 July 1950, Lieutenant Merchant was in charge of the rear guard, which, under constant enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire, was covering the withdrawal of the 27th Regimental Combat Team near Yongdong, Korea. With utter disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Merchant deployed his troops in such a manner that the entire combat team was able to withdraw in an orderly manner with a minimum of casualties. Lieutenant Merchant's gallant leadership reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Merck, Edwin C.

First Lieutenant Erwin C. Merck, 02002860, Infantry, United States Army, 224th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Haso-Ri, Korea on 21 November 1952.  Lieutenant Merck was leader of a patrol that penetrated deep into enemy territory with the mission of contacting, killing or capturing the enemy.  Through skillful maneuvering and physical alertness, Lieutenant Merck led his men to a position within ten feet of the enemy.  At this point, they were met by a shower of machine gun and small arms fire, inflicting one casualty on the friendly troops.  Lieutenant Merck immediately exposed himself to enemy fire and threw a grenade into the enemy position, silencing it long enough for the wounded man to be evacuated.  Lieutenant Merck then directed accurate fire into the enemy positions, destroying one enemy bunker and causing heavy enemy casualties. While the patrol withdrew, Lieutenant Merck further exposed himself to enemy fire, assisting in the evacuation of the wounded man.  The superior leadership, adept knowledge and aggressiveness displayed by Lieutenant Merck were instrumental in the successful withdrawal of the patrol.  Lieutenant Merck's consumate courage, and outstanding devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the Federal service from Georgia.

Merica, George E.

FULL CITATION NOT YET FOUND.

"Private George E. Merica, 15th Antiaircraft (AW) Battalion, December 1950. The Army awarded Private Merica a Silver Star for gallantry in action near the Chosin Reservoir in Korea. He was a crew member on an M-19 gun carriage, leading a convoy of trucks filled with wounded soldiers, when the convoy encountered a heavily defended enemy road block. Because his M-19 had already expended all its ammunition, Private Merica obtained a 3.5 inch rocket launcher and four rockets, and proceeded on foot through withering enemy fire to a vantage point from which he was able to fire the rockets at the road block and reduce it to rubble, so that the convoy was able to pass through."

Merrall, Frederick E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Frederick E. Merrall (MCSN: 565377), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 March 1951. When the platoon's attack was delayed by vicious flanking fire from enemy automatic weapons, Corporal Merrall led his fire team in a bayonet charge up the steep slope of a heavily fortified ridge line. Despite the intense enemy fire, he directed his men in the neutralization of key enemy bunkers, thereby allowing his company to advance and secure the entire ridge line against the commanding fire of a numerically superior entrenched enemy force. By his outstanding courage, coolness under fire and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Merrall served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by the company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Binghamton, New York. Home Town: Binghamton, New York.

Merrill, Charles A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Charles A. Merrill (MCSN: 0-48892), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. Assigned the mission of withdrawing his platoon from its exposed position because of intense hostile small arms and machine gun fire from well-concealed enemy positions, First Lieutenant Merrill observed five members of his unit, two of whom were wounded, in an area forward of the platoon and unable to move because of the heavy fire. After attempting flanking movements by a volunteer rescue party were halted because of extremely heavy hostile machine gun fire, First Lieutenant Merrill moved forward alone through intense enemy fire and, by throwing smoke grenades, succeeded in effecting the rescue of the five men. His outstanding courage, daring initiative and aggressive leadership reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Born: Hinton, Oklahoma. Home Town: Montara, California.

Merrill, John N.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 255 - 28 October 1950

Second Lieutenant John N. Merrill, 02014595, Infantry, Company G, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  During the afternoon of 16 September 1950 Lieutenant Merrill led his platoon on a combat patrol near Changyong, Korea.  Contacting the enemy on the last of a series of hills, Lieutenant Merrill aggressively led his platoon to a position flanking the hostile forces and dispersed his men to return the fire.  Calling for mortar fire on the position, he effectively adjusted its fire from a forward observation post.  The intense barrage of mortar and machine gun fire from the numerically superior enemy forces inflicted numerous casualties among his men.  Since it was necessary to withdraw to a more favorable position, Lieutenant Merrill moved back and forth across his platoon encouraging his men and supervising the evacuation of the wounded until all personnel had withdrawn.  Lieutenant Merrill's courageous leadership is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Texas.

Merrill, Samuel J.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 129 - 9 September 1950

First Lieutenant Samuel J. Merrill, 02204100, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 20 August 1950 near Sinji, Korea, when his 81mm mortar platoon was receiving heavy counter fire from enemy mortars, communications with the fire direction center were disrupted.  Leaving his position of relative safety, Lieutenant Merrill rushed through the falling mortar shells to the Fire Direction Center, and though gravely wounded in the head, supervised restoration of the lines.  Only after he had assured himself that his guns were again in full operation and that communications were adequate, did he consent to be evacuated.  Lieutenant Merrill's valorous devotion to duty reflects the greatest credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Florida.

Merrill, Stanley O.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 9 June 1953

Sergeant First Class Stanley O. Merrill, (then sergeant), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of the 3d Platoon, Company E, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Chura-dong, Korea, on 18 and 19 September 1952.  The 3d Platoon, mounted on tanks, moved forward to join the 2d Platoon in a coordinated attack on "Old Baldy".  Arriving within 250 yards of the objective, the troops learned that the 2d Platoon had been ambushed and suffered numerous casualties.  The platoon dismounted and medical aid was summoned.  Fully aware of the odds against him, Sergeant Merrill advanced along the open road through heavy artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire to provide security for the wounded.  Firing his rifle and throwing grenades with deadly accuracy, he silenced six hostile machine guns and, although knocked to the ground several times by enemy mortar blasts, maintained his position until all casualties were removed.  Despite rapidly increasing mortar fire, he voluntarily remained behind to cover the withdrawal of friendly forces.  Finally falling back, he found a wounded man and carried him approximately 300 yards down the fire-swept road to safety.  Sergeant Merrill's courageous actions, tenacity, and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Blackfoot, Idaho.

Merritt, Hiram M.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 305 - 29 May 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Hiram M. Merritt (ASN: 0-32638), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in Korea. On 25 March 1951, while driving toward Chiktong-ni, Korea, the assault company of Lieutenant Colonel Merritt's Battalion was brought under intense automatic weapons and mortar fire. Moving forward to replace the wounded company commander, Lieutenant Colonel Merritt repeatedly exposed himself to the deadly barrage to direct the advantageous placement of half-tracks and tanks. By his skillful coordination of movement and fire, he was instrumental in enabling his men to regain the initiative and drive the entrenched foe to flight. Lieutenant Colonel Merritt's calm courage, military ability and inspirational devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.

Mersing, Charles P.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 186 - 15 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles P. Mersing (ASN: RA-13276559), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company L, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Namgye-dong, Korea, on 21 September 1950. During an attack, the 3d Battalion of the 21st Infantry Regiment was held up by fire from enemy tanks. Private Mersing, a 3.5 inch rocket launcher gunner, volunteered to join a patrol attempting to flank the enemy's armor and strike from his rear. Observing one of the tanks, he moved forward, and by his effective fire crippled it. Advancing, he observed another tank and although he had only one round of ammunition remaining he again moved forward, with utter disregard for his own safety, into the face of the tank's machine gun fire. Reaching a position along side the tank he fired his last round shattering the gun barrel and forcing the tank's withdrawal thus permitting the continued advance of the battalion. His gallant actions and unhesitant devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Oakland, Maryland.

Mertz, Franklin D.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 107 - 31 December 1950

Private First class Franklin D. Mertz, RA13335310, Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army.  On the morning of 3 December 1950 in the vicinity of Hukau'ri, Korea, Private First Class Mertz, utterly disregarded his own personal safety and deliberately exposed himself to enemy fire to assist in the evacuation of a wounded man from a company command post which had been overrun by the enemy.  Private First Class Mertz, armed with a carbine, moved a distance of two-hundred-fifty (250) yards to the command post location, stood up and drew fire upon himself from the enemy, who were within a distance of twenty to thirty yards, in order that the evacuation of the wounded man might be made unnoticed.  Only through the unfailing coolness and courage under fire of Private First Class Mertz was the successful evacuation of a wounded man made possible.  Private First Class Mertz's disregard for personal safety, courage and initiative, reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Pennsylvania.

Merz, Oliver James Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Radioman Third Class Oliver James Merz, Jr. (NSN: 3236850), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to the U.S.S. Henrico (APA-45) as a Sternhook of an LCM during the amphibious assault against Inchon, Korea, on 15 September 1950, in an area subjected to enemy gunfire. His initiative and courageous action saved the boat crew and embarked troops from death or serious injury when, with complete disregard for his own safety, he picked up and threw overboard a live grenade that had been accidentally dropped in the boat by a Marine. He also distinguished himself during the disembarkation of Marines from his boat when the ramp cable parted allowing the ramp to fall on one Marine member. He pulled the Marine from the water, while under heavy enemy rifle and mortar fire, and administered first aid to him until transfer was effected to the hospital boat. His heroic actions above and beyond the call of duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 375 (March 14, 1951).

Messier, Emmanuel R.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Emmanuel R. Messier, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Aidman attached to Company C, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Messier displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 23 September at Tujon, Korea. The Platoon to which Corporal Messier was attached as aidman came under heavy enemy small arms fire. Several of the platoon were wounded immediately and Corporal Messier with complete disregard of his own safety went to them, administering first aid and evacuating one of them to a more concealed and cover position. His fearlessness in repeatedly exposing himself to enemy small arms fire while assisting the wounded was an inspiration to his entire platoon and resulted in the probable saving of one soldiers life. His gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Army Medical Service. Home of record: Pawtucket, RI.

Messmer, Robert C.

Corporal Robert C. Messmer, Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 9 October 1951 in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea. On this date a platoon of Company I was pinned down by intense hostile fire from an enemy bunker. Corporal Messmer, a squad leader, realizing the seriousness of the situation and with complete disregard for his personal safety, advanced through the intense enemy fire toward the hostile emplacement. With hand grenades he single-handedly destroyed the bunker and killed its occupants. Corporal Messmer then secured an automatic weapon and continued on in the one man assault on the hostile positions. So inspired by this example of bravery under fire, his men rose from their positions and followed him in the attack. By his courageous actions his unit was able to secure its objective and inflict numerous casualties upon the hostile force. The gallantry in action and dogged determination displayed by Corporal Messmer on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Indiana.

Metcalfe, Robert B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert B. Metcalfe (MCSN: 0-39605), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Battery G, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as a Forward Observer of an Infantry Company in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 May 1951. When a numerically superior enemy force attacked the company position under cover of darkness and directed the main brunt of the three-hour assault on his observation post, First Lieutenant Metcalfe effectively defended his sector in the face of withering hostile fire. Continuing to call down devastating artillery fire on the attackers, he was instrumental in inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy, closing off the opposition's reinforcement and withdrawal route and forcing large numbers of the hostile troops to surrender to counterattacking friendly forces. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Metcalfe contributed in large measure to the successful defense of the strategic ground and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Portland, Oregon. Home Town: Portland, Oregon.

Metheny, Thelbert L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Boatswain's Mate First Class Thelbert L. Metheny (NSN: 3371267), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in the rescue of personnel casualties aboard the U.S.S. Brush (DD-745) on 26 September 1950, when the Brush struck an enemy mine in North Korean waters. Boatswain's Mate First Class Metheny, without regard for his personal safety, entered Plot, which was oil-drenched, filled with smoke and fumes and a burning inferno, to rescue his shipmates who remained alive in this space. He was able to remove two men who doubtlessly would have perished but for his coolness and tenacity of effort. Boatswain's Mate First Class Metheny also sight-checked five remaining bodies among much debris and live electrical circuits to determine whether or not they could be removed. His unfailing devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 4898 (May 20, 1951).

Metivier, Bernard E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Bernard E. Metivier (MCSN: 1001182), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. Voluntarily leaving his post while strong hostile forces were attacking an exposed flank of his platoon, Private Metivier boldly moved t the section which was receiving intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire and fearlessly engaged the hostile troops with effective automatic weapons fire, successfully defending the position until his rifle ceased to function. Undeterred by the pain of wounds received during this gallant, single-handed stand, he courageously remained at his voluntary post and, without the use of his weapon, boldly threw hand grenades at the enemy until ordered to submit to evacuation and medical treatment. Private Metivier's courageous initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sault St. Marie, Michigan. Home Town: Dearborn, Michigan.

Metz, Steve J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 173 - 16 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First class Steve J. Metz, RA17281691, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 38 Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 17 May 1951 in the vicinity of Pungchon-ni, Korea. At about 2200 hours of that date, Company K was counterattacking to reduce an enemy penetration of the defense line. All during this attack, Private Metz, with complete disregard for his own personal safety and oblivious of the intense enemy small arms, grenade and mortar fire, fiercely assaulted enemy strong points with courage and determination, killing and wounding many of the enemy. His intrepid courage and fierce determination in the face of numerical odds largely contributed to the success of the attack. The gallantry displayed by Private Metz reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Dickinson, North Dakota.

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News Clippings

"Mrs. Steve Metz, formerly Miss Florentine Schwindt, has received word from her husband that he has arrived in France where he will be stationed for several months.  He is connected with the engineer maintenance company.  He received the Silver Star in Korea while in service there."

Metzler, James P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major James P. Metzler (MCSN: 0-9735), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 27 February to 17 March 1951. With his battalion assigned the mission of attacking and seizing a precipitous ridge controlling the main supply route and terrain north and west of Hoengsong, Major Metzler moved forward in the advance along a narrow and treacherous slope towards the objective when heavy enemy small arms, mortar and automatic weapons fire from commanding ground pinned down the leading assault company. Aware that the devastating fire was inflicting heavy casualties, he voluntarily maneuvered through the intense barrage to a position in front of his own lines where he could coordinate an effective attack and bring accurate supporting fires to bear on the hostile positions. With the assaulting forces dangerously depleted under the blistering fire, Major Metzler personally organized an enveloping movement composed of a platoon of the support company and remaining elements of the assault companies and, leading a brilliantly executed maneuver, succeeded in overrunning the objective with a minimum of casualties among his units. By his aggressive and determined leadership, daring combat tactics and cool courage throughout this period of intensive combat, Major Metzler served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kansas City, Missouri. Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri.

Meyer, Henry John Dick (2nd award - 1st received in WWII)

Headquarters 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 179 - 13 October 1950

Brigadier General Henry J.D. Meyer, O-12290, United States Army, Commanding General, Division artillery, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy in Korea during the period 16-20 September 1950.  During the advance on Waegwan, the Naktong River crossing and the ensuing pursuit of the enemy General Meyer was continuously present with both infantry and his own artillery unit commanders in the forward area.  With complete disregard for his own safety he frequently exposed himself to intense enemy artillery, machine gun and small arms fire in order to better direct the employment of his command and to provide the maximum artillery support for the attack.  His gallant actions were an inspiration to his command, greatly influenced the success of this most important operation and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Army.  General Meyer entered military service from New York, New York.

Meyerhoff, Wilbur F. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Colonel Wilbur F. Meyerhoff (MCSN: 0-6522), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commanding Officer, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Songnim-chon, Korea, on 14 June 1951. On that date, during an assault on a well defended enemy position, the battalion command post was suddenly subjected to an intense barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire. Without regard for his personal safety, Colonel Meyerhoff continuously exposed himself in order to locate the enemy positions and to coordinate the maneuvering elements of his battalion. He remained in his exposed position throughout the day, directing fire on the enemy emplacements and selecting the routes of advance for his troops. The gallantry, leadership and outstanding devotion to duty displayed by Colonel Meyerhoff on this occasion contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders 179 (August 16, 1951).  Born: Rochester, New York. Home Town: Rochester, New York.

Meyerhoff, Wilbur F. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Wilbur F. Meyerhoff (MCSN: 0-6522), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 2 to 7 April 1951. Assigned the mission of attacking northward from Chunchon to the "Kansas Line," Lieutenant Colonel Meyerhoff constantly exposed himself to hostile fire to lead and deploy his companies in the attack over extremely rugged terrain and, although forced to move all supplies overland on foot, rapidly approached his objective despite determined enemy resistance. Calling in tanks to support the action, he bravely made his way forward into a shallow valley in the face of intense hostile small arms, mortar and automatic weapons fire to reach a position from which he could effectively observe and direct the attack. Undeterred by the bursts of enemy shells all around him, he skillfully organized a tank-infantry team and led the group in a final assault which secured the objective and inflicted heavy casualties on the hostile forces defending the position. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and unswerving devotion to the fulfillment of a vital mission, Lieutenant Colonel Meyerhoff contributed immeasurably to the success achieved by the regiment and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Rochester, New York. Home Town: Rochester, New York.

Meza, Baltimore G.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 245 - 26 October 1950

Private First Class Baltimore G. Meza, RA39597726, Artillery, Service Battery, 90th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  When his battery position near Pongam-ni, Korea was attacked by numerically superior enemy forces on 11 August 1950, Private First Class Meza heroically exposed himself to the intense hostile fire to administer first aid to a wounded soldier.  Early the following morning when a section of the battery was being subjected to enemy automatic weapons fire, Private First Class Meza crawled over exposed terrain to silence the gun.  Later, as the battery was withdrawing to a more favorable position, he made two trips with a jeep in order to evacuate wounded comrades despite the intense fire directed at the position.  Private First Class Meza's courageous devotion to duty reflects the highest credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from California.

Mezias, Fernando O.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Second Class Fernando D. Mezias (NSN: 8078788), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 August 1952. Serving as Company Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Second Class Mezias displayed exceptional courage, initiative and devotion to duty. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved about in an exposed area under continuous enemy fire in order to administer aid to the wounded. During a period of nine hours, he treated and evacuated thirty-nine seriously wounded Marines while subjected to intense hostile artillery and mortar fire. He was later wounded but continued performing his duties until evacuated to the rear. His indomitable spirit and resourcefulness under enemy fire served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were instrumental in saving the lives of many wounded Marines. Hospital Corpsman Second Class Mezias' gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 1934 (January 17, 1953).

Michaelis, Donald R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 150 - 28 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Donald R. Michaelis, United States Air Force, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force on 11 December 1950. First Lieutenant Michaelis, while participating in a local transition flight, monitored a distress call from the flight leader of a group of four (4) F-80 type aircraft. A member of the flight having sustained extensive battle damage had abandoned his aircraft in enemy territory. Realizing that the interval of time necessary to alert and dispatch a helicopter would necessitate and attempted and possibly unsuccessful evacuation after darkness, Lieutenant Michaelis proceeded without hesitation to the reported position. Locating the pilot, this officer displayed superior airmanship and profound courage by landing his light reconnaissance aircraft on a frozen rice field five (5) miles south of the city of Pyongyang, Korea. Under fire from enemy snipers, Lieutenant Michaelis at great personal risk succeeded in locating and evacuating the downed pilot, again demonstrating great skill and courage in making a successful take-off under adverse conditions. The intrepidity and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Michaelis are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Michalski, Ralph R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Ralph R. Michalski (MCSN: 659359), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1950. When his platoon was pinned down by intense hostile small arms and mortar fire during an attack by his battalion, Corporal Michalski moved forward from his covered position on two occasions and, in the face of intense enemy fire, hurled hand grenades into hostile positions, thereby causing heavy casualties. By his courageous actions at the risk of his life, he served to inspire others of his group to heroic endeavor in repulsing the enemy attack and regaining fire superiority. His fortitude and daring initiative reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Michalski and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Michelony, Lewis J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Lewis J. Michelony, Jr. (MCSN: 266202), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Company Gunnery Sergeant of the 4.2-in Mortar Company, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1950. Despite constant exposure to hostile small arms, machine gun and automatic weapons fire, Master Sergeant Michelony led a combat patrol of three men for a distance of one thousand yards to clear a mortar position of enemy troops who were firing on elements of his company. During the ensuing action, the hostile elements of approximately platoon strength suffered twenty-four killed and the loss of three heavy machine guns, four automatic weapons and seventeen rifles, all of which were captured. Personally accounting for the crews of all three of the hostile machine guns, Master Sergeant Michelony directed the clearing of the whole area of enemy troops, thereby paving the way for the rapid employment of his mortar company in providing supporting fire for front line elements without suffering casualties. His courage, initiative and outstanding leadership reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Born: Oneida, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Sheppton, Pennsylvania.

Michienzi, James A.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 51 - 29 November 1956

Captain James A. Michienzi, Infantry (then First Lieutenant) United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Chong-Ji-Chon, Korea, on 7 September 1952.  The combat patrol of which Captain Michienzi was a member was suddenly subjected to an intense volume of small arms, mortar, and grenade fire from a well entrenched enemy position.  The platoon leader was severely wounded and the platoon became disorganized.  Although painfully wounded himself, Captain Michienzi assumed command, reorganized the platoon, and continued the mission.  He personally carried the severely wounded patrol leader from the position and assisted in the evacuation of other wounded.  His unhesitating and courageous action inspired his comrades to the successful completion of their mission and is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.

Mickelson, Richard D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Richard D. Mickelson (MCSN: 0-51426), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Battery G, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as an Artillery Forward Observer with a Rifle Company, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 May 1951. Although seriously wounded in the leg when his company's position was subjected to a concentrated night attack by an enemy force employing a heavy barrage of mortar fire, Second Lieutenant Mickelson made his way forward in the darkened area to assist a forward observer at an observation post. With the forward position heavily interdicted by small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire, he skillfully assisted in directing artillery fire upon the attackers. When a hand grenade landed among his group, he immediately seized the missile in a daring attempt to hurl it back toward the enemy. Painfully wounded a second time when the grenade exploded close by and filled his hand with shrapnel fragments, he courageously continued to assist the forward observer until ordered to an aid station. By his indomitable initiative, marked fortitude and steadfast devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Mickelson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fargo, North Dakota. Home Town: Harwood, North Dakota.

Middleton, John Davidson

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade John Davidson Middleton (NSN: 0-8386246/521706), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Jet Fighter Plane in Fighter Squadron Seven Hundred Eighty-One (VF-781), based on board the U.S.S. Oriskany (CVA-34), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 November 1952. Encountering a numerically superior force of attacking hostile jet aircraft while participating in a combat air patrol mission on station over Task Force Seventy-Seven, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Middleton unhesitatingly carried out daring firing runs on two enemy fighters. Attacking alone when mechanical difficulties forced his section leader to retire, he scored a hit on one jet plane, causing it to burn and spiral into the sea and, continuing his runs, succeeded in inflicting heavy damage upon a second hostile aircraft which immediately retired from further action. By his outstanding valor, exceptional skill and selfless devotion to duty in the face of heavy enemy aerial opposition, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Middleton materially aided in the successful defense of the Task Force against enemy attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 835 (May 7, 1953). Born: October 29, 1925 at at Birmingham, Alabama. Death: May 10, 1976.

Mikelson, Wallace W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Wallace W. Mikelson (MCSN: 606392), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Command Pilot of a Transport Plane in Headquarters Squadron, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri and Koto-ri, Korea, from 5 to 9 December 1950. Braving a surrounding concentration of enemy troops estimated at seventy thousand, some of whom were entrenched within two hundred yards of the airstrip at Koto-ri, Technical Sergeant Mikelson carried out a series of vital transport missions from extremely small and hastily constructed airstrips. Executing all landings and take-offs in the face of intense hostile small arms fire, he successfully delivered eight loads of urgently needed ammunition, medical supplies and food to beleaguered friendly ground troops in the Chosin Reservoir Area. Returning on each occasion with his aircraft dangerously overloaded with the sick and wounded, he carried all casualties safely to a rear area. By his outstanding airmanship, daring initiative and unfaltering devotion to duty throughout, Technical Sergeant Mickelson upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Julesburg, Colorado. Home Town: Littleton, Colorado.

Milburn, Frank William

Headquarters, VIII Army
General Orders No. 90 (1950) & G.O. 567 (1951)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant General Frank William Milburn (ASN: 0-3738), United States Army, for gallantry in action. During the period of 6 September 1950 through 28 September 1950, General Milburn commanded the I Corps in an attack against an assaulting, aggressive enemy. The attack involved shifting from defense to offense with depleted troops that had been beaten back repeatedly by an enemy superior in numbers. General Milburn planned and launched the attack, broke the enemy offensive and main line of resistance and crossed the Naktong river. The attack unfolded over difficult terrain including mountains and the Naktong river against heavy opposition. During this period General Milburn was forward with the frontline units directing and encouraging them to seize assigned objectives without delay. His presence, enthusiasm, leadership and fearlessness inspired his command to victorious assault. With skill and shrewd tactics General Milburn led his command to envious victory. His gallantry, heroism and valor reflected credit on himself, his command and the military service.

Miles, Harry E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Harry E. Miles (MCSN: 1088703), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Light Machine Gunner of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yudam-ni, Korea, on 1 December 1950. With hostile troops on the verge of overrunning his positions, Private First Class Miles boldly stood up, lifted his weapon from its mount and, cradling the gun in his arms, fired point-blank at the onrushing enemy soldiers who were within a few yards of his gun emplacement. Cool and courageous in the face of the fanatical attack, he succeeded in killing over thirty of the enemy and contributed materially to the defeat of the hostile attempt to occupy the hill. His outstanding skill, quick-wittedness and indomitable fighting spirit reflect great credit upon Private First Class Miles and the United States Naval Service. Born: Springfield, Missouri. Home Town: Springfield, Missouri.

Miles, William Thomas Jr.

"Ranger William T. Miles, Jr. distinguished himself in combat as a member of the 4th Ranger Infantry Company (Airborne) in Korea.  At the start of the Korean War, Ranger Miles answered the call for volunteers, and received his Ranger training with the 3rd Ranger Infantry Company (Airborne), and was reassigned to the 4th Ranger Infantry Company (Airborne) in Korea.

With his training as a radio and demolition infantryman, Ranger Miles volunteered and was selected by the G3 Miscellaneous Division as a member of the Operation Virginia I Mission team.  On 15 March 1951, Ranger Miles parachuted into North Korea 65 miles behind enemy miles to destroy a vital railroad tunnel southwest of Hyon-ni to disrupt communications and supply lines.  He was seriously wounded during evacuation as he was being hoisted by cable into a helicopter.  Ranger Miles was awarded a Purple Heart and Silver Star for his actions during this mission.

Volunteering for another mission, Operation Spitfire, Ranger Miles was transferred to the Miscellaneous Division, Baker Section, receiving partisan training.  Ranger Miles, as one member of the advance pathfinder party, jumped into the mountains near Karyoju--ri on 18 June 1951 on reconnaissance duty.  While scouting out sites for a base camp and prior to the arrival of the other team members, Ranger Miles located two camouflaged shelters used by Chinese troops.  He radioed air units and coordinated strikes, destroying the sites and enemy troops.  Later, moving ahead of the Operation Spitfire team, Ranger Miles warned of an ambush set up by enemy troops and volunteered, along with a South Korean lieutenant, to hold off the enemy, allowing the rest of the team to escape.  With reports of heavy machine-gun and mortar action against the two men, Ranger Miles was presumed wounded and taken prisoner.  He was listed as an MIA on 8 July 1951.  During this second mission, he earned a second Silver Star and Purple Heart.

Ranger Miles demonstrated exceptional valor under enemy fire placing the lives of his fellow Rangers above that of his own.  Ranger Miles was a credit to the Rangers, the United States Army, and the United States of America."

[Source: 11th Annual Ranger Hall of Fame, August 6, 2003, Ft. Benning, GA]

Miley, John David

Headquarters, Eighth Army (EUSAK)
General Orders No. 745 - October 5, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) John David Miley (ASN: 0-28586), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer of Company G, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division, in the vicinity of Parun-ni, Korea, on 25 March 1951. On that date, the weather was cold and wet, with a steady rain denying the company the use of tactical air support as it moved forward to assault a hill held by a well-entrenched enemy force. As the men proceeded toward their objective over the slippery terrain, they were suddenly subjected to a heavy volume of enemy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire. Unhesitatingly, Captain Miley moved to the head of his company and urged his men forward. Inspired by his personal example of courage in the face of the devastating enemy fire, the friendly forces successfully overran the hostile positions, driving the enemy down the reverse slope of the hill. However, by the time the objective had been secured, many of the company's weapons had been rendered inoperative by the inclement weather and the enemy, sensing this, immediately launched a fierce counterattack. Rapidly and skillfully deploying his men in a defensive perimeter, Captain Miley moved among them, directing their fire and encouraging them. Using the weapons that were still operating and hand grenades, the company successfully repulsed the fanatical attacks of the enemy, finally forcing the numerically superior hostile force to withdraw withy many casualties. The gallantry and inspiring leadership displayed by Captain Miley throughout this action reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Milia, Carmelo Placido

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 565 - December 16, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Armor) Carmelo Placido Milia (ASN: 0-62462), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company A, 64th Tank Battalion (Medium), 3d Infantry Division, in Korea. On 18 September 1951, two assault platoons of the reinforced tank battalion were engaged in a clean up mission near Hat-O-Dong, Korea, when three tanks of the leading platoon were suddenly disabled by mines and subjected to anti-tank fire. As the enemy continued firing from positions in the surrounding hills, the supporting infantry was dispersed in the open terrain. Lieutenant Milia, Fourth Platoon tank leader, was assigned the task of seizing a low hill, which would enable friendly troops to cover evacuation of the wounded and repair of the disabled tanks with fire protection. Disregarding the hail of hostile fire, he dismounted from his tank and moved about fearlessly organizing the nearest infantrymen into an assault team. Shouting encouragement to the men, he led them toward the objective which they secured and held until the tank force was ready to move. Although the group sustained casualties while assaulting the hill, Lieutenant Milia, by valorous and resolute leadership, retained control of the unit amid the intense hostile fire. The gallantry and inspiring leadership displayed by Lieutenant Milia reflect high credit upon himself and the military service.

Millener, George A. Jr.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 105 - 30 December 1950

First Lieutenant George A. Millener Jr., 061600, Infantry, Company "B", 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 21 November 1950, near Majon-Ni, Korea, Lieutenant Millener was in command of a reinforced motorized platoon patrol proceeding to Tengyong, Korea.  The patrol encountered a road block consisting of an overturned burned truck.  Lieutenant Millener sent one squad forward to remove the road block.  At this instant, heavy enemy fire was received from the left front, right flank, and left rear of the column.  Lieutenant Milliner was wounded in his hand and leg in the initial outburst of fire.  Unhesitatingly, and with utter disregard for his own personal safety, he moved to successive positions along the road organizing his platoon. Although at all times exposed to consistent, intense enemy fire, he calmly stood on the road, directing the drivers into their vehicles and getting them turned around.  Under covering fire directed by Lieutenant Milliner, some vehicles with wounded aboard were able to withdraw to their battalion area.  The gallantry, leadership and initiative displayed by Lieutenant Milliner reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the state of Maryland.

Miller, Benjamin H.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 306 - November 06, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Benjamin H. Miller (ASN: RA-6282803), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company A, 29th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in action on 4 August 1950. Sergeant First Class Miller led a patrol down a mountain pass near Changan-ni, Korea, to endeavor to recover critical equipment and supplies which had been lost during an enemy attack. When heavy fire was opened on the patrol about 1,000 yards from the patrol objective, Sergeant First Class Miller ordered his men to cover, worked his way forward, and killed the snipers and permitted the rest of the patrol to continue. Expertly organizing defense while the salvage work was done, he enabled the patrol to recover four vehicles, large supplies of ammunition and several weapons. Sergeant First Class Miller's exemplary courage and military skill reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Miller, Charles V.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Charles V. Miller (MCSN: 664331), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rocket Gunner of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When the assault section approached the crest of the ridge while participating in a mission to secure a ridge line overlooking the main supply route, the unit was subjected to intense enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire from well concealed trenches. Fearlessly rushing forward through the heavy fire and leaping into the emplacement, Private Miller bayoneted one of the enemy, killed another with the butt of his weapon and, seizing a hostile machine gun, poured blistering fire on the remaining enemy, completely routing the hostile force from the position. By his daring initiative, valiant fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty, Private Miller contributed materially to the success achieved by the company in rapidly securing the remainder of the objective and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Astoria, New York.

Miller, Daniel J.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 395 - 17 August 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Daniel J. Miller, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action while serving as a helicopter pilot, Detachment F, 3d Air Rescue Squadron, FIFTH Air Force, in action against an enemy while rescuing an American pilot forced down behind enemy lines on 15 March 1951. When alerted, Captain Miller was informed that the area in which the downed pilot was located was infected with enemy troops and anti-aircraft batteries. The ceiling was 500 feet. Captain Miller realized his highly vulnerable helicopter would be a perfect target at that low altitude, but without thought for his safety, he immediately proceeded on the rescue mission. The slow-moving helicopter attracted small arms fire while crossing the front lines en route to the crash scene. Despite determined enemy fire, Captain Miller landed and rescued the helpless pilot. Before he cleared the area a fighter escort plane was shot down by the enemy. Without hesitation, Captain Miller attempted a second rescue. However, the pilot was dead. Captain Miller then returned safely to his home base. Captain Miller's courageous actions reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Miller, Henry S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Henry S. Miller (MCSN: 0-11233), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Tactical Air Coordinator of Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three (VMA-323), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 August 1952. Informed by an emergency radio message that a flight member had been forced to abandon his burning aircraft after it was hit by enemy fire during an attack against a heavily defended mine area, Lieutenant Colonel Miller immediately alerted rescue facilities and initiated a rescue patrol over the downed pilot. Ordering the remainder of the strike group to return to base, he continued flying in company with his wingman at an extremely low orbit over the helpless airman and, despite heavy enemy ground fire, remained over the area until assured that the rescue patrol and helicopter had sighted the pilot. Although his plane was damaged by enemy fire, he returned to an intermediate air base and landed his crippled aircraft with less than a ten-minute fuel supply. By his superb airmanship, marked courage and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Lieutenant Colonel Miller contributed directly to the rescue of the downed pilot and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Jenkintown, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Jenkintown, Pennsylvania.

Miller, John R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John R. Miller (MCSN: 1071110), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. With the platoon engaged in a bayonet attack against a group of strong enemy positions, Private First Class Miller led a fierce assault on a large body of hostile troops in the face of withering automatic weapons and small arms fire. Shouting words of encouragement to his comrades above the din of battle, he bravely charged forward, firing his weapon and hurling grenades, personally killing five of the enemy and wounding many others, enabling the platoon to seize its objective without suffering casualties. By his exceptional courage, inspiring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Miller upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.

Miller, Joseph Roth (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Joseph Roth Miller (MCSN: 345901), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces south of Yudam-ni, Korea, from 20 to 28 November 1950. When a fanatical assault by numerically superior enemy forces penetrated the right flank of his position during the hours of darkness on the morning of 28 November, inflicting heavy casualties, Private First Class Miller daringly exposed himself to intense hostile machine gun, mortar and small arms fire to rally his remaining men and lead them in repulsing the attack. Unyielding in the face of overwhelming odds throughout the fierce encounter, he bravely moved from position to position, shouting words of encouragement to his squad and directing effective fire on the enemy until he fell, mortally wounded. By his brilliant leadership and resourcefulness, he served to inspire his men to greater efforts, thereby directly contributing to the success of his company in preserving its defensive integrity. His outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Miller and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: July 27, 1922 at Two Harbors, Michigan. Home Town: Des Moines, Iowa. Death: KIA: November 28, 1950.

Miller, LeRoy B.

Headquarters, 8th Army
General Orders No. 455 - June 24, 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel LeRoy B. Miller, 0289004, Infantry, United States Army. Colonel Miller, while a member of the United States Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea (KMAG), distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Wonju, Korea. On 25 September 1950, Colonel Miller, Senior United States Advisor to the Republic of Korea 6th Division, led a group of 12 men on a patrol to reconnoiter possible sites for the division to cross the Naktong River. Shortly after arrival at the river, an enemy force of approximately 40 men launched an attack against the small reconnaissance patrol. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Colonel Miller deployed his men and effectively directed return fire on the enemy. Realizing that his patrol would be wiped out if the enemy launched a frontal assault, Colonel Miller maneuvered four of his men to a position from which effective flanking fire could be directed on the hostile force. Caught in the withering cross fire of the two friendly groups, the enemy troops were forced to flee in wild disorder, leaving two dead and three wounded at their abandoned positions. The aggressive leadership and gallantry displayed by Colonel Miller reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the federal service from Cando, Towner County, North Dakota.

Colonel LeRoy Miller (1897-1955) served in the Navy during WWI; with the North Dakota 164th National Guard in the Pacific in WWII (as an officer); and with KMAG in Korea. He is buried in Arlington Cemetery.

Miller, Norman A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Norman A. Miller, Jr. (MCSN: 0-8154), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of the Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 2 to 6 December 1950. Commanding elements of the battalion left to support the advance of infantry assault units while the remainder went forward to occupy new firing positions during the movement from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri, Major Miller was quick to act when his echelon came under heavy enemy mortar, artillery, automatic weapons and small arms fire on 2 December. Repeatedly exposing himself to direct the employment of all available personnel to meet an onslaught of anticipated greater intensity, he went from howitzer to howitzer to point out and direct accurate fire on approaching hostile weapons and personnel, and was directly responsible for breaking up the attack. Although painfully wounded by hostile machine gun fire while directing elements of his battalion through an enemy roadblock the night of 6 December, he staunchly refused medical attention and continued to lead the remainder of his men through the fire-swept area until all personnel and vehicles were safe, submitting to treatment only after all the other wounded had been treated. By his forceful and determined leadership, fortitude and cool courage in the face of heavy odds, Major Miller served as an inspiration to all who observed him, and his heroic actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Washington, D.C. Home Town: Hyattsville, Maryland.

Miller, Philip C.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 399 - December 07,  1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Philip C. Miller (ASN: 0-1329501), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 9 October 1951, near Sidamak, Korea. When the enemy attacked friendly positions, they succeeded in isolating a portion of Company B from the rest of the unit. Observing this critical situation, Lieutenant Miller organized a hasty line and armed with a carbine and grenades, directed accurate fire against the foe, forcing them to retreat and allowing the friendly troops who had been cut off to return to the main body. When the Chinese regrouped and attacked again, Lieutenant Miller once more led the friendly forces and the enemy was repulsed. He then realized that three forward observers were still directing artillery fire, unaware that the friendly position had been overrun. Displaying exceptional courage, he made his way to them, firing his weapon and throwing grenades at the foe. Lieutenant Miller covered their withdrawal with withering fire. On one occasion, he stood on a bunker armed with an automatic rifle, and directed deadly fire on the enemy who were in nearby positions. Lieutenant Miller's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Miller, R. Arthur (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade R. Arthur Miller (NSN: 0-430018), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Detachment No. 7, Helicopter Squadron One at Changyon, Korea, on 14 December 1950. As the pilot of a helicopter, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Miller was assigned the mission of locating and effecting the rescue of friendly troops cut off and isolated deep in enemy held territory. With great skill and courage he landed his aircraft and queried Korean villagers far beyond the friendly front lines. Upon locating some friendly soldiers, he carried out his mission with complete success in the face of direct attack by three hostile jet fighters upon his unarmed and completely unprotected aircraft. Continuing his task over a period of several hours he assisted in evacuating by helicopter, with disregard for his own personal safety, twenty-three soldiers who were cut off and isolated deep in enemy held territory. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Miller's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 10535 (October 29, 1951).

Miller, Ray

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Ray Miller (MCSN: 1088067), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 September 1950. Wounded in the leg during an early morning enemy counterattack, Corporal Miller refused medical treatment and, despite loss of blood and excruciating pain, continued to lead and direct his fire team until it returned to friendly lines where he submitted to medical treatment. By his courage, initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Miller aided materially in completely routing the enemy, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Stansberry, Missouri. Home Town: Stansberry, Missouri.

Miller, Richmond L. Jr.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 317 - 26 June 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Richmond L. Miller, Jr., United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as Pilot of an unarmed T-6 aircraft with the 6148th Tactical Control Squadron, 6147th Tactical Control Group, FIFTH Air Force, on 15 May 1952. While on a tactical reconnaissance mission in the vicinity of Kumgong-ni, Korea, Captain Miller directed a series of devastating attacks by three flights of fighter-bombers on a heavily fortified area of enemy troop concentration. While marking the target for each flight of fighter-bombers, Captain Miller received battle damage on three separate passes. Despite the fact that he could not evaluate the extent of his battle damage, Captain Miller continued his passes and directions until all the fighter-bombers had expended all their ordnance. His skillful airmanship and aggressiveness contributed materially to a highly successful mission against the enemy. Through his high personal courage and devotion to the best interests of the military service, Captain Miller reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Miller, Robert M.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 277 - 21 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) Robert M. Miller (ASN: 0-388301), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Major Miller distinguished himself by courageous action near Anju, Korea, on 4 November 1950. His battalion was engaged in holding a strategic road net as friendly forces withdrew to new defensive positions. Shortly after the last unit passed through the battalion's positions a numerically superior enemy force attacked and soon surrounded the battalion. In the absence of the Battalion Commander Major Miller immediately set about to organize the command to meet the overwhelming assault. With complete disregard for his own safety he repeatedly exposed himself to the intense fire to better direct the battalion in its defense. During this fearless action, Major Miller was wounded. Unmindful of his wounds he remained with his men and in an unusual display of courage and devotion to duty, led them through areas infested by the infiltrating enemy to more tenable positions. Major Miller's gallant actions and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Marley, Maryland.

Miller, Thomas Dawayne (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Thomas Dawayne Miller (MCSN: 1192779), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Wireman of Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 October 1952. Assuming the duties of both radio operator and artillery observer when his team sustained heavy casualties, Corporal Miller voluntarily exposed himself to intense and accurate hostile mortar, artillery and sniper fire to call and adjust accurate artillery supporting fire and to check and repair damaged communication lines. Although mortally wounded when an enemy shell fell directly on his bunker, he succeeded in instructing another Marine in the operation of his radio before succumbing to his wounds. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and zealous devotion to duty, Corporal Miller served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 17, 1933 at Morris, Oklahoma. Home Town: Perry, Oklahoma. Death: KIA: October 5, 1952.

Miller, William C.

Private First Class William C. Miller, Jr., RA 10732047, Infantry, Company "C", 15th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 23 March 1951, near Uijongbu, Korea, in the final assault on Hill 155, Private Miller, although an ammunition bearer in the weapons squad, voluntarily joined the assault wave of the third platoon.  Courageously he charged for fifty yards through a deadly hail of enemy grenades and rifle fire and was the first man in the platoon to reach the crest of the hill.  Upon reaching the ridge, he was immediately fired on from close range by two automatic riflemen on the reverse slope.  Private Miller rapidly hurled four grenades at the enemy causing them to abandon their weapons and flee.  Following and firing his rifle, he killed three of the enemy and captured both enemy automatic weapons.  The outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Private Miller reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the Territory of Hawaii. General Orders No. 150 - 18 May 1951

Miller, William S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class William S. Miller (NSN: 8763167), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 December 1950. Serving as a Medical Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Miller was moving with the company in the attack of a strongly defended enemy position when leading elements were subjected to devastating enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire, causing numerous casualties. Fearlessly and with complete disregard for his personal safety exposing himself to the heavy enemy fire, he advanced to the forward unit and coolly rendered aid to the wounded. Despite the fact that he suffered a severe wound in the back, he courageously refused to seek aid for his own wound, continuing steadfastly to treat his fallen comrades. His great personal bravery and courageous devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Miller's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 35978 (October 14, 1951).

Millette, Eugene

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Eugene Millette (MCSN: 0-39992), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yonpo, Korea, on 4 and 7 December 1950. Quick to recognize the indication of friendly troops behind hostile lines when he observed a panel and the flashing rays of a mirror during a routine reconnaissance mission over enemy territory in an unarmed, light observation plane, First Lieutenant Millette promptly lowered his flaps and flew slowly over the terrain at a low altitude in order to further investigate. Although his aircraft sustained several hits from heavy enemy small arms fire, he boldly persevered in the search until he had positively identified the troops on the ground as friendly. Returning to base for supplies, he flew food and ammunition to the beleaguered men in successive air drops and, when the main ground forces redeployed from Hagaru-ri on 7 December, radioed the convoy and directed a combat patrol to the area to effect a rescue. By his daring initiative, brilliant airmanship and selfless efforts in behalf of others, he directly aided in saving the lives of 28 friendly soldiers. His marked courage and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Millette and the United States Naval Service. Born: Springfield, Massachusetts. Home Town: Springfield, Massachusetts.

Millman, Gerald

Private First Class Gerald Millman, RA13281639, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of the Clearing Company, 24th Medical Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy on 20 July 1950 at Taejon, Korea. PFC Millman’s platoon was rendering medical support to the units in surrounded Taejon. Casualties were mounting and supplies were running low. Realizing this, Private Millman and a companion loaded an ambulance with critically needed supplies and ran the road blocks into the town. During the trip, they passed through intense enemy fire directed at their vehicle. PFC Millman was seriously wounded in the chest and abdomen. By moving these supplies into Taejon, PFC Millman enabled his unit to perform its assigned mission of treating the wounded. His actions were in accord with the high standards of the military service. GO 82, 10 Aug 1950. Entered service from Philadelphia, PA. (See Cletus Biederstadt citation.)

Mills, Charles F.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 63 - October 12, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Charles F. Mills (ASN: 0-1057539), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company F, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 1 September 1950 at An-Sin, Korea. On this date, he was in command of a platoon forming a combat outpost along a strategic ridge. The platoon was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force supported by heavy artillery and mortar fire. Though seriously wounded in the initial onslaught, he painfully dragged himself over the terrain and reorganized his men into an efficient defensive force which stemmed the tide of the enemy advance. When the enemy had been checked, he assisted in the evacuation of his wounded, exposing himself to do so to the intense enemy artillery, machine gun, and small arms fire, and himself refused treatment or evacuation until all other wounded had been removed. His determination to defend his position despite his wound, his exemplary leadership, and his complete disregard for his own personal safety, were an inspiration to his men and were the determining factors in repelling the enemy attack. His gallant and heroic conduct throughout this operation was such as to reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.

Mills, Neil B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Eugene Millette (MCSN: 0-39992), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yonpo, Korea, on 4 and 7 December 1950. Quick to recognize the indication of friendly troops behind hostile lines when he observed a panel and the flashing rays of a mirror during a routine reconnaissance mission over enemy territory in an unarmed, light observation plane, First Lieutenant Millette promptly lowered his flaps and flew slowly over the terrain at a low altitude in order to further investigate. Although his aircraft sustained several hits from heavy enemy small arms fire, he boldly persevered in the search until he had positively identified the troops on the ground as friendly. Returning to base for supplies, he flew food and ammunition to the beleaguered men in successive air drops and, when the main ground forces redeployed from Hagaru-ri on 7 December, radioed the convoy and directed a combat patrol to the area to effect a rescue. By his daring initiative, brilliant airmanship and selfless efforts in behalf of others, he directly aided in saving the lives of 28 friendly soldiers. His marked courage and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Millette and the United States Naval Service. Born: Springfield, Massachusetts. Home Town: Springfield, Massachusetts.

Mills, Robert John (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Robert John Mills (MCSN: 1035051), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Bearer in Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. With the company subjected to fierce hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire from the flank while moving in attack along a narrow ridge line, and his squad assigned the mission of rendering close support to the assault platoons, Private First Class Mills boldly moved through the enemy fire to maintain an adequate supply of ammunition for his unit. When the gun position was suddenly subjected to withering hostile fire from another direction, he bravely shielded the gunner with his body while attempting to locate the enemy weapon. Skillfully spotting the hostile strong point, he continued to call effective fire for his gunner until he fell mortally wounded by the enemy. By his marked courage, unswerving devotion to duty and selfless efforts in behalf of a comrade, Private First Class Mills served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: May 27, 1932 at Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York. Death: KIA: May 28, 1951 - Buried at: Long Island National Cemetery - Long Island, New York.

Milton, Ralph A. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Ralph A. Milton (MCSN: 66479), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Headquarters and Service Company, First Motor Transport Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the period 29 November 1950 to 4 December 1950. His actions contributed materially to the successful break-through of United Nations troops in the Chosin Reservoir area and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 66 (December 15, 1950).

Milton, Ralph A. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Private First Class Ralph A. Milton (MCSN: 66479), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Headquarters and Service Company, First Motor Transport Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. When the convoy was halted by inoperative vehicles and brought under heavy attack by the enemy, Private First Class Milton boldly moved to an exposed position under intense enemy fire and fired relentlessly into the hostile emplacements. Remaining steadfast for a prolonged period of time, he continued his daring tactics until the enemy fire was neutralized, the road cleared and the convoy able to move forward again. By his determined initiative, fortitude and cool courage in the face of grave peril, Private First Class Milton was in large measure responsible for the delivery of vital supplies to front line assault units, and his heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Gordon, Nebraska. Home Town: Pine Bluffs, Wyoming.

Miner, Ross A. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Ross R. Miner (MCSN: 0-35874), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer, Company F, Second Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against the enemy on 29 May 1951. On that date, First Lieutenant Miner's company was given the mission of assaulting an enemy position near Panjang-ni, Korea. The position was situated on commanding terrain dominating the regimental zone of action, and was defended by an estimated battalion of enemy forces, well entrenched and fighting a determined rear guard action. After employing all available supporting fire, Lieutenant Miner skillfully led his company in an assault on the position. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire in order to observe and control the actions of his men. As a result of his outstanding leadership, the objective was secured with a minimum of casualties, and the enemy forces to withdraw. The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Miner on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 225 (October 7, 19512).  Born: Lyons, Texas. Home Town: San Diego, California.

Miner, Ross R. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Ross R. Miner (MCSN: 0-35874), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 - 11 June 1951. Although seriously wounded in both legs while leading his company in the seizure of vital enemy hill positions, First Lieutenant Miner refused medical aid and personally directed the establishment of the defense. Anticipating a hostile counterattack, he steadfastly devoted himself to duty, remaining at his post throughout the night and consenting to evacuation only when it was discovered that his wounds were infected. By his courageous leadership, fortitude and unswerving determination, First Lieutenant Miner served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lyons, Texas. Home Town: San Diego, California.

Minietta, Michael S.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 104 - 9 June 1951

Master Sergeant Michael S. Minietta, ER39425395, Infantry United States Army, Company F, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 25 January 1951, near Turengi, Korea.  When the company was attacking the enemy positions on Hill 256, Sergeant Minietta's platoon leader was seriously wounded.  As Sergeant Minietta was assisting the platoon leader to a place of safety, he was also wounded by the fierce fire, but successfully removed his comrade to a covered position.  After regrouping his platoon, he returned to the base of the hill and directed tank fire upon the enemy position.  During this action Sergeant Minietta was under constant enemy fire, but refused to be evacuated until a direct order was given to him by an officer.  His outstanding leadership undoubtedly saved the life of his platoon leader, kept his platoon combat effective, and also served to give the supporting tanks enemy targets to fire upon.  Sergeant Minietta's selfless and gallant actions reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered federal service from California.

Minkle, Chester J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 120 - 5 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Chester J. Minkle (ASN: RA-1181398), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company B, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 20 July 1950, near Taejon, Korea. Private Minkle's company had reached a position of complete safety after the withdrawal from the city of Taejon. Private Minkle learned that some wounded comrades remained in an area that had been evacuated and that was still under intense enemy fire. With no regard for his own personal safety, Private Minkle voluntarily made three trips into the fire swept terrain largely controlled by the enemy to rescue three wounded comrades. By displaying such a high regard for the well being of others, and such a disregard for his own, Private Minkle brought the greatest credit to himself and to the military service. Home Town: Brookline, Massachusetts.

Minkler, Robert Warren (posthumous)

Source: "Rensselaer County [NY] Heroes Korean War 1950-1953: The Forgotten Remembered" compiled by Ken Page.

"Robert Warren Minklerresided on River Street in Troy with his parents William A. and Anna Alba Minkler. After attending school at St. Patrick's he enlisted in the Army (shortly after his 18th birthday) in April 1950. Pfc. Minkler was in Company G, 187th Airborne Infantry Regiment. Pfc. Minkler was killed in action on February 15, 1951 and for his gallantry in action on that day in an attack against Hill 255, four miles northwest of Wonju, South Korea, he was awarded the Silver Star (posthumously). Other military awards were the Purple Heart, Good Conduct, National Defense Service, Korean Service, Combat Infantryman Badge and United Nations Service Medals. He is buried in St. Peter's Cemetery in Troy."

Minter, Henry C. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Henry C. Minter, Jr. (NSN: 4222503), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 28 to 30 March 1953. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Minter displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He was a member of a unit that was assaulting a vital enemy held combat outpost position when the unit was subjected to a devastating barrage of hostile mortar and artillery fire. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he courageously moved about the hazardous impact area administering first aid to his stricken comrades and moving them to sheltered positions. Later, during the consolidation of the outpost, several Marines wee buried in debris by the intense hostile barrage. With remarkable resourcefulness under the murderous enemy fire, he unhesitatingly began digging to free his imprisoned comrades. After they were freed, he administered aid to them and insured their immediate evacuation to a position of safety. Although a victim of concussion, he fearlessly remained at his position and refused aid until assured that all of the casualties had been cared for. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Minter's gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 25050 (July 24, 1953).

Minton, Frank A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Frank A. Minton, Jr. (MCSN: 0-43592), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observe or an unarmed Observation Plane while attached to the Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. Observing signs of activity near two houses located in a valley deep in enemy territory, First Lieutenant Minton immediately made a very low pass over the area, where he noticed a distress message written in the snow and friendly troops signaling to him via flashing rays of a mirror. Refraining from circling the area to prevent disclosure of the position, he continued his low run through the valley where his plane sustained several hits when the enemy opened fire. After informing friendly units of the location of the trapped men, he further risked his life to make successive flights over the position and drop food and ammunition. By his superb airmanship, fearless and aggressive tactics and exceptional courage, First Lieutenant Minton was in large measure responsible for the rescue of the imperiled troops, and his heroic efforts throughout reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Born: Independence, Missouri. Home Town: Independence, Missouri.

Mirando-Rosado, Domingo

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 29 May 1951

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Domingo Mirando-Rosado, (RA20022645), Corporal, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 16 December 1950, near Sansong-ni, Korea, a large enemy force, under cover of intense fire, succeeded in penetrating positions defended by the machine gun platoon of Company M, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry. Securing a light machinegun, Corporal Mirando-Rosado, accompanied by the platoon sergeant and an aid man, left the platoon command post and attempted to go forward to the machinegun positions but, in the darkness and confusion, the platoon sergeant was wounded. Firing his machinegun from the hip, Corporal Mirando-Rosado successfully diverted the attention of the enemy, which enabled the aid man to rush forward and render medical assistance to the stricken soldier. Despite the fact that he was wounded by grenade fragments, Corporal Mirando-Rosado chose to remain in his exposed position and alone held off the enemy until the wounded man was evacuated. The outstanding gallantry and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Mirando-Rosado reflect great credit upon himself and exemplify the high traditions of the military service.

Mireles, Lee O.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 365 - 29 August 1953

Corporal Lee O. Mireles, RA18412995, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the early morning of 11 June 1953, enemy forces attacked the Company "B" sector of the main line of resistance in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea. The ensuing hail of automatic weapons fire wounded Corporal Mireles in the leg. A medical aid man in close proximity to him persuaded him to move to a less exposed position to receive first aid for his wound. After his leg was bandaged, Corporal Mireles ran back to his previous firing position and re-engaged the enemy in an intense fire fight. When the enemy troops entered the trenches, he charged at them, throwing fragmentation grenades and firing his weapon. An enemy grenade fell near him, wounding him seriously. As the medical aidman was evacuating him, he repeatedly sought to return to his comrades and continue the fight. Corporal Mireles' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Texas.

Mishler, Russell Gordon (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Russell Gordon Mishler (NSN: 3647666), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action again enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 25 January 1951. Immediately answering a cry for help from a casualty during a platoon attack against the enemy, Hospitalman Mishler boldly moved across fire-swept hostile terrain to render assistance. Although exposed to direct enemy machine-gun, mortar and small-arms fire, he bravely continued to administer first aid to the stricken Marine until he was mortally wounded. By his courageous efforts in behalf of others and unswerving devotion to duty, Hospitalman Mishler served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Commander, Naval Forces in the Far East: Serial 11096 (November 10, 1951). Born: February 1, 1930. Home Town: Massillon, Ohio. Death: KIA: January 25, 1951.

Mitchell, Frank Nicias (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Frank Nicias Mitchell (MCSN: 0-48132), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against the enemy near Hamhung, North Korea, on 3 November 1950, as a Rifle Platoon Leader occupying a position in his company's defensive sector. While making a short reconnaissance to improve his position, his platoon was suddenly and viciously attacked by the enemy. Immediately returning to his platoon, which was on the verge of being overrun, he rallied his men to repel the attack and he, although painfully wounded in the ensuing action, refused to be evacuated until the danger of a serious break-through was averted. First Lieutenant Mitchell's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 49 (December 8, 1950). Born: August 18, 1921 at Indian Gap, Texas. Home Town: Roaring Springs, Texas. Death: KIA: November 26, 1950 - Buried at: Roaring Springs Cemetery - Roaring Springs, Texas.

Mitchell, Grady Purden Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Grady Purden Mitchell, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49074), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader, while attached to Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forced in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri, Korea, on the night of 28 - 29 November 1950. When an infantry company's position was overrun by an enemy force estimated to be of regimental strength, First Lieutenant Mitchell led a group of reinforcements on a mission to locate the company's position and to assist in re-establishing its defense line. Subjected to heavy enemy small-arms, machine-gun and mortar fire in the complete darkness and with no means of contacting the rifle company, he left the reinforcements in covered positions and proceeded alone to find the exact location of the company. Despite the extreme danger of his mission, he discovered the rifle company's position and revealed the location of the reinforcements before he was fatally wounded while returning to his group. By his courageous actions, he served to inspire all members of his unit and contributed materially to the successful re-establishment of the company's original defense line. His outstanding leadership, fortitude and daring initiative reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Mitchell and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 15, 1925 at Chattanooga, Tennessee. Home Town: Selma, Alabama. Death: KIA: November 29, 1950.

Mitchell, Guy Everett Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24ID
General Orders No. 215 - 4 November 1950

By direction of the President, First Lieutenant Guy E. Mitchell Jr., 057446, Infantry, a member of Headquarters Company, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver (Posthumously) for gallantry. He distinguished himself by courageous action near Chonui, Korea, on 10 July 1950. Voluntarily joining two rifle companies in their attack against an enemy force estimated at regimental strength, he moved forward, through intense artillery, mortar and small arms fire, in order to maintain vital communications. His actions, without regard for his own safety, on a mission of his own choice, was an inspiration to those who fought about him and aided materially in the success of the attack. Lieutenant Mitchell’s gallant example reflects the greatest credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered service from Madison, South Dakota. [Lieutenant Mitchell was killed in action 19 September 1950.]

Mitchell, Howard L. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 194 - 18 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Howard L. Mitchell, Jr. (ASN: RA-21305619), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near the Naktong River, Korea, on 7 August 1950. After several attempts had been made and failed to seize enemy positions on high ground, Sergeant Mitchell led five men under intense mortar, machine guns, and rifle fire and reached the summit of the hill. With complete disregard for his own safety he continually exposed himself while placing his men in positions to direct fire on the enemy. While checking the positions of his men and directing their fire, Sergeant Mitchell was killed. His gallant example reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: 1915. Home Town: Dorchester, Massachusetts. Death: KIA: August 7, 1950.

Mitchell, John F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John F. Mitchell (MCSN: 0-44003), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces on a hill in the vicinity of Yudam-ni, Korea, on 27 November 1950. With several sectors of his company's defensive position overrun when a numerically superior hostile force suddenly attacked with small arms, automatic weapons and mortars, First Lieutenant Mitchell hastily organized and led a hand grenade assault against the infiltrating enemy. Painfully wounded and driven back by the outnumbering force, he refused to be evacuated and, quickly reorganizing his men, led them in a second attempt to overcome the onslaught. Exposing himself to the direct fire, he crawled to an advantageous position for another grenade attack and, using his left arm, hurled his missiles with deadly accuracy to assist in the infliction of heavy losses among the aggressors and contribute to the success of his company in regaining its objective. By his aggressive and determined leadership, daring combat tactics and cool courage in the face of extreme odds, First Lieutenant Mitchell served as an inspiration to all the men of his command and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Portland, Oregon. Home Town: Portland, Oregon.

Mitchell, Joseph Paul Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Joseph Paul Mitchell, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49815/533704), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 October 1952. Commanding a small defending unit on an outpost forward of the main line of resistance when a numerically superior hostile force attacked under cover of darkness, Second Lieutenant Mitchell immediately deployed his men to positions to deliver devastating small arms and automatic weapons fire on the attackers. With his group suffering numerous casualties when subjected to an accurate barrage of hostile artillery and mortar fire, he supervised the removal of the wounded to cover and, taking charge of the outpost radio, informed the company command post of the critical situation and directed effective friendly supporting fires which forced the enemy to withdraw. After personally examining the casualties, he prepared for a second hostile assault which was launched almost immediately and, throughout the engagement, led his men against the fanatical enemy in hand-to-hand combat in the trenches and on the bunkers until the numerically superior hostile troops forced his group to withdraw into the tunnel work of the hill. Expertly calling down friendly artillery on the enemy-dominated outpost, he regulated timely fire from his position inside the tunnel, thereby enabling his men to hold back the enemy advance by delivering effective fire from the tunnel entrance. By his valiant fighting spirit, outstanding courage and resourcefulness while under hostile fire, Second Lieutenant Mitchell contributed materially to the successful repulse of the enemy and to the subsequent defense of the outpost against further assault, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Union Beach, New Jersey. Home Town: Quantico, Virginia.

Mitchell, Twyman D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Twyman D. Mitchell, United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 7 December 1950. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Mitchell, serving as Company Corpsman, displayed exceptional courage and bravery while his company was on the verge of being overrun by a battalion of enemy troops who were subjecting the company to heavy automatic fire and hand grenades. Despite mounting pain from a wound received by automatic fire, he declined to be evacuated and continued to administer first aid to the numerous wounded Marines. Not until after the fire fight had subsided and all other wounded men were evacuated did he allow himself to be evacuated to the battalion aid station. While at the aid station he learned that his company was without a corpsman, and realizing the seriousness of the situation, without hesitation, he walked and climbed over rough frozen terrain to return to duty. By his utter disregard for his own wound, which was serious enough to require his evacuation, he displayed a courage and unselfish devotion to duty that contributed greatly toward saving the lives of many wounded Marines who were suffering from extreme exposure. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Mitchell's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Mizusawa, Bert K. (DMZ)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Bert K. Mizusawa, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for exceptional valor and gallantry in action while serving as Commander of the Joint Security Force Company, United Nations Command Security Force at Panmunjom, Korea, on 23 November 1984. In reaction to thirty attacking North Korean soldiers in pursuit of a Soviet defector, Captain Mizusawa's outstanding leadership and aggressive actions in leading his company while under fire were instrumental in defeating the enemy and ensuring the safety of the defector and other personnel in the United Nations Command sector of the Joint Security Area. He was responsible for providing sustained suppressive fires and stopping the enemy force with an M-203. Throughout the intense firefight, Captain Mizusawa displayed a complete disregard for his own personal safety while accomplishing his mission. Captain Mizusawa's bravery and outstanding leadership under extremely hazardous circumstances are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect great credit upon him, the United Nations Command and the United States Army.

Mock, Roy J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Roy J. Mock (MCSN: 289369), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the First Marine Amphibian Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 20 September 1950. As a Section Commander in charge of an amphibian tractor section, Technical Sergeant Mock observed many wounded Marines near the front lines. Technical Sergeant Mock ordered his tractor driven as near to the front lines as possible, then he disembarked and fearlessly and courageously proceeded on foot to the front lines making five trips under intense enemy mortar and small arms fire returning each time with a wounded Marine. During these trips he killed four of the enemy and captured two. Technical Sergeant Mock's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Moe, Marcus E.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Marcus E. Moe (ASN: ER-36740007), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company G, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 3 and 4 March 1951, in the vicinity of Chigu-ri, Korea. On the morning of 3 March 1951, Sergeant Moe led his squad in a successful attack against a strong enemy force on a hill. After forcing the enemy to withdraw, his squad dug in for the night in their newly won positions. On 4 March 1951, the enemy attacked again. In the face of overwhelming odds and in great danger of being overrun, Sergeant Moe withdrew his squad to a more advantageous position on the same hill. During this withdrawal a comrade was seriously wounded and left behind. Sergeant Moe, with complete disregard for his own safety, made his way to his fallen comrade and assisted him to the safety of the newly-formed perimeter. When the enemy again attacked Sergeant Moe suffered a painful wound in his right leg, but refused medical aid until the final enemy attack was repulsed and the enemy withdrew. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Moe reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Mohler, Arthur E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 201 - 25 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Arthur E. Mohler (ASN: 0-2011796), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Kyongju, Korea, on 9 September 1950. Moving his platoon into position for an attack, Lieutenant Mohler was wounded by a burst of a mortar shell. Refusing evacuation, he remained in command in spite of severe pain, personally directing the assault and the men, inspired by his gallant example, overran the enemy position. Lieutenant Mohler's heroic actions and complete devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Columbus, Georgia.

Mohr, Gordon D.

Full citation not yet found.

"In a general order published July 12 by U.S. forces in Korea, and made public in Tokyo Thursday, 1st Lt. Gordon D. Mohr of Minot, N.D. was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action.  According to the citation Lieutenant Mohr, an adviser to one of the South Korean Army units, joined his unit on June 25 when it was under heavy attack by North Korean forces including heavy armor.  When enemy armor launched an assault on his unit, Lieutenant Mohr, realizing it was in grave danger of being overrun, secured an anti-tank gun and using his own vehicle as a prime mover, personally moved the gun to the front without infantry support and fired at the enemy tanks.  The officer fired the gun at the assaulting tanks until both his weapon and vehicle were overrun and destroyed.  He then escaped on foot and rejoined his unit.  Lieutenant Mohr's wife who resides in Japan is the former Doris Crone of Webster Groves, MO." - Racine Journal Times, 20 July 1950

Mohr's actions were the first to receive decoration in the war.

Mojica, Antonio Pizarro

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 286 - 16 July 1951

Corporal Antonio Pizarro Mojica, ER30428931, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 11 April 1951, near Yonggan-myon, Korea, Corporal Pizarro Mojica accompanied a patrol into hostile territory to determine enemy dispositions and movement. As the patrol was returning to friendly lines it was subjected to an intense mortar barrage. Noticing a wounded comrade lying in an exposed area, Corporal Pizarro Mojica ran to his assistance and, after administering first aid, proceeded to carry the soldier to a protected position. While trying to cross a dike, he was shot in the back by an enemy sniper. Completely ignoring the painful wound, Corporal Pizarro Mojica courageously dragged the stricken infantryman over the dike to safety. The selfless gallantry displayed by Corporal Pizarro Mojica reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Mol, William D.

Headquarters, I Corps, United States Army
General Orders No. 124 - 8 August 1951

Second Lieutenant William D. Mol, A01911670, United States Air Force, 36th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 8th Fighter-Bomber Group, 5th Air Force, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Yunhyon, Korea on 17 April 1951.  On this date, Lieutenant Mol was serving as forward Air Controller with a tank task force of the 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, on a reconnaissance in force, deep in enemy territory.  During the mission, Lieutenant Mol voluntarily stood in the exposed turret of the lead tank for better observation of targets.  Lieutenant Mol, early in the mission, displayed alertness and cool thinking in saving the life of his tank commander by immediately applying first aid when enemy small arms fire severed an artery in his right forearm, requiring his evacuation.  Carrying his portable VHF radio with him, Lieutenant Mol then transferred under fire to the new lead tank and the column continued on under sporadic small arms fire from the encircling hills.  While trying to climb an embankment, the tank threw a track and was ordered abandoned.  Lieutenant Mol, filling his pockets with pistol ammunition, carrying his now damaged radio and a light machine gun, for the second time transferred to a new tank under a withering hail of small arms, automatic weapon, and mortar fire from enemy positions within 150 yards.  Acting as gun loader, he aided in blasting enemy positions until the task force commenced its withdrawal when the fire of the tank cannon was no longer effective.  Placing his loaded pistol and four extra magazines within easy reach, Lieutenant Mol stood up in the leader's turret in time to see the other two leading tanks become stuck in the soft ground to his left flank.  At this time the enemy moved down the hills to assault them.  Suddenly from the right flank, at a distance of 25 yards, two enemy squads commenced to rush Lieutenant Mol's tank.  At this moment the tank commander's .50 caliber machine gun jammed.  Lieutenant Mol, seizing his gun, surprised and dispersed the onrushing enemy with his intense and accurate fire.  Other crewmen passed him their own pistols and reloaded his empty magazines, a total of about twenty-five clips being spent.  A brief examination of the ground revealed eight bodies within a few yards of the tank.  Lieutenant Mol's initiative, presence of mind, coolness under fire, and aggressive action prevented the certain loss of the tank in which he was riding and insured the safe withdrawal of the personnel of the two stuck tanks.  His energy, leadership, courage and gallantry in action were an inspiration to the other men of the task force and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the federal service from Michigan.

Moling, Donn W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Donn W. Moling (MCSN: 1066844), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Machine Gunner of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 March 1951. Moving with the leading elements in the assault of a strongly defended enemy hill position, Private First Class Moling courageously exposed himself to withering enemy automatic weapons, mortar and small arms fire to give accurate fire support to the riflemen. When the company had gained a portion of the high ground, he quickly moved his weapon forward and put it into action at the point of the assault platoon, pouring devastating fire on enemy emplacements for 18 hours. When an air strike was called in to assist the attack, he remained in position, although rockets exploded within 20 feet of his position. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Moling served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of his company in seizing the objective, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Columbus, Ohio. Home Town: Columbus, Ohio.

Moment, William E. (posthumous)

Second Lieutenant William E. Moment, O-2208120, Infantry, US Army, a member of Company A 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950, near the Kum River, Korea. During the withdrawal of the Regiment from positions in the vicinity of the river, a group of about 15 soldiers became separated from their organization. 2LT Moment organized the group and began leading them to the new positions. During the march they encountered two enemy machineguns in position. When they opened fire on the group, 2LT Moment advanced and silenced both guns by throwing grenades into their positions. The movement was resumed and another automatic weapon was encountered. He silenced this one by automatic rifle fire. After the river had been crossed and the new positions nearly reached, the group was ambushed by enemy soldiers firing submachineguns. Again defying the enemy fire, 2LT Moment exposed himself and threw grenades at the enemy. By constantly exposing himself to hostile fire, often at extremely short range, 2LT Moment succeeded in leading a group of men in a difficult retrograde movement. His coolness, courage and excellent leadership made the movement of this group of disorganized men possible. He brought great credit to himself and to the military service. (2LT Moment was listed as missing in action on this date, later reclassified as killed in action.) GO 57, 24 Jul 1950.Home of record: Orange County, CA.

Monaghan, John D.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces,
General Orders No. 569 - 4 December 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain John D. Monaghan, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Pilot, 8th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron Photo Jet (redesignated 15th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron Photo Jet), FIFTH Air Force. On 3 February 1951, Captain Monaghan took off in an unarmed RF-80 type aircraft and flew unescorted to his assigned target area deep in enemy held territory. His mission required that he make nine photographic runs over targets in the immediate vicinity of two enemy jet fighter bases near the city of Sinuiju, North Korea. After completing several photographic runs, Captain Monaghan noticed approximate 15 enemy jet fighters circling above him. Fully aware that an attack was imminent, he skillfully maneuvered his aircraft to keep the enemy out of firing position while he completed the important photographic work. As Captain Monaghan broke away from his last target, several of the enemy aircraft started their attack. In the ensuing engagement, the enemy made numerous firing passes, inflicting major damage on Captain Monaghan's aircraft. One 37 mm shell struck a tip tank and another seriously damaged the left wing. Through his skill as a pilot and knowledge of enemy capabilities, Captain Monaghan evaded the enemy and returned his badly damaged aircraft to home base. The photographs obtained by Captain Monaghan proved to be of great value to the United Nations forces. Captain Monaghan's gallantry and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Monette, Merle J.

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Merle J. Monette (US37803110), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a member of Company F, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Monette distinguished himself by courageous action near Soun-ni, Korea, on 15 October 1951. His company had the mission of attacking and securing an enemy-held objective, a rugged and steep hill. Acting as lead element, his platoon advanced up the objective but as it neared the top, it was suddenly halted by a tremendous volume of enemy fire. Seeing that a hostile recoilless rifle position was the key defensive emplacement, Sergeant Monette, with complete disregard for his own safety, advanced through the withering fire to destroy it. He was seriously wounded as he moved forward but refused to stop. He then engaged the four enemy troops and killed them all after a fierce automatic weapons duel. As his platoon followed in the attack, he entered a communication trench and killed three additional hostile soldiers on his way to the top of the objective, there setting up covering fire and enabling his platoon to follow and capture the objective. As his comrades went on to the next objective, he was again wounded by enemy machine gun fire. However, he continued to provide effective covering fire, killing two more of the enemy and contributing immeasurably to the success of the entire mission. Sergeant Monette's courageous action, aggressive fighting skill and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

Monk, Matthew D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Matthew D. Monk (MCSN: 273489), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 27 October 1950. With his platoon subjected to a concentrated enemy attack while carrying out an independent outpost mission, Master Sergeant Monk skillfully maintained his platoon position under three separate onslaughts, boldly moving from position to position to insure that his lines still held. When the final attack encircled his outpost and threatened to overrun his platoon, he moved through the intense barrage to the most threatened areas to lend personal assurance and confidence to the men on the line. Forced to re-dispose his platoon when the enemy finally penetrated his lines, he directed a brilliantly executed defense and, despite close range hostile automatic weapons and grenade fire, led and inspired his men to heroic efforts in defeating all attempts by the enemy to take his position and in inflicting heavy casualties among the aggressors. By his forceful and determined leadership, aggressive tactics and heroic efforts throughout the fierce engagement, Master Sergeant Monk served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Rodgers, Texas. Home Town: Greenville, Texas.

Montalvo, Marine Narvaez (KIA)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 197 - 17 June 1951

Private First Class Marine Narvaez Montalvo, ER30415205, Army Medical Service, Medical Company, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 29 April 1951, Company "C", 65th Infantry, sustained several casualties while attacking well-defended enemy positions on Hill 272, Korea.  Private Narvaez Montalvo, attached to Company "C" as an aid man, repeatedly braved intense hostile fire to give medical assistance to his wounded comrades. When a friendly infantryman was severely wounded and completely surrounded by the enemy, Private Narvaez Montalvo fought his way to the stricken soldier's side, wounding several enemy. He was subjected to a fanatical enemy attack while rendering first aid and, while offering valiant resistance, was mortally wounded. The outstanding gallantry and exemplary devotion to duty displayed by Private Narvae Montalvo reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Montee, Matthew P.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 120 - 5 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Matthew P. Montee (ASN: RA-6735521), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with the 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 12 August 1950, near Yongsan, Korea. Sergeant Montee was in command of a tank that moved into an area where troops of Task Force HAFEMAN were surrounded by the enemy. After successfully destroying an enemy roadblock his tank received seven direct hits from enemy anti-tank guns. Even though one member of the crew was killed and the tank partially disabled he continued to direct machinegun and tank fire on enemy positions, which resulted in destroying the enemy machinegun and inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. The Task Force was later able to withdraw to new positions. The act of gallantry displayed by Sergeant Montee reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Enid, Oklahoma.

Montesclares, Melicio J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 146 - 26 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Melicio J. Montesclaros (ASN: 0-1305289), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 10 August 1950, in the vicinity of the Naktong River, Korea. An attack launched on the enemy soon met stiff resistance from intensive fire of both exposed flanks. Although the lead company had been cut off and our positions subjected to the concentrated automatic weapons fire of the enemy, Captain Montesclaros, the Battalion S-3, moved from one position to another rallying the men to greater efforts. With complete disregard for his own safety he organized riflemen into successful fire groups to neutralize many of the enemy machine gun emplacements. Due to ever increasing volumes of fire, the battalion was forced to withdraw from its main position. Realizing the importance of renewing the attack and regaining the last positions, Captain Montesclaros reorganized the battalion for a counterattack and personally led the men against the heavily defended enemy positions. Through his capable leadership, courage and unhesitant devotion to duty, the enemy was successfully routed with a considerable loss of personnel and automatic weapons. His fearlessness and outstanding gallantry in the face of a vastly superior enemy served well to inspire the men of his battalion and reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered Service From California.

Montgomery, Ray McKinley (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Ray McKinley Montgomery (MCSN: 1093500), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Headquarters and Service Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 September 1951. Volunteering to repair the break in a severed communications line to an outlying platoon during a hostile night attack, Corporal Montgomery left his position of relative safety and, braving a barrage of intense enemy fire, proceeded through the darkness to the aid of the stranded platoon. Mortally wounded while engaged in this heroic act, Corporal Montgomery served as an inspiration to all his comrades. His daring initiative and outstanding courage were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 8, 1930 at Cincinnati, Ohio. Home Town: Fort Wayne, Indiana. Death: KIA: December 3, 1951.

Moody, Robert R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Robert R. Moody (MCSN: 0-54818), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Mortar Section Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 - 7 October 1952. When the enemy launched a devastating barrage of artillery and mortar fire followed by an assault by an overwhelming force of infantry troops that overran a friendly outpost forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Moody prepared to lead the remaining members of two platoons and elements of another company in an assault to regain the friendly outpost. Although two previous attempts to retake the objective had failed, he reached the foot of the outpost slope and fearlessly led the charge up the hill, shouting words of encouragement to his men. Despite painful wounds received during the advance up the slope, he continued to lead his men to the objective and, after gaining the outpost, succeeded in driving the enemy off the hill and in rescuing several wounded Marines who otherwise would have been captured by the enemy. By his outstanding courage, skillful leadership and indomitable fighting spirit, Second Lieutenant Moody served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Picayune, Mississippi. Home Town: Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Moody, Troy E. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 168 - 19 September 1950

Second Lieutenant Troy E. Moody, 02204023, Infantry, Company F, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  A patrol under the command of Lieutenant Moody was proceeding to the aid of a company which had been heavily attacked on 2 August 1950 near Chindong-ni, Korea.  When the patrol was halted by intense hostile machine gun fire, Lieutenant Moody ordered his men to cover and mounted a tank to man a 50 calibre machine gun.  Though a conspicuous target for the enemy, he continued to man his weapon and direct fire of the tank until he silenced the machine gun, inflicted severe casualties on the enemy and permitted his patrol to continue on and complete its vital mission.  Lieutenant Moody's gallant actions and inspiring leadership are in keeping with noblest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Florida.

Moog, Robert J.

Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 197 - 10 August 1951

Sergeant First Class Robert J. Moog, RA20504448, Infantry, United States Army, Company L, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 15-16 February 1951, near Chipyong-ni, Korea.  During the engagement of Task Force Crombez, Sergeant Moog courageously engaged the enemy to prevent attempts to destroy the armor and covered his tank's blind side with his own weapon.  Although hostile rocket launcher crews made all-out attempts to stop the advancing column, and fanatical troops carrying satchel and pole charges attacked the column in waves, Sergeant Moog, though wounded, constantly displayed outstanding fighting qualities and an eagerness to close with the Chinese.  Aided by his courage and selfless devotion to duty, Task Force Crombez smashed through the 4 1/2 mile defensive position, killing over 500 enemy, and arriving at the objective in time to repulse a strong assault by the Chinese against the encircled 23rd Infantry Regimental Combat Team.  Sergeant Moog's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered federal service from Ohio.

Mooney, Gordon Wayne (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Gordon Wayne Mooney (MCSN: 641998), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 November 1950. With several Marines wounded and trapped in their vehicle when the platoon was subjected to a fierce enemy attack during a motorized reconnaissance patrol near Chinhung-ni, Corporal Mooney bravely exposed himself to direct hostile small arms and mortar fire in a daring attempt to reach the stricken men and effect their rescue. Mortally wounded by enemy fire, Corporal Mooney, by his marked courage, bold initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, served to inspire the members of his unit to greater efforts in the subsequent rescue of the casualties and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 10, 1930 at Sioux Falls, Iowa. Home Town: Waterloo, Iowa. Death: KIA: November 4, 1950.

Moore, Dick

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Dick Moore (MCSN: 1084859), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Reconnaissance Detachment, First Provisional Marine Brigade, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kosong, Korea, on 10 August 1950. When an estimated enemy company ambushed his platoon, Corporal Moore, with complete disregard for his personal safety, attacked and destroyed two heavily supported machine gun emplacements. His daring actions completely demoralized the enemy troops and enabled his platoon to rout them from the area. The outstanding courage and intrepidity displayed by Corporal Moore were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 473 (June 29, 1951). Entered Service From Nebraska.

Moore, Edwin Cecil (POW)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Edwin Cecil Moore (NSN: 0-304299), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity during combat rescue operations deep in enemy territory, northwest of Wonsan, Korea, on 8 February 1952, while serving as Officer-in-Charge, Helicopter Unit 21, attached to U.S.S. Manchester (CL-83), and engaged in a rescue mission. After his aircraft was forced down and damaged while hovering to pick up a seriously injured pilot, Lieutenant Moore steadfastly sacrificed his own chances of prompt rescue by refusing to leave when another helicopter landed in the area but not within reach of the injured man. Knowing full well the hazards involved, he rendered first aid and assisted the injured pilot to the most probable place of rescue. Adverse conditions prevented the successful conclusion of the rescue efforts, and the officers are now missing in action. The gallant conduct and self-sacrifice of Lieutenant Moore in the face of extreme peril were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Board Serial 560 (June 11, 1952).

Moore, Frank O. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Frank O. Moore, Jr. (MCSN: 116143), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Messenger of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 August 1952. When the forward outpost was subjected to an intense enemy attack, Private First Class Moore voluntarily guided three separate assault groups on an important terrain position in the face of continuing heavy artillery, mortar and small arms fire and assisted in the evacuation of wounded personnel. Later, he skillfully guided a tank into a position to fire on the enemy and remained in an open area near the vehicle to observe and direct its fire. By his resourcefulness, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Moore served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the operation, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Etna, Pennsylvania.

Moore, Gale S.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
Amended by General Orders No. 91 - 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Gale S. Moore (ASN: RA-19302645), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Chonan, Korea, on 5 July 1950. Sergeant Moore was at the Battalion Command Post which was located on the side of a hill. The Command Post was under intense enemy artillery fire which made the position untenable. The order was given to withdraw from this position. Sergeant Moore stayed at the position to direct the men as to where they were to go, and helped several men who had been wounded out of the area and to places of safety. He stayed at his position with no regard to his own personal safety and checked the area to make sure that all the men had gotten out. During this time Sergeant Moore suffered heart attack and requested to be left behind as he would slow the progress of the other men. With the aid of some other men he was able to make it to a place of safety. This heroic action on the part of Sergeant Moore reflects great credit on himself and the Military Service.

Moore, Harold Wesley

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 146 - 8 April 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Harold Wesley Moore, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 2 February 1951 for rescuing a pilot and observer from behind enemy-held positions near Sangch'angbong-ni, Korea. Piloting an unarmed, highly vulnerable H-5 type aircraft, First Lieutenant Moore flew thirty miles behind enemy lines to rescue the two airmen who were hemmed in by cross fire from machine guns and small arms. While friendly fighter strafed the area to minimize enemy ground attack, Lieutenant Moore landed the helicopter. Demonstrating complete disregard for his safety, he remained at the controls despite the heavy fire which was being directed at him. As the downed airmen crawled toward the helicopter, four bullets struck the aircraft and missed Lieutenant Moore's head by inches. Immediately after the airmen boarded the helicopter, Lieutenant Moore took off. At this time the aircraft was again hit by enemy fire, and after striking the rotor blade, the bullet penetrated the pylon going into the fan assembly. By his heroic act, Lieutenant Moore saved the lives of two Air Force personnel. His remarkable courage while under enemy attack was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Moore, James B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel James B. Moore (MCSN: 0-6155), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane and Commanding Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Eleven (VMF-311), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 August 1951. Skillfully leading his squadron in two damaging strikes against strategic targets in the heavily defended enemy capitol city of Pyongyang, Lieutenant Colonel Moore expertly surmounted the difficulties imposed by adverse weather conditions and, availing himself of the cover afforded by low clouds over the target area, spearheaded a series of bombing and strafing attacks, scoring direct hits with his own bombs and aiding directly in wiping out the objective. Taking off a second time that day, he led his squadron into the well fortified area to attack another assigned target and was instrumental in its similar destruction without loss or damage to a single aircraft. By his inspiring leadership, aggressive determination and exceptional ability as an airman, Lieutenant Colonel Moore contributed materially to the success of vital operations against the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: McColl, South Carolina. Home Town: McColl, South Carolina.

Moore, James D.

Pvt. 1C James D. Moore, Battery B, 21st AAA AW Bn. On the morning of 2 April 1951, while traversing a narrow valley north of Sonjong-ni, Korea, Private First Class Moore's half track platoon was suddenly attacked by a well-concealed hostile element entrenched on the commanding slope. After his comrades had placed a machine gun in firing position, he voluntarily advanced to force the enemy to disclose their positions by drawing their fire to himself. Maneuvering stealthily to the flank, he suddenly attacked, taking the enemy by complete surprise. Thinking that they had been ambushed, the enemy fired a hasty volley, abandoned their emplacements, and fled in disorder over the hill. Private First Class Moore's valorous action reflects the highest credit on himself, his unit and the United States Army. Entered service from Virginia.

Moore, John Wallace (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24ID
General Orders No. 72 - 17 January 1951

By direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action, is awarded posthumously to Private First Class John Wallace Moore, RA14237213, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company E, 19th Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Anju, Korea, on 5 November 1950. His company was attacked, from the front, left flank and rear, by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength. Although exposed to fire from three sides, he rallied a group of allied soldiers attached to his unit and placed them in positions where they formed a firing line to protect the company’s mortar positions. When the platoon was ordered to withdraw, he voluntarily remained behind to cover the movement. In this gallant action, Private Moore was killed. His fearless action and complete devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered service from Florida.

Moore, Ned Dalton (2nd award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry  Division
General Orders No. 157 - 3 October 1950
Amended by General Orders No. 177 - 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Colonel (Infantry) Ned Dalton Moore (ASN: 0-18212), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Chingam-ni, Korea, on 1 August 1950. The enemy, attacking extended defensive positions of the 1st Battalion, had penetrated both flanks and established positions to the rear. Seeing that the battalion was being disorganized he determined to counterattack. Rallying elements of Company C he directed the assault and the company, inspired by his gallant example, overran the enemy's positions. Remaining exposed during the remainder of the day he directed the employment of heavy weapons and small arms of the rifle companies until the enemy attack was completely repulsed with heavy losses. His gallant actions and devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: Iowa. Home Town: Guthrie Center, Iowa. Death: October 8, 1982.

Moore, Oscar L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Oscar L. Moore (MCSN: 658573), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1950. When his squad was delayed by intense hostile machine gun fire during an assault on an enemy position, Corporal Moore courageously charged the hostile position, killed three enemy machine gunners and destroyed the position. By his heroic actions, he contributed materially to the success of his squad in continuing the advance and in accomplishing its assigned mission. His fortitude, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Moore and the United States Naval Service. Born: Scotland Neck, North Carolina. Home Town: Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

Moore, Rex D. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 322 - 15 June 1953

Pvt. Rex D. Moore, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 17th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Yonchon, Korea.  On 17 March 1953, Private Moore was a member of a group that was occupying strategic defensive outpost positions.  Although the area was under intense enemy artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire, Private Moore fearlessly moved through open terrain to administer first aid.  Hearing a cry for help, Private Moore, with complete disregard for his personal safety, moved to the wounded man and performed on-the-spot first aid.  Private Moore continued administering aid to the wounded until an enemy mortar round landed near him, taking his life.  The gallantry displayed by Private Moore reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Idaho.

Moore, Robert M. Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 117 - 3 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain (Medical Corps) Robert M. Moore, Jr. (ASN: 0-59530), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Headquarters Battery, 24th Division Artillery, 24th Infantry Division, on 16 July 1950, Tuman Ri, Korea. When instructions were issued for Headquarters Battery personnel and all others near the Battalion Command Post to form a line of fire and advance it southward against the enemy left flank, Captain Moore joined the leading element of the attack in order to provide immediate medical assistance to the wounded. As the attack advanced over an area swept by enemy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire, Captain Moore continued among the forward elements under fire. He gave the wounded prompt and skilled medical aid. Captain Moore issued the necessary instructions for the evacuation of the wounded to his battalion aid station, but he remained forward until the enemy was forced to retreat and the area was cleared. Captain Moore returned to the rear where he continued to give medical assistance to the wounded. Later that night he was seriously wounded in en attempt to evacuate the wounded through an enemy road block. He died the following morning as the result of his wounds. This act of conspicuous gallantry in action on the part of Captain Moore reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. Born: 1920. Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana. Death: Killed in Action.

Moore, Thomas S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Thomas S. Moore (MCSN: 0-38646), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron 513 (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 October 1952. While flying on a special night attack mission near the sea coast of North Korea, Captain Moore sighted four enemy supply trains and immediately pressed home an attack which damaged a locomotive and set fire to or derailed several box cars. Unable to apprise other aircraft of this lucrative target, he conducted a radar search which located a friendly destroyer. Establishing communication, he directed the destroyer into position to fire upon the trains, and then returned to a position over the target where he remained to spot naval gunfire, despite intense hostile anti-aircraft fire. Although Captain Moore was untrained in aerial spotting techniques, he improvised methods that effectively directed the fire of the vessel in the complete destruction of nearly thirty freight cars. His aggressive determination to inflict maximum damage upon the enemy, resourcefulness in the utilization of friendly naval forces, and marked courage in remaining over the target area in the face of heavy enemy fire reflect the highest credit upon Captain Moore and the United States Naval Service. Born: Amarillo, Texas. Home Town: Amarillo, Texas.

Moore, William L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain William L. Moore (MCSN: 0-42473), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 December 1951. Observing an uncoupled enemy locomotive near the village of Singosan while he was engaged in a pre-dawn intruder mission unsupported by flare-dropping planes, Captain Moore, fully aware of the danger from numerous hostile anti-aircraft weapons in the area, boldly executed repeated napalm, bomb and cannon attacks on the target, and succeeded in completely destroying the locomotive. Later in the evening while investigating fires started by earlier intruders, he located three enemy vehicles engaged in salvage operations and immediately pressed home daring strafing runs to destroy the vehicles. Continuing his reconnoitering mission, Captain Moore scored a direct hit with an expertly placed napalm bomb, blocked the forward progress of a large hostile convoy by destroying the lead truck, and strafed the trapped vehicle until his ordnance was expended. By his outstanding courage, daring combat tactics and inspiring devotion to duty, Captain Moore single-handedly dealt a damaging blows to the enemy's vital supply route and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Oak Park, Illinois.

"A former resident of Winona, Minnesota, Capt. William L. Moore of the Marine Corps has been awarded the Silver Star for heroism in action while participating in air action over Korea.  Captain Moore, while piloting a radar equipped night fighter aircraft, attacked and destroyed an enemy train during the early morning hours near Wonsan, Korea.  Later in the evening of that same day Capt. Moore attacked a convoy of enemy vehicles on a supply route near Singosan, Korea, and destroyed 12 large supply trucks and tankers.  Capt. Moore holds the squadron record for trucks destroyed in one mission with 18 destroyed and 5 damaged.  He has destroyed over 100 trucks, 2 trains, and numerous supply dumps during his past 80 missions.  Capt. Moore attended Winona Senior High School and has an engineering degree from the University of Miami, Florida.  He has been a resident of Miami since the end of the past war.  He was called to active duty in 1950 with the National Championship Miami Marine Reserve Squadron.  Capt. Moore served as a carrier pilot during World War II and wears the Distinguished Flying Cross with three gold stars and the Air Medal with three gold stars." - Winona Republican-Herald Newspaper, March 20, 1952.

Moots, Lawrence R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Lawrence R. Moots (MCSN: 1057664), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Battery I, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When two attempts to remove two wounded Marines from an open, fire-swept area failed and the rescuers also became casualties, Corporal Moots unhesitatingly volunteered to attempt to bring the wounded men to safety. Braving enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire, he boldly made his way to one of the wounded men and, after evacuating him to safety, returned and brought the second casualty out of the line of fire. By his daring initiative, heroic efforts and grave concern for others at great personal risk, Corporal Moots served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ness, Kansas. Home Town: Springfield, Oregon.

Moran, Donald Stewart

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 42 - September 1, 1950, amended by G.O. 55 (1950)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Donald Stewart Moran (ASN: RA-19301968), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 27 August 1950, near Sobu-dong, on the Naktong River, Korea. Private First Class Moran volunteered to accompany his platoon leader on an extremely dangerous mission of destroying 16 enemy landing rafts located on the west bank of the Naktong River. Unarmed and assisting in the carrying of two five gallon cans of gasoline, the patrol crossed 200 yards of open sandy beach and swam across 150 yards of swiftly flowing river. The crossing of both the beach and river was made under direct enemy observation and intense machine gun and small arms fire, from an undetermined number of enemy troops. Upon reaching the rafts Private First Class Moran assisted in the assembling and burning of the enemy material, under extremely adverse and dangerous conditions. Private First Class Moran waited until there was no possibility that the rafts and material would not be completely destroyed, then returned with the patrol to the east bank of the river under heavy machine gun, artillery, and small arms fire. Private First Class Moran's actions on this patrol reflect great credit upon himself, his organization, and the military service.

Moran, James J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 68 - 28 March 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal James J. Moran, RA12325487, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. On that date he was riding in a convoy composed of the units of his battalion which were withdrawing before a numerically superior enemy force. When the convoy was halted by an enemy roadblock, the rear vehicles were subjected to such heavy enemy machine gun fire that all personnel were forced to dismount and seek cover along the sides of the road, leaving the dead and wounded in the vehicles. Corporal Moran dashed through the heavy enemy fire, without hesitation or thought for his personal safety, to a vehicle which mounted a .50 caliber machine gun. He then placed such accurate and heavy machine gun fire upon the enemy that he silenced two of the hostile machine guns, thus enabling his comrades to proceed along the road. As the convoy moved out, he remained on the road in order to administer to the wounded and assist in loading them into an ambulance. Throughout the remainder of the day he made numerous trips through enemy small arms and mortar fire to carry wounded men from the surrounding hills to the vehicles in the convoy. When he reached the medical clearing station, he voluntarily remained there throughout the night, assisting in transporting and caring for the wounded. The gallantry and devotion to his wounded comrades displayed by Corporal Moran reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from New York.

Morar, George

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 158 - 2 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant George Morar, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Special Equipment Operator aboard a B-26 attack bomber, 8th Bombardment Squadron (L-N), 3d Bombardment Group (L), Fifth Air Force, on 14 September 1951 over North Korea. Sergeant Morar flew on a mission to develop tactics utilizing an airplane mounted searchlight for destroying the enemy's lines of communication, troop concentrations and supply dumps. On that date, Sergeant Morar's aircraft stopped an enemy train, expending all bombs and ammunition in the attack. The pilot of his ship called for assistance in destroying the crippled train and was answered by an aircraft from their own Group. To further aid the friendly aircraft in locating their position, Sergeant Morar turned on the searchlight three different times, fully aware of their vulnerability to enemy attack. When positive visual contact was made the pilot of Sergeant Morar's ship informed the other aircraft he would make a pass over the train, to illuminate it as a better target. The searchlight glare revealed the train's position in a valley surrounded by mountainous terrain. The fact that the searchlight set up his own aircraft as an excellent target for the enemy did not deter Sergeant Morar from his task of directing the searchlight on the train for the longest time possible, giving the circling aircraft above ample opportunity to attack. Sergeant Morar's ship was then observed to be hit by flak. Sergeant Morar's gallantry at the risk of his life in executing his duty, knowing well the grave hazard, resulted in the destruction of vital enemy rolling stock and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Morehead, Luther D. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Luther D. Morehead, Jr. (MCSN: 1263779), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 31 January 1953. Assigned the difficult mission of applying flanking fire on an enemy position well forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Morehead skillfully led his squad to the left flank of the assaulting force. Although painfully wounded during the initial stages of the ensuing action, he refused treatment and evacuation and continued to direct his unit. Repeatedly exposing himself to intense hostile mortar, artillery, small arms and automatic weapons fire, he moved among his men and directed devastating fire upon the enemy, reducing the amount and accuracy of the hostile fire to a minimum and remaining on the position until the last man in his squad had withdrawn. His outstanding courage, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Private First Class Morehead and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Calvert City, Kentucky. Home Town: Calvert City, Kentucky.

Morgan, Chester H.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 272 - 4 June 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel Chester H. Morgan, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as Pilot of a B-26 attack bomber, 90th Bombardment Squadron, 3d Bombardment Group, FIFTH Air Force, on 11 March 1952. Colonel Morgan sighted a live locomotive while on a combat mission in the vicinity of Sunan, North Korea. He made four rapid, successful bombing and low-level strafing passes, inflicting heavy damage. Colonel Morgan then observed a second locomotive and twenty boxcars in the same area while maneuvering for position to make another attack. By this time, full anti-aircraft fire from the enemy was directed at the bomber. Colonel Morgan, combining courage of the highest type with superior flying ability, pressed additional, successful attacks through a seemingly impregnable curtain of flak, leaving this locomotive and one box car enveloped in flames. Through his keen airmanship, selflessness, and devotion to duty, Colonel Morgan deprived the enemy the use of vital supplies and equipment, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Morgan, Ray

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Technical Sergeant Ray Morgan (MCSN: 262793), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Headquarters Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against an armed enemy on 9 August 1950 near Chindong-ni, Korea. On 8 August 1950 Sergeant Morgan, Infantry Chief of his rifle company, was with the company in an assault against a well organized and heavily defended enemy position. During the assault the left flank of the company was pinned down by heavy enemy machine gun fire. Without regard for his own safety, Sergeant Morgan advanced alone, across terrain devoid of cover and swept by enemy fire, and reduced eight of the enemy and enabled the company to continue its advance. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Morgan on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 72 (September 16, 1950). Entered Service From California.

Morrell, Bradford L. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Bradford L. Morrell (MCSN: 653853), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Guide of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 March 1951. When the platoon's advance was delayed by devastating automatic weapons and small arms fire from a cleverly concealed enemy bunker during the attack against a strongly defended hill position, Sergeant Morrell fearlessly charged forward over the fire-swept ground, killed eight enemy riflemen protecting the automatic weapon and then wiped out the machine gun crew with hand grenades and accurate rifle fire. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and inspiring devotion to duty, Sergeant Morrell contributed in large measure to the success of the platoon in rapidly advancing to its objective and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Greenbush, Illinois. Home Town: Camden, Illinois.

Morrell, Bradford L. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Sergeant Bradford L. Morrell (MCSN: 653853), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 June 1951. When intense enemy fire delayed elements of his platoon after he led his unit to within 50 yards of heavily fortified enemy emplacements atop a high ridge mass, Sergeant Morrell fearlessly moved across a fire-swept area and assumed command of a squad depleted by casualties. Reorganizing the remainder of the men, he led a bayonet charge against the enemy's flank in the face of intense hostile fire. Reaching the objective ahead of the squad, he engaged the enemy with grenades, rifle and bayonet and succeeded in killing four of the enemy and wounding two others. By eliminating the key bunker, he enabled the platoon to advance and secure the objective. His aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and steadfast devotion to duty were contributing factors in the success achieved by the company and reflect great credit upon Sergeant Morrell and the United States Naval Service. Born: Greenbush, Illinois. Home Town: Camden, Illinois.

Morris, Clarence A. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 142 - 24 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Clarence A. Morris (ASN: RA-18337533), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Yongsan, Korea, on 15 August 1950. During the attack the enemy had succeeded in overrunning the forward position and the company was ordered to withdraw. Sergeant Morris and the members of his squad elected to remain and cover the withdrawal. Under his expert direction the squad maintained effective fire and succeeded in temporarily halting the advance. Sergeant Morris refused to abandon his position until the company had succeeded in its movement and when last seen was firing into the ranks of the numerically superior enemy when his position was overrun. His gallant actions and unhesitant devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service. Born: November 2, 1912. Home Town: Dallas, Texas. Death: KIA: August 15, 1950 - Buried at: Smyrna Cemetery - Harleton, Texas.

Morris, Edward C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Edward C. Morris (MCSN: 0-50033), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 28 to 30 November 1950. Leading his platoon in an attack along a ridge to seize and destroy an enemy pillbox on commanding ground and defended by a force of approximately company strength, Second Lieutenant Morris boldly pressed the attack and, when the intensity of hostile small arms and machine gun fire increased, ordered his men to take cover. Contacting his company commander and receiving orders to withdraw to more favorable positions during an intended air strike, he skillfully effected the withdrawal of his platoon and assumed hasty defense positions for the night. Again compelled to direct his men to cover when the enemy counterattacked in force the following morning, he repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy barrage to move among his men, expertly directing and controlling their fire, pointing out targets of opportunity and shouting orders and words of encouragement until the enemy force was almost annihilated. Subsequently evacuated to the battalion aid station with painfully frostbitten feet, he voluntarily returned to his platoon and continued leading and directing his men until his company had successfully completed its movement from Yudam-ni to Majon-dong. His inspiring and aggressive leadership, valiant fighting spirit and heroic efforts maintained throughout the furious engagement reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Morris and the United States Naval Service. Born: Mount Vernon, Illinois. Home Town: Tucson, Arizona.

Morris, James H.

Company C, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division - On 24 March 1951, Sergeant Morris was leading his squad in an attack on Hill 337, north of the town of Uijongbu, Korea.  While advancing up the slopes, he and his squad were pinned down by intense small arms fire and hand grenades coming from a knoll overlooking their position.  Sergeant Morris, having gathered grenades from his men to replenish his own exhausted supply, leaped to his feet and singlehandedly assaulted the enemy emplacement in the face of withering fire.  Having utilized his grenades he then courageously continued his charge, firing his rifle into the well fortified position and completely destroying the occupants.  The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Morris reflect great credit upon himself and exemplify the high traditions of the military service.

Morris, Jared W. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 695 - 9 November 1951

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to First Lieutenant Jared W. Morris, 027566, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action on 1 September 1950 in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea. On that date Company E, 9th Infantry Regiment was under attack by a numerically superior enemy force attempting to surround the company. Lieutenant Morrow, aide-de-camp to the commanding general, voluntarily and with complete disregard for his personal safety, joined the friendly unit to aid in repelling the enemy force. Under his gallant leadership and courageous example the men of the company were able to repulse several enemy attacks, thereby preventing the hostile force from encircling the friendly unit and cutting it off from other units. During the ensuing action Lieutenant Morrow was wounded in the leg and lost his life from
loss of blood and shock while being evacuated. The gallantry and outstanding leadership displayed by Lieutenant Morrow on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Fargo, North Dakota.

[KWE Note: According to the Korean War Project, Lieutenant Morrow was in the US Military Academy Class of 1945. He was Aide-de-Camp to Brigadier General Laurence B. Keiser, who at the time was the Assistant Division Commander of the 2nd Infantry Division.]

Morris, Lester A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman First Class Lester A. Morris (NSN: 5559486), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Rifle Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 31 May 1951. Hospital Corpsman First Class Morris displayed outstanding qualities of professional skill and courage in the performance of his duties as a Company Corpsman. Advancing with the company in the assault of well dug in and heavily defended enemy positions on a densely wooded ridge, he received a painful wound, but, observing a comrade lying wounded in an exposed position, he ignored heavy enemy fire to reach him and administer first aid. Although suffering from pain and loss of blood he continued to move with the company, searching out and treating many wounded Marines until he was again hit, and had to be evacuated. Hospital Corpsman First Class Morris' courageous devotion to duty was an inspiration to all the men of the company, and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 39176 (September 6, 1951).

Morris, Marvin J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 813 - 4 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal Marvin J. Morris, US55022846, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 3 September 1951 in the vicinity of Mandeau-san, Korea. On this date, the platoon of which Sergeant Marsh was a member had infiltrated the enemy lines and was immediately encircled and attacked by a fanatically determined enemy force. Corporal Morris was placed in a position on a finger that was the enemy’s main route of approach. During several fierce attacks by the enemy, he left the safety of his position and exposed himself to the intense hostile small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire in order to effectively place automatic rifle fire upon the advancing enemy force. As a result of his intrepid actions, numerous casualties were inflicted upon the enemy, and his unit was able to maintain its position. The gallantry in action and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Morris on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Morris, Norman M. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 258 - 12 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Norman M. Morris (ASN: US-52010248), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chinju, Korea, on 31 July to 1 August 1950. Corporal Morris, with three other men, volunteered to hold a roadblock forward of the 19th Infantry Regiment to insure the use of the road by the regiment in a planned attack. The block had been prepared for demolition and its destruction would have seriously imperiled the attack. Although fully aware of heavy enemy infiltration in and around the roadblock, he gallantly insisted upon holding the position. During the night enemy infiltration caused the attack to be short lives, although leading elements were able to proceed past the roadblock before withdrawing. In the action that followed the position was overrun and Corporal Morris was last seen defending the position against the advancing enemy. His fearless action in holding this vital position against overwhelming odds reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Engineer Corps. Home Town: Havre De Grace, Maryland.

Morris, Warren

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major Warren Morris (MCSN: 0-8444), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of the Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces on the road between Hagaru-ri and Koto-ri, Korea on 6 and 7 December 1950. With the Battalion protecting the flanks of the regimental train, and his column ambushed and penetrated at many points by enemy forces controlling the road from high and low ground in strength estimated at several regiments, Major Morris boldly exposed himself to intense hostile machine gun, mortar, grenade and small arms fire to move from one critical position to another and direct fierce resistance. Despite the hazardous conditions of darkness and overwhelming enemy fire power, he staunchly encouraged and rallied the fighting spirit of his men and, by his skillful supervision of operations, successfully neutralized the hostile attack and enabled the convoy to rejoin and continue its movement. Early on the following morning, with the Battalion badly battered by further ambushes and its commander reportedly a casualty, Major Morris immediately assumed command and reorganized his troops. Later, receiving orders to attack a strategic enemy roadblock menacing units of the division train, he personally led an infantry company through heavy machine gun fire to a position where effective fire could be directed on the hostile strong point. By his inspiring leadership and tactical ability he was materially responsible for the elimination of the hostile key position, thereby clearing the way for the advance of the regimental train. His outstanding courage and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Major Morris and the United States Naval Service. Born: Searcy, Arkansas. Home Town: Tulsa, Arkansas.

Morrison, Clifford O.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 87 - 5 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Clifford O. Morrison (ASN: RA-6555711), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Battery, 37th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 10 September 1950 in the vicinity of Poncho, Korea. On this date Sergeant Morrison was the artillery forward observer for a rifle platoon during an attack against an enemy position. Although the enemy was delivering heavy concentrations of mortar and hand grenade fire he voluntarily moved ahead of the attacking infantry in order to better observe the enemy's dispositions and call for artillery fire. While he was in this exposed position heavy enemy fire severed the communication lines to his artillery. With complete indifference for his personal safety and completely disregarding the enemy fire he moved along the line repairing the breaks. While engaged in this task he was wounded, but he refused to be evacuated. He remained in this position relaying firing orders to his artillery until the platoon successfully accomplished its mission and destroyed the enemy position. His courageous action was instrumental in preventing more serious casualties and greatly facilitated the mission of the infantry. The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Morrison on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the fine traditions of the military service.

Morrison, Eugene M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Eugene M. Morrison (MCSN: 324261), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Platoon Sergeant of Company D, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 October 1950. When the platoon was halted by an extensive enemy mine field while supporting attacking infantry elements, and a hostile anti-tank gun opened fire from the right flank, Technical Sergeant Morrison immediately returned fire with his 90-mm. gun. Observing another anti-tank gun on the opposite flank, he directed his gunner to continue firing on the first enemy weapon and, opening the hatch, bravely exposed himself to fierce hostile fire to man the external heavy machine gun, quickly putting the second enemy gun out of action. Boldly maintaining his exposed position, he located an enemy machine gun placing fire on the infantry units and promptly destroyed it. By his marked courage, daring leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, Technical Sergeant Morrison served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brownwood, Texas. Home Town: Shreveport, Louisiana.

Morrison, Gene W. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Gene W. Morrison (MCSN: 0-25706), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 December 1950. Although aware of the risks involved in flying an unarmed aircraft behind enemy lines in an area known to be infested with hostile troops, Captain Morrison courageously flew to the rescue of a Navy pilot and his crewman who had crashed on the northeast shore of the Chosin Reservoir. In the face of imminent attack by enemy forces massed in this area, he hovered his helicopter over a snow-covered hilltop until both downed airmen climbed aboard. His courage, fortitude and heroic actions were contributing factors in saving the lives of the airmen, thereby reflecting great credit upon Captain Morrison and the United States Naval Service.  Born: Santa Ana, California. Home Town: Santa Ana, California.

Morrison, Gene W. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Gene W. Morrison (MCSN: 0-25706), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 March 1951. Notified that a friendly pilot had been downed five miles behind enemy lines, Captain Morrison unhesitatingly volunteered to attempt a rescue. Aware that the area was infested with hostile troops, he boldly flew in over the airman's position and, undaunted by the enemy's close range small-arms and automatic weapons fire, succeeded in taking the man on board his plane and in transporting him to safety. His superb airmanship, fearless and determined actions and grave concern for another at great risk to his own life served as an inspiration to all members of his squadron and reflect the highest credit upon Captain Morrison and the United States Naval Service. Born: Santa Ana, California. Home Town: Santa Ana, California.

Morrison, Robert C.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Coast Artillery Corps) Robert C. Morrison, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 21st Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 25th Infantry Division, in action near Kyadong, Korea, on 15 April 1951. On that date, while under heavy artillery bombardment, Lieutenant Morrison's half-track platoon was advancing along a river bed to support the attacking infantry. In the middle of the impact area, he found the route blocked by a truck loaded with gasoline. After directing his men to seek cover, he climbed into the truck and drove it through bursting shells to clear the route. His bold action enabled his platoon and its supporting tanks to proceed to the safety of a defilade. First Lieutenant Morrison's valorous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army. Entered the military service from Tennessee.

Morrow, Edwin

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 872 - 22 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant Edwin Morrow, 02014537, Artillery, Army of the United States, Battery B, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 3 September 1951 in the vicinity of Worun-ni, Korea. On this date Lieutenant Morrow was the artillery forward observer with Company B, 9th Infantry Regiment. On this occasion, Company B was pinned down by enemy machine gun and mortar fire. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Lieutenant Morrow left hi position of comparative safety and advanced under intense fire to a more forward and highly exposed observation post where he could better adjust fire on the enemy. Although he was painfully wounded, he refused to leave the observation post and continued to adjust devastating artillery fire until th targets were destroyed. The gallantry in action and outstanding devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Morrow reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Mortensen, Benjamin F.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 351 - 18 August 1953

Chaplain (First Lieutenant) Benjamin F. Mortensen, 0999809, Chaplains Corps, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 27 July 1953, the 1st Battalion Headquarters area in the vicinity of Pong-Dong, Korea, was subjected to a devastating concentration of artillery fire by enemy forces. Chaplain Mortensen, who was positioned in the command post at the inception of the action, made his way directly to the aid station in anticipation of casualties. As he moved through the intensely shelled area, he came upon an officer lying critically wounded on the open ground. As enemy fire increased in intensity, Chaplain Mortensen unhesitatingly hurled himself upon the wounded man, shielding him from further harm. When the fire diminished, Chaplain Mortensen aided in the further removal of the wounded officer to the aid station and remained there giving comfort and assistance to the wounded. As the shelling continued, Chaplain Mortensen again exposed himself to the enemy fire as he moved about to render aid and comfort to other men who fell casualties to the relentless fire. Chaplain Mortensen's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Utah.

Morter, Thomas M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Thomas M. Morter (MCSN: 1063928), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as a demolitions expert assigned to an infantry company, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 September 1951. Although painfully wounded, Corporal Morter volunteered to guide a reinforced platoon on a mission to destroy several enemy pillboxes which were firing on friendly forces. Repeatedly exposing himself to intense hostile fire, he led the point of the platoon and personally participated in overrunning the strongly defended enemy emplacements. After organizing a defense, Corporal Morter bravely assisted in evacuating the wounded and was the last man to leave when the tactical withdrawal took place. By his outstanding courage, brilliant leadership and gallant devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Akron, Ohio. Home Town: Akron, Ohio.

Mortimer, Thomas J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 87 - 28 April 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class Thomas J. Mortimer, RA17260475, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company G, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 30 January 1951 in the vicinity of Sinchon, Korea. Private Mortimer was a member of a patrol which, attacked and surrounded by a numerically superior enemy, formed a perimeter defense on high ground. When the only machine gun with the patrol was threatened by a strong enemy assault, Private Mortimer left his position and, under intense hostile fire, went to the aid of the gunner. The enemy concentrated their efforts to destroy the machine gun, and the gunner soon exhausted his ammunition. With the enemy advancing toward the gun, Private Mortimer charged fearlessly into their midst with fixed bayonet, inflicting heavy losses upon them and singlehandedly causing them to withdraw. Largely as a result of his heroic action his patrol was able to break out of the enemy trap. The gallantry displayed by Private Mortimer reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Keokuk, Iowa.

Morton, Douglas K.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Douglas K. Morton (MCSN: 0-18633), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observer attached to Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1950. Flying an observation mission in an unmarked plane in support of the Division movement from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri, Captain Morton succeeded in locating approximately 400 of the enemy entrenched on a high ridge and waiting to ambush friendly troops. Pinpointing the exact location of the enemy, he immediately warned the advancing forces and radioed for close support aircraft. When the planes arrived at the scene, his pilot promptly executed several low altitude dives over the hostile positions allowing him to mark the targets with smoke grenades. With the plane damaged by ground fire on each consecutive run and the glass canopy destroyed in a low dive over a machine gun emplacement, he and his pilot dauntlessly remained over the area despite the condition of the aircraft until the last plane had expended its ammunition and the emplacements had been neutralized. By his skill, perseverance and daring tactics at great personal risk, Captain Morton contributed directly to the successful movement of the convoy to its destination and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Wilmington, California.

Morton, Richard L.

First Lieutenant Richard L. Morton (then Second Lieutenant) O59313, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy of 3 September 1950 near Pyong-Po, Korea. When Company F was driven from their hill positions by a numerically superior enemy force, Lieutenant Morton took his heavy weapons platoon and scattered elements of the company and three times led an assault on the enemy occupied hill. Although wounded during the action, Lieutenant Morton continued to display such courageous leadership and disregard for his own safety that the men were inspired and renewed their efforts to such an extent that the hill was taken on the third assault, meanwhile inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. Lieutenant Morton’s gallantry and outstanding leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Indiana.

Morwood, George Michael Abraham (Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 399 - December 7, 1951, Amended by General Orders No. 185 - 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery) George Michael Abraham Morwood (ASN: 0-963415/11016454), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 99th Field Artillery Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 4 October 1951, near Chobakkol, Korea. During an assault on enemy emplacements, Lieutenant Morwood volunteered to lead a group of men through mortar and small arms fire in order to occupy a position desired by the company commander. Throughout the action, he remained with the assaulting elements, and on one occasion, fearlessly traversed an area swept by enemy fire, in order to re-supply a machine gun crew which had exhausted its ammunition. When the foe was forced to take up defensive positions, Lieutenant Morwood directed artillery fire with extreme accuracy, repelling repeated enemy counterattacks. His dauntless leadership and exceptional courage were instrumental in the successful accomplishment of the mission and served as an inspiration to his comrades. Lieutenant Norwood's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Moses, Lloyd Roosevelt

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel (Infantry) Lloyd Roosevelt Moses (ASN: 0-29362), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action near Kumhwa, Korea. On 14 August 1952, Colonel Moses, voluntarily acting as a rifleman, accompanied an Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon patrol in an attack on enemy-held positions with the purpose of taking prisoners and gathering information. Colonel Moses, acting as telephone operator, took up a position approximately ten yards in front of the alert force in order to maintain contact with the assault elements and relay the information of the progress of the action to the alert forces so that they could take necessary action. As the assault elements accomplished their mission and began to withdraw through the alert force's positions, Colonel Moses took up an exposed position to check and encourage the returning men and insure that his force was properly covering their withdrawal. While the entire force moved back to friendly lines, Colonel Moses moved from position to position, directing the movements of the men and supervising the observance of security measures. As the patrol approached the friendly lines, they were subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage, but Colonel Moses, with complete disregard for his personal safety, calmly continued to direct the movements of the men and remained forward of the Main Line of Resistance until every other member of the patrol was safely returned. The gallantry displayed by Colonel Moses reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

[KWE Note: This Silver Star was superseded by a Distinguished Service Cross.]

Mosco, Vincent E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Vincent E. Mosco (MCSN: 658095), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Chief of a Howitzer Section of Battery H, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea early on the morning of 7 December 1950. During a heavy and accurate hostile mortar, automatic weapons and small arms attack on his battery, Sergeant Mosco skillfully directed the positioning of his gun in a strategic location from which effective fire could be delivered on the enemy as they were assembling for a close-in assault on his unit. On one occasion during the engagement, when his gun section was depleted by casualties, he joined another Marine in loading and firing his piece at point-blank range and, as a result of his firing accuracy, was responsible in great measure for repelling the attack with heavy casualties to the enemy. His outstanding courage, initiative and indomitable devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Sergeant Mosco and the United States Naval Service. Born: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.

Moses, Albert R.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 104 - 9 June 1951

First Lieutenant Albert R. Moses, 062235, Infantry, United States Army, Company E, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 4 February 1951, near Konjiam-ni, Korea.  During the attack against a firmly entrenched enemy on Hill 512, the assaulting elements were subjected to an extremely heavy volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire which temporarily halted one platoon.  Lieutenant Moses immediately maneuvered the remainder of the unit to the flank, and with complete disregard for his safety, personally led them in charging the hostile positions.  The enemy, disorganized by this attack, broke and fled to the rear.  When the foe attempted to counterattack, Lieutenant Moses and his company engaged them in hand-to-hand combat and routed them for a second time.  The Chinese then launched a third vicious assault, and Lieutenant Moses, despite the intense fire, moved forward to the lead elements and assisted them in repelling the enemy for the final time.  His aggressiveness and conspicuous gallantry reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered federal service from Texas.

Moss, Jack G.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 265 - 17 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Armor) Jack G. Moss (ASN: 0-1167130), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, Company A, 6th Medium Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chongko-dong, Korea, on 2 November 1950. His company was spearheading the advance of the 21st Infantry Regiment toward the Yalu River. As the lead tank of the column moved into open ground the enemy brought upon it the fire of tanks, self-propelled guns and small arms fire. Riding in an open vehicle Captain Moss ordered his driver and radio operator to seek cover while he remained in his exposed position giving commands, by radio, to his tank crews. Completely disregarding his own safety, he moved among his company, time after time, positioning his tanks and directing their fire upon the enemy's positions. As a result of his directed fire one of the enemy's self-propelled guns was destroyed, many enemy infantry killed and wounded and the remaining forces routed in complete disorder. Captain Moss' courageous action, devotion to duty and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Armor. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Moss, Lawrence Dale (MIA/POW) (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 126 - 12 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Lawrence Dale Moss (ASN: 0-2262077/RA-16227852), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Service Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 20 July 1950 at Taejon, Korea. On the morning of 20 July 1950, the city of Taejon was infested with enemy snipers and tanks that had entered the city. Sergeant Moss took a reconnaissance patrol through one sector in the city and obtained vital information as to enemy positions. Upon his return to the Regimental Command Post he led a truck carrying wounded to the railway station which was then under heavy enemy fire. After his unit was ordered to withdraw from Taejon, Sergeant Moss was assigned the mission of leading a 2.36 rocket launcher team to knock out an enemy tank parked near the railway station that was preventing the withdrawal of his unit. While Sergeant Moss was approaching the tank he was fired on by an enemy machine gun. Sergeant Moss fired on the machine gun and put it out of action. He then fired on an enemy vehicle which was carrying ammunition for the tank and set it on fire. Having expended his ammunition he returned to the railway station where he secured more ammunition. He then returned to the tank which had proceeded further down the street and from a distance of fifty yards succeeded in setting it on fire. During this whole action he was subjected to heavy enemy fire. This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of Sergeant Moss reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Jasper, Missouri. Death: MIA as a Prisoner of War (Korean War).

Moura, George T. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class George T. Moura, Jr. (MCSN: 1185785), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Machine Gunner of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 5 July 1952. Although painfully wounded when hostile troops attacked the combat outpost, he quickly took over the operation of the machine gun from the seriously wounded gunner and continued to deliver effective fire, repulsing the enemy. During the moments between attacks, he administered first aid to six wounded men in his bunker. When enemy grenades were thrown into the position, he unhesitatingly picked up the missiles and hurled them back at the enemy. Painfully wounded a second time when one of the grenades exploded as he hurled it toward the enemy, he steadfastly continued to man his gun until the action ceased. By outstanding courage, inspiring initiative and selfless devotion to duty in defending his position and in rendering aid to the wounded Marines, Private First Class Moura upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Coronado, California. Home Town: Wailuku, Hawaii.

Moyer, Franklin J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 428 - 11 November 1952

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant Franklin J. Moyer, RA36801838, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company D, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 18 September 1952 in the vicinity of Chorwon, North Korea. Throughout that day Sergeant Moyer braved heavy enemy fire to supervise the emplacement of his squad to insure that all approaches to the outpost were well covered. As dusk fell, the enemy mortar and artillery barrage was greatly intensified, and word came that the enemy was grouping for an attack. During the first assault, Sergeant Moyer, with complete disregard for personal safety, moved from position to position encouraging his men and directing their fire with deadly results. In the second wave, the enemy succeeded in overrunning a portion of the position, and Sergeant Moyer, with frenzied determination, engaged the enemy in hand to hand combat, killing at least six. At one point, an enemy grenade landed between Sergeant Moyer and his platoon leader. Without hesitation, he pushed the platoon leader to a safe position and absorbed the blast of the grenade himself. Despite painful wounds, he continued to direct his men until the hostile attack was repulsed. The indomitable courage and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Moyer reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Minnesota.

Mucci, Anthony John (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Anthony John Mucci (MCSN: 1112212), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Mortar Ammunition Carrier of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 May 1952. Volunteering to help reinforce a rifle platoon on a strategic outpost which had been subjected to an intense enemy barrage, Corporal Mucci repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile mortar and small arms fire to cover the redeployment of the forward elements and the evacuation of the wounded. Bravely maintaining his position in the face of heavy fire from numerically superior enemy forces, he continued to deliver effective machine gun fire on the attackers until he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Corporal Mucci upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 31, 1933 at New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York. Death: KIA: May 9, 1952.

Mueller, Charles Ernst

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Charles E. Mueller (1096342), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. Although painfully wounded in the head when his unit was subjected to intense fire from concealed enemy positions during a company assault against a hostile strong point located on commanding terrain, Corporal Mueller bravely continued to make his way forward toward the objective. Crawling through the heavy enemy fire to a hostile bunker which was impeding the advance of the company, he hurled two grenades through the aperture of the emplacement, killing the occupants and silencing the enemy fire. By his marked courage, daring initiative and gallant devotion to duty, Corporal Mueller served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Home Town: Locust Grove, Virginia.

Muetzel, Francis W.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Second Lieutenant Francis W. Muetzel (MCSN: 0-49792), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Platoon Leader, Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces on Obangi-ni Ridge, near Yongsan-ni, Korea, on 18 August 1950. Lieutenant Muetzel, after leading a daring assault against a strong enemy hill position, was hit above his eye by a grenade fragment. Regaining consciousness approximately two hours later, he rejoined his company, which had withdrawn for reorganization after a strong enemy counterattack, and, refusing medical attention, he devoted his energies to readying machine gun elements for another impending assault. During these preparations, Lieutenant Muetzel was hit in the right foot by sniper fire. Again refusing medical aid and evacuation, he directed the utilization of machine gun elements in the attack. His aggressiveness in combat and his fierce determination to carry on despite painful battle wounds were an inspiration to his comrades and materially aided in the capture of their objective. Lieutenant Muetzel's exemplary valor and tenacious devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and uphold the cherished traditions of the military service. Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 6 (January 11, 1951). Entered Service From New York.

Mulkins, William D.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 146 - 24 March 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant William D. Mulkins, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Navigator of a B-26 attack bomber, 8th Bombardment Squadron (L-NI), 3d Bombardment Group (L) on 14 September 1951 over an area north of Wonsan, North Korea. On that date, Lieutenant Mulkins flew on a mission to develop highly specialized tactics in attacking enemy communications, troop concentrations, supply dumps and other targets. A call was heard requesting aid in attacking an enemy train which had been stopped. Lieutenant Mulkins skillfully furnished his pilot with the coordinates of their position which were relayed to another aircraft coming to their aid. The two aircraft made rendezvous in minimum time. Lieutenant Mulkins' aircraft then made a low level pass over the train, illuminating it for the attack. On the pass, his aircraft was struck by anti-aircraft fire and an explosion was observed. It then continued in straight flight for approximately two miles when it crashed into a mountainside. Lieutenant Mulkins' accurate plotting of both positions of his aircraft and that of the target resulted in an excellent strike on vital cargo. As a result, a telling blow denied the enemy critically needed rolling stock, and contributed invaluably toward reducing his war potential. Lieutenant Mulkins' skill and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Mull, Homer J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Homer J. Mull (MCSN: 1218364), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 24 November 1952. Although he suffered severe wounds and his machine gun was put out of action when his patrol was attacked by a numerically superior hostile force forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Mull fought bravely until he lost consciousness as a result of his wounds. After the enemy had made two attacks through the friendly perimeter of defense in attempts to capture the machine gun, he regained consciousness and, killing three of the enemy, succeeded in preventing the loss of his vital weapon. By his outstanding courage, valiant fighting spirit and self-sacrificing devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds, Private First Class Mull served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Clark County, Indiana. Home Town: Borden, Indiana.

Mullaney, Paul V.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Paul V. Mullaney (MCSN: 0-34396), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with a Marine Infantry Company in the Seventh Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. First Lieutenant Mullaney, a platoon commander, was leading his men up a steep hill in an assault on strong enemy positions when he was painfully wounded. Although weakened from loss of blood he continued to lead his men and direct their fire until the assault was completed and the objective seized. He then skillfully stationed his men in defensive positions and successfully repelled a determined enemy counterattack. First Lieutenant Mullaney's initiative, professional skill and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 49 (December 2, 1950). Entered Service From Massachusetts.

Mullen, Terry (1st award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Terry Mullen (ASN: RA-39465951), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Aidman of Medical Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action at Yangsan, Korea, on 18 August 1950. On that date, Corporal Mullen's company was subjected to intense enemy small arms fire. With utter disregard for his own safety, Corporal Mullen went forward in the face of withering fire to administer to two wounded soldiers. Seeing another fallen soldier he again exposed himself and ran to his comrade's aid. Although severely wounded in this action he continued on to the soldier's aid. Disregarding his own intense pain he sought other stricken men until he collapsed from the severity of his wounds and was himself evacuated. Corporal Mullen's gallant actions and selfless devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army Medical Service. Home of record: Somerton, Arizona.

Mullen, Terry (2nd award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 263 - December 14, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Corporal Terry Mullen (ASN: RA-39465951), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Medical Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Anju, Korea, on 4 November 1950. His company was struck by an attack of such violence that the enemy quickly accomplished a deep penetration of the company's defenses and inflicted many casualties. Although he was seriously wounded, Corporal Mullen went to the aid of a fallen comrade. When the company withdrew from its untenable positions he refused evacuation, electing to remain with the wounded man. Half dragging and half carrying, he helped his comrade through the heavy brush and working their way well behind the enemy's lines, secured themselves in an abandoned hut. Corporal Mullen watched over and cared for the wounded soldier for five days, until the enemy was driven from the area and friendly troops could be summoned. Through his ceaseless and unselfish devotion to duty, he saved the live of his stricken comrade, who otherwise would have been left to the mercy of the enemy. His gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Medical Service.

Mulligan, Vernon G. (posthumous)

General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
24th Infantry Regiment

Private First Class Vernon G. Mulligan, RA 13276949, Infantry, a member of Company "B", 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy near Chonan, Korea on  July 1950.  Company "B" and Company "C" were in a defensive position when they were attacked by an enemy force estimated to be two regiments.  During this engagement Private First Class Mulligan was firing his machinegun with such accuracy that it inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy.  His position was subjected to such intense and accurate small arms and mortar fire that the tripod was shot out from under his machinegun.  Undaunted by this he placed the machinegun on an ammunition box and continued to deliver effective fire on the enemy.  Again the enemy fire was so intense and accurate that the ammunition box was shot out from under his machinegun.  At this point six of the enemy had penetrated the positions of his unit, with disregard of his own personal safety he picked up the machinegun and laying the barrel across his arm continued to fire, killing all six of the enemy.  He kept firing in this manner until his unit was forced to withdraw and he had expended all his ammunition, at which time he destroyed the machinegun with a hand grenade and withdrew with the remainder of his unit.  This gallant action on the part of Private First Class Mulligan reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Mullins, Charles L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Charles L. Mullins (MCSN: 0-44184), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312), in action against the enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 December 1952. When a pilot was forced to parachute into the icy waters of the Taedong estuary after his attack plane was struck by hostile anti-aircraft fire during an aerial assault against a major enemy supply installation, Captain Mullins conducted low-level strafing runs against the hostile batteries firing from the nearby shore while the remainder of the flight took covering stations above the downed pilot. Informed that friendly helicopter and surface vessels were approaching the estuary, he rendezvoused with them through an intense barrage of enemy fire to act as guide and protective cover for the defenseless craft. During this stage of the rescue operation, a flight of hostile jet interceptors pressed a diving assault against the rescue facilities and were immediately engaged by the covering propeller-driven aircraft. Meeting the intruding enemy fighters with head-on firing runs whenever they broke through the defensive screen, Captain Mullins succeeded in thwarting their attacks on the rescue facilities. When the hostile aircraft finally disengaged, he momentarily resumed his strafing assaults on the enemy shore positions and subsequently escorted the withdrawal of a rescue boat that had been severely damaged by hostile shore battery fire. Although the fuel reserve in his plane had reached a dangerously low level, he bravely remained on station until other aircraft arrived and only then did he return to his carrier base, landing with practically empty fuel tanks. By his superb airmanship, indomitable courage and gallant efforts in behalf of a fellow airman, Captain Mullins upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Independence, Missouri. Home Town: Norwalk, California.

Mulrennan, Timothy C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Timothy C. Mulrennan (MCSN: 0-32773), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commander of a Provisional Rifle Platoon attached to Battery M, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. With his platoon assigned the mission of guarding a convoy of trucks and tractor-drawn howitzers during the movement to Hagaru-ri, Second Lieutenant Mulrennan was quick to act when the convoy was stopped by an enemy roadblock and brought under heavy and accurate small arms, machine gun and mortar fire. Moving among his platoon, he repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy barrage to position his men in hasty defense positions and direct their effective fire. Observing many personnel of the convoy assuming positions along the road, he advanced under enemy fire and ordered them to move out and join the defense line, steadfastly refusing to take cover himself until he had built up his defensive positions, set up his machine guns and directed the removal of stalled vehicles that blocked the road. By his daring and forceful leadership, determined fighting spirit and courageous efforts in the face of grave danger, Second Lieutenant Mulrennan served as an inspiration to all members of the convoy and contributed materially to its successful advance forward. His professional ability and conscientious devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bloomingale, Florida. Home Town: Vairico, Florida.

Munhall, George P. Jr.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 154 - June 15, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal George P. Munhall, Jr. (ASN: RA-19308332), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 15 February 1951, near Chipyong-ni, Korea. On that date he was a member of an infantry unit while that unit was launching a coordinated tank-infantry attack to regain lost positions. When the tanks were held up by an enemy mine field, the infantry was unable to advance. Attempts were made to get the infantry forward far enough to cover men removing mines, but these attempts were unsuccessful. Corporal Munhall, disregarding the danger of the mines and the enemy fire, joined a volunteer group consisting of three other men, to go forward and help remove the mines. In spite of the great danger involved to his personal safety, he remained under intense enemy fire until all the mines were removed, allowing the attack to continue with the full support of the tanks. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Munhall reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Munkelwitz, Ronald Gilbert

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Ronald Gilbert Munkelwitz (ASN: RA-27342330), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with the Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry division, in action on 18 July 1952, in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea. On that date, Private Munkelwitz was serving as a Medical Aidman attached to Company B, whose mission was to hold a vital position on "Old Baldy". At approximately 1600 hours the enemy unleashed a tremendous barrage of artillery and mortar fire upon the friendly unit, causing many friendly casualties. Private Munkelwitz, with complete disregard for personal safety, voluntarily moved about during the intense shelling, giving aid wherever needed. On one occasion, Private Munkelwitz noticed a man lying helplessly wounded on the forward slope of the position. Without hesitation and undaunted by the heavy barrage, he crossed the fire-swept area and went to the stricken man's side. Seeing that the man was seriously wounded, Private Munkelwitz picked him up and carried him to a point where he could be evacuated to the aid station. Private Munkelwitz' display of gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. General Orders: Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, General Orders No. 312 (September 11, 1952)
Home of record: Minnesota.

Munsell, Russell A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Russell A. Munsell (MCSN: 325250), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 and 3 December 1950. Undaunted by adverse circumstances and the lack of proper tools and repair facilities, Staff Sergeant Munsell employed ingenious field expedients in skillfully repairing and placing in operating condition a heavy tank which had previously been abandoned. When the repaired tank was attached to an infantry battalion which had been ordered to assault through enemy-held territory as the advance guard of the Seventh Regiment, he unhesitatingly directed his vehicle to spearhead the column at the point where the enemy wound undoubtedly concentrate its heaviest fire. Despite the hazards of ice, snow, hostile road blocks and an incessant hail of enemy automatic weapons fire, he fought his tank over sixteen miles of precipitous mountain roads which, in many instances, barely permitted the passage of his heavy vehicle. Exposing himself to hostile fire, he guided his tank over perilous terrain to strike the well-entrenched and fiercely resisting enemy. His initiative, resourcefulness and indomitable courage were contributing factors in the ultimate destruction of the hostile forces blocking the road from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri, thereby reflecting great credit upon Staff Sergeant Munsell and the United States Naval Service. Born: Toledo, Washington. Home Town: Seattle, Washington.

Munson, Warren L. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Warren L. Munson (MCSN: 1218389), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1952. Undeterred by the wounds he had sustained in a previous action on "Bunker Hill," Private First Class Munson unhesitatingly volunteered to participate in an attempt to recapture a vital sector of the main line of resistance. Although keenly aware that two other platoons had suffered heavy losses in their efforts to retake the position, he bravely advanced at the point of the attack in the face of intense hostile artillery and mortar fire, personally killed a sniper who had inflicted casualties on his squad and greatly aided his unit in seizing the objective. Mortally wounded during an enemy artillery and mortar barrage while reorganizing the near-by Marines in defensive positions, Private First Class Munson, by his outstanding courage, exceptional initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 11, 1932 at Indianapolis, Indiana. Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana. Death: KIA: October 27, 1952.

Muntean, Virgil

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 42 - September 1, 1950, Amended by G.O. 55 (1950)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Virgil Muntean (ASN: RA-15282504), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 27 August 1950, near Sobu-dong, on the Naktong River, Korea. Private First Class Muntean volunteered to accompany his platoon leader on an extremely dangerous mission of destroying 16 enemy landing rafts located on the west bank of the Naktong River. Unarmed and assisting in the carrying of two five gallon cans of gasoline, the patrol crossed 200 yards of open sandy beach and swam across 150 yards of swiftly flowing river. The crossing of both the beach and river was made under direct enemy observation and intense machine gun and small arms fire, from an undetermined number of enemy troops. Upon reaching the rafts Private First Class Muntean assisted in the assembling and burning of the enemy material, under extremely adverse and dangerous conditions. Private First Class Muntean waited until there was no possibility that the rafts and material would not be completely destroyed, then returned with the patrol to the east bank of the river under heavy machine gun, artillery, and small arms fire. Private First Class Muntean's actions on this patrol reflect great credit upon himself, his organization, and the military service.

Murch, Gordon E.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 146 - 1 September 1950

Major Gordon E. Murch, 031651, Infantry, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  Having made an attack in the vicinity of Soi-ri, Korea on 18 August 1950, elements of the Regiment took up defensive positions in the vicinity of Sinji.  Major Murch immediately went to the most forward position of his battalion and despite continuing attacks by artillery, mortars and small arms, supervised establishment and improvement of defensive measures.  Though for seven days and seven nights the battalion was subjected to constant attacks by the enemy who were further supported by tanks, Major Murch, by constantly sharing the dangers of his men and by his skill in supervising the defense, inspired all his associates to a supreme effort to hold.  As a result, his battalion together with the other battalion in defense, accounted for eleven tanks, three self-propelled guns, three vehicles and approximately 1200 casualties among the enemy.  Major Murch's gallant leadership and conspicuous tactical ability reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Missouri.

Murphy, Francis Phillip (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Third Class Francis Phillip Murphy (NSN: 9549443), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company I, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 4 - 5 September 1952. Although he had recently completed his tour of duty in the front lines, Hospitalman Third Class Murphy unhesitatingly volunteered to replace a wounded Corpsman at an outpost well in advance of the main line of resistance and constantly exposed himself to heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire to give aid to the wounded. When a nearby bunker was hit by hostile fire, he immediately left the comparative safety of his own position to go to the aid of the stricken men and, while trying to reach his objective, was instantly killed by the explosion of an enemy shell. By his outstanding courage, indomitable spirit and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Hospitalman Third Class Murphy served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Authority: Board of Awards: Serial 24 (January 15, 1953). Born: September 13, 1931. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan. Death: KIA: September 5, 1952.

Murphy, Franklin J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Franklin J. Murphy, Jr. (MCSN: 0-47052), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. When the platoon was pinned down by a volume of devastating fire while he was leading an attack against a group of strongly defended enemy positions, First Lieutenant Murphy, although painfully wounded, refused to be evacuated and bravely made his way through the fire-swept area to reorganize his unit. In the absence of a Corpsman, he personally treated the wounded and, rallying his men around him, led the platoon in a daring assault in the face of intense hostile fire, enabling his unit to secure a commanding sector of the terrain and inflict heavy casualties upon the enemy. Continuing to press the attack until the platoon had seized its final objective on the following morning, First Lieutenant Murphy, although again seriously wounded, refused to allow himself to be evacuated until he had supervised the reorganization of his unit. His inspiring leadership, exceptional courage and selfless devotion to the fulfillment of a vital mission were major factors in the success achieved by the company and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Springfield, Massachusetts. Home Town: Springfield, Massachusetts.

Murphy, James F.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 33 - 24 June 1957

Captain James F. Murphy, (then First Lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sahuiryong, North Korea, on 19-20 February 1953.  In the process of conducting a raid on enemy lines in an effort to take a prisoner the third platoon of Company F discovered enemy movement on a ridge to the left.  The original mission was changed to one of attack with the supporting element delivering flanking fire.  As the assault element closed in they realized that they were walking over sleeping enemy troops.  At the same instant the enemy became alerted and a point blank fire and grenade battle ensued.  Captain Murphy, who had been with the company commander during the action, volunteered to lead a new attack to divide the enemy's attention.  Speed being essential, Captain Murphy was able to assemble only nine men but nevertheless proceeded toward the ridge.  Despite having to proceed through scattered enemy troops from whom he received severe wounds, Captain Murphy reached his objective and accomplished his mission.  The gallantry, superior leadership, and cool judgment of Captain Murphy blunted an enemy attack and are in keeping with the high traditions or the military service.  Home of record: Oklahoma City, OK.

Murphy, John B. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 156 - November 16, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery) John B. Murphy, Jr. (ASN: 0-58525), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Battery A, 61st Artillery battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, on 31 August 1950 near Waegwan, Korea. When the infantry regiment to which his unit was furnishing artillery fire support came under very heavy enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire, Lieutenant Murphy, as forward artillery observer, noticed that the artillery fire on the enemy positions was not fully effective due to lack of adequate observation. With extreme devotion to duty and disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Murphy voluntarily left his position of comparative safety and exposed himself to the intense enemy fire in attempting to reach an elevation from which he could better observe and direct the artillery fire. In trying to reach his chosen objective he was struck by a mortar shell fragment and instantly killed. The inspirational courage and gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Murphy in sacrificing his life for his country reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Murphy, John James

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John James Murphy (MCSN: 0-37117), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), Marine Aircraft Group Thirty-Three (MAG-33), First Marine Aircraft Wing, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Yonp'o Area, Korea, on 9 and 10 December 1950. A skilled and resourceful officer, First Lieutenant Murphy voluntarily piloted a Torpedo Bomber Aircraft to an emergency airstrip at Koto-ri and, although he had not flown a plane of this type in four and one-half years, evacuated wounded personnel in the face of intense hostile small-arms and mortar fire. Undeterred by the hazardous landing and take-off facilities occasioned by the temporary runway, he made a total of three flights into the area, carrying nine serious casualties to safety on each mission. His marked courage, perseverance and unwavering devotion to duty were contributing factors in saving the lives of the wounded men and reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Murphy and the United States Naval Service. SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, FMF: Serial 2004. Born: Voluntown, Connecticut. Home Town: Voluntown, Connecticut.

Murphy, John W. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant John W. Murphy, Jr. (MCSN: 621446), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tank Commander of Company D, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. With his tank the focal point of the defense of a portion of a stalled convoy of vehicles, and the principal target of a series of four attacks by an estimated enemy force of platoon strength, Sergeant Murphy expertly directed the fire of his tank as he stood on the engine compartment doors and fired the .50 caliber machine gun that was mounted on the tank. Seriously wounded in the abdomen when one of the attacks penetrated to within five yards of his position, he staunchly refused to be evacuated and, remaining with his tank, continued to direct accurate and effective fire until the enemy withdrew. By his forceful leadership, inspiring courage and steadfast devotion to duty against heavy odds, Sergeant Murphy contributed to the saving of personnel and vehicles in the convoy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Johnstown, Pennsylvania.

Murphy, Raymond Gerald

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Raymond Gerald Murphy (MCSN: 0-54837), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 November 1952. Assigned the extremely hazardous mission of assaulting a strong point of the enemy main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Murphy courageously exposed himself to devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire to press the assault on the objective. On three separate occasions, when the enemy attempted to prevent him from accomplishing his mission, he skillfully coordinated and utilized supporting arms to repulse the foe. Although the platoon suffered severe casualties by the time the objective was reached, the unit succeeded in evacuating the wounded in the face of continuous enemy fire. Upon successful completion of the mission, he ordered the withdrawal and personally remained behind until assured that all of his men had withdrawn. By his outstanding courage, superb leadership and indomitable spirit, Second Lieutenant Murphy served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: January 14, 1930 at Pueblo, Colorado. Home Town: Pueblo, Colorado. Death: April 6, 2007 - Buried at: Santa Fe National Cemetery - Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Murphy, Robert M. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 105 - 28 March 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Robert M. Murphy (ASN: US-52106922), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Pyoru, Korea, on 13 October 1951. His company was holding positions for the night and making preparations for continuing its attack in the morning. Shortly before midnight, the enemy, supported by an intense mortar barrage, launched a savage assault. Four fanatical attempts to overrun the friendly lines were repulsed. Private Murphy, point man for his squad, played a vital part in beating off the enemy hordes, firing with devastating accuracy into the onrushing waves. As the tempo of the battle intensified, the enemy made another attack, charging forward with such fanaticism and weight of numbers that the friendly unit was forced to withdraw to more defensible positions. Private Murphy, with complete disregard for his own safety, unhesitatingly remained in his emplacement, single-handedly holding off the attackers, five of whom he killed but a few yards from his position. He was mortally wounded while still fighting, but his valiant stand gave his comrades time to reorganize and to ultimately recapture the objective. Private Murphy's gallant action, indomitable fighting spirit and self-sacrificing devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: 1929. Home Town: Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: October 13, 1951.

Murray, Raymond Leroy (1st award in Korea)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in addition to a previously awarded Gold Star in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Colonel Raymond Leroy Murray (MCSN: 0-5127), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while commanding the Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the amphibious landing resulting in the capture of Inchon, Korea, on 15 September 1950 in the Inchon-Seoul operation. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 50 (October 27, 1950).  Born: January 30, 1913 at Los Angeles, California. Home Town: San Diego, California. Death: November 11, 2004.

Murray, Raymond Leroy (2nd award in Korea)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in addition to a previously awarded Gold Star in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Colonel Raymond Leroy Murray (MCSN: 0-5127), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations in Korea during the period 3 August to 6 September 1950. While serving as Commanding Officer of the Fifth Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), Colonel Murray displayed exceptional ability in directing the operations of his regiment against organized enemy resistance of superior strength. With complete disregard for his own safety, Colonel Murray made numerous visits to forward elements of his assault battalions to obtain first hand information necessary for sound tactical judgment in the employment of his regiment. On 11 August, as the regiment was advancing along the road to Sachon, it was halted by heavy enemy fire directed from well concealed emplacements on high ground overlooking the route of movement. Moving up to the front, constantly exposed to enemy small arms fire, Colonel Murray personally directed the tactical employment of his troops until the situation became stabilized. His cool and positive control of the command, fearless determination, and indomitable courage were an inspirational propellant for his valiantly fighting men and furthered the United Nations campaign for peace. Colonel Murray, through his valor and notable proficiency as a combat commander, reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 89 (December 26, 1950). Born: January 30, 1913 at Los Angeles, California. Home Town: San Diego, California. Death: November 11, 2004.

Muryasz, Walter M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Walter M. Muryasz (MCSN: 628937), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 October 1952. Advancing toward the enemy's main line of resistance during a mission to establish a patrol ambush forward of a friendly outpost, the squad was hit by a num sup hostile force moving under cover of darkness and, during the ensuing fire fight, several of the patrol members fell seriously wounded. Skillfully deploying his men, Sergeant Muryasz directed effective fire which resulted in disrupting the enemy and inflicting heavy casualties upon them. Immediately after ordering the withdrawal of his men to the friendly outpost, he discovered another Marine seriously wounded and unable to move. Although painfully wounded himself, Sergeant Muryasz advanced through the intense hostile fire to aid his comrade and, unassisted, carried him uphill through numerous barbed wire entanglements and heavy concentrations of enemy mortar fire to the friendly outpost. A brave and inspiring leader, he continued to direct and reorganize his squad until all his men had reached the outpost. By his outstanding courage, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Sergeant Muryasz was greatly instrumental in preventing a heavy attack on the friendly position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: East Chicago, Indiana. Home Town: East Chicago, Indiana.

Muser, Joseph A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Joseph A. Muser (MCSN: 0-44404), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 October 1951. During a combined tank-infantry raid against a well-fortified enemy position, First Lieutenant Muser expertly and fearlessly led his tanks through a mine field which could not be cleared because of intense hostile mortar and artillery fire. As the friendly units were effecting a withdrawal, the enemy launched a vicious counterattack. Learning that all ammunition had been expended except that of the heavy machine gun mounted on the tank's turret, he quickly climbed to a position outside of the tank and bravely delivered devastating fire against the advancing enemy, inflicting heavy casualties upon them and enabling the friendly forces to successfully complete their withdrawal. By his indomitable courage, brilliant leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Muser served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Danville, Illinois. Home Town: Danville, Illinois.

Musialowski, Melvin J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Melvin J. Musialowski (MCSN: 836115), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. During a friendly air strike, when his commander discovered that the platoon's marking panel had been left at their last position, Private First Class Musialowski voluntarily went back and brought the panel forward although he was suffering from pain and loss of blood due to a wound received in action. Courageously exposing himself to intense hostile fire, he placed the panel forward of the platoon's front line and, while executing this hazardous mission, was wounded a second time. By his daring initiative, heroic determination and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Private First Class Musialowski upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Buffalo, New York. Home Town: Buffalo, New York.

Musser, Earl B. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Earl B. Musser, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49847), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 June 1951. When the platoon he was leading on a reconnaissance mission forward of friendly lines was pinned down by devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire, First Lieutenant Musser, realizing that the forward element of the platoon had suffered heavy casualties, courageously moved forward through the heavy enemy fire to direct the evacuation of the wounded to safety. Although seriously wounded by shrapnel and having great difficulty in breathing, he refused to accept medical attention and remained in the exposed area to direct the removal of the casualties until he lapsed into unconsciousness. By his exceptional fortitude, leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Musser served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kansas City, Missouri. Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri.

Myer, William Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 255 - 28 October 1950

Corporal William Myers Jr., RA12299509, Infantry, Company F, 5th Infantry, United States Army.  During an attack by a superior number of enemy on 13 August 1950 in the vicinity of Sahnlung-li, Korea, Corporal Myer quickly moved his mortar to a position exposed to intense enemy fire and directed effective fire to inflict heavy casualties on the attacking forces until he was mortally wounded.  Corporal Myer's courageous determination and gallant devotion to duty were instrumental in disrupting the fanatical attack and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from New York.

Myers, G.B.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 265 - 17 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) G. B. Myers (ASN: 0-1289612), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 2d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Angang-ni, Korea, on 5 - 6 September 1950. His battalion, moving south during a tactical withdrawal, was attacked by a large enemy force which had established a strong roadblock along the route. Temporarily in command during the absence of the Battalion Commander, Major Myers immediately directed and supervised the action of the battalion, initiating effective measures to break through the road block. In spite of the extreme darkness he organized all elements of the command and deployed his men in positions from which an attack could be launched. Completely unmindful of his own safety he personally directed the assault against the strong positions which resulted in heavy enemy casualties and eventual rout. Major Myers' gallant actions, unhesitant devotion to duty and outstanding leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Lufkin, Texas.

Myers, Jack W.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 266 - 18 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Jack W. Myers (ASN: RA-15041479), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 6th Medium Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chongkodong, Korea, on 1 November 1950. During the advance of the 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, he was commanding the lead tank supporting the attack. Moving around a sharp curve in the road, his tank was struck by fire from camouflaged anti-tank guns. The initial volley wounded Sergeant Myers and six of the infantrymen advancing by his side. Utterly disregarding his own safety and ignoring his wounds, he refused to evacuate the area and directed his cannon and machine guns on the enemy positions. Through the volume and accuracy of his fire one of the enemy's guns was destroyed, many of the gun crews killed or wounded and the friendly dismounted troops enabled to withdraw from their precarious positions. Only upon the orders of his platoon leader did he withdraw and before being evacuated, gave the location of other enemy positions, which were later destroyed by artillery and air action. Sergeant Myers' gallant action and unhesitant devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Armor. Home Town: Marietta, Georgia.

Myers, Marvin G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commissioned Warrant Officer Marvin G. Myers (MCSN: 0-39932), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Forward Observer of Battery C, First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. Boldly leaving his shelter in the face of intense hostile machine gun and sniper fire which was inflicting numerous casualties in the convoy while it was stalled in the middle of an enemy roadblock, Commissioned Warrant Officer Myers voluntarily organized a makeshift crew, supervised the positioning of a 105-mm howitzer and directed its fire at hostile machine gun positions about 150 yards away. Fearlessly and courageously persisting in his self- assigned duty in the face of intense fire concentrated on his emplacement, he conducted the volunteer group in delivering effective fire which successfully destroyed or neutralized several enemy positions, thereby contributing materially in clearing the roadblock and permitting the convoy to advance. His initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring leadership reflect great credit upon Commissioned Warrant Officer Myers and the United States Naval Service. Born: Boerne, Texas. Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Myron, George D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant George D. Myron (MCSN: 1035407), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. During an attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Sergeant Myron bravely led the assault in the face of devastating hostile fire and, skillfully maneuvering his men in an effort to keep casualties at a minimum, deliberately exposed himself to the enemy to draw their fire in a daring attempt to ascertain the hostile strong points. In the final assault on the objective, he spearheaded a fierce bayonet charge against the enemy and, throwing grenades and shouting words of encouragement to his squad, led the unit in overrunning the hostile stronghold. By his courageous leadership, exceptional initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Myron served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by the company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Orange, New Jersey. Home Town: Livingston, New Jersey.


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