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McAbee, Filmore W. (Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 156 - November 16, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Filmore W. McAbee (ASN: 0-1294507), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer of Company L, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, on 16 September 1950, near Tabudong, Korea. Assigned the task of taking Hill 401, Captain McAbee led two platoons, with another in support, in an attack up the hill. Although outnumbered by the enemy who were in commanding position, his excellent leadership and skillful use of supporting fire kept the advance from wavering. Near the summit, he sent his supporting platoon around to outflank the enemy, causing the enemy to withdraw. An extremely heavy enemy counterattack followed by a fanatical banzai charge failed to dislodge Captain McAbee's company which proceeded to organize for the successful defense of this key terrain. Throughout the attack and the successful defense against the enemy's counterattacks, he held his company together by his extremely aggressive leadership and skillful tactical ability. Captain McAbee exposed himself repeatedly to the heavy enemy fire to personally lead his company in its successful action. Captain McAbee's gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

McAlister, Francis Marion

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel Francis Marion McAlister (MCSN: 0-4264), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 25 April 1951. Assigned the mission of denying the enemy the mountainous terrain covering the approaches to a vital bridge, Colonel McAlister, despite multiple wounds sustained by hostile mortar fire, refused to be evacuated and continued to lead and direct his units until the numerically superior enemy forces were repulsed. By his inspiring and determined leadership, superb tactical ability and heroic devotion to duty in the face of tremendous odds, Colonel McAlister contributed materially to the success of his regiment's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: August 29, 1905 at Houck, Arizona. Home Town: Blue Mountain, Mississippi. Death: September 2, 1965 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, VA.

McAlpine, Douglas B.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 154 - June 15, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant [then Corporal Douglas B. McAlpine (ASN: RA-19336830), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Service Battery, 37th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 26 and 27 September 1950, near Hyopchon, Korea. On this date, Sergeant McAlpine was in charge of several trucks hauling gasoline from Service Battery to the firing batteries. When they took the wrong road at a crossroads and joined a convoy of 23d Infantry trucks, they were attacked by a numerically superior enemy. Sergeant McAlpine realized that, being at the end of the column, he would have to furnish his own defense. He immediately placed his men in the best defensive position and during the attack continually exposed himself to enemy fire, encouraging his men and pointing out targets for them enabling them to turn back the attack on the rear echelon of the column. The gallantry and inspiring leadership displayed by Sergeant McAlpine reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

McAnallan, Arthur M.

Private Arthur M. McAnallan, RA13290388, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy near Osan, Korea on 5 July 1950. During an enemy attack on Company C's positions Private McAnallan, who was assistant machine gunner, displayed courage and bravery by making several trips from his machine gun position to obtain ammunition for his weapon. This position was under heavy small arms, mortar and artillery fire from the enemy. Due to the large enemy force attacking his positions the order was given to withdraw to new positions. Private McAnallan volunteered to stay at his machine gun position to cover the withdrawal of his unit. He was last seen to be firing his machine gun when it was overrun by the enemy. The courage displayed by Private McAnallan made it possible for his unit effect an orderly withdrawal. This gallant act on the part of Private McAnallan reflects great credit on himself and the military service. GO 90, 14 August 1950. He entered the service from Butler, PA.

McBarron, Alden

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Alden McBarron (MCSN: 0-27577), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane and a Flight Leader in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), during operations against enemy aggressor forces during the withdrawal from Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 7 December 1950. Leading his flight in a night fighter mission, Captain McBarron reported in to the Close Air Support Control Center and, after ascertaining the hazardous weather conditions in the area, voluntarily let down through heavy overcast over mountainous terrain to execute six bold attacks. Skillfully carrying out his assault, he succeeded in silencing an enemy mortar positions which was threatening a friendly convoy stopped at a hostile roadblock. By his daring initiative, outstanding courage and loyal devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Captain McBarron contributed materially to the infliction of damage on the enemy and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: Portland, Oregon.

McBryde, Robert E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert E. McBryde (MCSN: 358314), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. When the leading elements were subjected to intense and accurate enemy automatic weapons, hand grenade and small arms fire from well-concealed hostile bunkers and were temporarily unable to advance during the company's attack on a strongly defended enemy hill position, Sergeant McBryde courageously advanced forward through the devastating hostile fire and crawled to within 25 yards of the enemy positions. Standing erect, he delivered heavy rifle fire into the bunker apertures, thereby silencing the hostile fire and allowing the company to rapidly advance and secure the strategic positions. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant McBryde served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hobart, Oklahoma. Home Town: Tollison, Arizona.

McCain, Gene M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Gene M. McCain (MCSN: 0-48889), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company B, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 May 1952. During the assault against a well-fortified enemy outpost, First Lieutenant McCain unhesitatingly left the shelter of his tank and, bravely exposing himself to intense hostile fire, made a reconnaissance of the situation to determine a position from which his tanks could deliver the most effective supporting fire. When the infantry units were pinned down by the heavy enemy barrage, he fearlessly led one section of his unit through a known enemy mine field to deliver more direct fire. After expending all the ammunition in his tanks, First Lieutenant McCain again braved the hostile fire to help place casualties on the rear of the vehicles and evacuate the wounded Marines to positions of safety. A courageous and daring leader, he immediately rearmed his tanks and bravely returned to the fire fight, carrying a re-supply of ammunition for the infantry forces on the rear of his vehicle. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, First Lieutenant McCain contributed materially to the success of the attack and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tennyson, Texas. Home Town: Slaton, Texas.

McCaleb, Alfred F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Alfred F. McCaleb, Jr. (MCSN: 0-30869), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Navy Torpedo Bomber Plane in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. Notified of the critical need for the rapid evacuation of wounded Marine and Army personnel from an improvised air strip at Koto-ri, Captain McCaleb unhesitatingly volunteered to fly a newly acquired heavier aircraft in which three patients could be evacuated rather than one who could be brought out in the light observation type planes. Despite extremely adverse flying conditions, he completed one flight and, after observing the large number of patients awaiting evacuation, increased his patient load each flight until, by his sixth flight, nine patients per trip were being brought out. Although subjected to enemy fire, he continued his determined efforts, completing eleven round trips throughout the remainder of the day and brining seventy-six casualties to safety. By his superb airmanship, cool courage under fire and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Captain McCaleb served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana.

McCammon, Eugene B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Eugene B. McCammon (MCSN: 1118867), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of an Engineer Squad of Company D, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1950. When a Corpsman needed assistance in removing a critically wounded Marine to an aid station for further medical attention during an attack by numerically superior hostile forces against the infantry regiment to which he was attached in the vicinity of Yudam-ni, Private First Class McCammon voluntarily helped carry the stricken man back through the enemy-infested lines under small arms, mortar and machine gun fire. Pinned down by the intense barrage upon reaching a position at the bottom of the hill, he made a valiant attempt to break away from cover to seek further aid, but was driven back. Persisting in his efforts, he left the position, proceeded through the enemy's lines and, despite serious wounds sustained in the hands and arms, succeeded in advancing through the area and in gaining help for the trapped men. By his daring initiative, bold and determined actions and extraordinary heroism in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class McCammon was directly instrumental in saving the lives of his two comrades and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Youngstown, Ohio. Home Town: Youngstown, Ohio.

McCargar, Robert L.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders JNo. 219 - May 22, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Robert L. McCargar (ASN: RA-17192958), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 7th Reconnaissance Company, 7th Infantry Division, in action near Oksan-dong, Korea, on 9 April 1951. On this date, the 7th Reconnaissance Company's mission was to cross the Choyang River near Oksan-dong. Prior to crossing, word was received that assault boats for the operation would not be available and an attempt would be made to wade the rifer, despite previous reconnaissance reports of a swift, deep current, and a mine hazard at the river ford. Sergeant McCargar entered the river from the south bank with fifteen men of the lead force. These men came under a hail of enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire. In mid-stream, the swift current swept a number of men off their feet. Orders were issued to return however, Sergeant McCargar and six men were too exhausted and continued across to the north side. On the north side of the river, Sergeant McCargar observed a wounded soldier, helpless in the water. Without hesitation and despite intense small arms fire, Sergeant McCargar plunged to the aid of the man. He worked his comrade back (remainder of citation missing).

McCarthy, Timothy F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Timothy F. McCarthy (MCSN: 1187621), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 - 26 July 1953. When a combat outpost and the main line of resistance were subjected to a vicious attack by an overwhelming force of enemy troops, Sergeant McCarthy fearlessly exposed himself to the deadly hostile mortar and artillery fire and moved about the are a in order to check the lines and to insure that the outpost's defensive machine guns were in action and the welfare of his men was maintained. Although nearing a point of complete exhaustion, he continued to inspire his men to heroic efforts and, when the enemy threatened to overrun the position and entered the trench line, directed a daring hand-to-hand attack on the assaulting force, succeeding in repelling the enemy and in securing the vital position. Despite painful wounds sustained during the attack, he refused evacuation and continued to direct his men and offer them words of encouragement until he was overcome by his wounds. By his indomitable fighting spirit, skilled leadership and marked courage, Sergeant McCarthy served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Corona, New York. Home Town: Elmont, New York.

McClain, Andrew H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Andrew H. McClain (MCSN: 658885), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of the Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 September 1950. Assigned the mission of assaulting a steep hill upon which the enemy was well entrenched, Corporal McClain courageously led his squad up the hill and succeeded in completing his mission. After rejoining his platoon and learning that the platoon leader and all senior non-commissioned officers were wounded, he immediately assumed command of the rest of the group and hastily reorganized and placed his men in defensive positions, thereby contributing materially to the success of the platoon in holding its objective without further casualties. In charge of his platoon for a period of about two days, Corporal McClain, by his courage, initiative and steadfast devotion to duty, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Spur, Texas. Home Town: Spur, Texas.

McClain, John W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal John W. McClain (MCSN: 628084), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. When the enemy succeeded in putting a machine gun out of action and attempted to capture the weapon during the fire fight which followed the platoon's assault of a heavily defended enemy-held ridge line, Corporal McClain courageously moved through the hail of hostile fire and succeeded in killing the enemy near the gun and in carrying the weapon to a more advantageous position. By his outstanding courage and daring initiative, Corporal McClain denied a valuable weapon to the enemy and enabled the platoon to utilize it at a crucial moment, thereby contributing materially to the success of the attack. His aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Clinchburg, Virginia. Home Town: Elkview, West Virginia.

McClean, Robert E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Robert E. McClean (MCSN: 0-13125), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observer attached to the Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Flying in an unarmed aircraft over enemy lines, Captain McClean observed a concentration of heavy machine gun emplacements which were greatly hindering the advance of friendly troops. Although his light plane sustained many hits during repeated low-altitude passes, he determined the exact location and disposition of the hostile force and, despite heavy enemy ground fire, remained over the area until he had contacted close-support aircraft. He then proceeded to direct the support planes to the target by carrying out additional low passes until his aircraft again received hits which necessitated his ultimate abandonment of the crippled plane. By his outstanding courage and resolute determination in the face of hostile fire, Captain McClean contributed materially to the neutralization of the enemy position and the advance of friendly forces. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Holguin, Cuba. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

McCleery, James H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant James H. McCleery (MCSN: 0-37166), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Twelve (VMF-212), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 March 1951. Leading a two-plane armed reconnaissance flight on a mission deep into enemy territory, First Lieutenant McCleery carried out a series of daring strafing attacks against hostile anti-aircraft emplacements on high ground and completely neutralized the positions. Locating a group of four camouflaged enemy tanks in the same area, he immediately initiated a second attack and, although his wingman had expended his armament, continued to press a lone assault at minimum altitude with rockets and napalm bombs until all the hostile vehicles were destroyed. By his marked courage, brilliant airmanship and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant McCleery was directly instrumental in dealing a damaging blow to the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Louis, Missouri. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri.

McClelland, Robert K.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Robert K. McClelland (MCSN: 0-7433), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 June 1951. Assigned the mission of passing through a friendly unit to continue the attack and seize key enemy-held high ground, Lieutenant Colonel McClelland continuously moved forward withy his assaulting companies in the face of intense hostile mortar, artillery and automatic weapons fire. Displaying sound tactical knowledge, he, from his forward position, so expertly maneuvered his companies and committed his reserve, that his objectives were rapidly secured with a minimum of friendly casualties. By his outstanding leadership, indomitable courage and gallant devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel McClelland contributed materially to the success achieved by the regiment and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Grove City, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Grove City, Pennsylvania.

McClelland, William A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William A. McClelland (MCSN: 0-48890), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 December 1950. Assigned the mission of seizing three strong enemy positions located on successive heights of a precipitous ridge line, First Lieutenant McClelland personally led his platoon's assault on each position in the face of devastating hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire and, skillfully maneuvering his squads through heavy snow in bitter cold weather, repeatedly braved the intense enemy barrage to move among his men, shouting words of encouragement and effectively directing their fire. In the attack against the final key emplacement controlling the vital Koto-ri pass road, he again led his men forward and, engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat, succeeded in completely routing the opposition and inflicting approximately two hundred casualties. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and zealous devotion to duty, First Lieutenant McClelland contributed materially to the success achieved by his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

McCloskey, Donald W.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Second Lieutenant Donald V. McCloskey (MCSN: 0-49711), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against an armed enemy on 9 August 1950 near Sangnyong, Korea. On 9 August 1950 Lieutenant McCloskey was observing the fire of an 81-mm. Mortar Platoon from the forward observation post of the Second Battalion, when he noted that a friendly patrol had been pinned down by heavy fire from two enemy machine guns. It was evident that the patrol could not extricate itself, so Lieutenant McCloskey volunteered to lead a party to rescue them. After reaching a firing position and establishing a base of fire, he advanced through the heavy enemy machine gun fire to the patrol's position and coolly directed its withdrawal, together with two wounded men and a prisoner. His coolness under fire and personal leadership made the rescue possible. Lieutenant McCloskey's gallantry displayed on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 72 (September 16, 1950). Entered Service From California.

McCloskey, Paul Norton Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Paul Norton McCloskey, Jr. (MCSN: 0-50232), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 June 1951. When his platoon was subjected to an intense hostile artillery and mortar barrage while moving through an open valley in support of a tank patrol, and sustained eight casualties, including two Corpsmen, Second Lieutenant McCloskey quickly directed the remainder of his platoon to cover and crawling through the hail of enemy fire, began to administer first aid to the wounded. Despite severe pain and loss of blood when he himself received a severe leg wound, he continued to treat the stricken men and personally directed their evacuation when a stretcher party succeeded in reaching the area. Returning to his platoon, he refused to be evacuated for treatment until ordered to the aid station by his battalion commander and senior medical officer. By his daring leadership and initiative, Second Lieutenant McCloskey directly aided in saving the lives of four critically wounded Marines. His marked courage and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: September 29, 1927 at San Marino, California. Home Town: Loma Linda, California.

McClymont, James R.

Captain James R. McClymont, 01059196, Artillery, U.S. Army, while commanding Battery "D," 15th AAA AW Battalion (SP). distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Chosin Reservoir, Korea, on 28 November 1950. On this date the battery which he commanded was providing close support fires for infantry and field artillery units in positions east of the reservoir. From his location at the battery command post, Captain McClymont learned that the command post of his first platoon was under exceedingly heavy enemy fire and was in grave danger. Captain McClymont called for volunteers to form a patrol to go to the rescue of the platoon headquarters and then led the patrol to the vicinity of the action. He saw that his patrol was far outnumbered by the enemy attacking farce, which was firing automatic weapons, small arms, and mortars and was throwing hand grenades. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain McClymont exposed himself to almost certain injury or death by leading his patrol of one officer and six enlisted men quickly into close combat with the enemy. Under his cool and aggressive leadership, the patrol killed or dispersed all of the enemy in the vicinity. Captain McClymont himself killed a number of the enemy. As a result of Captain McClymont's personal daring and resourceful leadership, the patrol rescued one officer and six enlisted men who were still alive, and recovered the bodies of one officer and four enlisted men who had been killed. Captain McClymont's display of gallantry on this occasion was in keeping with the highest traditions of the Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Washington.

McConkey, Earl R.

Citation not yet found.

"Sgt. Earl R. McConkey, 22-year-old Butte soldier who earlier this week was awarded the Silver Star for valor in battle, has been wounded in the foot and is in a hospital, presumably in Korea, his mother said Saturday.  Mrs. Lillian McConkey said she had received a letter from her son telling her he had been wounded during the later stages of the bitter fighting for the outposts of Carson, Elko and Vegas.  She said his wound was not believed to be serious.  The Butte youth won the Silver Star for personally leading his platoon through intense small arms, artillery and mortar fire as it fought its way up the steep slopes of Carson in an unsuccessful attempt to recapture the outpost." - Billings Gazette, 7 June 1953

McConnell, John A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 208 - 28 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) John A. McConnell (ASN: 0-246796), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Hung-hae, Korea, on 4 September 1950. During his battalion's attack against strong enemy hilltop positions, Company K was held up by intense fire and sustained numerous casualties, threatening the success of the entire attack. With utter disregard for his own safety he moved unhesitantly under heavy mortar and automatic weapons fire to an exposed position in order to better direct his command's activities. From his own observation he redeployed Company K and personally directed its successful assault. His courageous example was an inspiration to his command and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Fayetteville, Arkansas.

McConnell, Kenneth D.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 724 - 16 November 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant Kenneth D. McDonnell, US55077327, (then Corporal), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 3 September 1951 in the vicinity of Kach’il-bong, Korea. On this date, during an assault on well prepared and defended enemy positions on dominating terrain features, Sergeant McConnell provided supporting fire for the advancing units with his machine gun. Noticing that the fire was ineffective from his position, Sergeant McConnell, braving the intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons, mortar, and grenade fire, moved his weapon to the foremost elements of the unit. After the objective had been secured he assisted in defending the strategic terrain feature against numerous enemy counterattacks, inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy. The gallantry in action and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant McConnell on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Nebraska.

McCormick, Robert A.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Staff Sergeant Robert A. McCormick (MCSN: 509728), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Saemol, Korea, on 3 June 1951. On that date, Sergeant McCormick, a Platoon Leader, repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy fire to direct the movement and fire of his platoon in an assault on a strongly defended enemy position. Without regard for his personal safety, he led his unit across exposed terrain in a bayonet attack which routed the enemy and secured the objective. During the action, Sergeant McCormick was painfully wounded by grenade fragments, but continued t lead and encourage his men. When the position was secured, he worked rapidly to move sufficient ammunition into his position to insure the repulsion of an enemy counterattack. The gallantry, initiative, and high devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant McCormick on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 177 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From California.

McCoy, Charles W. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Charles W. McCoy (MCSN: 1247891), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 24 - 25 July 1953. When a friendly outpost position, located far forward of the main line of resistance, was subjected to a fierce enemy attack and was urgently in need of vital supplies and ammunition, Sergeant McCoy voluntarily led a supply train over a route heavily interdicted by murderous enemy mortar and artillery fire to the beleaguered position. Discovering that hostile troops had entered the trench line at the outpost, he immediately took charge of a flame-thrower operator and, covering his comrade with a pistol, skillfully directed him toward the enemy to deliver deadly flame upon the attackers. Although seriously wounded by an enemy grenade, he resolutely continued to move through the trench line until he fell, mortally wounded. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and marked fortitude, Sergeant McCoy served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 19, 1928 at Ashville, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland. Death: KIA: July 25, 1953.

McCoy, Dale K.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 28 - 14 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Dale K. McCoy (ASN: 0-978564), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Kumsong, Korea, on 19 October 1951. His company was assigned the mission of securing Hill 554, the final objective of a series. The First Platoon was designated the assaulting element. Having undergone five days of continuous battle against determined enemy resistance, the friendly troops had to overcome fatigue as well as hostile opposition. Fully understanding this, Lieutenant McCoy, Platoon Leader, drove himself to the utmost of his endurance, although he himself was on the point of exhaustion, to compensate for the unavoidable circumstances and directed his men with brilliant tactical skill. With complete disregard for his own safety, he continuously exposed himself to devastating enemy fire as he expertly directed his men's fire on enemy positions. After fighting to within 200 yards of their objective, the friendly troops, aided by another platoon, launched a powerful assault and secured the objective, inflicting severe losses upon the enemy. Lieutenant McCoy's courageous action, exemplary leadership and outstanding performance of duty in the face of extreme adversity contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri.

McCoy, Joseph

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 154 - June 15, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Joseph McCoy (ASN: 0-2006186), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Japan RTC, 8042d Army Unit, APO 613 (then Company K, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division in action against an armed enemy on 10 January 1951 near Wonju, Korea. On that date he was a member of a tank-infantry patrol which had the mission of reconnoitering the route to Wonju inflicting as many casualties as possible upon the enemy. The route over which the patrol was to travel was known to be occupied by the enemy; but in spite of this, Lieutenant McCoy proceeded on the mission. With complete disregard for his personal safety he exposed himself to small arms fire while standing on the turret of his tank manning a .50 caliber machine gun. On the return trip the patrol encountered heavy enemy fire and a firefight occurred which destroyed one jeep containing five enlisted men. Upon learning that the five enlisted men had been left behind, Lieutenant McCoy turned his tank around and returned through intense enemy fire to the position of the abandoned men, placed the five men on his tank and returned them to safety. The gallant conduct of Lieutenant McCoy on this occasion reflects great credit upon him and the military service.

McCubbin, Orville W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Boatswain's Mate First Class Orville W. McCubbin (NSN: 3561865), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity and meritorious devotion to duty as Minesweep Boatswain's Mate aboard the U.S.S. Kite (AMS-22), during combat minesweeping operations off Wonsan, Korea, on 9 November 1951. While recovering minesweep gear upon completion of a hazardous night operation, Boatswain's Mate Second Class McCubbin spotted a live mine caught in the end cutter five feet from the stern of the ship in such a position that its detonation could be expected at any minute. With complete disregard for his own safety he remained on his station and directed the paying out of the gear to remove the danger to his ship. His alertness and devotion to duty were the only factors preventing the loss of the ship and the lives of his fellow crewmen as the mine exploded forty feet astern. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 204 (February 4, 1952).

McDaniel, David C.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 139 - 17 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain David C. McDaniel, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 10 October 1950, by rescuing in a helicopter an injured British Fighter pilot from his downed aircraft, deep in enemy territory north of Seoul, Korea. Landing under small arms fire with complete disregard for his own life and the vulnerability of his aircraft, Captain McDaniel kept the helicopter running, ready for immediate takeoff. The downed pilot, injured and unable to free himself, was pulled out of the wreckage by the para-doctor crew member. Captain McDaniel, upon noting the difficulty the para-doctor was experiencing, left his aircraft, and heedless of enemy fire directed at him, rushed to the injured man's aid. Still under fire, Captain McDaniel and the para-doctor placed the critically injured pilot aboard the helicopter and flew him out of enemy territory to a hospital at Inchon. The courageous action and devotion to duty displayed by Captain McDaniel are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

McDaniel, Roland L. (POW)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Roland L. McDaniel (MCSN: 0-52985), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Artillery Aerial Observer in the Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 September 1952. Assigned the mission of searching for active enemy artillery positions deep in enemy territory, Second Lieutenant McDaniel spotted the well-camouflaged objectives from his slow unarmed aircraft and, undaunted by intense small arms and antiaircraft fire, skillfully conducted fire missions simultaneously on the active artillery and anti-aircraft gun emplacements. Despite grave hazards, he continued to seek out the hostile targets, remaining in the area until his plane was shot down. His courage, professional skill and zealous devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant McDaniel and the United States Naval Service. Born: Vincennes, Indiana. Home Town: Monticello, Illinois.

McDaniel, William Thomas

Major William Thomas McDaniel, 024088, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action on 20 July 1950, at Taejon, Korea.  After a Battery of 155 millimeter howitzers had been overrun by the enemy and the weapons turned on our own troops, Major McDaniel was ordered to neutralize the position.  He gathered a group of volunteers from headquarters personnel and led the attack on the battery position.  Despite intense small arms and mortar fire, Major McDaniel succeeded in retaking the howitzers.  Going beyond his instructions, he brought up prime movers, coupled the guns and, through a hail of hostile fire, led the convoy out to a position of safety.  By his inspirational leadership and outstanding courage, Major McDaniel not only neutralized the captured battery position, but succeeded in restoring to friendly forces the critically needed artillery pieces.  His gallantry brought the highest credit to himself and to the military service.  Entered the service from Albany, Georgia.

McDermott, Joseph E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Joseph E. McDermott (MCSN: 664321), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 November 1950. Suddenly confronted by an enemy tank while advancing as Fire Team Leader at the point of a motorized patrol, Corporal McDermott bravely climbed onto the hostile vehicle in an attempt to open the hatch and deposit a hand grenade within. Unable to open the cover, he knocked down the periscope and thereby allowed another Marine to drop a grenade in the aperture. When the tank moved a few yards and stopped, he again mounted it to make a second attempt to disable it and, by his daring initiative, succeeded in destroying the tank's firing power. His marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Corporal McDermott and the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: New York, New York.

McDonough, Thomas P.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 261 - 14 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Thomas P. McDonough (ASN: RA-31089588), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chinampo, Korea, on 19 October 1950. Leading his squad in its attempt to secure high ground positions he was informed by other elements of his company that an enemy force estimated at platoon strength was advancing up the reverse slope of the hill. Private McDonough, without waiting for orders, unhesitatingly dashed to the summit of the hill and opened fire, at close range, into the enemy's ranks. His accurate fire killed or wounded eight of the enemy and caused the remainder to retreat in complete disorder After placing his squad in position he observed that the remainder of the platoon was being held up by fire from a well dug in machine gun emplacement. Again unmindful of personal safety he again left his position of comparative safety and stopping a friendly tank, directed its fire on enemy positions killing all of the enemy. Private McDonough's gallant actions and devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered Service From Massachusetts.

McDow, Walter J.

24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 27 - 13 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Walter J. McDow (ASN: RA-18374686), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Sangsan-ni, Korea, on 18 October 1951. Sergeant First Class McDow's company had the mission of taking and securing a strategic peak on a ridgeline which led to a major objective. As Sergeant McDow, Acting Platoon Leader, led his men up the steep ridge, the enemy suddenly subjected them to a withering hail of small arms, automatic weapons, grenade and mortar fire. Several of the friendly troops were hit by the initial burst of fire, including the medical aidman who had attempted to give aid to the wounded. Seeing this, Sergeant McDow, with complete disregard for his own safety, jumped from his position of cover into the murderous enemy fire and raced to the aidman. Carrying him to safety, he administered first aid and then, picking up the man's first aid kit, went back two more times, evacuating men to safety and giving them medical aid. On the fourth trip into the exposed area, an enemy concussion grenade exploded near him, temporarily stunning him. Although suffering intense pain, he resolutely carried two more men to safety, and then led the assault squad in a successful attack on the objective. Sergeant First class McDow's courageous actions, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to his comrades reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home of record: Maud, Texas.

McDowell, Charles W. Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 66 - April 1, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Charles W. McDowell, Jr. (ASN: RA-14313030), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 29 and 30 November 1950, while serving with Company M, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, near P-Yosa-San, Korea. While his unit was being attacked by a numerically superior enemy, Private McDowell, one-quarter ton vehicle driver, with utter disregard of his own life, volunteered as a replacement as a machine gunner in another vehicle when he had learned the regular gunner had been killed. Private McDowell, with a brilliant display of cool calmness and skill, operated the gun and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy until the counterattack order was given. Returning to his own vehicle, that also mounted a machine gun, he drove forward with the advancing troops, although constantly exposed to the hazardous mortar and automatic weapons fire, and courageously continued to drive his vehicle until he was mortally wounded. His selfless behavior and conspicuous devotion to duty greatly contributed to the successful completion of his unit's mission. Private McDowell's gallant actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

McDurmin, Richard E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Richard E. McDurmin (MCSN: 587456), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Runner in Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Seoul, Korea, on 2 October 1950. Voluntarily braving hostile small arms and machine gun fire, Private First Class McDurmin helped to remove wounded Marines, attached to an adjacent platoon, to a covered position, thereby assisting materially in successfully evacuating all the casualties. Personally reorganizing the remaining members of the adjoining unit, he fearlessly led them in a vigorous assault against well-entrenched enemy forces. His skill, courageous initiative and gallant devotion to duty in the face of intense hostile opposition were contributing factors in the successful accomplishment of the assigned mission and reflect great credit upon Private First Class McDurmin and the United States Naval Service. Born: Mobile, Alabama. Home Town: Chattanooga, Tennessee.

McDurmon, George

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private George McDurmon (MCSN: 643047), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. When the unit was subjected to devastating hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire while participating in an attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Private McDurmon bravely put his gun into action and effectively engaged the enemy, although the open terrain offered no cover from the intense hostile fire. Painfully wounded during the action, he refused medical attention and remained with his comrades to pour withering fire on the enemy emplacements until the company had seized the objective, submitting to evacuation only after the hostile force had been completely routed. By his aggressive fighting spirit, indomitable fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire, Private McDurmon served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lynn Township, Indiana. Home Town: Mt. Vernon, Indiana.

McElrea, Lawrence W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private George McDurmon (MCSN: 643047), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. When the unit was subjected to devastating hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire while participating in an attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Private McDurmon bravely put his gun into action and effectively engaged the enemy, although the open terrain offered no cover from the intense hostile fire. Painfully wounded during the action, he refused medical attention and remained with his comrades to pour withering fire on the enemy emplacements until the company had seized the objective, submitting to evacuation only after the hostile force had been completely routed. By his aggressive fighting spirit, indomitable fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire, Private McDurmon served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lynn Township, Indiana. Home Town: Mt. Vernon, Indiana.

McElroy, James A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman James A. McElroy (NSN: 2535260), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 September 1952. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospitalman McElroy displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty during a patrol action deep in enemy territory. The patrol was cut off by a numerically superior enemy force. Although he had been painfully wounded early in the action, he expressed complete disregard for his personal comfort and safety and repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire in order to administer aid to his wounded comrades. When he saw a wounded machine gunner in an exposed area, he unhesitatingly ran to his aid. While amidst the hostile fire and caring for the wounded Marine, he was gain wounded but realizing the extreme danger of his position he picked the man up and carried him through the blanketing enemy fire to the comparative safety of a shell hole. He continued to tend the wounds of the patrol until the unit reached the safety of friendly lines whereupon Hospitalman McElroy collapsed as a result of his own wounds. His gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 5335 (February 12, 1953).

McFarland, David W. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major David W. McFarland (MCSN: 0-11760), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot and Commanding Officer of Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), during a rescue mission in hostile territory in Korea on 3 July 1951. Although keenly aware of the grave hazards involved, Major McFarland unhesitatingly volunteered to fly his slow, unarmed helicopter deep into hostile territory in a brave attempt to evacuate two critically wounded Marines who were members of a patrol pinned down by the enemy. Locating his objective in the face of hostile mortar and automatic weapons fire, he landed his aircraft hear the friendly patrol, repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy ground fire while loading the stricken men aboard the helicopter and immediately took off on his return journey. Although forced to circle over hostile positions in order to gain sufficient altitude to clear a mountain ridge separating him from friendly lines, he skillfully accomplished this dangerous maneuver. By his outstanding courage, brilliant airmanship and selfless efforts in behalf of his fellow Marines, Major McFarland upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: Berkeley, California. Home Town: Glendale, California.

McFarland, David W. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major David W. McFarland (MCSN: 0-11760), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot and Commanding Officer of Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), during a rescue mission in hostile territory in Korea on 15 September 1951. Volunteering to perform a night evacuation mission, Major McFarland skillfully maneuvered his light, unarmed helicopter over dangerous terrain and expertly executed a safe landing at a forward position in the face of intense hostile fire, although guided to the pick-up point only by voice radio commands and intermittent flashing of small hand lamps. Learning that the critically wounded infantryman could not survive unless taken directly to a field hospital, he quickly loaded the injured man aboard the helicopter and delivered him safely to the medical aid facilities. By his superb airmanship, courage and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Major McFarland served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Berkeley, California. Home Town: Glendale, California.

McGaffigan, John J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John J. McGaffigan (MCSN: 1112811), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of the Anti-tank Company, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. With the leading assault infantry company halted by fire from a numerically superior hostile force employing small arms, automatic weapons and mortars during its movement from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri, Private First Class McGaffigan quickly responded to order to deliver fire on the attackers and clear the way for the advance. Upon learning the several casualties were in need of aid, he voluntarily left the comparative safety of his vehicle and, exposing himself to direct fire, carried the wounded men back and held them on the body of the tank while the driver moved it to an area out of the range of the enemy fire. By his daring imitative, courageous and determined efforts and grave concern for others at great personal risk, Private First Class McGaffigan was directly instrumental in saving the lives of the stricken Marines, and his heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Winchester, Massachusetts. Home Town: Medford, Massachusetts.

McGee, Edward J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Edward J. McGee (MCSN: 0-7522), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane and Executive Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMF-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 August 1951. Leading a fifteen-plane strike against vital railroad and highway bridges linking the key supply center of Wonsan with the enemy's rail and highway network supplying troops along the entire eastern front, Major McGee skillfully located his objective despite intense hostile fighter opposition and extremely adverse weather conditions and, during his initial run on the target, personally scored a direct hit on a railroad bridge with a 1,000-pound bomb. Although his plane sustained numerous hits during the intensive action, he carried out repeated low-level strafing and rocket runs on adjacent enemy gun positions to diver the antiaircraft fire from the remainder of his flight, destroying one emplacement, silencing several others and enabling the striking force to complete the destruction of two vital bridges. By his courageous leadership, outstanding ability as an airman and unswerving devotion to duty, Major McGee was greatly instrumental in dealing a damaging blow to the enemy's transportation facilities and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Boston, Massachusetts. Home Town: Brookline, Massachusetts.

McGee, Fred B.

Corporal Fred B. McGee U.S. 52146660, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 17th Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Tang-Wan-Ni, Korea, on 16 June 1952, during an assault on enemy fortified positions on Hill 528. As gunner on a light machine gun in a weapons squad, Corporal McGee delivered a heavy volume of supporting fire from an exposed position, despite intense enemy machine gun and mortar fire directly on his position. Though forced to move his gun several times, he continued to support the assault and give covering fire to the assault elements. When his squad leader was wounded, he assumed command of the squad and moved even farther forward to a more exposed position in order to deliver neutralizing fire on an enemy machine gun sweeping the other assault platoon with deadly flanking fire. When his machine gunner was killed, he again took over the gun and delivered deadly fire on the enemy positions. On the order to withdraw, he voluntarily remained behind to assist in the evacuation of the wounded and dead. Though wounded himself, he heroically exposed himself to intense enemy machine gun and mortar fire to assist his wounded and dead comrades. The gallantry and courageous actions of Corporal Fred B. McGee reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the Federal Service from the State of Ohio.

McGhee, Robert R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert R. McGhee (MCSN: 1111332), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 June 1951. Serving as a heavy machine gunner attached to a rifle platoon, Private First Class McGhee displayed outstanding skill and perseverance in the performance of his duties while engaged in repelling a vicious hostile counterattack. Although painfully wounded and knocked from his machine gun by a blast concussion from an enemy grenade while firing his weapon in the face of intense hostile fire, he refused evacuation and, returning to his position, continued to employ his gun, delivering fire on the enemy with deadly accuracy. By his valiant fighting spirit, exceptional fortitude and selfless devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds, he served to inspire all who observed him and was largely responsible for repulsing the hostile counterattack. Hid indomitable courage and determination reflect great credit upon Private First Class McGhee and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Washington, D.C. Home Town: Alexandria, Virginia.

McGinnis, Donald B.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 252 - 28 October 1950

Private First Class Donald B. McGinnis, RA13297161, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 35th Infantry, United States Army.  Volunteering to act as assistant machine gunner on a M-39 personnel carrier transporting rations and ammunition to an isolated company near Chir-won, Korea on 4 September 1950, Private First Class McGinnis remained in his exposed position on top of the carrier to assist the gunner neutralize two enemy roadblocks encountered on the return trip while carrying casualties to an aid station.  Although receiving a wound during the intense hostile fire, Private First Class McGinnis' courageous devotion to duty and conspicuous bravery were instrumental in saving numerous lives and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the American soldier.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

McGinnis, James P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James P. McGinnis (MCSN: 463166), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Machine Gun Section of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 September 1950. Sent to procure ammunition for his machine gun which was pinned down under intense hostile automatic weapons fire, Private First Class McGinnis courageously proceeded to the supply point approximately five hundred yards across a fire-swept paddy. Skillfully observing the situation en route, he determined that the fire directed on his gun was coming from a farm house, whereupon he unhesitatingly assaulted the building, killing five of its occupants. Continuing on his mission, he obtained the ammunition, returned to his gun position and, finding the gun and its crew put out of action, salvaged what useable parts remained of the weapon, and made his way to another gun in his section with ammunition and parts to keep it in operation. By his daring initiative, aggressive determination and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Private First Class McGinnis upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Baltimore, Maryland. Home Town: Alipquippa, Pennsylvania.

McGinty, John Joseph (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 262 - 14 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class John Joseph McGinty (ASN: RA-13267533), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near the Kum River, Korea, on 16 July 1950. His company was withdrawing from the Kum River as the result of fanatic attacks by overwhelming numbers of the enemy. Disregarding his own safety he volunteered to remain behind to cover an attempt to evacuate the company's vehicles. Exposed to the full fury of the enemy's fire he continued to service his machine gun until it was put out of action by enemy fire. Running to the nearest vehicle he located an automatic weapon and fired point blank into the ranks of the pursuing enemy, inflicting many casualties. In this action he was wounded. In spite of his wound he continued his effective fire until he was killed by the enemy's fire. Private McGinty's fearless action and unselfish devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

McGlotlin, Joe H. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Joe H. McGlothlin, Jr. (MCSN: 0-7445), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane and Commanding Officer of Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 January 1952. Leading his flight on a strike against a main enemy supply area located at Paegan-San, Lieutenant Colonel McGlothlin pressed home his initial attacks at extremely low altitude in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire from strategic hostile gun positions on ridges surrounding the area, and scored direct hits on his objectives with 1,000-pound bombs. Although exposed to heavy enemy machine gun fire while recovering from his bombing runs, he carried out a series of daring rocket attacks with unerring accuracy, inflicting extensive damage within the target area. Wounded by the explosion when a hostile shell shattered the canopy of his aircraft, he quickly regained control of the crippled plane, proceeded to his home base and accomplished a safe landing on the airfield. By his outstanding courage, superb airmanship and unswerving devotion to the fulfillment of a vital mission, Lieutenant Colonel McGlothlin was directly instrumental in dealing a damaging blow to the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Princeton, West Virginia. Home Town: Princeton, West Virginia.

McGoey, James Joseph Francis (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant James Joseph Francis McGoey (MCSN: 0-50256), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as Liaison Officer of the Third Battalion, First Korean Marine Corps Regiment, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 June 1951. While moving with the battalion in the attack on a series of enemy positions on commanding ground, First Lieutenant McGoey observed a wounded Korean Marine lying in a fire-swept area, and fearlessly rushed forward through withering enemy fire to reach the stricken man and remove him to a covered position. By his daring imitative, marked courage and selfless efforts in behalf of another, First Lieutenant McGoey served to inspire all who observed him and materially aided in saving the life of the wounded man, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: March 18, 1926 at Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Jackson Heights, New York. Death: KIA: September 2, 1951.

McGonagle, Patrick T. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Patrick T. McGonagle (MCSN: 1073798), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner in Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 and 15 August 1952. Voluntarily manning a machine gun after the gunner became a casualty during the defense of a strategically important hill position, Corporal McGonagle bravely repulsed several hostile attacks and, although wounded and suffering from shock and concussion, continued to inflict heavy casualties upon the enemy until he fell, mortally wounded by enemy mortar fire. By his inspiring courage, resolute determination and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal McGonagle upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 10, 1931 at Lynn, Massachusetts. Home Town: Haverhill, Massachusetts. Death: KIA: August 15, 1952.

McGovern, Francis Jerome (posthumous)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Francis Jerome McGovern, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company I, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 10 February 1951 in the vicinity of Kumwang-ni, Korea. On that date Second Lieutenant McGovern's company jumped off in an attack to seize Hill 442. After advancing approximately 300 yards, the company was halted by intense mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire. Completely ignoring a wound which he received at this time Lieutenant McGovern, with forceful leadership, reorganized his platoon and resumed the assault. Inspired by his heroic conduct and absolute fearlessness, the platoon followed him in a fierce charge upon the hostile positions. During this attack, he was wounded a second time. The gallantry and inspirational leadership displayed by Lieutenant McGovern reflect great credit upon him and the military service.

McGrail, Thomas M.

Headquarters 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 140 - 24 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Thomas M. McGrail (ASN: 0-39875), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy on 17 July 1950, near Taejon, Korea. By infiltration and flanking movement the enemy had established a strongly defended road block in rear of front line troops which denied the use of the main supply route, cut off the route of withdrawal for friendly troops and had trapped the wounded at the regimental collecting station. Lieutenant Colonel McGrail organized two companies with armored support which he volunteered to lead. Prior to reaching the main road block, a second roadblock was encountered, which stopped the vehicles of the two companies and destroyed two friendly tanks. Lieutenant Colonel McGrail continued to lead his remaining tanks forward while under heavy anti-tank and machinegun fire and upon reaching the main road block placed his weapons in positions to neutralize enemy fire and to place smoke on enemy observation posts. He quickly organized the vehicles which had been trapped, placed the wounded in the column and ordered their withdrawal. Following this, he again returned to the rifle companies to continue the fight against the enemy. The calm, outstanding leadership, while under enemy fire, displayed by Lieutenant Colonel McGrail was instrumental in the safe withdrawal of approximately 200 men and a great amount of material while inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy. His courage and devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: California

McGregor, Robert J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 42 - September 1, 1950), Amended by G.O. 55 (1950)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert J. McGregor (ASN: RA-16294344), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company F, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action west of Changyong, Korea, on 10 and 11 August 1950. On 10 August 1950 Sergeant McGregor voluntarily attached himself to the second platoon of Company F, which was dispatched to free Company E from an enemy ambush. Under extremely heavy small arms fire, Sergeant McGregor went forward instantly with complete disregard for his personal safety and assisted in the removal of wounded from the ambush area. He repeatedly returned to the area even though it was still under intense enemy fire until all of the wounded had been evacuated. On 11 August 1950, when a fellow soldier from Company F was wounded, Sergeant McGregor with two assistants volunteered to evacuate the wounded man, knowing that the area was under enemy observation and small arms and machine gun fire. While advancing in a 1/4 ton truck, they were the target for an intense amount of machine gun and small arms fire. Sergeant McGregor stayed with the vehicle and returned fire with the .50 caliber machine gun, mounted thereon, while his assistants were helping the wounded man to the vehicle. When his weapon failed to fire, Sergeant McGregor drove the truck to where the wounded man lay. As the wounded man was being assisted to the vehicle, a particularly heavy burst of fire killed the wounded man, and wounded both of Sergeant McGregor's assistants, one seriously. Sergeant McGregor covered the withdrawal of his assistants to a point where they could be evacuated by another vehicle. Sergeant McGregor's utter disregard for his personal safety, courage, and aggressive leadership served as an example of the highest standards of the military service.

McHenry, Lorn D. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 100 - June 2, 1951

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to Corporal Lorn D. McHenry, Infantry, U.S. Army, Company B, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 4 February 1951 near Ochon-ni, Korea. The company was engaged in attacking the firmly entrenched enemy on Hill 402 and was halfway to the assigned objective when an extremely intense volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire pinned down the assaulting elements. Corporal McHenry, quickly sizing up the situation, voluntarily made his way beyond his platoon’s position. In spite of heavy concentrations of hostile fire, he, with two comrades, worked his way to within 50 feet of the emplacements. From this spot he fired his weapon into the enemy’s midst, and when his ammunition was exhausted, he unhesitatingly arose, oblivious to the hail of fire, and fearlessly charged directly towards the Chinese. Although he was killed in this act, his aggressive and selfless action so surprised the enemy that they shifted their fire from the platoon, thereby allowing the friendly forces to continue forward and accomplish their mission. Corporal McHenry’s conspicuous gallantry and supreme devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Kansas.

McIlvaine, Aubrey L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Aubrey L. McIlvaine (NSN: 0-433069), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Safety Officer on a 3-inch gun on board the U.S.S. Pledge (AM-277) during minesweeping operations in densely mined areas subjected to enemy gunfire off Wonsan, Korea, on 12 October 1950. Through his leadership and judgment his gun crew took under fire and silenced two enemy shore batteries firing on a stricken sister ship, and after his own ship was mined, he unselfishly organized and directed the orderly evacuation of his crew, though painfully injured, thereby contributing to the successful clearing of mine free channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan. His outstanding courage and steadfast devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 262 (February 20, 1951).

McIlwain, Andrew S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Andrew J. McIlwain (MCSN: 1154963), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 September 1951. Although painfully wounded twice during the company attack against a well-fortified enemy strong point, Private First Class McIlwain bravely exposed himself to devastating enemy fire and continued to fire upon hostile bunkers, neutralizing several positions and permitting the other wounded men to be evacuated. Sustaining a third wound several hours later, he steadfastly refused to be evacuated until he was physically unable to continue firing his weapon. By his outstanding courage, initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class McIlwain served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Columbus, Georgia. Home Town: Columbus, Georgia.

McInnis, Thomas A. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 11 - January 14, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Thomas A. McInnis (ASN: RA-39498232), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 11 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea. On that date his company was repeatedly attacked by a determined and numerically superior enemy force. Sergeant McInnis skillfully maneuvered his rifle squad to meet these hostile assaults. Three times his squad was driven from their positions, but each time he led them in successful counterattacks, regaining the lost ground. Throughout the engagement he displayed complete indifference for his personal safety as he moved about his defensive position, supervising the fire of his riflemen and encouraging them by his example of bravery under fire. As he moved about the fireswept perimeter assisting wounded comrades to safety he was killed by enemy small arms fire. His courageous actions and inspiring leadership materially contributed to the defense of his company positions and resulted in numerous casualties inflicted upon the enemy. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant McInnis reflects great credit upon himself and was in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.

McKean, James L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman James L. McKean (NSN: 4132870), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 March 1953. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospitalman McKean displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. While subjected to a devastating enemy barrage of mortar and artillery fire, he and three of his comrades were critically wounded by hostile fire falling in the trenchline. Despite extremely painful wounds, he gallantly crept through the intense barrage to aid the three injured Marines. Expressing complete disregard for his serious condition, he steadfastly refused medical attention for his wounds until he had administered aid to the other stricken men. He courageously insisted that the others be evacuated to safety before he allowed himself to be treated and then only upon the direct order of the Battalion Surgeon was he evacuated. Hospitalman McKean's gallant and courageous actions combined with his selfless devotion to duty served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 28642 (August 21, 1953).

McKee, Wilson J.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 400 - 18 August 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Wilson J. McKee (ASN: 0-389352), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action near Hwachon, Korea, on 29 May 1951. On this date, Company K was engaged in heavy combat with a counterattacking numerically superior enemy force. During the action, Captain McKee exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to direct the actions of his men and to insure a continuous supply of ammunition. While engaged thusly, he was wounded by fragments from an enemy shell. Although in great pain, he refused evacuation and with disregard for his personal safety, continued his dangerous task until the company repulsed the enemy attack. The gallantry displayed by Captain McKee reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered Military Service from California.

McKenna, Bernard P.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Bernard P. McKenna, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a member of Medical Company, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division in action against the enemy on 15 September 1950 near Taogu, Korea. At dawn, when the enemy had infiltrated Company I’s position on Hill 174 and launched an intense grenade attack on the company’s command post, Private McKenna, attached as medical aid man to the company, heard cries for aid from every quarter. With conspicuous devotion to duty and selfless disregard for his own safety, he moved through the furious close in fighting to locate and treat the many wounded. When he had dressed a man’s wound, Private McKenna would prop the man up and give him his weapon, enabling the man to continue to defend his position. He removed the more seriously wounded to occupied foxholes for protection. Not a man was wounded to whom Private McKenna did not give prompt and efficient medical aid. Wounded in the arm, Private McKenna continued to treat another man’s wound while his own was being dressed. A moment later, he received multiple back wounds from a grenade burst that knocked him down. Crawling into a foxhole, Private McKenna, despite considerable pain, continued to direct the treatment of the wounded until the company commander ordered his evacuation. Private McKenna’s conspicuous gallantry and selfless devotion to duty greatly contributed in saving many lives and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. General Orders: General Order number 151, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division, 11 November 1950. Home of Record: Pennsylvania.

McKinney, Robert

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Robert McKinney (MCSN: 1123031), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of the First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Seoul, Korea, on 30 September 1950. Observing that elements of his platoon were pinned down by intense hostile small arms and machine gun fire from two covered enemy positions on a hill to the front, Private McKinney courageously ran to the base of the hill and directed two friendly tanks to a firing position from which they could neutralize the hostile strong points. After positioning the armored vehicles, he braved the enemy barrage to direct the tanks in delivering accurate fire on the hostile emplacements, thereby contributing materially to the advance of his platoon on its objective. His initiative, skill and indomitable fighting spirit reflect great credit upon Private McKinney and the United States Naval Service. Born: Clark County, Kentucky. Home Town: Evansville, Indiana.

McKinney, William Russell

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Commander William Russell McKinney (NSN: 0-85170), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity during minesweeping operations at Wonson, Korea, from 10 to 31 October 1950. While serving as Commanding Officer of Underwater Demolition Team Three which participated in sweeping enemy mine fields in the face of heavy fire from enemy coast defense batteries by his inspiring leadership and professional competence he contributed directly to the successful clearance of mine free channel and anchorage areas off Wonsan. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1070 (November 17, 1950). Born: December 5, 1917 at at Springfield, Ohio. Home Town: San Francisco, California. Death: June 14, 1980.

McKinnon, Woodrow

Sergeant Woodrow McKinnon, 21st AAA AW Battalion (SP). On the night of 24-25 April 1951, hostile forces launched a strong attack near Yori, Korea, and isolated Sergeant McKinnon's half-track from the remainder of the unit. Although most of his crew had been wounded he continued to direct a deadly concentration of fire on the encircling foe. Despite repeated hostile attempts to overrun the position, he conducted a spirited defense to enable the infantry elements to displace to a new defense line with minimum casualties. Sergeant McKinnon's courageous actions reflect great credit on himself, his unit and the American soldier. Entered the military service from Florida.

McKinzie, Osburn E. (1st award)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 318 - 12 July 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Osburn E. McKinzie, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action while serving with Detachment ONE, 3d Air Rescue Squadron, Fifth Air Force, on 20 March 1951. Lieutenant McKinzie displayed a high degree of heroism by attempting the rescue of a United Nations pilot forced down behind enemy lines. Upon reaching the location, Lieutenant McKinzie attempted to land his unarmed aircraft, but was met with an extremely heavy barrage of small arms fire which made landing impossible. After escorting fighter strafed the area, he made three more attempts to land, but each time he was met by a hail of enemy fire. On the final attempt, Lieutenant McKinzie flew within range of enemy sub-machine gun fire, which struck the helicopter in the control area and accessory section. With smoke pouring from the aircraft and controls difficult to manage, he affected a safe landing in friendly territory. Lieutenant McKinzie's technical skill, courage, and selfless devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

McKinzie, Osburn E. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 135 - 19 March 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Osburn E. McKinzie, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Pilot, Detachment 1, 3d Air Rescue Squadron on 2 June 1951. In a slow and highly vulnerable H-5 helicopter, Captain McKinzie flew to the rescue of a United Nations pilot who had parachuted near Chon-gong-ni, Korea, deep in enemy territory. Advised that no enemy troops were in the area, Captain McKinzie flew directly to the site, located the pilot, and began an approach. As the helicopter neared the ground, enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire forced Captain McKinzie to climb away. Although fighter aircraft strafed and napalmed the area, a second attempt to land was thwarted by enemy fire. With determination, Captain McKinzie made a third attempt, and although his helicopter was struck several times, he managed to land near the downed pilot. While on the ground, Captain McKinzie directed the strafing runs of friendly fighter aircraft against enemy troops entrenched approximately 75 yards on either side. When the pilot was helped aboard with the aid of the accompanying medical crewman, Captain McKinzie took off and returned to safety. As a result of Captain McKinzie's courage, perseverance and devotion to duty, a United Nations pilot was saved from certain death or capture while heavy casualties and destruction were inflicted on the enemy. By his actions Captain McKinzie reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

McKotch, Edward T. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 482 - 17 November 1953

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Edward T. McKotch (US52212295), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company K, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in Korea. During the early morning hours of 24 June 1953, in the vicinity of Chat-Kol, Korea, the main line of resistance positions of Company K were attacked by a numerically superior enemy force supported by heavy barrages of mortar and artillery fire. In the initial bombardment, a friendly automatic rifle position was hit by enemy fire which wounded the two men stationed there. Learning this, Sergeant McKotch immediately ran to the weakened sector and removed the casualties to safety. Disregarding the intense enemy concentration, he courageously returned to the position and commenced to operate an automatic rifle. Although the enemy had reached his position, he continued to fire his weapons and inflicted much damage upon the advancing foe. He valiantly defended the vital position until mortally wounded. Sergeant McKotch's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Home Of Record: Pennsylvania

McLain, Billy James (posthumously)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (posthumously) to Private First Class Billy James McLain (ASN:RA-18363291), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Taejon, Korea on 20 July 1950.  His company, attacking northwest of the city, encountered a column of six enemy tanks.  With utter disregard for his own safety he advanced to an exposed position within fifteen yards of the leading tank.  Firing his 3.5-inch rocket launcher with deadly accuracy he disabled the tank which blocked the road and prevented further advance of the column.  Private McLain's gallant action reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  General Orders: Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 209 - 29 October 1950.

McLaughlin, Frederick C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Frederick C. McLaughlin (MCSN: 0-47896), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 - 27 October 1952. While leading his company in a night attack against an enemy-held portion of the main line of resistance, Captain McLaughlin fearlessly exposed himself to intense hostile small arms, mortar and artillery fire to direct his men more effectively in the attack. When it became necessary to pass another company through the attacking force, he voluntarily remained in a forward position to acquaint the new forces with the tactical situation and terrain features, despite painful wounds sustained during the course of the preceding battle. After personally leading members o the new unit on a detailed reconnaissance, he effectively supervised the disengagement of his own company. Following the withdrawal of his men, he remained in an exposed position in the fire-swept area to advise and assist the new company in directing and controlling friendly supporting arms. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and resolute determination, Captain McLaughlin contributed materially to the eventual success of the mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Decatur, Illinois. Home Town: Arlington, Virginia.

McLaughlin, Gerald J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Gerald J. McLaughlin (MCSN: 0-43995), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. When a numerically superior hostile force launched a fanatical attack against his platoon's position, First Lieutenant McLaughlin fearlessly exposed himself to heavy and accurate enemy small arms, machine gun and grenade fire to reorganize his remaining men and lead them in a counterattack against the enemy. Armed only with a .45 caliber pistol and hand grenades, he continued to press the assault against the hostile troops, which were reinforced by a heavy machine gun and 60-mm. mortars, and, by his daring tactics, personally accounted for five enemy dead in his drive to capture the enemy weapons and to retake all the lost ground. Aggressive and determined throughout, First Lieutenant McLaughlin, by his courageous leadership and heroic fighting spirit contributed to the successful repulse of the enemy attack and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Paul, Minnesota. Home Town: St. Paul, Minnesota.

McLaughlin, John E. Jr.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 191 - 26 September 1950

Corporal John E. McLaughlin Jr., RA12247586, Military Police Corps, 25th Military Police Company, United States Army.  While on patrol duty 16 August 1950 near Chindong-ni, Korea, Corporal McLaughlin encountered an enemy roadblock on the main supply route.  Without hesitation, he commandeered a 2 1/2 ton truck in the area, directed the 50 caliber machinegun on the roadblock and instructed the gunner.  Then directing another soldier to one flank, he moved in from the other although the enemy had by that time opened fire with automatic weapons.  He coordinated counterfire on the roadblock, killed five of the enemy and set the other ten to flight.  Corporal McLaughlin's valorous leadership and notable soldierly ability made possible reopening of the supply route and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Massachusetts.

McLean, Thomas S.

Second Lieutenant Thomas S. McLean, 02028610, Infantry, Company C, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  During the early morning hours of 6 September 1952, Lieutenant McLean's unit was engaged in a bitter fight to halt the enemy advance and recapture positions which the enemy had overrun near Satae-ri, Korea.  Lieutenant McLean organized a counterattacking force and led it through heavy mortar and small arms fire against the enemy held positions.  The assault was broken and Lieutenant McLean wounded, but he fell back, regrouped his men, and courageously led another charge.  Intense enemy fire stopped the second attack and inflicted heavy casualties on the friendly force, again wounding Lieutenant McLean.  Despite his painful injuries, he risked his life to go to the aid of a wounded comrade who was lying in an exposed position.  After the man had been carried to safety, Lieutenant McLean, refusing to be evacuated himself, organized a third assaulting group and led it forward until it too broke in the face of the withering enemy fire.  Although near the point of collapse from shock and loss of blood, Lieutenant McLean insisted on remaining with his unit to lead still another charge.  He was evacuated against his will.  Lieutenant McLean's heroic actions were instrumental in stopping the enemy advance and were a great inspiration to the men of his unit.  His extraordinary courage, unfaltering leadership, and determined devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the Federal service from New York.

McLean, William H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class William H. McLean (NSN: 5703836), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 27 November to 2 December 1950. As Corpsman with a reinforced Rifle Company which was assigned the mission of protecting a mountain pass on the Division main supply route between Hagaru-ri and Yudam-ni, Hospital Corpsman Third Class McLean displayed outstanding skill and courage in going to and caring for the wounded during a five day period when the company was isolated and cut off from friendly units. The Company suffered approximately 84 casualties and was constantly under fire. On the morning of 29 November, when one sector of the perimeter was being assaulted by a strong enemy force, Hospital Corpsman Third Class McLean voluntarily and with absolute disregard for his own personal safety left his covered position and moved through intense rifle and automatic weapons fire in order to administer aid to a wounded man who was forward of the front lines. When it was found that the wounded man could not be moved because of the intense enemy fire, Hospital Corpsman Third Class McLean elected to remain with him and continued to administer aid until the enemy attack had been repulsed. Throughout the five day period in sub-zero weather he saved many lives by his daring and fearless actions which served as an inspiration to all members of the command. Hospital Corpsman Third Class McLean's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 2760 (January 25, 1951).

McLeod, Purdy E.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 168 - 19 September 1950

Second Lieutenant Purdy E. McLeod, 0969250, Infantry, Company G, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 11 August 1950 near Chang-yong, Korea, Company G was halted by hostile fire.  Moving forward through the intense fire, Lieutenant McLeod reorganized a platoon which had lost its leader.  By placing its machine guns in effective positions and inspiring the men by his own calm courage, Lieutenant McLeod enabled the platoon to hold off a later attack.  He similarly rallied another platoon which had been heavily attacked.  In the evening when the enemy pressed its attack and the company was forced to withdraw, Lieutenant McLeod, directing the rear guard action, held a mortar tube, without bipod, in his bare hands and fired it into the enemy.  Not until the entire company had cleared and all wounded had been evacuated, did he withdraw.  Lieutenant McLeod's unfailing valor, initiative and leadership reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from South Carolina.

McLeod, Sandy L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Warrant Officer Sandy L. McLeod (MCSN: 0-57551), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Tank Platoon Commander of Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 24 - 25 July 1953. Assigned the difficult and extremely hazardous mission of placing four of his tanks on a prominent main line of resistance position in order to provide close support for friendly infantry defending the area against a vicious attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Warrant Officer McLeod stubbornly held his ground and called down friendly mortar and artillery fire on his own position when his tank was surrounded by the enemy and cut off from friendly infantry support. When the hostile troops succeeded in climbing on his vehicle, he ordered the other tanks to bring down their fire on his tank while his crewmen hurled grenades at the enemy from inside the vehicle and, throughout a continuous series of determined hostile assaults, skillfully directed his platoon in delivering devastating fire on the enemy. By his outstanding leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and zealous devotion to duty, Warrant Officer McLeod was greatly responsible for the success achieved by his platoon in preventing the enemy from capturing the vital area and overrunning the infantry. His courageous actions served to inspire all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Jonesboro, North Carolina. Home Town: Norfolk, Virginia.

McMahon, James Patrick

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade James Patrick McMahon (NSN: 0-472745), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy during mine sweeping operations at Wonsan in the Korean theater during the period 10 to 31 October 1950. As Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Chatterer (AMS-40) and while sweeping enemy minefields in the face of heavy fire from enemy coast defense batteries, by his inspiring leadership and professional competence, he contributed directly to the efficient operation of his ship and the successful clearance of mine free channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1073 (November 17, 1950).

McMahon, John F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain John F. McMahon, Jr. (MCSN: 0-32949), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. Assigned the mission of seizing the key terrain of a heavily fortified enemy hill position in the vicinity of Inje, Captain McMahon fearlessly exposed himself to devastating enemy artillery, mortar, automatic weapons an small arms fire to skillfully direct his men and encourage them in overcoming the fierce hostile resistance. After expertly seizing his objective, he quickly reorganized his company and continued to hold the position despite constant heavy enemy mortar and artillery barrages. By his aggressive leadership, outstanding tactical ability and unswerving devotion to duty, Captain McMahon contributed materially to the success of the battalion and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Woodhaven, New York. Home Town: Lynbrook, New York.

McManus, Luther M.

First Lieutenant Luther M. McManus, 0975625, Infantry, United States Army, Company A, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Wolbong-ni, Korea, during the night of 18-19 October 1951.  During his company's attack upon a strongly defended enemy occupied hill, Lieutenant McManus, platoon leader, observed that an adjacent element's advance had been halted by a tremendous concentration of hostile fire.  Dashing across open terrain to investigate, he found the platoon disorganized, its leader a casualty.  With complete disregard for his own safety, he ran throughout the fire swept area, regrouping the men, and soon had them moving forward again.  He then joined another platoon, which was engaged in a heated fire fight, and unhesitatingly assumed command upon discovering that its leader was also wounded.  Inspiring the soldiers with his aggressive fighting spirit, he ordered them to fix bayonets and personally led them in a powerful charge against the enemy.  Halfway up the hill, the hostile forces unleashed a murderous barrage of hand grenades, inflicting casualties among the forward troops.  Lieutenant McManus, farthest forward but unhurt, shouted encouragement to his faltering men and set the example by advancing upon nearby enemy positions alone.  In the face of enemy fire, he charged a key bunker, firing his pistol and tossing grenades with deadly accuracy.  Thus encouraged, his men moved forward and fought their way up with him to the top of the objective.  He then obtained an automatic rifle and pursued the enemy a short distance down the opposite ridgeline; inflicting heavy casualties among the wildly retreating hordes.  By this time, word had reached him that the company commander had become a casualty.  He quickly reorganized the entire unit and established defensive positions to resist the inevitable counterattack.  Throughout the night, in spite of the savage ferocity of repeated enemy assaults, he moved fearlessly about the position, directing the defense and caring for the wounded.  On several occasions, it was only his courageous determination that prevented the enemy from overrunning the friendly lines.  He rushed about to threatened spots in the defense perimeter and personally repulsed the attacking masses with hand grenades and machine gun fire.  By morning, the greatly decimated enemy force withdrew, leaving approximately forty dead, some of whom had fallen within three feet of his machine gun position.  Lieutenant McManus' gallant actions, intrepid leadership and selfless performance of duty reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from the District of Columbia.

McMillan, Charles M. Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers) Charles M. McMillan, Jr. (ASN: 0-2204339), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 14th Engineer Combat Battalion, in action against an armed enemy on 12 August 1950, at Yousan, Korea. On 12 August 1950, Lieutenant McMillan and a platoon of engineers were defending a road block on the connecting road between Yonsan and Iryang when they were completely surrounded by numerically superior enemy forces. The position soon became untenable and Lieutenant McMillan gave the order to withdraw, voluntarily remaining behind to protect the withdrawal of his men. At this time Lieutenant McMillan was wounded by an enemy grenade, but despite his wound he remained in his position directing fire on the advancing enemy. During this action Lieutenant McMillan was killed. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant McMillan on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

McMinn, James L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal James L. McMinn (MCSN: 665737), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company A, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1950. When his unit was ordered to withdraw after a numerically superior enemy force had overrun a friendly position on the outpost line of resistance, Corporal McMinn, who had the only machine gun still in operation, courageously volunteered to remain behind to cover the withdrawal. After providing a base of covering fire for the unit, he began to withdraw and simultaneously delivered devastating fire upon the enemy, inflicting heavy casualties and momentarily stopping the hostile advance, thereby enabling the platoon to reach the safety of the main line of resistance without further casualties. Subsequently making his way to friendly lines through intense hostile fire, he again set up his weapon and continued to fire upon the enemy until the attack was repulsed. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty in the face of extreme peril, Corporal McMinn served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Grunville, Mississippi. Home Town: Houston, Texas.

McMullen, Birton Eugene

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Birton Eugene McMullen (NSN: 0-320519), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Pilot of a Helicopter in Helicopter Squadron One, based on board the U.S.S. LST 799, during a rescue mission near Wonson, Korea, on 13 June 1952. Skillfully piloting his helicopter at low altitude over the mountainous terrain to the scene of a pilot downed in enemy territory, Lieutenant McMullen expertly maneuvered his vulnerable plane in the face of intense hostile rifle and machine-gun fire and succeeded in reaching a position where his crewman could lower the rescue sling and recover the downed airman. While returning to his base, he sighted another pilot in the water approximately 400 yards from shoreline and quickly carried out a second rescue, returning both airmen to safety. His superb airmanship, outstanding courage and unswerving devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Lieutenant McMullen and the United States Naval Service. Commander, 7th Fleet: Serial 215 (February 3, 1953).

McMullen, Cornelius E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Commander Cornelius E. McMullen (NSN: 0-88622), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Pirate (AM-275) during minesweeping operations conducted in heavily mined waters and in areas subjected to enemy gunfire during the period 10 to 12 October 1950. The inspiring leadership and professional competence constantly displayed by Lieutenant McMullen in the performance of this mission contributed directly to the efficient operation of his ship and to the successful clearance of mine free channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan, Korea. His loyalty and steadfastness to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1204 (December 13, 1950).

McMullen, Orval F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Orval F. McMullen (MCSN: 238755), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces during the assault landing at Inchon, Korea, on 15 September 1950. Reaching the beach after a delay because of mechanical difficulties, Technical Sergeant McMullen found his platoon pinned down under intense fire from an enemy bunker located to their front and, quickly realizing that reorganization and continuation of the attack would be impossible until the hostile position had been destroyed, proceeded forward toward the bunker. Boldly exposing himself to the vicious enemy fire, he advanced on the emplacement, neutralizing it completely with well placed rifle and grenade fire and, immediately effecting the reorganization of his platoon, rapidly seized his assigned objective. By his daring initiative, inspiring leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Technical Sergeant McMullen upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tuttle, Oklahoma. Home Town: Camaj, Washington.

McMullen, Robert A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Robert A. McMullen (MCSN: 0-30452), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Company Commander of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 September 1950. Assigned the mission of assaulting a ridge line in front of the Battalion area, Captain Mullen repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire while moving among his men, directing their fire and lending assistance and encouragement. By his courageous actions, he contributed materially to the successful completion of the company's assigned mission. Later, while reorganizing the units of his company to continue the attack, he was seriously wounded and had to be evacuated. His fortitude, initiative and outstanding leadership reflect the highest credit upon Captain McMullen and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tyrone, Pennsylvania. Home Town: West Chester, Pennsylvania.

McMullen, Wayne O.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 210 - 22 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal Wayne O. McMullen, RA17291093, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 2 June 1951 in the vicinity of Inje, Korea. On that day he was attached to Company A, 9th Infantry Regiment, as a medical aidman. Company A was attacking Hill 451 under intense enemy mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire and suffered numerous casualties. Corporal McMullen showed disregard for personal safety by moving continually into fire swept positions to aid wounded soldiers. In spite of the number of casualties no one had to wait for medical aid for more than a few moments. In addition to the application of medical aid, he saw to the safe evacuation of the wounded. His actions directly contributed to the high morale of the unit and the confidence necessary to carry on with the mission. Corporal McMullen’s gallantry and devotion to his comrades reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military, service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

McNamara, Homer C.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Homer C. McNamara (ASN: 0-57432), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 4 February 1951 near Nukhyon-ni, Korea. While assaulting enemy emplacements on a large hill, sparsely covered with small shrubs and bushes, the leading attack elements of Company A were pinned down by intense machine gun and rifle fire. Lieutenant McNamara, platoon leader, realizing the serious consequences that could result if his men remained in their stalled positions, stood up and called to the platoon to follow him. Moving up the hill, alternately throwing grenades and firing his carbine at the enemy, Lieutenant McNamara so inspired his men and confused the hostile defenders that the platoon followed him and seized
the objective. When attacking the next hill, Lieutenant McNamara's men again were subjected to heavy fire, but under the inspired direction and encouragement of their leader, the platoon successfully routed the enemy from important positions. Lieutenant McNamara's leadership and courageous behavior in gallantly leading his men reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

McNeil, Commodore C. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Commodore C. McNeil, Jr. (MCSN: 870491), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Painfully wounded when part of his squad's position was overrun during an enemy assault, Corporal McNeil voluntarily exposed himself to intense hostile machine gun, rifle and mortar fire while making his way to the platoon command post to report the breakthrough. Although wounded a second time on his return, he steadfastly refused evacuation until assured that the squad's position and personnel were secure. By his daring initiative, outstanding courage and loyal devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Corporal McNeil upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina. Home Town: Wilkesboro, North Carolina.

McNesky, Robert M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Robert M. McNesky (MCSN: 1087501), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 April 1952. Assigned the mission of investigating possible enemy activity on a friendly outpost, Staff Sergeant McNesky was estimating the situation when he accidentally detonated a well-concealed booby trop which caused part of his foot to be blown off and wounded two other men. Immediately afterwards, when the squad was taken under heavy hostile mortar and small arms fire, Staff Sergeant McNesky, despite his painful wound, courageously remained in command of the squad and supervised the evacuation of the other wounded. By his exceptional courage, perseverance and outstanding devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant McNesky served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Foley, Alabama.

McNutt, Billie W. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 62 - October 11, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Billie W. McNutt (ASN: RA-18099230), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 1 September 1950, in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea. On the night of 31 August 1950, Sergeant McNutt, with another soldier, was manning the Battalion Observation Post in the Naktong River to keep the enemy under observation, At approximately 2230 hours the enemy began crossing the Naktong River in strength. All lines of communications in the Battalion were disrupted and the only means of keeping the battalion informed of the situation was by means of the radio with Sergeant McNutt. He remained at his post relaying information about enemy movements. AT 0130 hours on 1 September it became apparent that the enemy was making a major break-through and by 0230 hours the Battalion was completely surrounded. Although ordered to withdraw, he elected to remain with the radio and kept a steady flow of information to the rear and adjusted artillery fire which resulted in numerous casualties among the enemy and disrupted their time schedule. At 0300 hours enemy infantry in conjunction with tanks had advanced within grenading distance of the Observation Post. At this time he made his last transmission stating that this was a definite breath-through with the main objective the rear of the 9th Infantry Regiment, and then withdrew through enemy lines to the Regiment Command Post. As a result of his courageous action in remaining at his post in the face of overwhelming enemy penetrations, vital information regarding enemy strength and deployment was relayed to his battalion. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant McNutt on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

McNutt, Russell W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Russell W. McNutt (MCSN: 0-51611), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 March 1952. Participating in an attack against an enemy supply route, Second Lieutenant McNutt aggressively pressed his assault and scored a direct hit on a hostile railroad. Observing that the flight leader was forced to bail out of his aircraft when it was hit by enemy fire, he skillfully lowered his landing gear and flaps and, despite multiple small arms fire, followed the parachuting pilot to mark his downed position. When his own plane was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire, and the downed airman was captured by two of the enemy, Second Lieutenant McNutt resolutely continued to carry out low firing passes over the area to discourage the hostile troops from leaving with their prisoner and, when the rescue helicopter arrived, directed it to the downed pilot. By his expert airmanship, outstanding courage and daring initiative in the face of grave personal risk, Second Lieutenant McNutt contributed materially to the liberation of his flight leader and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Anacortes, Washington. Home Town: Seattle, Washington.

McPherson, Mitchell S.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 112 - September 29, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class [then Corporal] Mitchell S. McPherson (ASN: RA-18338061), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 26 July 1950, near Yong Dong, Korea. Sergeant First Class McPherson's platoon had prepared a bridge and a highway section for demolition. Infiltrating enemy elements cut the wires to the demolition charges during the early morning. While the wires were being reconnected, the blasting machine came under heavy enemy machine gun fire. Sergeant First Class McPherson and two comrades, with complete disregard for their own safety, moved the machine under heavy mortar fire to a more tenable position and reconnected the wires for a second time. The bridge and highway section were then demolished, greatly retarding the advance of the enemy. Sergeant First Class McPherson's gallant action reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

McPherson, Stanley Burton

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Staff Sergeant Stanley Burton McPherson (MCSN: 539332), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company A, First Engineer Battalion, First Provisional Marine Brigade, from 3 September to 5 September 1950, in Korea. Before nightfall on 3 September 1950, when an infantry company was occupying a salient position, Sergeant McPherson led his demolition squad forward of the company's position and set up an elaborate system of anti-personnel mines, trip flares and demolition traps on all approaches. In full view of the enemy who was occupying high ground, Sergeant McPherson braved continuous small arms and occasional mortar fire for a period of one and one-half hours. Completely disregarding his own safety he remained thus exposed until his squad had established a formidable chain of obstacles around the company position. After darkness on the night of 4 September when the company was again occupying a salient position, Sergeant McPherson led his men forward of the company lines and once more set out obstacles on all approaches. Heedless of enemy small arms in the darkness he remained well forward of friendly lines until 0200 the next morning. At dawn on 5 September 1950 in full view of the enemy he led his squad forward of the company's position and removed the obstacles so that the attack could be continued. Even though exposed to hostile fire and twice trapped by strafing of friendly airplanes, Sergeant McPherson coolly directed his men until his mission was accomplished. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant McPherson reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 41 (January 25, 1951). Entered Service From Massachusetts.

McReynolds, William

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Colonel William McReynolds (MCSN: 0-7189), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer of the Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action on 22 August 1951, in the vicinity of Tumil-li, Korea. On that date, the battalion was supporting the 36th Regiment, Republic of Korea Army, whose objective was to take the hill mass in front of Hill 940. Colonel McReynolds personally chose to direct the supporting fires of his battalion against the well-entrenched enemy positions. Continually exposed to heavy enemy small arms fire, he sought out enemy positions, directing artillery fire. The unusual accuracy of this fire resulted in staggering losses being inflicted on the enemy, forcing them to withdraw. His coolness under heavy enemy fire, his skillful direction of the fires of his battalion in support of the Republic of Korea Infantry, and the accuracy of this fire contributed immeasurably to the success of the operation. The gallantry, broad knowledge of artillery tactics, and professional skill displayed by Colonel McReynolds on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 228 (October 8, 1951). Born: January 1, 1919 at Iona Island, New York. Home Town: Victoria, Maryland. Death: November 25, 2008.

McVeigh, Thomas Lyons (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Thomas Lyons McVeigh (MCSN: 0-50859), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during a fierce attack against strong enemy hill positions on 31 May 1951. When the assault platoon, which his own unit was supporting, fell back under intense hostile fire, suffering heavy casualties, Second Lieutenant McVeigh quickly observed that the platoon commander was among the casualties and unhesitatingly rushed forward to effect the reorganization of the depleted unit. Skillfully directing the platoon's redeployment and supervising evacuations, he steadfastly remained with the foremost elements and, when the enemy launched a furious counterattack in an attempt to dislodge the entire company, directed a brilliant defense which culminated in the repulse of the hostile force with heavy losses, although he himself sustained painful and serious wounds during the action. By his inspiring leadership, daring initiative and courageous devotion to duty in the face of strong enemy opposition, Second Lieutenant McVeigh contributed materially to the success achieved by his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: June 13, 1928 at Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Stewart Manor, New York. Death: KIA: September 11, 1951 - Buried at: Long Island National Cemetery - Long Island, New York.

McVicars, Andrew L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Andrew L. McVicars (MCSN: 0-22243), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of an unarmed Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), during operations against enemy aggressor forces west of Koto-ri, Korea, on 15 December 1950. Unhesitatingly volunteering to attempt the rescue of a downed Navy pilot forty miles behind enemy lines, Captain McVicars courageously flew his aircraft over mountainous terrain in the face of severe turbulent winds and landed near the crashed aircraft. Although the pilot was dead, he immediately attempted to extricate the body from the wreckage and, when approximately thirty of the enemy in ambush opened fire and endeavored to render his aircraft unserviceable, immediately placed the deceased in the plan and took off. Once aloft, he called in friendly aircraft to strafe and bomb the ambushers. Captain McVicars, by his fearless and aggressive actions, daring initiative and grave concern for another at great risk to his own life, served as an inspiration to all members of his squadron and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Diamondville, Wyoming. Home Town: Butte, Montana.

 

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