Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "Q"

 
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Quadros, Frank A.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Staff Sergeant Frank A. Quadros (MCSN: 522472), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy as a Platoon Sergeant in the First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. The platoon of which Staff Sergeant Quadros was platoon sergeant assaulted an enemy automatic weapons company which was dug in on a large hill about one hundred fifty yards from the platoon's assault position behind the ruins of destroyed buildings. The platoon received very heavy automatic fire. The platoon leader was wounded, six men were killed and eight others were wounded almost immediately. Staff Sergeant Quadros took command of the platoon and continued the assault. Although finally forced to withdraw, Staff Sergeant Quadros personally killed six enemy. He deliberately exposed himself to draw enemy fire and returned fire on the enemy while the wounded were evacuated. When the remainder of the company brought assistance, the enemy withdrew leaving sixty-five dead, fifteen heavy machine guns, eight mortars and eighty-five automatic rifles. His display of gallantry reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 5 (September 27, 1950). Home Town: San Francisco, California.

Quails, Paul D.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 233 - 24 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Paul D. Quails (ASN: RA-14318198), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chingju, Korea, on 28 July 1950. The enemy was attacking his company's position in such numbers that in spite of the well placed and deadly fire being poured into the advancing forces, some succeeded in reaching a point where grenades were thrown into the company area. One grenade fell in the position where Private Quails was servicing his recoilless rifle. With great presence of mind and with utter disregard for his own safety he picked up the live grenade and hurled it from the position in time to prevent its burst from killing or injuring the crew. Private Quails' gallant actions reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Calera, Alabama.

Queen, Ralph H. (posthumous)

Citation not yet found.

"Second Lt. Ralph H. Queen of Billings, Montana has been awarded the Silver Star medal for gallantry in action.  U.S. Eighth Army headquarters said the award went to Queen, son of Mrs. H.W. Queen, 2204 Elm St., posthumously.  Queen was in charge of a 75mm recoilless rifle crew with the 35th Infantry Regiment moving toward Sanai-ri.  He was fatally wounded by enemy fire after he had assisted two wounded crewmen to safety and was attempting to service the rifle." - The Independent Record, Helen, Montana, October 9, 1950

Queenin, Hugh F. (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 37 - 17 August 1956

Lieutenant Colonel (then Major) Hugh F. Queenin, Armor, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Pyongyan, Korea, on 5 December 1950.  Having been informed by the division commander that the division was out of contact with a battalion of the 8th Cavalry Regiment, and that this battalion was in danger of being overrun by a strong enemy force, Colonel Queenin conducted a personal ground reconnaissance 15 to 20 miles in front of friendly elements in the Corps area in order to determine the exact location of the battalion, inform the battalion commander that he was relieved from his covering force mission, and advise him of routes which would provide for the battalion's safe withdrawal.  Colonel Queenin conducted the reconnaissance alone and without support in the full knowledge that all friendly troops had been withdrawn.  Despite the fact that he was subjected to enemy fire, his vehicle partially disabled, and that he narrowly escaped capture Colonel Queenin's intrepid action achieved the safe withdrawal of the endangered battalion and its effective employment elsewhere during a critical period.  The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Colonel Queenin reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.  Home of Record: Massachusetts.

Quelch, Kenneth H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Kenneth H. Quelch (MCSN: 0-19705), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as S-4 of the First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. When the convoy, which was transporting his battalion, was halted by an enemy roadblock, First Lieutenant Quelch fearlessly and repeatedly exposed himself to intense and accurate hostile small arms, machine gun and mortar fire to move voluntarily among the unit firing positions supplying critically needed ammunition and directing effective fire on hostile positions on both sides of the road. By his courageous initiative, coolness in the face of heavy fire and inspiring devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Quelch contributed materially to the subsequent advance of the convoy, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lawrence, Kansas. Home Town: San Diego, California.

Quesenberry, Charles P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Charles P. Quesenberry (MCSN: 649379), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 July 1952. Exhibiting outstanding courage in the performance of his duties, Staff Sergeant Quesenberry participated in three separate patrols in one day, During the initial patrol, which involved an assault against a well-entrenched enemy position, he braved intense enemy fire while participating as a member of the attacking party. After it was discovered that one Marine from the first patrol was missing, Staff Sergeant Quesenberry courageously exposed himself to intense hostile fire to join a rescue patrol attempting to locate the man. Upon reaching the base of a hill, he provided the necessary covering fire which enabled the remainder of the unit to advance up the hill and recover the missing Marine. After the unit was forced to withdraw due to intense enemy fire, the body of the Marine was placed in a position from which it could be recovered by another party. Returning to the main line of resistance, Staff Sergeant Quesenberry volunteered to lead another patrol forward to retrieve the body and bravely moved ahead to the position, directing supporting fire that enabled the party to remove their fallen comrade without casualties. His exceptional courage, coolness under fire and selfless devotion to duty served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Dugspur, Virginia. Home Town: Floyd, Virginia.

Quillen, Marion A. (posthumous)

The Silver Star is awarded (posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Marion A. Quillen, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Battery D, 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 2nd Infantry Division, in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Agok, Korea, on 1 September 1950.  On this date, Sergeant First Class Quillen was a Section Leader commanding two anti-aircraft firing vehicles.  At about 0300 hours, when the leading elements of the attacking enemy came within range of his gun, Sergeant First Class Quillen gave the order to open fire.  The enemy continued to advance, and as the attack developed, enemy fire became devastating.  Although units to his right and left started to withdraw, his crews were stimulated by his leadership and indomitable courage and continued to fire smoothly and effectively until forced to withdraw because of ammunition shortage and a defective traversing mechanism.  As a result of this tenacity, great damage was inflicted upon the enemy.  After withdrawing for a mile, they met a tank crew from which additional small arms ammunition was obtained.  Sergeant Quillen and his crews again engaged the enemy with their individual weapons in his sector until forced to withdraw to avoid certain destruction or capture.  Sergeant First Class Quillen's gallantry and indifference to his personal safety were determining factors in causing the enemy's defeat on this occasion and fully upheld the highest traditions of military service, reflecting great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

Quillian, Stone W. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Stone W. Quillian (MCSN: 0-31762), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 June 1951. Assigned the mission of assaulting and seizing a ridge line heavily fortified by a series of mutually supporting enemy bunkers, Captain Quillian courageously led his men up the steep and rugged approach and, upon encountering a vicious hail of hostile automatic weapons and mortar fire, boldly exposed himself to deploy his platoons and seek points of observation from which to call down supporting fire. Ignoring the pain of a shrapnel wound received the previous day, he resolutely continued to control the action and to encourage his men, inspiring them to heroic efforts which culminated in the seizure of the objective. By his outstanding leadership, coolness under fire and valiant devotion to duty, Captain Quillian upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Quillian, Stone W. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Stone W. Quillian (MCSN: 0-31762), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 June 1951. Assigned the mission of seizing and occupying an advanced patrol base approximately 1,500 yards forward of friendly lines and in close proximity to a known hostile strongpoint located on commanding ground and dominating the entire area, Captain Quillian bravely led his men to the objective under cover of darkness and, upon arriving at the first light of dawn, came under intense enemy fire. Faced with the immediate problem of digging in to minimize casualties and of locating the most effective defensible terrain and the best positions for machine guns and mortars, he coolly walked over the entire area, issuing orders to his men who were forced to work in the open under intense mortar and artillery barrages, offering words of encouragement, carefully inspecting his lines and supervising evacuation of the wounded. Continuing his valiant efforts throughout the day, he assured himself that the sector was completely organized for defense and that all his men were in covered positions before seeking protection for himself. By his calm and inspiring leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and courageous determination in the face of heavy odds, Captain Quillian contributed immeasurably to the success achieved by his company, and his heroic devotion to duty throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Antonio, Texas. Home Town: San Antonio, Texas.

Quinn, Edward B. (First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

First Lieutenant Edward B. Quinn, 062377, Armor, United States Army, a member of Headquarters and Service Company, (then Company A), 72d Tank Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 31 August 1950 in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea.  On that date a friendly platoon was completely surrounded by a large enemy force.  Lieutenant Quinn immediately volunteered to go to the aid of the trapped platoon with his tank and crew.  Although subjected to intense enemy small arms, mortar, anti-tank, and artillery fire, he drove his tank directly through the enemy encirclement until he reached the en-battered platoon.  Delivering effective and devastating fire from his tank weapons, he escorted the surrounded platoon to a position where it could again establish a solid line.  The initiative, courage, and gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Quinn reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Utah.

Quinn, Francis X.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Francis X. Quinn (MCSN: 0-55941), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 - 6 April 1953. Voluntarily leading a patrol in the difficult and extremely hazardous mission of aiding another friendly unit which had been ambushed by the enemy over 2,000 meters forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Quinn led his men through intense hostile small-arms and hand-grenade fire and skillfully maneuvered them to a position between the stricken friendly patrol and the enemy. Although painfully wounded during this action, he dauntlessly continued to move among his men, successfully covering the withdrawal of the friendly unit and directing the evacuation of the wounded. Discovering that the ambushed patrol was unable to account for all its members, he reorganized his unit and returned to the point of initial contact where he remained until daylight to make every possible effort to locate the missing men. By his courageous leadership, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Quinn served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Division, Serial 20739. Born: April 15, 1927 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Williamsburg, Virginia. Death: May 5, 2009.

Quinn, William E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 65 - 28 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant William E. Quinn (ASN: NG-14022567), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 26th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self-Propelled), 24th Infantry Division, (then a member of the 52d Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self-Propelled), 24th Infantry Division), near Paegyangni, Korea, on 8 November 1951. His unit dispatched a platoon of weapons carriers to give close fire support to infantry elements attacking an enemy held objective. As the platoon was maneuvering into position, it was subjected to an intensely concentrated enemy mortar barrage which disabled two vehicles and forced the others to withdraw temporarily. When informed of the two critical weapons abandoned in enemy territory and the possibility of wounded crewmen still being on or near the vehicles, Sergeant Quinn volunteered to direct his tank recovery crew in the recovery operations. With calm disregard for murderous sniper and mortar fire bursting about him, he continually exposed himself to direct the maneuvering of the retriever to the first half-track and towed it out of the area. Once this vehicle and the wounded crewman inside were brought to safety, he unhesitatingly returned through the concentrated mortar barrages and small arms fire for the other disabled carrier and towed it out of danger. As a result of his fearlessness, several lives were saved and valuable equipment was prevented from falling into enemy hands. Sergeant Quinn's courageous action, daring initiative, and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Montgomery, Alabama.

Quiroz, Arturo

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Arturo Quiroz (MCSN: 633117), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of the First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 September 1950. Repeatedly exposing himself to intense hostile fire in order to deliver his own deadly fire on the enemy during a fierce attack, Private First Class Quiroz killed seventeen of the aggressors and contributed materially to the successful rout of the remainder. By his exceptional skill, aggressive determination and staunch devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Quiroz upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Doole, Texas. Home Town: San Antonio, Texas.

 

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