Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "N"

 
Close this window
 

Nabors, James F. (1st award of 3)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 48 - September 17, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) James F. Nabors (ASN: 0-397813), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Headquarters, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 1 September 1950, near Mojon-Ni, Korea. Major Nabors, in his capacity as Regimental S-2 and S-3, was, on 1 September 1950, observing a tank platoon in support of the Infantry, attacking the enemy in the vicinity of Mojon-Ni, Korea. When the attack was forced to halt due to the intensity of the enemy mortar and heavy weapons fire, Major Nabors voluntarily and upon his own initiative, mounted the back of the lead tank and directed the platoon to continue the attack under his orders. Under his aggressive and fearless leadership, the platoon advanced into a village where the enemy had established a strong point. The enemy was routed soon by machine gun and tank fire under his cool leadership. Still remaining in his exposed position, and with utter disregard for his personal safety, Major Nabors continued the advance of the tanks by outflanking the enemy, causing him to retreat and thus clearing the way for the advance of the foot troops. The actions of Major Nabors on this occasion were an inspiration to all who witnessed the act, and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Nabozny, Eugene L. (Posthumous)

Sergeant First Class Eugene L. Nabozny, RA15224480, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 15 February 1951 in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea.  Sergeant Nabozny was a platoon sergeant in Company B which was to counterattack and regain possession of a strategic hill south of Chipyong-ni, Korea.  Disregarding a painful wound received earlier in the attack, he determinedly assisted the platoon leader in the assault.  He repeatedly exposed himself to close range enemy machine gun fire to place his rifle squads in the most advantageous positions.  Though Sergeant Nabozny was mortally wounded during this action, he had contributed materially to the ultimate success of his unit.  The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Nabozny reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Michigan.

Naftel, Stacey D.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 432 - 14 September 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Stacey D. Naftel, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy in June and July 1951, while participating in three aerial flights over enemy territory as Aircraft Commander of an RB-45. Captain Naftel was assigned the task of reconnoitering enemy installations located in areas strongly defended by anti-aircraft artillery and heavily protected by enemy jet fighters to procure intelligence material vital to the United States Air Force. The missions were largely planned by Captain Naftel. Unaided and unarmed, in the face of enemy air opposition he relentlessly pursued his objective. The directive under which he operated allowed him to exercise his own judgment on whether or not to continue the missions in the event of hostile interception. Captain Naftel refused to take advantage of the latitude provided and pursued each mission to a successful conclusion. The technical proficiency, exceptional courage and devotion to duty displayed by Captain Naftel were in keeping with the highest tradition of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Nairn, William Wallace III (1st award)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 80 - August 25, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant] William Wallace Nairn, III (ASN: 0-50720), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company E, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. On 26 July 1950, near Sangn-yong, Korea, Captain Nairn was ordered to move his company up a narrow river bed to block the advance of enemy forces. He quickly organized a team of tanks and infantry and led them forward to recapture an enemy-held village. Proceeding beyond the town where numerically superior enemy forces held a strategic position, his company inflicted an estimated two hundred casualties upon the enemy before they were able to reinforce their position. When enemy reinforcements arrived and threatened to outflank his company, Captain Nairn withdrew his company so skillfully that a minimum of casualties were sustained despite withering fire from both flanks. His inspired leadership and gallant actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Nairn, William Wallace III (2nd award)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 81 - August 25, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant] William Wallace Nairn, III (ASN: 0-50720), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company E, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. When the line of departure had been secured for a battalion attack in the vicinity of Masan, Korea, on 2 August 1950 and Captain Nairn was moving his company along a road to the rear area, he was notified that the enemy had set up a road block and had immobilized a small friendly force with machine gun fire. Captain Nairn deployed two platoons to flank the enemy force which held a key hill, and moved the other platoon into position to trap the enemy as they withdrew. In the resulting action the enemy was deprived of the road which had served as a supply route and suffered heavy casualties. As the enemy retreated, they were reinforced to strength of an estimated battalion and counterattacked, isolating each of the three platoons. Captain Nairn devised a route of withdrawal for one platoon and moved through intense enemy fire to lead the other two platoons through the mountains to safety. Captain Nairn's resourcefulness, inspired leadership and selfless devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Nakashita, Kelly S.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 112 - September 29, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant [then Corporal] Kelly S. Nakashita (ASN: RA-19340826), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 16th Reconnaissance Company, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 29 August 1950, near Chingu-dong, Korea. Sergeant Nakashita was a member of a heavy machine gun crew giving support to a combat patrol crossing the Naktong River. The patrol was forced to withdraw due to heavy enemy fire, leaving two wounded on the enemy shore. Without a word from anyone and with complete disregard for his own life, Sergeant Nakashita swam the river under enemy machine gun fire and brought one of the wounded men to safety. His gallant action saved the life of a wounded comrade and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.

Naples, Samuel

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 191 - 26 September 1950

Sergeant First Class Samuel Naples, RA33411206, Armor, Company E, 89th Medium Tank Battalion, United States Army.  At about 0200 hours, 7 September 1950 near Daisa-ri, Korea, Sergeant First Class Naples' tank was attacked by a squad of enemy infantry.  Having dismounted his 30 caliber machine gun and set it up at the right of the tank, he traversed the 90mm tank gun to the left.  However, the enemy pressed within 35 yards of the tank so that fire from the tank could not hit them.  Standing up in the turret, Sergeant First Class Naples threw hand grenades and fired his rifle and submachine gun until he had killed seven of the enemy and driven the rest to a nearby hut.  He eliminated the hut and its occupants by fire from his tank gun.  The exceptional gallantry, determination and soldierly ability of Sergeant First Class Naples reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Narvaez-Montalvo, Marine (Posthumous)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 197 - 17 June 1951

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Marine Narvaez-Montalvo(ER30415205), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company C, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 29 April 1951, Company C sustained several casualties while attacking well- defended enemy positions on Hill 272, Korea. Private Narvaez-Montalvo, attached to Company C as an aid man, repeatedly braved intense hostile fire to give medical assistance to his wounded comrades. When a friendly infantryman was severely wounded and completely surrounded by the enemy, Private Narvaez-Montalvo fought his way to the stricken soldier's side, wounding several enemy. He was subjected to a fanatical enemy attack while rendering first aid and, while offering valiant resistance, was mortally wounded. The outstanding gallantry and exemplary devotion to duty displayed by Private Narvaez-Montalvo reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Nash, James B. (POW)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant James B. Nash (MCSN: 293875), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with the Military Police Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1950. When the convoy in which he was riding was ambushed by numerically superior hostile forces while en route from Koto-ri to Hagaru-ri, Staff Sergeant Nash immediately assisted in directing effective counterfire on the well-concealed enemy positions. Although painfully wounded in both legs and in one hand, he bravely made his way through the intense hostile fire to rescue a casualty lying in an exposed, fire-swept area and succeeded in hauling the stricken Marine to a position of comparative safety. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Staff Sergeant Nash was greatly instrumental in saving the life of the wounded Marine and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Durham, North Carolina. Home Town: Durham, North Carolina.

Nash, Robert E.

Second Lieutenant Robert E. Nash, O966722, Infantry, US Army, a member of Headquarters Second Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action near Yuson, Korea, on 16 July 1950. LT Nash distinguished himself by outstanding courage and devotion to duty in running enemy road blocks under heavy enemy fire. LT Nash was in a jeep leading two 2 ton trucks on the main supply line loaded with much needed ammunition for front line units. Along this main supply route his vehicles came under intense enemy machine gun fire from high ground on both sides of the road. Both trucks were knocked out and LT Nash continued in his jeep until it was shot from under him. He then crawled roughly one-half mile through rice paddies to clear the roadblock and to reach the Regimental Command Post to report to the commanding officer. LT Nash, on learning that communication with Division Headquarters was out, volunteered to bring help to break the road block. He secured another jeep and attempted to run the road block a second time. Again his jeep was shot from under him, and he crawled far enough to clear the road clock. He reached the Division Command Post, where he contacted a battalion commander and secured enough men and trucks to punch through the road block allowing the First Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment to withdraw through the opening. It was necessary to physically restrain LT Nash even though he was in an exhausted condition to prevent his return the third time to the road block. His fearless courage and outstanding devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest tradition of the Armed Forces and reflects great credit on himself and the Military Service. GO 57, 24 Jul 1950. (Home town unknown.)

Nassetta, Peter Michael (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Peter Michael Nassetta (MCSN: 629519), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. During an attack by numerically superior hostile forces in the vicinity of Tangam-ni, Private First Class Nassetta repeatedly exposed himself to the fire of enemy automatic weapons to deliver effective counterfire and succeeded in silencing numerous gun positions. When an adjacent platoon was partially overrun, he boldly manned the automatic rifle of a fallen comrade and directed accurate fire against the hostile troops until a secondary defense line could be established. With his own sector again subjected to a fierce assault, he bravely remained at his post and, although the enemy were only a few feet from his position, continued to launch a daring hand grenade attack until he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Nassetta greatly aided in repulsing the enemy attacks and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 5, 1928 at New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York. Death: KIA" April 24, 1951 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Naudts, Morris J. (2nd Award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 272 - December 20, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Morris J. Naudts (ASN: 0-32265), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Kumchon, Korea on 25 to 26 September 1950. During the advance from the Naktong River beachhead to the city of Taejon his battalion was organized into a motorized task force of armor, infantry and engineers. During the swift advance Colonel Naudts remained with the forward elements giving orders and direction to the point of the column. The battalion had advanced rapidly, overcoming the strong enemy defenses and had halted for refueling at Okchon. As the task force was preparing to move out an enemy tank opened fire with cannon and machine guns at close range and heavy mortar and machine gun fire-swept the area. With complete disregard for his own safety he advanced, through a hail of withering fire, to one of his tanks and directed its fire on the enemy tank which was quickly destroyed. Moving among his men, completely unmindful of personal safety, he directed their fire against the enemy's dismounted troops and made preparations for launching a counterattack. During the advance which followed, his battalion destroyed five enemy tanks and gained many miles of enemy territory, inflicting heavy casualties. Colonel Naudts' courageous actions, devotion to duty and outstanding leadership reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry.

Naudts, Morris J.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Morris J. Naudts (ASN: 0-32265), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chudong-ni, Korea, on 1 January 1951. On 31 December 1950, the 1st Battalion was deployed in defense of the left sector of the regimental front when the regiment engaged a Chinese Communist force estimated to be one division. Before daylight on 1 January 1951, an estimated enemy regiment had succeeded in infiltrating friendly lines, gained possession of high ground on both flanks of the battalion and established several road blocks on commanding terrain in the rear of the battalion. When it became apparent that the Battalion was in danger of being cut off and encircled, the regimental commander ordered Colonel Naudts to withdraw his battalion to alternate defense positions to the south. Forming his command post group, consisting of approximately 20 officers and enlisted men, he led the approximately 400 yards through heavy enemy fire to high ground where he intended to assemble and reorganize his battalion. Upon reaching this high ground, he encountered approximately 200 enemy who were armed with mortars and machine guns and moving towards the battalion's rear. Although greatly outnumbered, Colonel Naudts, in an amazing display of personal courage, unhesitatingly led a daring assault upon the enemy force inflicting numerous casualties and forcing the remainder to flee in wild disorder. Having successfully put this group of enemy to flight, he voluntarily re-traced his steps and again exposed himself to heavy enemy fire in order to guide the remainder of his battalion into the same area. Colonel Naudts remained in this exposed position until the last man of his battalion had safely crossed the rice paddies. Having thus successfully assembled his battalion, he immediately set to work to reorganize his men and deploy them in position on the right flank of the 2d Battalion and thus ensure the establishment of the final regimental defensive position as ordered. The gallantry and superior leadership displayed by Colonel Naudts on this occasion aided immeasurably in his regiment's stand against overwhelming odds and reflect high credit upon himself and the military service. Home Town: Waukegan, Illinois

Navarro-Rodriguez, Jose E. (posthumous)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 543 - 26 November 1951

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Jose E. Navarro-Rodriguez, (US50100816), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 30 September 1951, Company I attacked a hill near Chorwon, Korea, which was strongly held by a well entrenched and fanatically determined enemy force. As the unit advanced upon the hostile defenses, it was subjected to intense automatic weapons and mortar fire from two advantageously located wooden bunkers. Realizing that the destruction of these lethal obstacles was necessary to allow the company to continue its advance, Private Navarro-Rodriguez quickly dashed across the exposed terrain to within grenade range of the enemy emplacements, and although fully revealed to the fury of the hostile counterfire, threw hand grenades into the positions, completely destroying them. When this was done, the enemy defense crumbled and the rest of the hostile troops fled the area, hotly pursued by Company I. Joining in the advance, Private Navarro-Rodriguez bore a machine gun to the top of the hill and mounted it to pour heavy fire into the ranks of the dispersed and retreating enemy. As he was engaged in this action, he fell mortally wounded from the desperate hostile return fire. The fearless contribution that Private Navarro-Rodriguez made to his unit's mission and the completely selfless gallantry with which it was accomplished, reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Navo, Kenneth W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Kenneth W. Navo (MCSN: 650317), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 December 1950. When his squad leader became a casualty while participating in an assault against a series of hostile strong points, Private First Class Navo unhesitatingly assumed command of the unit and skillfully maneuvered the group through the heavy enemy fire. During the final attack on the hostile position, he exposed himself to devastating automatic weapons fire to move from bunker to bunker, killing the hostile occupants and shouting words of encouragement to his men. By his courageous leadership, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Navo aided immeasurably to routing the enemy from the strategic positions and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Los Angeles, California. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Naylor, Lewis J. (posthumous)

A member of Company C, 2nd Chemical Mortar Battalion, 8th United States Army, Sergeant Lewis J. Naylor distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sinjang, Korea.  During the absence of his platoon leader on November 26, 1950, Sergeant Naylor was directing the fire of his mortar platoon when he detected the enemy closing in on his position.  After the enemy had approached within such short range that mortar fire could not be delivered effectively he rallied his men and directed the delivery of small arms fire which inflicted numerous casualties on the enemy.  When a soldier operating a machine gun was wounded, Sergeant Naylor rushed to the gun and put it back in action.  Although wounded in the arm and the leg while operating the machine gun, he kept the gun in action until he was wounded a third time in the chest.  At this point, protesting vigorously, he was forcibly evacuated but died en route to the aid station.  The gallant actions of Sergeant Naylor were a great inspiration to the men of his platoon and reflected great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Pennsylvania.

Neagle, Paul E.

First Lt. Paul E. Neagle, formerly of Dubuque and Des Moines, has been awarded the silver star for gallantry in action in north Korea Oct. 13, 1951. The award was made in a front line ceremony in Korea. (Estherville Daily News, 3-18-52)

Neal, Willis (age 23, Winnfield, SC)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Willis Neal (RA182773), Corporal, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company C, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy near Kuram, Korea, on 19 February, 1951. Corporal Neal was a part of the unit attacking the enemy well entrenched on high ground near Kuram. During the actual assault, the lead squad were pinned down by grenades, automatic weapons and small arms fire. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Corporal Neal, with complete disregard for his personal safety, led his squad in a counter-attack. He personally destroyed the key positions which had held up the advance and was wounded in the accomplishment of his mission. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Neal on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Home Of Record: Winnfield, South Carolina

Neary, James K.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class James K. Neary (NSN: 7998656), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 October 1951. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Neary, a Platoon Corpsman, displayed unusual fortitude and loyalty to his comrades while accompanying a combat patrol in enemy territory. Disregarding his own safety, he entered an enemy minefield to give assistance when he saw a Marine seriously wounded by an exploding mine. While rendering aid to his fallen comrade, he was himself wounded by a mine and suffered the loss of his left foot. Despite severe shock, extreme pain, and the loss of blood, he continued to treat the wounded Marine and assured his safe evacuation to friendly lines. Only then did he attend to his own serious wound. His ability to perform his specialty skillfully in spite of his tremendous handicap enabled the patrol to move quickly from under enemy observation and fire and return to friendly lines without further casualties. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Neary's courage and determination were an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 2048 (January 25, 1952).

Neighbors, William S.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 196 - 28 April 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain William S. Neighbors, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 21 December 1950 as pilot of a B-26 attack bomber on a night attack sortie near Hamhung, Korea. Captain Neighbors received a request for assistance from a ground controller who informed him that enemy troops were attacking United Nations forces preparing to evacuate the vicinity. Although he flew his B-26 at a dangerously low altitude, just beyond bursting naval shells, Captain Neighbors was unable to see ground targets because of darkness. Disregarding his own personal safety, Captain Neighbors turned on the landing lights of his airplane to illuminate the ground ahead. Ignoring the hail of enemy fire attracted by his lights, he made repeated attacks upon enemy gun positions, silencing many of them. Continuing the same tactics, Captain Neighbors again exposed himself to enemy fire as he attacked other enemy targets, destroying six vehicles, damaging ten vehicles, and inflicting many casualties. This courageous act prevented an effective enemy attempt to penetrate friendly defenses. The aggressiveness, determination and unswerving devotion to duty displayed by Captain Neighbors were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Nein, David V.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class David V. Nein (MCSN: 293017), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. When the platoon leader and several of the noncommissioned officers became casualties under heavy enemy fire during an attack by his platoon against a well-entrenched hostile force on a high ridge near Yudam-ni, Private First Class Nein boldly moved through the enemy fire and issued fire orders, offering words of encouragement to the men and collecting ammunition from casualties for redistribution among the members of his platoon. Ordered to withdraw when the attack increased in intensity on his platoon's left flank, he continued exposing himself to the heavy barrage to direct his platoon's return fire, at the same time supervising and assisting in the evacuation of casualties before leading the remainder of his men from the danger area. By his daring initiative, forceful leadership and cool courage in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Nein served as an inspiration to all who observed him, and his heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fresno, California. Home Town: San Diego, California.

Nelson, Curtis F.

Award of the Silver Star - By direction of the President under the provision of the act on congress, approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43, 1918) and pursuant to authority in AR -600-45, the Silver Star for Gallantry in action is awarded to the following names of enlisted men.

Corporal Curtis F. Nelson, NG-27 774-881, Infantry - United States Army, a member of medical company, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, (then a member of Company G, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division) distinguished himself by courageous action near Lini-gol, Korea, on 21 September 1951. After a six-hour assault, his company succeeded in taking an enemy held objective. Sporadic enemy fire from higher ground, however, forced the friendly troops to take cover. The second platoon advanced to wipe out this last remnant of resistance, but having moved out 50 yards, it was pinned down by the fire of four enemy machine guns and countless small arms. Corporal Nelson, rifleman, noticed three men become casualties. With complete disregard for his own safety, he obtained a first aid kit and ran ahead forward through downpouring enemy fire to administer aid to his wounded comrades. He then made three trips through a murderous hail of enemy bullets, carrying and dragging the wounded men to safety. After successfully completing the self-assigned mission he continued to fearlessly expose himself to give aid to all the company's wounded, earning the respect of all those who saw him. Corporal Nelson's courageous action, unwavering determination and selfless devotion to his comrades reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Bottineau, North Dakota.

Nelson, D.J. "Jack"

Full citation not yet found.

"Sabre-jet pilot D.J. (Jack) Nelson came home this week with a chest-full of Korea citations and orders to report to Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., for test-pilot duty.  Capt. Nelson, often cited during 100 combat missions, brought home his newest citation--a Silver Star.  The award grew out of 'an extremely hazardous mission' last Feb. 18 along the Yalu River while the captain was flying an RF-86 (modified Sabre-jet).  Capt. Nelson, with Mrs. Nelson and their four children, Mary Ellen, Elizabeth, Daniel J. Jr., and Patricia, are visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.E. Nelson, 120 S. 33rd St.  The captain, a 12 1/2 year veteran of the Air Force, returned to the United States May 27 after 11 months' Korea duty.  During that time he served with another distinguished Billings airman, Col. Hauser C. Wilson, in the 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, specializing in photographic missions.  Capt. Nelson narrowly escaped death twice last fall.  On Oct. 30, 1952 he was pulled from icy waters of Wonson Harbor after force-landing his jet 60 miles behind enemy lines.  He credits a Navy helicopter with effecting the rescue.  'Heck', he says, 'I didn't even get wet.'  In November, while he was marking a target for fighter bombers, Communist ground fire exploded, a wingtip fuel tank of Capt. Nelson's plane.  He managed to chuck the blazing tank before the rest of the plane caught fire.  That encounter was only six miles from armistice talks site at Panmunjom.  Capt. Nelson was rewarded subsequently with a double oak leaf cluster Air Medal and a Distinguished Flying Cross with single oak leaf cluster.  And in March he was given command of his jet squadron, relieving Col. Wilson.  The Silver Star was presented May 15 by Gen. Glenn O. Barcus, Fifth Air Force commander, at an airbase outside Seoul.  The citation read "... for volunteering to fly an RF-86 aircraft on an extremely hazardous mission in support of a highly classified project of vital importance to United Nations operations, leading three F-86 aircraft with a flight of four aircraft as escorts.  'Major (temporary combat rank) Nelson penetrated deep into enemy territory to obtain photographic coverage of his assigned targets.  While Major Nelson's flight was in the target area it was attacked by 64 MIG-15 aircraft.  In the ensuing battles, four of the enemy aircraft were destroyed.'  Capt. Nelson thinks his Korea scrapes will be hard to beat for excitement.  But he's convinced his next tour of duty at the Air Force proving ground at Eglin should have great possibilities." - Billings Gazette 13 June 1953

Nelson, Edward T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Edward T. Nelson (MCSN: 659114), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Braving intense hostile mortar, machine gun and rifle fire to leave his foxhole and run to an unused automatic weapon, Private First Class Nelson quickly cleared the jammed machine gun and, directing accurate fire, killed several of the enemy who were setting up a machine gun on the left rear of the platoon as well as two hostile soldiers who had opened fire on the command post. By his courage and prompt initiative, he succeeded in preventing the enemy from delivering enfilading fire on the platoon lines and protected the command post, containing two casualties, from being destroyed. Throughout the remainder of the night, he periodically manned the same post, thereby impeding any additional hostile attempts to seize the platoon's position. His skill, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty were contributing factors in the success of his company's defense and reflect great credit upon Private First Class Nelson and the United States Naval Service. Born: Cotton Valley, Louisiana. Home Town: Cotton Valley, Louisiana.

Nelson, George W.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 35 - February 9, 1951

he President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant George W. Nelson (ASN: RA-35637272), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 9 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea. On that date his company was under heavy attack by a numerically superior enemy force which threatened to overrun the platoon on the left flank. Sergeant Nelson, a mortar forward observer, was at this time in an observation post on the right flank and was unable to supply effective supporting fire. Immediately and with complete disregard for his personal safety, he dashed through the withering hostile fire to the hard-pressed platoon, laying communications wire as he ran. He then established an observation post in full view of the advancing enemy and began to call for mortar fire. While directing the initial fire, he was wounded, but although he was in great pain he refused to leave his exposed position and continued to direct accurate fire upon the enemy. The fire he called for succeeded in forcing the enemy to withdraw with great casualties and was undoubtedly responsible for preventing serious casualties to his comrades. In the final phase of this engagement he was wounded a second time, and died of his wounds shortly thereafter. The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Nelson reflects great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.

Nelson, Milton E.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 446 - 21 September 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Milton E. Nelson, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 9 and 11 July 1951. On 9 July, Captain Nelson led a flight of eight F-86 aircraft on a bomber escort mission over the Sinanju area of North Korea. Shortly after the completion of the bomb run a formation of enemy MIG-15 fighters was sighted closing for attack from the "six o'clock low" position. After deploying his formation, Captain Nelson broke up the initial attack with a head-on pass at the enemy leader. Completely disregarding his own safety, he continued his pass and scored numerous hits on the enemy aircraft before it broke away in flames. The enemy pilot abandoned his aircraft which exploded and crashed into the Yellow Sea. After the loss of their leader, the remainder of the enemy formation dispersed. As a result of Captain Nelson's courageous action and skillful utilization of his forces, none of his bombers was damaged. On a subsequent mission, 11 July, Captain Nelson was element leader of a flight of F-86 aircraft on a combat patrol in the Sinuiju-Yalu River area. Shortly after the formation arrived in the target area, it was attacked by superior numbers of MIG-15 jet fighters. During the battle which followed, Captain Nelson again through superior airmanship destroyed another MIG-15. This brought his score to four enemy aircraft destroyed. Captain Nelson's outstanding skill and daring brought great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Nelson, Robert L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert L. Nelson (MCSN: 0-49498), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company D, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 September 1950. Fearlessly leading his platoon, with its attached tank bulldozer through a mined avenue of approach to support Marine Infantry units in an attack against the enemy, First Lieutenant Nelson was quick to act when the tank behind his struck a mine and was rendered inoperative, and the driver wounded and his assistant stunned in the explosion. Promptly halting his platoon, he boldly moved through the intense fire to the inoperative tank to direct the removal of the wounded Marine and then ran to the rear of the column to guide the bulldozer forward through the mine field. Constantly risking his life, he supervised the operator in digging the mines from the field and personally threw the explosives to the side of the road after they had been uncovered. By his daring initiative, exceptional ability, leadership and inspiring courage, First Lieutenant Nelson contributed to the successful advance of his platoon and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Osseo, Wisconsin. Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

"El Toro Marine Air Base, Calif. (UP) - A Marine flyer was killed when his plane crashed during an air show for Gen. John P. Westall, commandant of the British Royal Marine Corps, it was disclosed yesterday.  The victim was identified as Capt. Robert L. Nelson, formerly of Milwaukee, Wisc., who won the Silver Star in Korea in 1950 as a tank driver.  El Toro officers said Nelson was flying in a formation of 12 AD-Skyraiders in a simulated strafing attack on the landing strip when his plane suddenly developed trouble.  The plane crashed within 100 yards of U.S. Highway 101, where several cars were passing.  Nelson was killed instantly."

Nemes, John

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 7 - 4 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal John Nemes (ASN: US-52041503), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Kabong-ni, Korea, on 19 October 1951. His platoon was coordinating its positions on a newly-won objective when it was savagely counterattacked by an enemy force trying desperately to break through to its own lines. Corporal Nemes, Squad Leader, was in a forward position and received the brunt of the assault. The enemy fire was so intense that soon he and one other man were the only ones in the squad that weren't wounded. Although the situation appeared hopeless, he refused to abandon his position and continued to fire with devastating accuracy into the swarming enemy hordes. As the hostile troops approached closer, the concussion of an enemy grenade blew him out of his position. Shell fragments seriously wounded him in the face and neck but he still was not deterred in his mission. Almost single-handedly, he repulsed all enemy charges until hostile groups were either dead, wounded or scattered. Recognizing the possibility of further attacks, he refused to seek medical attention, but finally left his post when explicitly ordered to do so by a superior. Corporal Nemes' courageous action, aggressive determination and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Sharon, Pennsylvania.

Nemits, Steve

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Steve Nemits (MCSN: 264506), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Gunnery Sergeant of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 October 1952. Informed that every member of a fourteen-man patrol had been wounded during an explosion in an enemy mine field well forward of the main line of resistance, Master Sergeant Nemits immediately organized and led a rescue party to the aid of the wounded Marines. Despite total darkness and numerous trip wires, he led his men forward until he reached the stricken patrol and subsequently directed the successful evacuation of the wounded men to aid stations on the main line. By his outstanding courage, expert leadership and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Master Sergeant Nemits materially aided in saving the lives of many of the wounded Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania.

Nesrsta, MSgt. Edmund E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders Nos. 263 - 14 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Edmund E. Nesrsta (ASN: RA-6244515), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Anju, Korea, on 4 November 1950. His company, defending the bridgehead along the Chongchan River, was attacked from the flank and rear by overwhelming numbers of the enemy who quickly overran the company's positions. Rallying a group of the company headquarters personnel he placed his men in position and succeeded in holding the enemy at bay for two hours. Savagely attacking, the enemy, many times closed to within a few yards of his positions, but was beaten off by Sergeant Nesrsta's accurate carbine fire and well placed grenades, while the remainder of the company retired. When finally encircled and his ammunition supply almost exhausted he ordered his men to withdraw, while he covered, with continued fire, their movement to new defensive positions. Sergeant Nesrsta's courageous actions, unhesitant devotion to duty and superior leadership enabled other elements of his company to withdraw without casualties and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Abbott, Texas.

Neville, Ward O.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 91 - 15 August 1950

First Lieutenant Ward O. Neville, 01112888, Corp of Engineers, United States Army, a member of Company B, 3rd Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 12 July 1950 near Chongju, Korea. The First Platoon of Company C, commanded by Lieutenant Neville, was performing the mission of laying anti-tank mine fields and preparing two road bridges for demolition in front of the 21st Infantry Regiment. After completing this mission he took on squad forward to place a new mine field when he noticed approximately three hundred enemy troops approaching his position. With disregard for his own safety Lieutenant Neville continued laying the mine field and the withdrew the squad and the remainder of the platoon and blew the bridges they had previously mined. During the withdrawal he had to take his platoon and its organic transportation through approximately twenty miles of enemy occupied territory. Due to his leadership and devotion to duty he was able to lend his platoon to safety and avoid possible capture. The act of gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Neville reflects great credit on himself and the military service. He entered the service from Richmond, CA. Home of record, Zap, ND.

Newman, Merrill H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Merrill H. Newman (MCSN: 0-53018), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 May 1952. After launching a series of highly coordinated attacks which inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy, Second Lieutenant Newman reorganized his men in defense against a counterattack. When the hostile force attacked in overwhelming strength, he personally held off five of the enemy who were attempting to capture friendly casualties near his platoon command post. Despite intense hostile artillery, mortar and small arms fire, he fearlessly led his men against enemy forces who were infiltrating his lines and causing a break in the supply and evacuation route, and vigorously continued the attack until ordered to disengage. By his outstanding leadership, courageous initiative and steadfast devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Newman served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tillamook, Oregon. Home Town: Fairview, Oregon.

Newman, Thomas A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade (Chaplain) Thomas A. Newman, Jr. (NSN: 0-409192), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Chaplain, attached to a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 and 27 March 1953. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Newman displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. During the assaults on vital enemy outpost positions, he continuously exposed himself to devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire in order to assist the stretcher bearers and comfort the wounded. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he courageously gave his armored vest to a Marine whose vest was unfit for wear and for the remainder of the two day period he went without this assed protection in an area interdicted by hostile fire. During the reorganization phase when the enemy was only fifty to one hundred yards away, he fearlessly walked about the trench line offering words of encouragement and spiritual guidance to the men. His presence was a distinct comfort to the men and contributed in great measure to the maintenance of spirit and high devotion to duty among them. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Newman's outstanding actions and indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 20528 (June 14, 1953).

Newton, George Richard

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel George Richard Newton (MCSN: 0-5786), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 23 September 1950. When the left flank of his Battalion became exposed to heavy hostile fire after the seizure of a hill against fierce enemy resistance, Lieutenant Colonel Newton repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy small-arms, mortar and artillery fire to direct the activities of his unit to better advantage and to encourage and inspire his men to hold the ground they had gained despite extremely intense opposition. His fortitude, daring initiative and outstanding leadership were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: April 24, 1915 at Salt Lake City, Utah. Home Town: Salt Lake City, Utah. Death: April 15, 1993.

Newton, Minard P. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Minard P. Newton, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49755), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yudam-ni, Korea, on 27 November 1950. When a numerically superior enemy attacked his company's position with small arms, automatic weapons and mortars during the night, Second Lieutenant Newton fought bravely as the fanatical force overran a sector occupied by his platoon. Promptly reorganizing his units, he spearheaded a counterattack up the steep, precipitous ridge and, when the company was ordered to move to a new location, volunteered to remain as the rear guard. Dauntlessly holding his exposed position against two consecutive hostile onslaughts, he enabled his company to advance to the newly assigned sector with a minimum of casualties. His aggressive and determined leadership, fearless tactics and zealous devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Newton and the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York.

Nichols, Bobby G.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 173 - 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery), [then Sergeant] Bobby G. Nichols (ASN: 0-2262142), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy as a member of Battery B, 61st Artillery Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, on 15 August 1950 near Waegwan, Korea. Attacked and surrounded by one hundred and fifty enemy troops, Lieutenant Nichols, while positioned on a high hill crest as a forward artillery observer, found himself and his small party cut off from all friendly troops. When the enemy breached and threatened to break through the defense perimeter to annihilate the handful of defenders, Lieutenant Nichols fearlessly left his place of safety and charged across the open terrain to single-handedly assault the enemy. In the ensuing action he delivered such devastating fire that ten of the enemy were killed, the rest fleeing in confusion. His instantaneous and courageous action was responsible for preventing an enemy penetration of the defense perimeter and saved the lives of the surrounded men. Lieutenant Nichols gallant actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Nichols, Donald

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 131 - December 08, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Donald Nichols, United States Air Force, for conspicuous gallantry in action on 3 and 4 August 1950. From 27 June to 3 August 1950 United Nations Forces in Korea were forced to effect a gradual withdrawal in the face of a drive by numerically superior enemy forces spearheaded by the newly designed T-34 tank. The enemy's extensive use of this heavily armored weapon was largely instrumental in the many casualties and setbacks suffered by friendly forces. Since this type of tank appeared impregnable to standard ground and air weapons, concrete intelligence data had to be obtained in order to devise effective counter measures. On 3 August 1950 Captain Nichols, informed of the position f two disabled T-34 tanks, proceeded with four Korean assistants to an advanced position where he was informed that three additional T-34 tanks had arrived to protect the disabled ones. At 1740 hours, fully aware of the extreme danger involved, he advanced beyond the front lines, crawling through intense cross fire. Reaching the disabled tanks, Captain Nichols discovered that enemy tank crews and other enemy troops were less than 40 feet distant. Despite the threat of imminent discovery, and equipped only with a pair of pliers and a screwdriver, Captain Nichols removed all nomenclature plates, vital operating parts, technical manuals, and complete radio, and several 85 millimeter shells. He further determined by evaluation the vulnerable points where this tank could be successfully attacked. Although removal of this equipment necessitated several arduous trips of nine hours duration under increasingly hazardous conditions, Captain Nichols continued, unmindful of his personal safety. When one of his assistants was wounded by mortar fire, Captain Nichols, at the risk of his life, evacuated him to friendly lines. The intrepidity and outstanding gallantry displayed by Captain Nichols in securing this intelligence data so essential to the United Nations effort in Korea reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Nichols, James D. (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 89 - 4 October 1952

Sergeant James D. Nichols, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in the area of Hill 451 in the vicinity of Ch'u-dong, Korea, on 27 August 1951.  When the enemy launched a fanatical attack against Company B, he unhesitatingly moved forward through heavy enemy fire, delivered devastating machine-gun fire on the enemy, and caused approximately 100 casualties.  Sergeant Nichols again moved forward through a hail of fire to a vantage point 75 yards away from the enemy positions and gave effective supporting fire for his until as it pressed the attack.  Seeing that a friendly patrol was pinned down, he remained behind and covered the withdrawal of the patrol.  Sergeant Nichols' determination and personal courage reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Louisiana.

Nichols, John H. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant John H. Nichols, Jr. (MCSN: 0-50228), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 March 1951. When the assault platoon of the company was pinned down and critically depleted by casualties during the assault on well-fortified enemy positions north of Hoengsong, Second Lieutenant Nichols unhesitatingly moved to the head of his platoon and bravely led his men through a hail of machine gun and mortar fire to effect the relief of the halted unit. Although the initial assault was repulsed by withering grenade and automatic weapons fire, which wounded him and several of his men, he skillfully effected a hasty reorganization and led a successful charge against the hostile positions. By his exemplary leadership, inspiring courage and aggressive fighting spirit, Second Lieutenant Nichols was directly instrumental in seizing the objective and in capturing a great quantity of enemy ordnance, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Huntington, New York. Home Town: Verona, New Jersey.

Nichols, Sumner E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Sumner E. Nichols (MCSN: 327183), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 31 May 1952. Moving his squad forward through intense hostile small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire, Sergeant Nichols led his unit to within a few yards of hostile positions where it became pinned down by a coordinated barrage of hand grenades. Directing the fire of his squad, he began hurling grenades at the enemy and, although wounded, proceeded to reorganize his unit, moving his squad to better positions to cover the evacuation of the wounded. Receiving the order to withdraw to friendly lines, he was preparing to move his squad when he learned that a machine gun had been left on the slope of the enemy position. Aided my another Marine, he courageously returned to the slope and, under withering hostile fire, crossed barbed wire to recover the weapon. By his exceptional courage, initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Sergeant Nichols served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Franklyn, New York. Home Town: Walton, New York.

Nichols, Warren P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Warren P. Nichols (MCSN: 0-14463), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot and Tactical Coordinator in Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three (VMF-323), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the northeast section of Seoul, Korea, on 26 September 1950. Receiving an urgent request for assistance from beleaguered friendly forces threatened with annihilation and advised of the location of the main concentrations of enemy troops and gun positions, Captain Nichols expertly analyzed the situation and, after carefully briefing his pilots to obtain maximum use of their ordnance, tactically deployed his support aircraft in the vicinity of the hostile locations. Braving intense enemy anti-aircraft fire, he marked each target with smoke rockets and, returning to attack altitude, led his planes in daring bombing runs, personally scoring a direct hit with a 500-pound bomb. Despite the grave risks involved, he remained at a dangerously low altitude to observe the enemy more effectively and to direct his flight in launching bold rocket and strafing attacks which destroyed eight buildings and silenced several gun positions. When the hostile troops started to evacuate the area, he notified the ground controller and led his flight in launching bold rocket and strafing attacks which destroyed eight buildings and silenced several gun positions. When the hostile troops started to evacuate the area, he notified the ground controller and led his support aircraft in repeated low-level strafing runs on a column of fifteen enemy vehicles attempting to escape, destroying seven of them and damaging six others. His superb airmanship, indomitable courage and persistent devotion to duty were contributing factors in the subsequent advance of our forces with little resistance and in the infliction of hundreds of casualties on the enemy, thereby reflecting great credit upon Captain Nichols and the United States Naval Service. Born: Booneville, Arkansas. Home Town: Beaumont, Texas.

Nicholson, James

Awarded August 20, 2011

During the late evening hours, Corporal (then Private First Class) Nicholson's fire team came under intense enemy fire by a numerically superior enemy force. Despite being surrounded, Corporal Nicholson and his team courageously applied suppressive fire against the enemy, resulting in numerous enemy casualties. Although equipped with a malfunctioning weapon, he advanced under furious enemy automatic weapons fire and hand grenades to retrieve a seriously wounded Marine. Corporal Nicholson's outstanding courage and daring initiative was a constant source of inspiration to his fire team, squad, and platoon.  His determination and daring, despite overwhelming enemy fire, directly resulted in the return of a seriously wounded Marine to a safe area and the ability of his platoon to hold the high ground in the face of superior enemy numbers. Corporal Nicholson was personally responsible for drawing the fire of and destroying a particularly effective enemy machine gun with fire from his Browning Automatic Rifle. By his selfless determination, daring initiative, and complete dedication to duty, Corporal Nicholson reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Nicholson, Nathaniel

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 256 - 28 October 1950

Private Nathaniel Nicholson, RA12514128, Artillery, Battery C, 159th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  On 1 September 1950 near Haman, Korea hostile shelling of the battery position resumed and automatic weapons and antitank gun fire raked the area and only route of withdrawal.  Though severely wounded in the arm, Private Nicholson continued to assist in firing of his howitzer and made repeated trips across open terrain to bring up ammunition.  When withdrawal was possible and ordered, he helped move the howitzer although enemy action made movement extremely difficult, slow and hazardous.  Private Nicholson's valorous and selfless devotion to duty in the face of grave danger is in keeping with the highest traditions of the Armed Forces.  Entered the military service from New Jersey.

Nickerson, Herman Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel Herman Nickerson, Jr. (MCSN: 0-5128), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Liaison Officer of the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korean from 15 to 30 September 1950. Courageous and determined throughout the advance along the Inch'on-Seoul Highway and during the Han River crossing, Colonel Nickerson fearlessly exposed himself to the enemy's direct fire to move from one company to another to obtain information vital to the successful continuation of the drive against the aggressors. Inspiring all who served with him, he was in large measure responsible for the effective conduct of the attack carried out by the forward company and battalion while the enemy continued to lay down heavy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire. By his forceful leadership, sound judgment and conscientious efforts throughout, Colonel Nickerson contributed materially to the success achieved by his regiment and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: July 30, 1913 at Boston, Massachusetts. Home Town: Arlington, Massachusetts. Death: December 27, 2000.

Nicora, Robert Jelio Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Robert Jelio Nicora, Jr. (MCSN: 1136818), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Machine Gun Section of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 August 1952. Although painfully wounded when the enemy ambushed his unit while the men were en route to a combat outpost in advance of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Nicora bravely attempted to position his machine gun in the face of withering hostile fire in an effort to protect his comrades. Mortally wounded by another burst of enemy fire while he was moving forward, Sergeant Nicora, by his outstanding courage, exceptional fortitude and aggressive fighting spirit, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 10, 1929 at Barre, Vermont. Home Town: White River Junction, Vermont. Death: KIA: August 17, 1952 - Buried at: Elmhurst Cemetery - Elberton, Georgia.

Nietschmann, William J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William J. Nietschmann (MCSN: 0-47641), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander in Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 October 1950. Braving vigorous hostile opposition during a two-hour assault on strategically located enemy positions, First Lieutenant Nietschmann succeeded in maneuvering his platoon close to the objective where intense, damaging fire halted his advance. Ordered to move his platoon to a covered position to permit further softening of the hostile emplacements by a friendly close air strike, he observed three casualties lying in an open area near the front lines and, undaunted by the continued enemy barrage, fearlessly covered their evacuation to a protected area. Reorganizing his group following the air attack, he skillfully led his platoon in seizing its objective and in completing its mission. A courageous and daring leader, First Lieutenant Nietschmann, by his tactical ability and indomitable devotion to duty, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Nieves, Felix G. (1st award)

Sergeant First Class Felix G. Nieves, RA10402044, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 11 December 1950, near Sudong-ni, Korea, Sergeant Nieves displayed extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy. His company had been holding off a numerically superior force of the enemy for three days while protecting the vitally important withdrawal of members of the 1st. Marines and 7th Infantry Divisions toward Hamhung. After the final group of soldiers and marines had passed G company's defense positions, the company was ordered to withdraw and serve as a rear-guard for the main body of troops as far south as Majong-dong. Sergeant Nieves' platoon was ordered to cover the company's withdrawal and his squad to cover the withdrawal of the platoon. As the platoon was completing its withdrawal, an enemy attack in force developed. Sergeant Nieves fearlessly ordered his squad to withdraw as he alone defended the position in the face of heavy enemy machine gun and small arms fire. He killed at least eighteen of the enemy and caused the remainder to become confused and disorganized, allowing his squad to gain the comparative safety of the retreating column. Sergeant Nieves' ability in the use of his basic infantry weapons, the hand grenade and rifle, as well as his great courage saved the lives of many of his follow soldiers. His extraordinary heroism reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Nieves, Felix G. (2nd award)

General Orders No. 148 - 17 May 1951

Sergeant First Class Felix G. Nieves, RA10402044, Infantry, Company "G",  65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 2 February 1951, near Chensong-gok, Korea during a fierce enemy attack against the defensive positions held by Sergeant Nieves' platoon, one of the squad leaders was mortally wounded and the squad, becoming completely disorganized, withdrew before the fury of the attack. With complete disregard for his own safety, exposing himself to the enemy's view, allowed his body to be employed as an aiming stake so that effective friendly machine gun and mortar fire could be directed at the advancing enemy. Defiantly shouting at the enemy, throwing grenades and firing his rifle, blowing a whistle and brandishing his bayonet, Sergeant Nieves single-handedly held an area normally assigned to an entire rifle squad and threw the enemy into a state of complete confusion. Sergeant Nieves' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and exemplify the high traditions of the military service. entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Nightingale, Richard L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Richard L. Nightingale (MCSN: 1164230), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 24 - 25 July 1953. Discovering a group of friendly Marines occupying a trench line on a portion of the main line of resistance which was under devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire and vicious hostile attack, Private First Class Nightingale unhesitatingly assumed command of the group and moved through the trench line to place the men in position and direct their fire. Picking up an automatic rifle, he moved to an exposed position in order to observe the enemy and delivered effective fire until his rifle ceased firing, continuing to rout the attackers with hand grenades. Later, upon finding an unmanned machine gun, he braved a murderous hostile mortar and artillery barrage to place the weapon in a position where he could deliver intense fire upon the enemy, thereby preventing them from massing for an attack. Although seriously wounded, he remained in his position throughout the night and the following morning in the face of constant enemy fire and delivered withering return fire upon the hostile troops during repeated enemy attempts to overrun the friendly position. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and steadfast devotion to duty, Private First Class Nightingale contributed in large measure to the defense of the position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Halstead, Kansas. Home Town: Sedgwick, Kansas.

Nightingale, Thomas E.

Corporal Thomas E. Nightingale, NG23439946, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 17th Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sokkogae, Korea.  On 6 July 1953, Corporal Nightingale's unit was assigned the mission of defending a strategic friendly-held outpost.  As the enemy attacked, intense enemy artillery and mortar barrages inflicted heavy casualties throughout the friendly positions.  Not content with treating the casualties among the troops in the trenches, Corporal Nightingale left the comparative safety of the trench and moved to the side of a friendly wounded soldier in an exposed position.  Corporal Nightingale repeatedly endangered his life in his effort to care for each of the wounded when outside the trenches, carrying or assisting each to a point of safety.  The gallantry displayed by Corporal Nightingale reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service in Ohio.

Nix, Casey R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Casey R. Nix (MCSN: 304362), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Wire Chief of the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. With communications severed and subordinate units of the regiment isolated about five miles south of Sudong after the enemy had succeeded in cutting the main supply route, Technical Sergeant Nix organized and led a wire team forward in an attempt to re-establish communications with two isolated battalions. Fearlessly exposing himself to hostile machine gun and rifle fire, he continued to carry out this mission until one team member was wounded and, immediately organizing and leading a rescue party to the casualty, administered first aid before directing the evacuation of the helpless Marine. Locating an enemy machine gun position, he called for a 75-mm. recoilless rifle and, directing accurate and effective fire on the hostile emplacement, destroyed the weapon and annihilated its crew. Subsequently, he succeeded in establishing wire communications with the isolated battalions, thereby contributing materially to the success of his regiment. His courageous initiative, skilled leadership and indomitable devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Technical Sergeant Nix and the United States Naval Service. Born: Nauvoo, Alabama. Home Town: Ensley, Alabama.

Nockerts, Lee G. J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Lee G. J. Nockerts (MCSN: 584105), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Artillery Forward Observer of Battery I, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 June 1951. When his company was pinned down under a vicious hail of small arms, machine gun and mortar fire from well dug-in and heavily defended enemy emplacements during the assault of a key terrain feature near Inje, Sergeant Nockerts unhesitatingly moved through the intense fire to an exposed vantage point from which he called fire missions to his radio operator. Although the hostile force directed a heavy volume of fire at his position, wounding him severely, he steadfastly continued to direct the artillery, calling down a tremendous barrage which permitted the assault troops to advance and overrun the objective. By his daring initiative, aggressive determination and valiant devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Sergeant Nockerts upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Green Bay, Wisconsin. Home Town: Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Nolan, Harry J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Harry J. Nolan (MCSN: 0-50305), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 September 1950. When the platoon was suddenly subjected to a murderous hail of enemy fire from well-concealed automatic weapons while providing covering fire for an assault unit during an attack against strongly defended enemy positions, Second Lieutenant Nolan fearlessly exposed himself to the full fury of the enemy fire in an effort to locate the hidden weapons, thereby drawing hostile fire away from the platoon and enabling the unit to regain fire superiority. Although painfully wounded during the action, Second Lieutenant Nolan, by his exceptional courage and daring initiative, served to inspire his men to heroic endeavor in successfully accomplishing their mission. His outstanding devotion to duty and indomitable spirit were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana.

Nolan, Harvey W.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Harvey W. Nolan (MCSN: 0-50159), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor force in the vicinity of Inje, Korea. On 31 May 1951, Lieutenant Nolan was serving as platoon leader with B Company. After successfully attacking along a ridge line near Inje, his unit was held up at the base of Hill 780 by intense fire from enemy automatic weapons, small arms, and hand grenades. Due to impending darkness, further attack was postponed until the following day. On the morning of 1 June 1951, Lieutenant Nolan led his platoon through the intense fire and hand grenade barrage, in an assault on the enemy positions near the crest of the hill. He skillfully maneuvered his platoon to a position where the enemy's well entrenched and cleverly camouflaged positions could be observed. Lieutenant Nolan then expertly and effectively fired rifle grenades into the enemy positions. The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Nolan contributed materially to the success of his unit's mission and reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 225 (October 7, 1951). Born: New Bedford, Massachusetts. Home Town: North Smithfield, Rhode Island.

Nolan, Jack L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Jack L. Nolan (MCSN: 0-49869), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. Boldly moving among the positions of his platoon during a heavy enemy attack on his battalion's right flank, Second Lieutenant Nolan repeatedly braved the hostile barrage to direct effective fire and encourage his men in vigorously defending their sector. Despite sub-zero temperatures and damaging enemy small-arms, machine-gun, mortar and grenade fire, he continued to conduct his platoon in resisting the numerically superior hostile attack and, by his inspiring and cool leadership, was responsible in great measure for the destruction of over 200 of the enemy in his sector and for the repulse of the fierce assault. His indomitable courage, fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Second Lieutenant Nolan and the United States Naval Service. Born: Santa Rosa, Texas. Home Town: Kaufman, Texas.

Nolan, John Edward Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant John Edward Nolan, Jr. (MCSN: 0-50769), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 September 1951. Leading his rifle platoon deep into enemy territory in a daring raid, Second Lieutenant Nolan skillfully maneuvered his unit to the hostile positions without being observed and initiated a vigorous charge through the enemy-held area. Continually shouting words of encouragement to his men throughout the ensuing fight, he effectively fired his weapon and accurately hurled grenades into apertures of bunkers until the enemy positions were completely destroyed. Quickly reorganizing his men, he calmly and expertly directed the orderly withdrawal of his unit and the calling in of supporting fire to aid his platoon in returning to friendly lines despite intense fire from enemy mortars and artillery. Intelligence information gained from eight prisoners brought back, two of whom he personally captured, aided immeasurably in future operations of the battalion. His aggressive leadership, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Second Lieutenant Nolan and the United States Naval Service. Born: Minnesota. Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Norby, Ronald

SILVER STAR
HEADQUARTERS 25TH DIVISION
GENERAL ORDERS NO. 113 - 6 September 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Second Lieutenant Ronald Norby, Infantry, Heavy Mortar Company, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army.  In the early morning of 24 July 1950 near Yongdong, Korea, an enemy force of infantry and tanks penetrated the 1st Battalion where Lieutenant Norby was acting as Liaison officer.  He quickly and accurately brought mortar fire on the hostile infantry.  Since he could not observe the tank positions, he rushed across an area swept by machine guns to a vantage pointy on a hill, from which, despite the direct fire from the tanks and sporadic mortar fire, he directed the mortars until the attack was successfully repulsed.  Lieutenant Norby's valorous action and military skill reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from North Dakota.

Noren, Wesley C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Wesley C. Noren (MCSN: 0-15907), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 February 1951. Assigned the mission of assaulting a difficult hill position which was strongly defended by a determined enemy force occupying numerous well-constructed and mutually supporting log bunkers, Captain Noren skillfully led his company up the approaches to the position. Observing that devastating automatic weapons, mortar and small arms fire was threatening the advance, and was inflicting heavy casualties among his men, he fearlessly rushed forward through enemy-held emplacements to reach the highest point of the hill. Although exposed to the full effect of the hostile fire, he quickly reorganized the leading elements of the company and launched an assault over the crest of the hill into the rear of the main hostile entrenchments. Under his inspiring and courageous leadership at close quarters with the enemy, his company charged on the run to engage in hand-to-hand combat and completely destroyed the hostile force, killing over 100 of the enemy. By his aggressive fighting spirit, resourceful initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Captain Noren contributed immeasurably to the tactical success achieved by the battalion and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Milaca, Minnesota. Home Town: Milaca, Minnesota.

Normoyle, Francis E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Francis E. Normoyle (NSN: 3880513), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. Hospital Normoyle was acting as a Corpsman when his platoon was engaged in a heavy fire fight with a well entrenched and concealed enemy. When he observed three wounded Marines lying in an exposed position he fearlessly and courageously exposed himself to administer aid. Despite the intense enemy fire, he succeeded in removing two of the wounded to a covered position. While advancing to the third wounded Hospitalman Normoyle was painfully and seriously wounded in the face. Despite his painful wounds and loss of blood, he refused to be evacuated and continued to pull the third wounded Marine to safety. He continued to administer aid to the wounded until he became so weak from loss of blood that he was ordered to be evacuated. Hospitalman Normoyle's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 17635 (November 2, 1950).

Norris, Ray A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Ray A. Norris (MCSN: 1226888), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Headquarters and Service Company, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 24 - 25 July 1953. Assigned the difficult and hazardous mission of re-establishing wire communications between a rifle company command post and three platoons, Sergeant Norris proceeded to the exposed forward slope of the main line of resistance and skillfully effected the installation of wire communications during continuous illumination and devastating enemy small arms, mortar and artillery fire. When the lines wee again severed by hostile fire, he volunteered to re-establish the vital communications despite the withering enemy fire and constant illumination. Later, he volunteered to assist in evacuating four seriously wounded Marines from an exposed crest on the main line of resistance to the company aid station approximately one thousand yards away. Despite the murderous enemy fire, he made three trips on foot to carry the stricken evacuees to safety. On the following night, after the third reinstallation of the vital land lines, he again organized and assisted an evacuation party in carrying six wounded men from an important position. By his resourcefulness, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Norris served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Silver City, New Mexico. Home Town: Cliff, New Mexico.

Norris, Ross E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Ross E. Norris (MCSN: 1137044), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company C, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 September 1951. Volunteering to lead a party of men in clearing a path through a mine field during an attempt to expedite the delivery of supplies for an infantry battalion, Corporal Norris bravely persevered with his task despite persistent enemy sniper and mortar fire covering the area of operation. Hearing a call for help from an area adjacent to the mine field, he immediately made his way to a position occupied by two seriously wounded men and, in the face of hostile fire, assisted in their evacuation before returning to his primary task. Although painfully wounded by a mine explosion while directing a group of native stretcher bearers in the removal of a deceased Marine, Corporal Norris calmly supervised the evacuation of another casualty and the body of his comrade before accepting aid for himself. By his outstanding courage, marked fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Corporal Norris served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the safety of many of his fellow Marines, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Augustine, Texas. Home Town: Center, Texas.

Northcott, Thomas V.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Chief Hospitalman Thomas V. Northcott, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 21 September 1950. During the attack by his battalion, Chief Hospitalman Northcott, serving as a Battalion Aid Man, repeatedly and fearlessly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to administer aid and evacuate the wounded Marines. While he was administering aid to a wounded Marine he was wounded by enemy mortar fire. Despite the pain, and suffering from loss of blood, he refused medical attention and courageously drove the ambulance on four evacuation missions to the forward areas. As a member of a two-man team he succeeded in rendering first aid and returning to the Battalion Aid Station with an ambulance load of wounded Marines on each mission. By his display of initiative and courageous actions he materially aided the wounded Marines in receiving medical attention much earlier than would otherwise have been possible and was a constant inspiration to all the members of the battalion. Chief Hospitalman Northcott's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Northcutt, Ernest O. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Ernest O. Northcutt, Jr. (MCSN: 0-54517), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 August 1952. When a reinforced squad was ambushed by the enemy approximately 1,000 yards forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Northcutt fearlessly led his men through devastating hostile mortar and artillery fire to within 150 yards of a trench line that sheltered the besieged unit, quickly deployed his men and skillfully directed their fire. With one of his gunners seriously wounded as the enemy launched a heavy barrage of mortar and artillery fire on the position, Second Lieutenant Northcutt unhesitatingly rushed to the assistance of the stricken man in an attempt to retrieve him. Although painfully wounded by flying shrapnel and small arms fire, he continued directing his men and calling in supporting fire. With the majority of his platoon sustaining casualties, he maintained firm control of his men, reorganized them into a perimeter of defense and directed the care of the wounded, refusing medical aid for himself until the arrival of a relief squad. By his courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and unyielding devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Northcutt served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Amarillo, Texas. Home Town: Amarillo, Texas.

Norton, John M.

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 107 - 31 December 1950

Second Lieutenant John M. Norton, Armor, 3d Reconnaissance Company, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army.  During the period 8-11 December 1950, inclusive, Lieutenant Norton was a member of a special task force with the mission of relieving elements of another division beleaguered by the enemy near Su-dong, Korea.  Repeatedly during this period he attacked the enemy with his unit, which spearheaded the relief task force.  He consistently exposed himself to enemy fire in order to pinpoint enemy positions.  His effective leadership was an inspiration to his men and greatly facilitated the successful accomplishment of the task force mission.  During a rear guard action, on 11 December 1950, Lieutenant Norton noticed upon withdrawing from the Chinhung-Ni area that demolitions set off to destroy a supply and ammunition dump had not been effective in destroying the dump.  With the enemy closing in and placing small arms fire on the team, Lieutenant Norton, without regard for his own personal safety, went back to the supply dump and personally destroyed the remainder of the supplies.  Lieutenant Norton successfully completed all his duties.  His efficient actions, gallantry, and superb leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Alabama.

Norton, Merrill Lafayette

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Merrill Lafayette Norton (MCSN: 0-49632), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Rifle Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When his position was subjected to a series of vicious attacks during the hours of darkness by a numerically superior enemy force, First Lieutenant Norton, realizing that a penetration of his critical sector would seriously jeopardize the entire battalion position, courageously exposed himself to devastating enemy automatic-weapons, hand grenade and small-arms fire to move among his men, exhorting them to hold at all costs. By his inspiring leadership and skillful direction of supporting fires, First Lieutenant Norton succeeded in repelling successive thrusts by large numbers of hostile troops, which resulted in the enemy's complete rout with heavy losses. His outstanding courage, initiative and indomitable fighting spirit were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: August 16, 1925 at Chaves, New Mexico. Home Town: Roswell, New Mexico. Death: April 2, 2003.

Norum, Milton G.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 111 - 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel Milton G. Norum, 0397867, (then Major), Infantry, Army of the United States, then Executive Officer, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 3 September 1950 in the vicinity of Am-sin, Korea. On this date the enemy, attacking in a numerically superior force, was forcing one the companies of his battalion to withdraw, thereby threatening the security and position of the entire battalion. Learning of this, Colonel Norum voluntarily left the comparative safety of his command post and led a section of heavy weapons and a section of tanks to support the withdrawing units. Upon arrival at the scene of battle, he rallied and reorganized the disheartened troops into an efficient fighting unit. Moving through intense enemy machine gun and mortar fire, he instilled in them, by sheer force of will power, the courage and determination necessary to counterattack in the face of almost hopeless odds. He then successfully led the counter-attack, gaining all ground previously lost, and effected a consolidation of their positions under heavy mortar and artillery fire. The gallantry and tactical ability of Colonel Norum on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Kansas. Home of record: Bryant, South Dakota.

Norum, Milton G. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 63 - 22 March 1951

The First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel Milton G. Norum, , 0397867, (then Major), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters, 38th Infantry, (then Headquarters, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry), who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 20 September 1950 in the vicinity of Chogye, Korea. On that day a company of his battalion was ordered to seize Hill 239. The initial attack was met by fierce and fanatical resistance that inflicted many casualties and resulted in the loss of all platoon leaders. As a result the company was disorganized and incapable of continuing the assault. Upon being informed of the situation, Colonel Norum left the comparative safety of the command post, which he was operating in the capacity of Battalion Executive Officer, and went immediately to the hard-pressed company. Arriving at the area, he made a rapid estimate of the situation, speedily reorganized the company while under intense enemy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire, and led a charge which drove the enemy from the hill. Had it not been for the superior leadership of Colonel Norum, who inspired the men of the company with his cool disdain for the dangerous enemy fire, it is doubtful that Hill 239 could have been captured with the forces available. The gallantry displayed by Colonel Norum reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Home of record: Bryant, South Dakota.

Norum, Milton G. (2rd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 208 - 21 June 1951

The Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel Milton G. Norum, 0397867, Infantry, Army of the United States, Executive Officer, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 27 May 1951 in the vicinity of Hyon-ni, Korea. On that date, Colonel Norum, seeing that a friendly tank column had been halted by a mine field which was covered by enemy automatic weapons and sniper fire, immediately proceeded to the head of the column and personally supervised the removal of the mines and further reconnoitered for a crossing of the river which lay ahead. During this action Colonel Norum was subjected to intense machine gun and sniper fire and in one instance was able to locate one of the snipers whom he killed with his carbine. Proceeding into the town with the leading elements, he observed a small group of enemy trying to work their way back to the right rear of the friendly position. Without hesitation, he called for two rifleman to accompany him and advanced to the high ground to intercept them. By his aggressiveness and courageous personal example, he was highly instrumental in clearing the town. The gallantry and outstanding leadership displayed by Colonel Norum reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Kansas. Home of record: Bryant, South Dakota.

Nottingham, Donald H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Donald H. Nottingham (MCSN: 609114), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 June 1951. Skillfully maneuvering his unit through the withering enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire during at attack against concealed and well-entrenched hostile strong points on commanding ground, Sergeant Nottingham succeeded in overrunning several of the enemy's positions. Although seriously wounded by hostile fire during the fierce encounter, he bravely refused to seek medical attention and continued to lead his fire team forward in the assault. When ordered to disengage and deploy to fresh positions, he unhesitatingly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to cover his men during the movement and refused to be evacuated for treatment of his wound until his unit had safely completed its redeployment. By his courageous leadership, fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Nottingham served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by his company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Dunnegan, Missouri. Home Town: Humansville, Missouri.

Nowell, Coy N.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 209 - 27 September 1950

Sergeant Coy N. Nowell, RA14274878, Infantry, Company K, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  Sergeant Nowell's squad was laying a base of fire to permit advance of the weapons platoon near Hadong, Korea on 27 July 1950 where stiff enemy opposition had been encountered.  After his machine gun crew was eliminated, he twice crossed a stream to bring up ammunition so that he could operate the weapon himself.  As the enemy action increased in intensity and threatened to bring direct fire on the platoon, Sergeant Nowell moved to a highly vulnerable spot from which he could command the hostile lines and delivered such effective fire that he stopped the enemy long enough to allow the weapons platoon to displace.  Sergeant Nowell's bold, valorous actions are in keeping with the noblest traditions of the United States Armed Forces.  Entered the military service from Mississippi.

Nuckel, Donald G. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Donald G. Nuckel (MCSN: 1078577), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman in the Second Platoon of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 October 1950. When a numerically superior enemy force launched a strong attack and succeeded in penetrating some of his company's positions, Private First Class Nuckel remained in an unprotected and isolated position and, despite heavy hostile small arms, machine gun and mortar fire, delivered accurate and effective fire upon the onrushing enemy, inflicting numerous casualties among them until he was mortally wounded. By his courageous actions, he served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the successful repulse of the hostile attack. His outstanding fortitude, initiative and aggressive fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Nuckel and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 9, 1929 at Ridgefield Park, New Jersey. Home Town: Little Ferry, New Jersey. Death: KIA: October 28, 1950.

Nunley, William C.

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved July 9, 1918, (WD Bul. 53, 1918), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Waogwan, Korea on 16 September 1950 is awarded to CPL William C. Nunley. As an aid man, Corporal Nunley was advancing with a tank infantry force into enemy held territory. Heavy enemy fire from the front and both flanks forced the infantry to dismount from the tanks and seek cover in the ditches along the road. Searching fire from an enemy flat trajectory weapon made their positions untenable. Throughout the entire action, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, Corporal Nunley made his way from one wounded soldier to another rendering on the spot medical assistance. When one man’s foot was almost severed by enemy artillery fire, Corporal Nunley listed him onto a tank and with fire raining all about him, calmly performed the amputation, dressed the wound and then carried the man to safety. Corporal Nunley’s gallant actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  General Orders: General Order number 173, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division. Home of Record: Texas.

Nye, Glenn Carlyle (1st Oak Leaf Cluster) (Missing in Action)

By direction of the President, Colonel Glenn C. Nye, 1758A, United States Air Force, has been awarded the first Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star.  MISSING IN ACTION.

Colonel Glenn C. Nye distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as a pilot, 17th Bombardment Wing, Light, on 14 August 1950.  Leading a formation of ten B-26 type aircraft in a daylight bombing mission deep into enemy territory, Colonel Nye displayed outstanding airmanship and skill in leading his formation over hazardous terrain and through marginal weather to an enemy airfield in North Korea.  While flying at medium altitude under intense fire from enemy automatic and heavy antiaircraft weapons fire, Colonel Nye's aircraft sustained serious battle damage, but despite the imminent possibility of loss of one engine, Colonel Nye elected to remain with his formation.  Under his able leadership, the formation dropped almost twenty-four tons of bombs which formed thirty-five large craters on the main runway, depriving the enemy the use of an important operational base.  Through his high personal courage, flying ability and exemplary devotion to duty, Colonel Nye reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Nyhan, Dennis Joseph (posthumous)

General Orders No. 46 - 20 July 1950

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Private Dennis Nyhan, RA12124172, Infantry, Army of the United States.  On the morning of 16 July 1950, the Second Platoon, Heavy Mortar Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, was in support of Company C which was subjected to a number of attacks by enemy infantry.  After a number of such attacks had been repulsed, the enemy succeeded in flanking the position of Company C and attacked between the rear of that organization and the heavy mortar position.  Since the enemy was inside heavy mortar range, the platoon defended its perimeter position with small arms fire.  When the position became untenable, the Platoon Leader gave the order to withdraw.  Private Nyhan, and three other soldiers, although unwounded and perfectly able to withdraw, volunteered to remain in the platoon position and hold off the enemy while the rest of the platoon withdrew.  During the time the platoon was withdrawing, Private Nyhan and his companions repulsed two assaults, killing at least nineteen of the enemy.  Defying odds of about thirty to one these soldiers enabled the main body of the platoon to withdraw and to take their wounded with them.  On the final enemy assault their position was overrun and all were killed.  Home Town: Long Island, New York.

 

Close this window
 

2002-2016 Korean War Educator. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use of material is prohibited.

- Contact Webmaster with questions or comments related to web site layout.
- Contact Lynnita for Korean War questions or similar informational issues.
- Website address: www.koreanwar-educator.org
 

Hit Counter