Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "O"

 
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Oakes, Ronald E.

General Orders No. 88 - 13 August 1950
24th Infantry Division

Second Lieutenant Ronald E. Oakes, 02033763, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Battery, 63rd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy on 8 July 1950 at Pude-ri, Korea. Lieutenant Oakes volunteered repeatedly to conduct fire missions on the enemy as called for by the 34th Infantry Regiment. Coming under intense enemy fire he withdrew to a new location only to find himself cut off by enemy tanks. While adjusting artillery fire on the enemy of 9 July his position was completely surrounded. He continued his mission and to relay that of the Liaison Officer in Chonan while pinned down by mortar and small arms fire. He then ordered protective fire around his own position in order to lead his party, two of which were wounded, into adjacent hills and to safety. By his coolness and skill under fire, he was able to accomplish his mission which resulted in destroying many of the enemy. This outstanding courage and leadership reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. He entered the service from Charleston, WV.

Oberg, Augustine H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Augustine H. Oberg (MCSN: 275610), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Platoon Sergeant of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 September 1950. With his unit held up by a hostile position manned by approximately fifteen of the enemy armed with automatic weapons and inflicting many casualties in his ranks during an attack by his platoon through the streets of Seoul, Staff Sergeant Oberg, on his own initiative, braved intense fire to hastily place the members of the leading fire team in strategic positions from which to assault the hostile emplacement. Running forward under a hail of enemy fire, he boldly and skillfully threw hand grenades which knocked out the hostile position and permitted his fire team to destroy the survivors as they attempted to flee from their untenable emplacements. His courageous initiative, skilled leadership and indomitable fighting spirit were contributing factors in the continued advance of the platoon and reflect great credit upon Staff Sergeant Oberg and the United States Naval Service. Born: Pala, California. Home Town: San Diego, California.

O'Born, Irwin J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 54 - 23 September 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Private Irwin J. O'Born, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 26 and 27 August 1950 in the Naktong River Salient, Korea. Private O’Born, with an officer and another enlisted man, voluntarily crossed the swiftly flowing rive r and moved to the high ground in enemy territory to ascertain the locution of automatic weapons and artillery pieces which had been harassing our front line positions and to locate enemy troop concentrations to insure the success of future operations. In order to gain the desired information, Private O’Born remained in enemy territory for 24 hours. Through his actions, valuable information was gained which helped prevent casualties among our troops, and helped to place fire on enemy fortifications and insure an avenue of approach into enemy held positions. Private O’Born’s courageous actions on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

O'Callaghan, Donal N.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 40 - 12 October 1960

Sergeant Donal N. O'Callaghan, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 13 February 1953 in North Korea.  While his company was being subjected to a barrage of heavy artillery from Chinese Communist forces during a night attack, Sergeant O'Callaghan was informed that men on an out-guard post had been cut off by this enemy action.  Immediately, and without concern for his own personal safety, he voluntarily exposed himself to enemy fire, located the men and brought them, together with a wounded member, safely back to the trenches.  Later, even though Sergeant O'Callaghan was seriously wounded by a round of mortar fire which destroyed the lower part of his left leg, he refused to be evacuated.  After dressing his wound himself, he crawled back to the command post and, from that position, controlled platoon action for the next three and one-half hours, giving orders to the squads over the phone.  Not until the enemy had withdrawn did he permit himself to be evacuated.  The unselfish heroism, courageous leadership, and outstanding gallantry displayed by Sergeant O'Callaghan reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.

Ocasio, Angel Luis (KIA)

General Orders No. 290 - 17 July 1951
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Sergeant First Class Angel lL. Ocasio, RA10403238, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 23 April 1951, in the vicinity of Ognyo-bong, Korea, Company "F" was subjected to a fanatical attack by a large hostile force. Noticing that one of his comrades had been seriously wounded, Sergeant Ocasio bravely went to his assistance and, completely oblivious of the heavy volume of fire sweeping the area, carried him to a place of safety. During the fierce firefight, Sergeant Ocasio moved from position to position, encouraging his men and directing their fire and movement, while returning to the command post to procure ammunition to replenish the rapidly diminishing supply, he was mortally wounded by fragments from an exploding shell. Sergeant Ocasio's selfless gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the esteemed traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

O'Connor, Arthur L.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 28 - 15 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Arthur L. O'Connor, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action as Flight Commander, 336th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Group, FIFTH Air Force, on 6 October 1951. On that date, Lieutenant O'Connor was element leader of a formation of four F-86 aircraft on a combat air patrol in the Sinanju area of North Korea. Upon arrival in the target area, Lieutenant O'Connor's flight was subjected to attack by a superior number of enemy jet aircraft. During the engagement, Lieutenant O'Connor repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire in defense of his leader. Sighting a formation of six enemy jet fighters attacking two F-86s below him, Lieutenant O'Connor unhesitatingly led his element to their assistance. Flying into their midst and disrupting the enemy's assault with the viciousness of his attack, Lieutenant O'Connor enabled the distressed flight of F-86s to engage a formation of enemy aircraft attacking friendly fighter-bombers below. In this battle, Lieutenant O'Connor's wing aircraft was heavily damaged by enemy fire and the pilot momentarily lost control of his aircraft. Recovering with great difficulty, Lieutenant O'Connor's wingman attempted a withdrawal, when the enemy concentrated on totally destroying him. Lieutenant O'Connor eluded the enemy with whom he was engaged to assist his comrade. Although out-numbered six to one he inflicted heavy damage to one of the enemy ships and escorted his wingman from the target area to friendly territory. The skill and gallantry displayed by Lieutenant O'Connor in the face of overwhelming odds reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

O'Connor, David F.

Headquarters 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 113 - 2 February 1952

AWARD OF THE SILVER STAR—By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918 (..D Bul 43, 1918) and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following named officer: First Lieutenant David F. O'Connor, 01861562 [then Second Lieutenant] Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company F, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 8 October 1951 in the vicinity of Tondul, Korea. On this date, while attacking strategic enemy positions on Hill 1005 during Operation TOUCHDOWN, elements of Company F were pinned down by intense hostile fire. A lone enemy machine gun, directly in front of the assaulting troops, had halted the entire advance. Lieutenant O’Connor, realizing the seriousness of the situation and with complete disregard for his personal safety, unhesitatingly advanced over the fire-swept terrain toward the hostile emplacement. Although harassed by enemy mortar and small arms fire, he continued forward. Nearing the machine gun emplacement, Lieutenant O’Connor stood in full view of the enemy and threw several grenades into the bunker, destroying the weapon and killing its crew. Although wounded during the initial stage of this action, he refused evacuation and continued with the objective. Lieutenant O’Connor’s example of individual bravery aided immeasurably in the success of his unit’s mission and of the entire operation. The gallantry in action displayed by Lieutenant O’Connor is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from South Dakota.

O'Connor, James H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James H. O'Connor (MCSN: 1152059), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. Handicapped by fading daylight and unable to determine the source of intense enemy automatic weapons, grenade and small arms fire during the assault against well-entrenched hostile forces, Private First Class O'Connor voluntarily stood up in full view of the enemy in a bold attempt to locate their positions. Observing two enemy soldiers, he immediately opened fire and killed both of them. When the enemy was moving forward to engage his unit along a commonly unobserved approach, he promptly determined their intention and warned his platoon commander, enabling the Marines to move into the attack and surprise the hostile force. Although painfully wounded during the ensuing engagement, he bravely refused evacuation until the objective was secured and, by his aggressive fighting spirit and fortitude, served to inspire all who observed him. His marked courage, initiative and steadfast devotion to duty were contributing factors in the success achieved by his company and reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class O'Connor and the United States Naval Service. Born: San Jose, California. Home Town: San Jose, California.

O'Daniel, William Q.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William Q. O'Daniel (MCSN: 1091183), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. When his company was pinned down by a vicious hail of enemy fire during the assault of a steep hill north of Hoengsong, Private First Class O'Daniel immediately observed that the platoon on his left was being raked by fire from hostile positions obscured by a wooded section and, crawling through the intense barrage to a more advantageous point, delivered accurate and deadly fire into the positions, partially neutralizing them and distracting the enemy troops. By his prompt and daring action, he was largely responsible for the subsequent success of the harassed unit in advancing to overrun the hostile position. After rejoining his own platoon to continue in the attack against the main objective, he fired aggressively until his gun jammed and, seeing an enemy soldier attempting to hide in a foxhole, leaped into the hole and killed the man with the butt of his rifle. By his heroic initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and valiant devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class O'Daniel contributed materially to the success of his company and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Camden, South Carolina. Home Town: Columbia, South Carolina.

Odell, Bobby J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Bobby J. O'Dell (NSN: 2910785), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 - 2 December 1950. Hospitalman O'Dell displayed great skill, courage, and confidence in the performance of his duties. During a period when his company was pinned down by accurate enemy automatic weapons fire, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he crawled over fire-swept enemy fire to render first aid to two wounded Marines. After treating the two wounded Marines he then attempted to evacuate another seriously wounded Marine and in so doing was himself seriously wounded. His devotion to duty and gallantry were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 11183 (May 3, 1951).

O'Donnell, Brendan P.

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Second Lieutenant Brenda P. O'Donnell, United States Marine Corps Reserve, for service as set forth in the following citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 April 1951.  Assigned the mission of leading the company assault on a strongly defended enemy hill position to learn the enemy's disposition in the area and to capture prisoners, Second Lieutenant O'Donnell skillfully maneuvered his platoon up the steep slope and effectively coordinated his advance with supporting arms, surprising the enemy and aiding his platoon in killing 27, wounding 35 and capturing 7 of the enemy.  Although exposed at all times to withering hostile automatic weapons fire from adjacent hills, he succeeded in organizing the defense of the position.  With his unit subjected to an intense mortar barrage, causing numerous casualties and destroying radio communications with his company commander, he led his remaining force forward in the assault on an adjacent ridge to relieve pressure on another element of the company which was pinned down by hostile fire.  Fearlessly exposing himself to a withering cross fire of enemy automatic weapons, he led his men in a furious assault on the ridge, routing the enemy and permitting the other friendly elements to advance.  By his inspiring leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Second Lieutenant O'Donnell  contributed materially to the success of the company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Everett, Massachusetts. Home Town: Malden, Massachusetts.

Oehler, Baxter F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Baxter F. Oehler (MCSN: 818190), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When hostile forces launched a strong assault against his sector of the perimeter defense on a hill southwest of Hwachon, knocking out the right flank machine gun and infiltrating the shallow trench position, Private First Class Oehler immediately opened fire on the attackers and, aided by those around him, succeeded in destroying the enemy and closing the gap in the line. Despite severe shrapnel wounds sustained in his leg, back and head when a hand grenade exploded nearby and killed the fire team leader, he reorganized the unit and bravely remained at his post until ordered to the rear for treatment of his wounds on the following morning. By his marked courage, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Oehler materially aided in preserving the integrity of the company position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Okema, Oklahoma. Home Town: Pauls Valley, Oklahoma.

Ogren, John W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John W. Ogren (MCSN: 1138130), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 October 1951. When the platoon to which he was attached was suddenly subjected to devastating enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire while engaged in a patrol, Private First Class Ogren immediately put his gun into action and delivered a volume of withering fire upon the hostile strong points. Although his weapon was repeatedly hit by enemy fire and his assistant gunner became a casualty, he continued to operate the gun without assistance and, when his ammunition was expended, skillfully employed his carbine in a brave attempt to contain the hostile force. With his supply of carbine ammunition exhausted, he promptly seized a rifle from a fallen comrade, continued to engage the enemy and, upon being ordered to withdraw, grasped his damaged machine gun and carried it a distance of several hundred yards across open, fire-swept terrain to prevent the weapon from falling into the hands of the hostile force. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty, Private First Class Ogren upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Des Moines, Iowa. Home Town: Des Moines, Iowa.

Ohina, Joseph S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Joseph S. Ohina (MCSN: 248224), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as S-2 Section Chief of the First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 21 September to 13 October 1950. Volunteering to accompany an assault platoon as an intelligence agent to gain information concerning the enemy's strength and disposition during the attack against the village of Samsan-dong, Technical Sergeant Ohina exhibited outstanding courage when direct hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire pinned down the forward elements. Learning of the critical shortage of ammunition and the failure of existing communications, he unhesitatingly risked his life in an attempt to replenish the supply. Repeatedly exposing himself to the intense barrage, Technical Sergeant Ohina succeeded in reaching the main supply route and, commandeering two vehicles, obtained the ammunition and returned to the embattled platoon. With the vehicles pinned down under devastating machine gun and mortar fire, he promptly directed their removal to a defiladed area and then crawled alone across 300 yards of exposed terrain to reach a friendly mortar position. Informing the Section Leader of the existing situation and pointing out the location of the opposition, he returned to the vehicles after the enemy fire had been neutralized and directed them to positions from which ammunition could be distributed, thereby enabling his platoon to continue the advance and seize its assigned objective. His daring initiative, courageous perseverance and extraordinary heroism in the face of heavy odds served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon Technical Sergeant Ohina and the United States Naval Service. Born: Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Home Town: South Attleboro, Massachusetts.

Okata, Richard Y.

General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

Corporal Richard Y. Okata, RA 10103069, Infantry, a member of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, Regimental Headquarters Company, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy near Cho-ni, Korea on 10 July 1950.  Corporal Okata was occupying a position on the right flank of the 21st Infantry Regiment's defensive position.  He observed elements of this flank position withdrawing, and tried to get them to stop withdrawing and get them to return to their former positions. He was unable to get them to return so he made his way under heavy small arms fire to the Regimental observation post in order to inform the Regimental and Battalion Commanders that the right flank had withdrawn with the exception of two men.  He then secured the two men and placing them in position continued to cover the right flank and rear to the best of his ability until the order to withdraw was given at which time he and his men withdrew in an orderly manner.  Through his efforts to notify the Regimental and Battalion Commanders of the action on the right flank and his aggressive attitude in organizing the position, covering the right flank and rear, the position was held and an orderly withdrawal was effected.  This gallant action on the part of Corporal Okata reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Okamoto, Harry H.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 313 - July 11, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Harry H. Okamoto, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 20 March 1951. On this date, Sergeant Okamoto volunteered for a mission to rescue a United Nations pilot forced down 30 miles behind enemy lines. As medical technician and combat air crewman, Sergeant Okamoto accompanied an unarmed helicopter to the location of the distressed pilot. A landing was attempted on reaching the area, but extremely heavy barrages of enemy fire forced the aircraft to orbit while escorting fighter planes strafed the ground. Repeated attempts to land were met by enemy fire until fighter planes effected a momentary lull. Although sill amidst continuous fire, the helicopter was able to land and Sergeant Okamoto assisted the pilot into the aircraft. Sergeant Okamoto's courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Oldani, Robert L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert L. Oldani (MCSN: 1059307), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader in a Rifle Platoon of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yudam-ni, Korea, on 27 November 1950. Voluntarily leaving a covered position in the face of intense hostile small arms fire and hand grenade attacks, Sergeant Oldani single-handedly assaulted an enemy position of approximately squad size and, delivering accurate rifle fire and skillfully throwing hand grenades, drove the hostile troops back after inflicting many casualties. By his courageous initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, he was primarily responsible for securing the platoon flank, thereby contributing materially to the success of his attack. His skill and staunch devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Sergeant Oldani and the United States Naval Service. Born: Aberdeen, Washington. Home Town: Aberdeen, Washington.

Oliver, Robert N. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Robert N. Oliver (MCSN: 1082766), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Wireman in Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 September 1950. Assigned the task of laying wire from an assault company to a Battalion mortar position, Corporal Oliver continued to carry out his mission despite intense enemy fire. Although fatally wounded as he neared his objective, he had aided materially in facilitating an effective counter-battery mortar fire attack against the enemy. His courage, perseverance and unwavering devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Corporal Oliver and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 25, 1930 at Whitney Point, New York. Home Town: Binghamton, New York. Death: KIA: September 19, 1950 - Buried at: Center Lisle Cemetery - Center Lisle, New York.

Oliver, Russell S.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 125 - May 31, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Russell S. Oliver (ASN: US-55002829), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company C, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1950, in the vicinity of Saemal, Korea. On that date, the enemy had established a roadblock in an effort to halt and destroy a friendly column composed of two battalions of Infantry and one of Artillery withdrawing southward to Hoengsong, Korea. When his platoon was ordered into the attack, Private Oliver aided in laying down a withering base of fire. With only a few rounds of ammunition left, during a lull in the battle he fixed his bayonet and charged the enemy in the face of intense fire. His courageous example inspired his comrades to resume the attack and destroy the enemy. The gallant action displayed by Private Oliver reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Oliver, Scotia D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Scotia D. Oliver (MCSN: 530387), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Guide of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. With his platoon forced to take cover and call for friendly artillery and mortar fire while attacking strongly entrenched hostile positions supported by mortars, machine guns and small arms, Sergeant Oliver fearlessly risked his life to attempt the rescue of several wounded Marines struck down during the intense action and lying in exposed enemy fire-swept area. Painfully wounded while carrying out his voluntary mission, he staunchly refused medical treatment or evacuation and, when his platoon sergeant became a casualty, immediately assumed command. Promptly reorganizing the platoon, he moved among his men to point out targets, direct effective fire and after the supporting fire was lifted, move the unit into position for continuing the attack, submitting to evacuation only after the enemy had been neutralized and his platoon's objective secured. Sergeant Oliver, by his daring initiative, aggressive and determined leadership and heroic efforts, served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Blowing Rock, North Carolina. Home Town: Charlotte, North Carolina.

Olivera, SFC Heriberto Medina

General Orders No. 470 - 15 October 1951
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Sergeant First Class Heriberto Medina Olivera, RA30452231, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 4 June 1951, Company "A" was assaulting its objective, Hill 466, near Unchon-ni, Korea, when the Third Platoon became pinned down by the severe fire of an enemy automatic weapons position. Sergeant Medina Oliversa, a squad leader in this platoon, instructed his squad to cover him and, without being ordered to do so, aggressively crawled forward through the open ground which the hostile machine gun was spraying with lethal fire. Immediately sighted by the enemy gun crew as he approached their position, Sergeant Medina Olivera faced the full fury of their weapon's firepower, but quickly moving into a small depression, affording scant cover, he continued to advance. When he was in range, Sergeant Medina Olivera threw hand grenades into the emplacement, destroying it and killing three of the occupants. With the weapon silenced, he signaled for his platoon to move forward and press its attack, finally securing the objective. Sergeant Medina Olivera's outstanding gallantry and courageous determination reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Olivio, Francisco Acevedo

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 139 - 9 April 1952

Private First Class Francisco Acevedo Olivo, US50107130, Infantry Company "B", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 28-29 January 1952, a reconnaissance patrol from Company "B" was ambushed and the forward elements of the patrol were surrounded and taken as prisoners. As a guard brought some rice into the barbed-wire enclosure where they had been placed, Private Acevedo Olivo, a member of the patrol, took him by complete surprise by tearing the container from his hand, striking him in the face with it and running from the cage. While fleeing from the foe, Private Acevedo Olivo was seriously wounded in the arm and leg, making it impossible for him to walk. With unflinching courage and an indomitable resolution to escape from the hands of the enemy, he crawled over four miles of snow-covered terrain and crossed a wide, icy river to return to friendly lines. His unwavering determination to return to his unit provided immense intelligence information about the enemy that could not otherwise have been obtained. Private Acevedo Olivo's gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Olmeda, Hipolito

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 176 - 9 June 1953

Master Sergeant (then Sergeant First Class) Hipolito Olmeda, RA30410478, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 22 February 1953, in the vicinity of Chonyong-Ni, Korea, Sergeant Olmeda a member of Company "A", advanced to the second platoon's listening post for the purpose of investigating his sentinels' report of suspected enemy movement. At the position, he detected and reported to the platoon leader signs of an enemy force proceeding in their direction. Disregarding his personal safety, he remained alone at the listening post, covering the return of the men from the post to the main line of resistance. After he was assured of the men's safety, he began moving back to friendly lines. While en route, he noted that the enemy was rapidly closing for the attack. Realizing they must be delayed to allow time for friendly forces to prepare for the defense, he opened fire, causing the enemy troops to deploy and expose their firing positions. This action brought intense hostile fire on Sergeant Olmeda, but he remained in the exposed position and continued firing until ordered back into the friendly trenches. Sergeant Olmeda's outstanding heroism and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Olsen, Hans G. (1st citation)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 229 - 6 July 1953

Second Lieutenant HANS G. Olsen, 01925827, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 9 June 1953, Lieutenant OLSEN was patrol leader of an assault element which engaged in a firefight with the enemy on Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. When his patrol entered the trenches of the enemy stronghold, he deployed his men with maximum effective results. During the course of action, he destroyed an enemy bunker together with enemy personnel by moving directly to its aperture and hurling grenades into it. When the enemy attempted to by pass the exposed flank of the element, he effectively fired his weapon and mortally wounded the foe. When the patrol's ammunition was nearly expended, he ordered a return to friendly lines. As a result of his actions, the mission was successfully completed and numerous casualties were inflicted upon the enemy force. Lieutenant OLSEN'S outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Minnesota.

Olsen, Hans G. (2nd Citation)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 338 - 15 August 1953

Second Lieutenant Hans G. Olsen, 01925827, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June 1953, Company "E" made a raid on Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. Lieutenant Olsen was platoon leader of the support element as the company made their way through the heavy enemy artillery towards their objective. When the support element reached its position, he directed a base of fire on the hill despite heavy enemy shelling concentrated on his area. Although wounded by the enemy fire, he remained in place, directing protective fire. After three assaults on the enemy outpost, the company was ordered to return to friendly lines. After returning to the main line of resistance, Lieutenant Olsen discovered several men were still missing. He immediately organized a patrol to search the battle area for the missing men. Under extremely dangerous conditions, he searched the entire area and evacuated several wounded men. Only after assured that no one remained on the hill did he allow himself to be given first aid for his wounds. Lieutenant Olsen's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Minnesota.

Olsen, Wesley E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 104 - 20 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Wesley E. Olsen (ASN: RA-14238587), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a member of the 24th Signal Company, 24th Infantry Division in action on 16 July 1950, north of Taejon, on the Kum River, Korea. During the defense of the Kum River Sergeant Olsen was in charge of a radio tem which was working with the 19th Infantry Regiment. He remained at his post and continued to provide radio and telephone communications when the Regimental Command Post was under enemy attack and was receiving considerable mortar and small arms fire. When the order was given to evacuate the position Sergeant Olsen packed his equipment and started his team on their way with it. He then volunteered his services to the Regimental Commander and was the first man to lead a patrol which successfully knocked out a machine gun position that was firing on the Regimental Command Post. Later when an enemy tank was blocking the withdrawal of the unit, he again volunteered to take a jeep load of dynamite to be used in blowing up the tank. After traveling some distance the jeep was taken under direct fire by the tank and destroyed. During this engagement Sergeant Olsen was seriously wounded. The act of gallantry displayed by Sergeant Olsen reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Oakland, California.

Olson, George H. (posthumous)

Headquarters 24th Division
General Orders No. 212 - 30 October 1950

Private First Class George H. Olson, RA17246069, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is (posthumously) awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy near Yongsan, Korea, on 4 September 1950.  The motorized patrol of which he was a member was ambushed by an enemy force and pinned down by intense mortar and automatic weapons fire.  With complete disregard for his own safety he exposed himself to the withering fire and poured such a volume of accurate fire into the enemy that the remainder of the patrol was able to extricate itself from its untenable position.  He continued firing until his ammunition was exhausted.  When the enemy subsequently overran his position, Private Olson was killed.  His courageous actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from Bigfork, Minnesota.

Olson, Harold M.

Corporal Harold M. Olson, RA17262076, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 82d Anti-aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled), 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 1 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyang, Korea. On this date Corporal Olson was a squad leader of an antiaircraft firing vehicle attached to an infantry battalion which had been surrounded and was desperately defending its perimeter. At dark the enemy overran and captured a hill overlooking the battalion positions. From this point the enemy delivered devastating mortar and small-arms fire on the Battalion Command Post, the Battalion Aid Station, and the motor vehicles in the area. Ordered to place fire on the enemy position, Corporal Olson and his squad covered the positions with such intensity and accuracy that the enemy fire was silenced and thirty enemy soldiers killed and without regard for the fact that in order to do so they must expose themselves to the intense enemy fire. The hill was retaken a few minutes later by the infantry, The inspirational and gallant heroism displayed by Corporal Olson on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and fully upholds the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

Olson, Robert L.

Private First Class Robert L. Olson, Battery D, 15th AA AW Battalion (SP) distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sendoi-ri, Korea, on 1 December 1950. On this date, Private Olson was a member of on automatic weapons crew which was protecting a convoy of trucks evacuating wounded from the Chosin Reservoir area. An enemy rood block had been reported destroyed by our troops, and Private Olson went forward to verify it. Upon passing the point where the road block had been, the party suddenly received heavy automatic weapons fire from a hitherto unseen enemy position. While the rest of the party took cover, Private Olson singlehandedly, and with utter disregard for his own personal safety, attacked the enemy position. By his extremely heroic action, he killed the enemy gunner notwithstanding the fact that at the time it was dark and he did not know how many enemy were present in the position. The enemy weapon was silenced and the convoy was able to proceed on its way. His display of gallantry on this occasion reflects great credit on the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

News Clipping - Waterloo Daily Courier

"The singlehanded destruction of a road block in Korea while he was escorting a group of wounded soldiers has won praise for a Winneshiek County [Iowa] soldier.  Pfc. Robert Olson, 19-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Casper Olson, living near Highlandville, destroyed the road block after his group had been fired upon.  A hand grenade, thrown after a near approach to the block is said to have scattered or killed all the occupants of the block.  For gallantry and bravery in northwest Korea Olson has been awarded the Purple Heart and the Silver Star emblems." - Waterloo Daily Courier, March 18, 1951

Oly, Richard E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Sergeant Richard E. Oly (MCSN: 539915), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the 7th Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea on 2 November 1950. When the battalion command post came under a well organized, determined assault by enemy infantry supported by tanks, Sergeant Oly fearlessly and courageously organized a hasty defense line in time to repulse it. A friendly unit was being overrun by enemy infantry and he, without regard for his own personal safety, ran out to the position, killed several of the enemy, forced the rest to withdraw and then carried the wounded Marines to the aid station. His bravery was an inspiration to all members of the battalion command post and materially aided the wounded Marines in receiving medical attention earlier than would otherwise have been possible. Sergeant Oly's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 49 (December 2, 1950). Entered Service From Minnesota.

Omeis, Frank E. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Frank E. Omeis (MCSN: 648826), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Machine Gun Platoon of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. With his squad leader and assistant squad leader seriously wounded by enemy fire during an attack by his platoon against a heavily fortified, well-entrenched hostile position, Corporal Omeis fearlessly left his covered position and, proceeding under direct enemy small arms and machine gun fire, brought his wounded leader to a sheltered position. Although fatally struck down while attempting to rescue the other wounded man, Corporal Omeis, by his bold initiative, heroic actions and grave concern for others, had risked his life to save that of a fellow Marine, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: July 25, 1929 at New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York. Death: KIA: March 15, 1951.

O'Moore, James R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain James R. O'Moore (MCSN: 0-22545), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), during a hazardous rescue mission in enemy-occupied territory near Chunchon, Korea, on 13 April 1951. Volunteering to fly sixty miles behind hostile lines to rescue a downed pilot positioned at extreme range of his helicopter, Captain O'Moore maneuvered his plane into mountainous terrain known to be infested with hostile troops and conducted a thorough but unsuccessful search for the missing aircraft. When he received a call of distress from a fighter pilot who was shot down while assisting in providing cover for the mission, he immediately flew to the location of the crashed plane and landed his aircraft. Discovering that the airman was dead, Captain O'Moore risked his life to transport the casualty to his helicopter in the face of continuous enemy fire and, after placing him on board, succeeded in returning him to a rear area. His skilled airmanship, personal courage and unselfish consideration for others reflect great credit upon Captain O'Moore and the United States Naval Service. Born: Ashland, Kentucky. Home Town: West Allis, Wisconsin.

O'Neal, George Alton Jr.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 214 - 22 June 1951

Major George A. O'Neal, Jr., 0439797, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 26 April 1951, in the vicinity of Ilbisang-ni, Korea, the 2d Battalion and attached units were attacked by an enemy force of approximately two regiments. The barrage of small arms fire, hand grenades, and mortar shells falling in the area indicated that the enemy was preparing to close in for what they intended to be a final assault. Major O'Neal, realizing the need for an immediate counter attack, organized several squads from the battalion command post personnel and personally led them in their thrust against the hostile force. This action coupled with his relocation of the machine gun positions to more effective fields of fire turned the tide of battle, causing the enemy to retreat in confusion. Major O'Neal's contributions to his units defense were given under the most hazardous conditions and at great risk to his own safety. The outstanding leadership and gallant courage displayed by Major O'Neal reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Georgia.

O'Neil, Lawrence A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Lawrence A. O'Neil (MCSN: 0-54868), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Machine Gun Platoon Leader of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 August 1952. With the platoon subjected to intense hostile artillery, mortar and automatic weapons fire, the Marines manning one machine gun position wounded and evacuated, Second Lieutenant O'Neil personally operated the weapon and delivered effective counter fire on the hostile forces, inflicting an estimated fifteen casualties. Sighting an enemy mortar delivering fire on the friendly position, he quickly carried the machine gun to another sector of the company's defense line, set up the weapon and succeeded in putting the hostile mortar emplacement out of action. Leaving his position after the gun was rendered inoperative, he bravely exposed himself to the heavy enemy barrage to carry three wounded Marines to positions of safety. Informed that a Marine had been mortally wounded on the forward slope, he voluntarily led a detail through intense hostile fire to recover the casualty. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Second Lieutenant O'Neil served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Oppenborn, Henry L. Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 181 - February 8, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Henry L. Oppenborn, Jr. (ASN: 0-2014471), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company L, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Yongpyong, Korea, on 1 January 1951. Following a withdrawal of his company he was informed that five wounded men had been left behind and were still in the former position. Securing two litter jeeps he led a small party in the hazardous return deep into territory now held by the enemy. Although he encountered small arms fire on the perilous journey he continued onward until the former position was reached. Skillfully deploying his men he quickly located the wounded soldiers and returned with them to the relative safety of the company's new position. Lieutenant Oppenborn's courage and complete devotion to his men, who, but for his fearless action, would have been left to the mercy of the fanatic enemy, reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

Opulauoho, William Kaiwi Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class William Kaiwi Opulauoho, Jr. (MCSN: 1059883), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. When a determined attack against a heavily fortified enemy hill position resulted in numerous casualties, including the squad leader, Private First Class Opulauoho boldly exposed himself to intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire to reorganize the unit and lead a fierce assault on the opposition. Bravely spearheading the attack from bunker to bunker, he skillfully directed the elimination of several enemy positions before he was mortally wounded. By his daring initiative and valiant fighting spirit, he served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the attack. His marked courage, resolute leadership and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Opulauoho and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 12, 1930 at Honolulu, Hawaii. Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii. Death: KIA: September 12, 1951 - Buried at: National Memorial of the Pacific Cemetery - Honolulu, Hawaii.

O'Quin, Winston

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Winston O'Quin (MCSN: 1221042), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner of a 75-mm. Recoilless Rifle of the Anti-tank Company, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 January 1953. While covering an assault on an enemy stronghold by friendly forces, Corporal O'Quin courageously exposed himself to intense enemy sniper and mortar fire to deliver direct fire against the hostile positions. Although forced to withdraw form his position on several occasions, he returned each time and managed to sustain accurate fire throughout the operation. Seriously wounded by enemy sniper fire and carried from his weapon during the final stages of the fierce action, Corporal O'Quin, by his outstanding courage, daring initiative and unyielding devotion to duty in the face of intense hostile fire, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lone Price, Louisiana. Home Town: St. Landry, Louisiana.

Oreilly, Hugh R.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 399 - December 7, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Hugh R. Oreilly (ASN: 0-1339208), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 10 October 1951, near Sidamak, Korea. After bombarding friendly positions with artillery, mortars and rockets, enemy troops attacked and overran the machine gun positions and Captain Oreilly's command post. Ignoring the extreme danger, Captain Oreilly moved about, exposed to the heavy hostile fire, expertly deploying his men in secondary positions and encouraging them to hold. During the battle, he stood on top of a bunker, presenting an excellent target to the enemy and directed accurate fire into the hostile ranks, taking a heavy toll. An enemy shell knocked him from the bunker and wounded him, but displaying outstanding courage, Captain Oreilly climbed back to his position and continued to fire at the foe with an automatic rifle. His fearless actions inspired his men who repulsed several attacks by the fanatical enemy. Captain Oreilly's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Orlicki, John E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist John E. Orlicki, United States Army, for exceptional valor and gallantry in action while serving as Team Leader, Joint Security Force Company, United Nations Command Security Force at Panmunjom, Korea, on 23 November 1984. In reaction to thirty attacking North Korean soldiers in pursuit of a Soviet defector, Specialist Orlicki's aggressive actions were instrumental in defeating the enemy. He was responsible for providing sustained suppressive fires and stopping the enemy force with an M-203. Throughout the intense firefight, Specialist Orlicki displayed a complete disregard for his own personal safety while accomplishing his mission. Specialist Orlicki's bravery and aggressive performance of duty under extremely hazardous circumstances are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect great credit upon him, the United Nations Command and the United States Army.

Orlish, Harry F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Harry F. Orlish, Jr. (MCSN: 1074184), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a 60-mm Mortar Gunner of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1950. Fearlessly exposing himself to damaging small arms and machine gun fire from hostile positions in the nearby hills during an attack by his company, Corporal Orlish rushed to an automatic weapon whose rifleman had been wounded while firing on an enemy position containing an automatic weapon manned by four men and voluntarily delivered accurate and effective fire which knocked out the enemy gun and killed the crew. His bold initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty were contributing factors in the successful accomplishment of the company's mission, thereby reflecting great credit upon Corporal Orlish and the United States Naval Service. Born: New Britain, Connecticut. Home Town: New Britain, Connecticut.


Paul O'Rourke's Citation
(Click picture for a larger view)

O'Rourke, Paul Joseph

Sergeant (then Corporal) Paul J. O'Rourke, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroic achievement near Pungaa, North Korea, on 2 November 1950.  On that date Sergeant O'Rourke and his 60mm mortar squad were in support of their company which was then engaged in a heavy fire fight with the enemy.  As the battle progressed, Sergeant O'Rourke was ordered to move his mortars to an advanced position in order to obtain a more effective field of fire.  While moving forward in advance of his squad to select his mortar position, he encountered a group of the enemy who had infiltrated to the rear of his company.  Sergeant O'Rourke immediately moved his squad into position and directed fire upon the enemy.  After killing and wounding several of the enemy, he was successful in forcing them to withdraw.  This quick action in attacking the infiltrating enemy saved his company from an attack from the rear which, had it been successful, would have been a complete surprise to his company and would have undoubtedly resulted in the death of many of his comrades.  His action on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered Federal service from Ohio.

Orozco, Joe S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Joe S. Orozco (MCSN: 1171060), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Section Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 July 1953. Although seriously wounded and evacuated to the forward aid station when the company's sector of the main line of resistance was subjected to devastating enemy mortar and artillery barrages, Sergeant Orozco voluntarily returned to his position after receiving medical treatment and courageously moved from one position to another, checking the machine guns and shouting words of encouragement to his men. Despite the murderous hostile barrages, he delivered effective machine gun fire to protect a critical terrain feature of the company's sector and remained at his post throughout a four-hour period until the seriousness of his wounds forced him to be evacuated. By his indomitable fighting spirit, marked fortitude and unwavering devotion to duty, Sergeant Orozco served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: French Camp, California. Home Town: Trona, California.

Orozco, Pete

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Pete Orozco (MCSN: 1056541), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces south of Yudam-ni, Korea, on 2 December 1950. With his rifle platoon pinned down by heavy enemy small arms fire while attempting to seize a well-entrenched hostile position, Private First Class Orozco voluntarily moved alone to the enemy's flank, fearlessly assaulted the position with hand grenades and succeeded in killing eight of the enemy and in driving back the remainder. His courageous initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty were contributing factors in permitting his platoon to seize its objective, thereby reflecting great credit upon Private First Class Orozco and the United States Naval Service. Born: Salina, Kansas. Home Town: Vallejo, California.

Orr, Leonard L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Leonard L. Orr (MCSN: 0-35685), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot in carrier based Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 February 1953. Participating in the rescue of a downed Marine aviator who was surrounded and being fired upon by enemy troops deep in hostile territory, Captain Orr conducted a series of daring low-level strafing assaults, intentionally drawing the heavy enemy fire away from the helpless pilot. Undeterred when his plane was hit and severely damaged by intense and accurate barrages of hostile anti-aircraft fire, he continued to maneuver the aircraft at minimum altitude and, on several occasions, succeeded in completely suppressing all enemy ground fire directed at the downed aviator. After expending his remaining ordnance, he initiated repeated dummy strafing runs on the hostile positions in the face of the increasingly accurate enemy fire which was bursting all around his stricken aircraft. Although the plane's fuel supply became dangerously low, he dauntlessly remained in the area until a rescue helicopter arrived and the mission was completed. By his superb airmanship, indomitable courage and gallant devotion to duty, Captain Orr was greatly responsible for the success of a mission that resulted in the saving of a fellow Marine's life and in inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hamilton, Missouri. Home Town: Hamilton, Missouri.

Ortiz, Jose N.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 161 - 27 April 1952

First Lieutenant Jose N. Ortiz, 0946705, Infantry, Company "M", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 2 October 1951, the 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry, was engaged in a vicious attack against strong enemy positions near Chorwon, Korea. Three well-entrenched hostile positions were delivering an intense barrage of automatic -weapons fire on the friendly force, seriously threatening its further advance. Realizing the necessity for silencing these enemy positions, Lieutenant Ortiz, a platoon leader in Company "M", immediately set up his 75 millimeter recoilless rifle section in an exposed position in order to get a good field of observation and fire. Despite the devastating artillery and mortar fire that was directed at his position, he undauntedly continued firing until two of the hostile positions were destroyed and his ammunition supply was expended. He then fearlessly crossed 200 yards of open, fire swept terrain and assumed command of Company "K" S 57 millimeter rifle section. From this position he continued his destructive fire until the third enemy position was neutralized. Lieutenant Ortiz' exemplary leadership and gallantry were instrumental in the successful accomplishment of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Ortiz-Perez, Domingo

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 17 May 1951

Master Sergeant Domingo Ortiz Perez, RA6674712, Infantry, Company "M", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 16 December 1950, the enemy launched a fierce attack and penetrated positions held by Company "M" and Company "I" of the 65th Infantry. Small groups of the enemy infiltrated in and around the nearby village of Sanghung, Korea, and four enemy soldiers managed to reach a flanking position from which they directed deadly small arms and automatic weapons fire upon the men of Company "M" who had been assigned the task of clearing the village and retaking lost positions. Realizing that the situation called for immediate action, Sergeant Ortiz Perez voluntarily and single-handedly attacked the aggressors, forcing them to take cover inside a house from which they returned his fire. He cautiously made his way to the building, threw a grenade inside of it, and a few minutes later called for the occupants to surrender. When the enemy gave no indication of surrendering, Sergeant Ortiz Perez assaulted the house, managed to kill three enemy soldiers in close combat, and captured the fourth. This action, executed by Sergeant Ortiz Perez at great danger to his own life, materially contributed to the ultimate success of the mission. Sergeant Ortiz Perez's gallantry and faithful devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and exemplify the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Osborne, William F.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 528 - 13 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major William F. Osborne, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy on 3 May 1951 as a Fighter Pilot. On that date, leading his flight of four F-80 type aircraft through adverse weather conditions and rugged mountainous terrain, Major Osborne located a large concentration of enemy troops and supplies in an almost inaccessible area near Inje, Korea. The area was surrounded by numerous anti-aircraft gun positions. While on his first attack strafing and dropping napalm, Major Osborne's aircraft was severely damaged by a direct hit. In spite of the damage, Major Osborne continued to press the attack, making several more strafing runs and leaving the target only after all ammunition was expended. While still behind the enemy line his aircraft started to burn and the engine failed. He guided the burning F-80 over the front lines and made a successful power-off wheels-down landing on a friendly airstrip. As a result of his attacks, over two hundred troops were killed and many supplies destroyed. Major Osborne's courage, skill and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Osburn, LeRoy

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 121 - 5 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) LeRoy Osburn (ASN: 0-1295262), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Headquarters First Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, action on 6 July 1950 at Namji Ri, Korea. Captain Osburn organized two companies of his battalion and personally directed an attack to extricate Company C, which was cut off and surrounded by the enemy. Disregarding his own personal safety, he directed the operations of both companies and designated targets for two attached tanks during which time he was exposed to heavy small arms, tank and mortar fire. He did this over a period of several hours before he was severely wounded while directing tank firing. The daring leadership and courage exhibited by Captain Osburn was an inspiration to men he contacted and contributed greatly to the success of the attack in reaching Company C. These acts of gallantry reflect the highest possible credit on Captain Osburn and the military service. Home Town: Madisonville, Kentucky.

O'Shea, Robert Joseph (POW)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert Joseph O'Shea (MCSN: 0-48902), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observer in an unarmed Observation Plane attached to Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 3 December 1950. Spotting approximately three companies of hostile troops waiting to ambush friendly units during the movement of the First Marine Division from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri, First Lieutenant O'Shea, although fully aware of the unavailability of close support aircraft and of the lack of sufficient artillery ammunition to conduct an effective attack, requested his radio control party to notify the heavy mortar section that he would mark the enemy positions by dropping smoke grenades and adjust the mortar fire by relaying radio messages. When hostile automatic-weapons fire struck his plane and the engine failed, the pilot succeeded in gliding to the temporary airstrip at Hagaru-ri where he could repair the damaged craft. After the weather had cleared sufficiently to allow close support aircraft to reach the area, First Lieutenant O'Shea contacted the flight and gain flew in through the intense fire to mark the targets for the strike. By his daring tactics and cool courage throughout the action, he contributed materially to the success of the Division in reaching its destination and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

O'Steen, Albert B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Albert B. O'Steen (MCSN: 567512), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 September 1951. During the platoon's night attack on a heavily fortified hill position defended by a tenacious and determined enemy force, Staff Sergeant O'Steen repeatedly exposed himself to devastating hostile small arms, mortar and automatic weapons fire to assist in deploying the unit against successive enemy strong points. Although he sustained two painful wounds during the intensive action, he refused to seek cover or accept medical treatment. Charging forward through withering hostile fire at the head of an element of the platoon during the final assault, he bravely led his men in completely routing the entrenched enemy. By his courageous leadership, marked fortitude and aggressive fighting spirit, Staff Sergeant O'Steen served to inspire all who observed him and contributed immeasurably to the success of the attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Blackshear, Georgia. Home Town: Blackshear, Georgia.

O'Toole, Thomas J.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 303 - 31 July 1953

Private Thomas J. O'Toole, US23735206, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 8 July 1953, Private O'Toole was a member of a five man listening post which had taken up a position on contested ground forward of the main line of resistance in the vicinity of Chungmoksil, Korea. As midnight approached, an enemy force of platoon size launched an attack in which they employed automatic weapons and numerous grenades. Private O'Toole, responding at once, mortally wounded three of the enemy in the initial burst of fire and continued to lay heavy and effective fire on the oncoming enemy until his weapon was blown from his hands by the force of an exploding grenade. Private O'Toole then moved to a position where one of his comrades had fallen and took up his weapon. Alternately hurling grenades and leveling effective fire on the enemy, he continued in the intense fire fight until the enemy was routed and withdrew in disorder. Private O'Toole's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Pennsylvania.

Otteson, Eugene L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 88 - 29 April 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal Eugene L. Ottesen, US57513689, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company G, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 15 February 1951 in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea. Company G, under overwhelming enemy pressure, was forced to withdraw for a distance of approximately 400 yards, During the withdrawal, the gunner of Corporal Ottesen’s machine gun crew was wounded. Corporal Ottesen immediately took over the operation of the weapon and so deadly was his fire that three enemy onslaughts were hurled back with heavy losses. Disregarding the overwhelming odds against him, he held fast and continued to cover his company’s withdrawal until, under the sheer weight of numbers, his position was overrun. The gallantry and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Ottesen reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Minnesota.

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News Clipping:

"Corporal Eugene L. Otteson, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Otteson of New Richland and who was reported missing in action in Korea in February, has been awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action.  The medal was presented to his parents.  It was awarded for his part in action against the enemy near Chipyong, Korea, on February 15, the day he was reported missing." - Austin Daily Herald (MN) - 8 October 1951

Eugene (US57513689), 23rd Regiment, 2nd Division, MIA, was declared dead.  He was from New Richland, MN.

Otwell, Bernie

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Bernie Otwell (MCSN: 289555), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Section Leader of Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1950. When a hostile mortar round landed in his gun position during a concentrated enemy attack on his battery and started a fire in the ammunition pit which contained one hundred rounds of high explosive ammunition, Staff Sergeant Otwell fearlessly entered the pit and began to throw snow on the ammunition in a desperate attempt to extinguish the flames. Realizing that the snow was not going to be effective and that an explosion might occur at any moment, he promptly removed his parka coat and used it to smother the flames. By his daring initiative, determined efforts and grave concern for others at great risk to his own life, Staff Sergeant Otwell prevented serious injury or death to the personnel of his section and the possible destruction of his gun during a critical stage of supporting action by his gun and battery. His heroic action throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Grayson, Louisiana. Home Town: Grayson, Louisiana.

Overholt, Edwin L.

General Orders No. 6 - 11 January 1951
General Headquarters Far East Command

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority contained in AR 600-45 and Department of the Army message, 10 July 1950, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following named officer:

Captain Edwin L. Overholt, 060030, Medical Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry in action at Osan and Ansong, Korea, during the period 5 July to 7 July 1950.  Working in rugged mountainous terrain with improvised facilities, hampered by rain and under constant enemy fire, Captain Overholt undoubtedly saved the lives of many wounded soldiers.  In all instances his care of battlefield casualties was characterized by exceptional skill, calmness and deep personal concern without regard for his own comfort and safety.  When forced to withdraw from Osan Hill, Captain Overholt assisted in carrying the wounded over mountainous terrain for a distance of approximately forty miles.  During this journey, he remained behind with several litter cases who could not be carried further, satisfying himself that every possible aid had been given to each of the wounded men before he rejoined the unit.  Immediately upon reaching Ansong, Captain Overholt, without food or rest, assisted with an emergency operation on an American soldier; and then he undertook to treat the wounded men of a unit that had lost its surgeon in combat.  Captain Overholt's professional skill and selfless devotion in caring for the wounded with complete disregard for the hazards of battle exemplify conduct that is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered Federal service from Iowa.

Overton, Dolphin Dunnaha III (1st award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Dolphin Dunnaha Overton, III (AFSN: 0-18504A), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United States as a F-86 Pilot of the 49th Bomber Wing, Fifth Air Force, over North Korea, 15 June 1952. On this date, Lieutenant Overton led a group-bombing raid to destroy specific targets on Pyong Yang Airport East that remained after a previous group bombing effort. The accuracy of the attack was critical since prisoners of war were embedded in key sites in the target area. To assure the maximum safety of the prisoners of war, napalm and strafing runs were employed, making the attacking aircraft low and slow, vulnerable targets to the dense ground fire. The airport was heavily defended by forty-eight anti-aircraft guns and more than 100 automatic weapons, making it one of the worst "flak traps" in Korea. Against these improbable odds, Lieutenant Overton led his group-bombing raid in an almost perfect attack, resulting in 100 percent coverage and 98 percent effectiveness. No prisoner of war buildings were hit, nor did any aircraft sustain major damage. The results of the mission were cites as excellent and gratifying, and proved the ability of the FAR EAST Air Forces jet and propeller planes to carry out a variety of destructive missions. By his gallantry and devotion to duty, Lieutenant Overton has reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

[Lieutenant Overton also was awarded five Distinguished Flying Crosses for his actions during the Korean War, as well as a Distinguished Service Cross.]

Overton, Dolphin Dunnaha III (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Dolphin Dunnaha Overton, III (AFSN: 0-18504A), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United States as a F-86 Pilot of the 49th Bomber Wing, Fifth Air Force, over Sakchu, North Korea, 4 July 1952. On this date, Lieutenant Overton led a group of 37 F-84s in a raid to strafe and deliver 7,000 gallons of napalm to the North Korean Military Academy, located across the Yalu River from Antung. Approximately 1,200 MiG-15s were based there. In spite of the fierce enemy opposition (200 attacking MiG-15s--the most numerous of the Korean War) and extremely heavy anti-aircraft fire, Lieutenant Overton and his group dealt a devastating blow to the Academy. During the preflight mission briefing, Lieutenant Overton emphasized there was no way to avoid radar detection, there would be MiG-15s encountered, and there would be no room for a feint to confuse their target destination. His pep talk described that they had to hit the target, not drop their ordnance at the report of MiG-15s as previous bombing groups had done. He further advised that if attacked they would form Lufbery Circles, hold their ordnance, then go into the target zone and drop their ordnance. Each plane as it left the target area would hit the deck and proceed to the mouth of the Yalu River where it would group with the other planes and form another Lufbery Circle until the attacking MiG-15s ceased. During the mission, Lieutenant Overton led by example and maintained the integrity of his force. When the MiG-15s attacked the flights, the flights performed as briefed and no F-84s were lost and all ordnance was expended on target. The raid was selected to show the effectiveness of fighter-bombers under the nose of MiG-15s after B-29s had suffered unacceptable loses. So significant was Lieutenant Overton's mission that when the United Nations sent a number of aircraft to attack the hydroelectric plants on the Yalu River, no MiG-15s rose to protect them and resulted in the Russian Commander being relieved of command. The success of this mission exemplified what could be done by good leadership during the height of intense chaos in combat, and written by both sides as being one of the major raids of the Korean War that helped convince North Korea of their non-assurance of winning the war and returning to diplomatic peace talks. By his gallantry and devotion to duty, Lieutenant Overton has reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Overton , Dolphin Dunnaha III (3rd award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Captain [then First Lieutenant] Dolphin Dunnaha Overton, III (AFSN: 0-18504A), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United States as a F-86 Pilot of the 51st Flying Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, near Insan-Dong, Korea, on 21 January 1953. Flying number two position in a flight of four F-86 aircraft, Captain Overton sight ed four MiG-15s. He attacked one of them scoring hits on the wing and tail section. The enemy aircraft was observed going straight down. Minutes later, Captain Overton sighted five MiGs. He attacked one hitting the wing roots, fuselage, and tail section. The enemy aircraft made a turn left and was last observed in a steep dive with fuel streaming from the right wing. By his gallantry and devotion to duty in the dedication to duty of his service to his country, Captain Overton has reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Overton, Dolphin Dunnaha III (4th award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Dolphin Dunnaha Overton, III (AFSN: 0-18504A), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United States as a F-86 Pilot of the 51st Flying Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force. During his second combat tour, in a 4-day period of 21 to 24 January 1953, Lieutenant Overton led the 51st Flying Interceptor Wing in the confirmed shoot-down of four enemy MiG-15s. On 25 January 1953, while flying his aircraft near Uiju, Korea, Lieutenant Overton shot down his fifth enemy MiG-15. This accomplishment set a re cord in his becoming a jet ACE in the shortest period of time, becoming the 24th of the 38 ACEs of the Korean War. The professional competence, aerial skill, and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Overton in the dedication of his service to his country reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Overvold, Edward D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Edward D. Overvold (MCSN: 533995), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Battery G, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. When the major part of a truck column was halted by burning ammunition trucks which blocked the entire road, Corporal Overvold voluntarily proceeded to the scene with his bulldozer and, despite the dangers of enemy fire and exploding ammunition, set about clearing the road of the burning vehicles. By his daring initiative, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Corporal Overvold was responsible for permitting the convoy to advance out of the enemy fire-swept area, and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Buena, Washington. Home Town: Arlington, Washington.

Owen, Dana H.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 156 - November 16, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Dana H. Owen (ASN: RA-35814455), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry in action while serving with Company B, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy), attached to the 1st Cavalry Division, on 8 September 1950, near Tabudong, Korea. When the enemy had penetrated friendly lines in their drive southward on the vital city of Taogu, Sergeant Owen, as Platoon Sergeant in the lead of a column of three tanks, came under intense enemy mortar and small arms fire as he moved up to protect the withdrawal of a friendly infantry battalion. Unable to traverse the turret guns because of trees beside the narrow road, Sergeant Owen fearlessly exposed himself to the intense enemy mortar and small arms fire by opening the tank hatch and manning the .50 caliber anti-aircraft machine gun to fire on the enemy infantry. When the friendly battalion had successfully withdrawn, Sergeant Owen moved his tanks back and covered a demolition crew with his machine gun while they destroyed a bridge to halt the enemy's advance. Still exposed to the enemy fire, and with complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Owen helped evacuate three wounded soldiers by taking them on the deck of the tank and transporting them to an aid station. Sergeant Owen's gallantry and outstanding devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Owen, Harvey B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Harvey B. Owen (MCSN: 357440), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. When his squad left the cover afforded by the houses of the village through which they were attacking, and were met with intense hostile fire form well-concealed positions, Sergeant Owen skillfully withdrew his men to the edge of the village and, ordering a base of fire, courageously placed himself in an exposed position in order to draw the enemy's fire. Quickly locating the hostile weapons, he directed his squad's fire against them and, although painfully wounded in both legs during the action, resolutely continued his direction and control. By his daring initiative, inspiring leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Sergeant Owen upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Waubay, South Dakota. Home Town: Washington, D.C.

Owen, Joseph R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Joseph R. Owen, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Mortar Section Commander, Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 27 November 1950. While on combat patrol, Second Lieutenant Owen's company suddenly came under heavy small arms, automatic weapon and mortar fire from concealed enemy positions, resulting in numerous casualties. With the company fighting to extricate itself from its untenable situation and the numerically superior enemy force moving rapidly to encircle and cut them off, Second Lieutenant owen expertly delivered mortar fire with deadly effect to hamper enemy movement. When his mortar rounds were exhausted, he quickly reorganized his mortarmen and available headquarters personnel into an ad hoc rifle unit. Under incessant hostile fire and with total disregard for his own safety, Second Lieutenant Owen skillfully led his improvised unit in an attack with the other rifle platoons. When the enemy counterattacked through a gap between the advancing platoons, he fearlessly led his Marines into the midst of the onrushing enemy soldiers, wielding his carbine as a club, to repulse the enemy penetration. Although stunned by an exploding concussion grenade, Second Lieutenant Owen refused medical treatment and continued to lead his men, moving from Marine to Marine, shouting encouragement and directing their attack, while remaining fully exposed to hostile fire. As the enemy onslaught intensified in his sector, now shifted to bear primarily on the wounded Marines and attending corpsmen assembled at the company aid station, Second Lieutenant Owen again boldly led his small group in a spirited assault against the strong enemy weapons position that endangered the aid station. By his aggressive action in eliminating that enemy position, he and his men not only assured the survival of many wounded Marines, but facilitated the breakout of his company through surrounding enemy forces. Second Lieutenant Owen's outstanding display of courage, unrelenting perseverance, and total devotion to duty reflected great credit upon him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Owens, Robert Allen (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Major Robert Allen Owens (MCSN: 0-25177), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 - 7 July 1952. Leading his company in an attack on a strongly defended enemy hill position, Major Owens, though seriously wounded in the face and leg early in the action, refused to be evacuated and continued to direct his company in the attack until ordered to break contact with the enemy. Continuing to ignore his painful wounds, and constantly exposing himself to hostile fire, he remained with his company to assure an organized and safe withdrawal to friendly lines, relinquishing his command and allowing himself to be evacuated only after a final accounting of every officer and man. By his outstanding courage, leadership and unyielding devotion to duty, Major Owens served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: December 16, 1918 at West, Texas. Home Town: Hillsboro, Texas. Death: MIA: October 4, 1952.

Owens, Wade E.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 112 - September 29, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal [then Private First Class] Ward E. Owens (ASN: RA-15412869), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, in action on 23 July 1950, near Yongdong, Korea. Corporal Owens, along with three other men, volunteered to remain in an exposed position under enemy artillery and mortar shelling throughout the night to operate a daisy chain of anti-tank mines should enemy tanks attack. One enemy tank was disabled by the mines. With complete disregard for their own safety, Corporal Owens and a companion attacked the halted tank with hand grenades, silencing its guns and killing its crew. Corporal Owens' gallant action reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.

Owens, William H. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 206 - 27 September 1950

Corporal William H. Owens, RA7235669, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 25 August 1950 elements of the regiment were starting an attack near Taegu, Korea, when an enemy minefield was encountered.  Since delay meant endangering the mission, Corporal Owens volunteered to assist in removing the mines.  Moving forward under intense direct hostile small arms fire, he was killed when the enemy suddenly lay a mortar barrage on the area.  Corporal Owens' gallant devotion to duty and to the service of his country was an inspiration to his fellow soldiers and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Missouri.

Oyola, German (posthumous)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 436 - 29 September 1951

Sergeant German Oyola, RA10404296, Infantry, Company "D", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 26 April 1951, near Chuygo, Korea, Sergeant Oyola's machine gun section was attached to and providing fire support for the attacking elements of Company "A" when a fanatical enemy counterattack necessitated a withdrawal to more tenable positions. Sergeant Oyola, placing his section in the new location, received notification that two of his men had been wounded and were in the area recently vacated. Immediately he advanced into the face of heavy hostile fire. Upon returning with one of the stricken soldiers, he courageously re-entered the fire-swept area and carried  the other man to safety. The gallant and selfless concern for his comrades displayed by Sergeant Oyola reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Ozolins, Leonids

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Leonids Ozolins (MCSN: 1218508), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving as an Observer of Company D, Second Battalion, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 2 December 1953. Volunteering to serve as an observer on a combat patrol venturing deep into enemy territory, Private First Class Ozolins, during the advance, was cut off from the patrol by intense hostile small arms and mortar fire that wounded a second observer. When the enemy advanced upon him while he was assisting a Corpsman in evacuating his wounded comrade, he returned the fire with his rifle and succeeded in driving off the attackers. Returning to the wounded man, he helped to carry the casualty a distance of 250 yards across an open rice paddy which was swept by devastating enemy mortar and small arms fire. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and indomitable fighting spirit in the face of grave peril, Private First Class Ozolins served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Walmiera, Latvia. Home Town: Hagerstown, Indiana.

 

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