Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "R"

 
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Rackow, Raymond J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Raymond J. Rackow, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Squad Leader, Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 July 1952. During the early morning hours, the Third platoon conducted a raid on a Chinese-held outpost located on a hilltop in no man's land. Corporal Rackow and his squad entered the enemy trench line and engaged the enemy soldiers. After clearing the enemy from the trench line, he carried two critically wounded Marines down the hill to a place of relative safety to await evacuation. Corporal Rackow and another Marine returned to the hilltop to recover the body of a Marine who had been killed in action. After returning once again to the hilltop, which was receiving enemy mortar fire, and finding no further Marine casualties or wounded enemy soldiers he could bring back as prisoners of war, he returned to the base of the hill where he found another critically wounded Marine. Due to wounds he had received in the initial engagement with the enemy, he was unable to move the Marine. After dressing the Marine's wounds, he moved toward his unit where he found a Hospital Corpsman who he led back to the wounded Marine. By his aggressive determination, untiring efforts, and loyal devotion to duty in the face of extreme danger, Corporal Rackow reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Radel, Frederick M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Frederick M. Radel (NSN: 0-82757), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer of U.S.S. Gurke (DD-783) in Korea, from 13 to 15 September 1950. Commander Radel navigated his ship through an enemy mine field, engaged enemy shore batteries at close range, and contributed greatly to the successful amphibious landings at Inchon. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 918 (October 14, 1950).

Radke, Donald O.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Donald O. Radke (MCSN: 324426), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Headquarters and Service Company, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. With the battalion subjected to heavy enemy machine gun and small arms fire from high ground during an attack along the main road between Yudam-ni and Hagaru-ri, Staff Sergeant Radke volunteered to lead an infantry platoon in outposting critical terrain features on the route of advance. When the platoon was pinned down by a well-concealed enemy force employing machine guns, hand grenades and small arms, he continually exposed himself to accurate hostile fire and boldly moved among his men to set up a base of return fire. Leading two of his squads, he carried out an aggressive assault against the enemy, inflicting severe casualties among them and seizing the vital terrain feature, thereby materially aiding the main force of the convoy in continuing its advance. By his marked courage, daring leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Radke served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Radow, Sammy E.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 69 - 5 November 1968

Major Sammy E. Radow, 088438, Infantry, United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Changnyong, Korea, on 16 September 1950, while serving as Commanding Officer, Company M. 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division.  On this date Major Radow was in command of Company M, 23d Infantry Regiment, while that unit was participating in the general attack upon enemy positions along the Naktong River.  Throughout the day, Major Radow voluntarily remained with the leading assault elements of his unit in order to direct fire of his supporting weapons with greater effect.  When the radio operator was wounded, Major Radow remained in an exposed position, under intense enemy fire, and personally operated the radio until another operator was sent forward.  His heroic and aggressive leadership throughout this action was a source of inspiration to all members of his company and contributed greatly to the success of his battalion in its offensive.  Major Radow's gallant conduct is in the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

Ragan, William H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Seaman William H. Ragan (NSN: 2113999), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy during the amphibious assault landings at Inchon, Korea, on 15 September 1950. As coxswain of a landing craft while preparing to return from landing troops on a hostile beachhead, Seaman Ragan noticed a small group of Marines on the beach receiving heavy enemy fire, some of whom had been wounded. He returned to the beach without regard for his own personal safety, rescued a seriously wounded Marine and transported him to safety. His daring initiative and courage were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 974 (October 26, 1950).

Ragsdale, James E. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal James E. Ragsdale, Jr. (MCSN: 1091213), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 July 1952. Discovering that one of his men was missing while reorganizing his squad after an assault on a strongly fortified enemy position, Corporal Ragsdale courageously exposed himself to intense hostile fire in an effort to find the missing man. Although wounded himself during the attack, he succeeded in locating the wounded Marine and aided in carrying him back to friendly lines. By his exceptional courage, coolness under fire and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Ragsdale served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Baltimore, Maryland. Home Town: Columbia, South Carolina.

Rainalter, William John (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain William John Rainalter (MCSN: 0-20896), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMF-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sariwon, Korea, on 22 April 1951. While on a routine reconnaissance mission, Captain Rainalter participated in a daring attack against an enemy airfield which was known to have strong anti-aircraft gun installations. Discovering several of these installations, he went in to strike repeatedly, despite the intense fire he encountered from each of the enemy positions. Boldly launching his attacks, he personally destroyed two of the hostile batteries, continuing in the assault until his supply of bombs and rockets had been exhausted. Still undaunted, he returned and executed numerous low strafing runs on the remainder of the enemy anti-aircraft positions, positively marking and identifying them for the rest of his flight so that other hostile batteries could be destroyed. While silencing a third emplacement on one of the strafing runs, his plane was hit, burst into flames and crashed into the target. By his superb courage, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty in the face of intense and accurate hostile anti-aircraft fire, Captain Rainalter contributed directly to the infliction of heavy damage on the enemy, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 8, 1922 at Honolulu, Hawaii. Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii. Death: KIA: April 22, 1951.

Rainforth, Richard H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Richard H. Rainforth (MCSN: 0-24652), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three (VMA-323), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 October 1952. Leading a four-plane flight on a mission against enemy artillery positions which were firing on friendly forces, Major Rainforth immediately pressed home an attack and completely demolished a self-propelled gun with a direct bomb hit. After recovering from his dive, he sighted and destroyed a moving hostile tank with a second bombing attack conducted in the face of heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire. Continuing to assail the target area, he bombarded and blew up a heavily defended enemy supply dump with three accurately placed bombs. With his ordnance expended, Major Rainforth rejoined two of his orbiting flight members whose planes were armed with napalm bombs, and led them in a daring attack that engulfed ten buildings and an enemy vehicle in flames, Carrying out a final assault with a third orbiting plane that lacked radio communication, he successfully employed hand signals to lead a destructive bombardment of a fortified enemy town. By his aggressive leadership, outstanding professional skill and unyielding devotion to duty under constant and intense enemy fire, Major Rainforth was largely responsible for the success of a mission that inflicted severe damage on the enemy and substantially reduced hostile pressure on friendly front line forces, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hastings, Nebraska. Home Town: Daniphan, Nebraska.

Raiser, Raymond B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Raymond B. Raiser (MCSN: 1103671), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 June 1951. With his team as the forward element in the attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Private First Class Raiser skillfully maneuvered his unit up the steep hill and vigorously led his men in neutralizing a series of well-concealed bunkers. When his unit was temporarily pinned down by withering fire from an enemy strong point, he boldly charged forward in the face of the heavy fire and initiated a furious assault against the position, killing the occupants with hand grenades. By his aggressive fighting spirit, inspiring courage and zealous devotion to duty, Private First Class Raiser contributed materially to the success of his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Francisco, California. Home Town: Mill Valley, California.

Ralston, Eldon

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Third Class Eldon Ralston, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medical Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 28 March 1953. While advancing with his company toward an outpost position to commence an assault, Hospitalman Third Class Ralston discovered numerous wounded men from other companies lying around the battlefield. Ignoring his own painful wounds, he courageously moved about through murderous hostile mortar and artillery fire to administer aid to the stricken men. Discovering one seriously wounded Marine who required immediate evacuation, he fearlessly carried him several hundred yards back to a check-point aid station and, after receiving treatment himself, refused evacuation in order to return to his company, which was engaged in the second assault on the outpost. Immediately after joining the unit, he moved through a devastating enemy barrage, rendering aid to his wounded comrades until forced to discontinue his efforts due to his own loss of blood. By his exceptional courage, fortitude and indomitable spirit, Hospitalman Third Class Ralston served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Ralston, James Dorman (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class James Dorman Ralston (MCSN: 655440), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with the Mobile Supply Section of Company C, First Amphibian Tractor Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 22 September 1950. Observing a wounded Marine during an intense enemy mortar barrage, Private First Class Ralston immediately ran to the aid of the wounded man in the face of intense hostile fire. Struck by shrapnel from an enemy mortar shell while attempting to remove the casualty to a covered position, he received a mortal wound. His fortitude and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Ralston and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 15, 1929 at Indianapolis, Indiana. Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana. Death: DOW: September 23, 1950.

Ramby, Vivian D. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Vivian D. Ramby, Jr. (NSN: 3615376), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Medical Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 28 October 1951. Although seriously wounded in the arms and legs when his unit was subjected to a devastating hostile mortar barrage, Hospitalman Ramby bravely exposed himself to the heavy fire to administer aid to a forward observer who was nearly blinded by fragmentation in both eyes. After leading his wounded comrades to the safety of friendly lines, he continued to treat other casualties before consenting to aid and evacuation for himself. By his outstanding courage, inspiring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Hospitalman Ramby was directly responsible for the speedy treatment and evacuation of many painfully wounded Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division, Serial 2719 (February 1, 1952).

Ramirez, Alvaro Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Alvaro Ramirez, Jr. (MCSN:1084040), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of the Supply Company, First Service Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. When the enemy ambushed the division convoy between Hagaru-ri and Koto-ri, Corporal Ramirez courageously exposed himself to intense hostile fire in order to deliver his own fire into the attackers' ranks and, with deadly accuracy, killed large numbers of them. Although critically short of ammunition, he remained at his gun as the temporarily halted convoy again proceeded forward, valiantly persisting in his efforts to effect complete enemy disruption until he fell, mortally wounded. By his daring initiative, unflagging determination and staunch devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Ramirez contributed materially to the repulse of the hostile force and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

Ramirez, Lucio Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 51 - 25 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant [then Corporal] Lucio Ramirez, Jr. (ASN: RA-16334974), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Chingyachon, Korea, on 27 May 1951. His company had the mission of defending positions located on Hill 800, an extremely steep and rugged commanding terrain feature. In the hours of darkness, an estimated reinforced company of enemy troops attacked the friendly positions, concentrating the main assault on the Second Platoon. In the terrific fire fight which followed, a machine gunner was wounded and the platoon was ordered to withdraw to more tenable positions. As the riflemen started to move out, Sergeant Ramirez, with complete disregard for his own safety and seemingly oblivious to the devastating bands of interlocking enemy fire, raced to the abandoned machine gun emplacement and opened fire on the enemy at point blank range, killing and wounding many and causing confusion in their ranks. His comrades, inspired by his fearless aggressiveness, returned to their former positions and forced the enemy hordes to flee in wild disorder, inflicting very heavy casualties on them. Sergeant Ramirez was credited with killing an estimated 17 of the 67 enemy dead found later. Sergeant Ramirez's courageous action, daring initiative and selfless performance of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Ramirez, Pablo

General Orders No. 92 - 11 April 1951

Second Lieutenant Pablo Ramirez, 0954382, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 1 February 1951, Lieutenant Ramirez led his platoon in an assault on Hill 449 in the vicinity of Kalgok, Korea. In the initial phase of the assault an enemy mortar barrage killed one of the men of the platoon and wounded two others. The platoon was disorganized by the terrific barrage, but Lieutenant Ramirez immediately reorganized his men and continued the attack on the hill in spite of the mortar and small arms fire. He discovered two wounded men and evacuated them. Upon reaching a third man, he was killed by a second mortar barrage. The bravery and gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Ramirez was and inspiration to his men and exemplifies the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Ramos, Joe

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Joe S. Ramos (MCSN: 403062), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 June 1951. Although badly wounded in the arms and body when the platoon was subjected to devastating enemy small arms, mortar and automatic weapons fire during an attack against a strongly fortified hill position, Corporal Ramos refused to seek medical aid and, bravely moving forward through the heavy fire, carried out a single-handed assault on the key bunker, killing three of the enemy with accurate rifle and hand grenade fire. Weakened by his serious wounds, he was forced to submit to evacuation while preparing to continue the attack. By his outstanding courage, marked fortitude and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Ramos served to inspire all who observed him and greatly aided the company in successfully seizing its objective, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Columbus, Texas. Home Town: East Bernard, Texas.

Ramos, Ralph (POW from 23 April 1951-31 August 1953)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Ralph Ramos, a member of Medical Company, 5th Infantry Regiment attached to 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Waogwan, Korea on 18 September 1950. Corporal Ramos, an aid man, was advancing with an infantry rifle platoon when enemy fire inflicted a large number of casualties among the men of the platoon. Corporal Ramos, hit by fragments from an enemy grenade, was among the first to be wounded, but refused to return to a rear position form treatment. He continued to treat the wounded in the front line positions until he was wounded a second time. When he reached a rear position, he discovered that all other aid men had been wounded and evacuated and that he alone was the only aid man available. He then refused to be evacuated further and remained in the rear position treating the ever increasing number of casualties until other aid men became available. Corporal Ramos’ actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. General Orders: General Order number 173, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division
Home of Record: Colorado.

Randolph, John (AP War Correspondent)

Messages from Art Lajeunesse, New York:

"While going through September 1951 "Buffalo Evening News" on microfilm at our library, I found a small article about John Robert Randolph. He was a AP War Correspondent in Korea and received the Silver Star for actions on April 23, 1951. The article states- Randolph carried wounded to safety while under enemy fire, on April 23, during a wild, four hour battle. This is all that is in the article, not even what unit he was with. The article was in the September 19, 1951 issue."

"I just recently learned that John Robert Randolph a correspondent for Associated Press was awarded the Silver Star on September 19, 1951 by General James A. Van Fleet. In April 1951 he was attached to B Company, 7th Infantry Regiment when it became involved in an action with a large enemy force along the Imjin River on April 23, 1951. John Randolph helped carry wounded riflemen to safety while under enemy fire. Mr. Randolph made four trips carrying wounded to safety. Later he braved intense fire to save another wounded soldier by carrying him in his jeep to an aid station. This action took place near Ongion-dang, Korea. This information came from the Stars & Stripes, the September 21, 1951 issue."

Citation:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Mr. John Randolph, a United States Civilian, for gallantry in action as a Correspondent, Associated Press, in action at Ongion-dang, Korea, on 23 April 1951. Voluntarily attaching himself to Company B, 7th Infantry Regiment, during an attack against an estimated regiment of Chinese Communists, heedless of the risk involved, he proceeded four times through heavy enemy fire to pick up and carry wounded riflemen to places of safety. Later, when Company B returned under orders to the assembly area, another soldier was severely wounded by automatic weapons fire sweeping the terrain occupied by the unit. Again, Mr. Randolph braved intense hostile fire, rushed to the aid of the wounded man, picked up and carried him to his jeep, then drove through a hail of enemy fire to the aid station. During this heroic drive, his jeep was spattered by bullets from enemy weapons, but he reached the aid station safely. The courageous and aggressive action taken by Mr. Randolph reflects great credit on himself and the United States Army.

Randolph, Raymond R. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 202 - 25 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Raymond R. Randolph (ASN: RA-6257239), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Yongsan, Korea, on 4 September 1950. He was in charge of the lead vehicle of a motorized patrol when it was ambushed and pinned down by a strong enemy force. With complete disregard for his own safety he so occupied the enemy with effective fire that the remainder of the patrol was able to extricate itself from the untenable position. When last seen Sergeant Randolph was still in an exposed position, drawing on himself the full fury of the enemy's fire in order that his comrades might safely withdraw. His gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: December 17, 1916. Home Town: Demitt, Texas. Death: KIA: September 4, 1950 - Buried at: Lockney Cemetery - Lockney, Texas.

Rankin, Marcus V.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Marcus V. Rankin (MCSN: 1182035), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 14 July 1953. When a friendly unit inadvertently entered a mine field during the hours of darkness and detonated a mine which killed one Marine and wounded three others, Sergeant Rankin assisted in carrying one of the casualties to the comparative safety of an outpost and returned over the treacherous area to aid the other stricken men. Upon reaching the unit, he again directed and assisted in carrying the wounded Marines to the safety of friendly lines. Although physically exhausted, he proceeded forward through the hazardous mine field in complete darkness in an attempt to retrieve the body of a mortally wounded man and diligently traversed the entire area until daylight to search for his fallen comrade. By his exceptional courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Sergeant Rankin served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Macomb, Illinois. Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana.

Raper, John F.

Citation not yet found.

"Lieutenant Colonel John F. Raper, Jr., of Sheridan [Wyoming] has been awarded the Silver Star for gallant action in Korea.  The Sheridan man is commander of the 300th armored field artillery battalion, former Wyoming national guard unit.  The citation was for distinguished and gallant service between May 15 and 25 in the vicinity of the Suyang river in Korea." - Billings Gazette, 18 July 1951

Rasberry, Howard R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Howard R. Rasberry (MCSN: 327506), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tractor Operator in Battery L, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces during the movement of Marine elements from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 5 December 1950. Informed that three tractors had stalled and were holding up the convoy, Sergeant Rasberry proceeded along the line of march to the inoperative vehicles and working rapidly and skillfully in the face of intense hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire, succeeded in starting all the stalled tractors. When five tractors towing 155-mm. howitzers were subsequently knocked out by enemy fire, he voluntarily manned a bulldozer and, despite continued hostile opposition, pushed the vehicles and cannon off the road to permit the advance of the convoy to safe positions. By his initiative, fearlessness and courageous devotion to duty, Sergeant Rasberry contributed materially to the saving of many lives and much equipment, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Coppell, Texas. Home Town: Farmers Branch, Texas.

Rauh, Stanly H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Stanly H. Rauh (MCSN: 0-54191), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 26 - 27 October 1952. With the platoon engaged in a night counterattack against a strongly defended hill that had been previously overrun by the enemy, Second Lieutenant Rauh skillfully led his men through a devastating barrage of hostile artillery and mortar fire to a position from which he could more effectively launch the assault. Although seriously burned by an exploding enemy white phosphorous shell during this action, he steadfastly refused evacuation in order to supervise the evacuation of men wounded during the approach stage of the assault. Immediately reorganizing the platoon, he proceeded in the attack until an enemy mortar shell exploded nearby, wounding him and killing one of his men. Again reorganizing the unit, he fearlessly pressed forward and led his force in a determined attack against the enemy positions. Although hand grenades were constantly hurled at his unit as they closed with the enemy, Second Lieutenant Rauh continued to move among his men, lending encouragement and inspiration, until he was seriously wounded a third time and forced to relinquish his command. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and resolute determination, Second Lieutenant Rauh contributed materially to the eventual success of the operation and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tacoma, Washington. Home Town: Seattle, Washington.

Rawlins, Robert J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert J. Rawlins (MCSN: 1137611), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Commander of a Flame Thrower Tank of Headquarters Company, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 October 1952. Participating in a tank-infantry assault against an enemy-held outpost forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Rawlins skillfully maneuvered his tank to a position from which he successfully burned the reverse slope of the enemy hill. While turning his vehicle to proceed to the rear of the main lines, he was subjected to an intense hostile mortar and artillery barrage that dislodged and entangled a towing cable in the sprocket and immobilized the vehicle. Although wounded while attempting to disentangle the cable, he continued to expose himself to hostile fire until he had sufficiently cleared the obstruction to enable him to move the tank under its own power. Guiding the vehicle down a slope and around a critical turn, he again remounted and proceeded back to the rearming point. By his outstanding courage, initiative and unswerving devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire, Sergeant Rawlins upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Waldo, Florida. Home Town: Plant City, Florida.

Rawls, Herbert L. Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 244 - 26 October 1950

Sergeant Herbert L. Rawls Jr., RA34964743, Artillery, Battery A, 64th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  On 2 September 1950, an attack by numerically superior enemy on the battalion position near Masan, Korea, resulted in disrupting the communications with supported units.  Despite the intense enemy action, Sergeant Rawls left the comparative safety of his position and repaired the communications.  While in his exposed position he was mortally wounded.  Sergeant Rawls' courageous devotion to duty reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from North Carolina.

Ray, Andrew M.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Sergeant Andrew M. Ray (MCSN: 534153), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, on 17 August 1950, in the Naktong River Bulge, Korea. On 17 August 1950, Sergeant Ray, a squad leader, was assigned the mission of assaulting a hill defended by well entrenched enemy forces. Without regard for his personal safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire in coordinating and directing the advance of his squad. During this action Sergeant Ray was wounded but, despite his wound, he refused to be evacuated choosing to remain with his men until the enemy position had been taken. When ordered to withdraw, he supervised the evacuation of other wounded to safety. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Ray on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 68 (September 15, 1950). Entered Service From Washington.

Ray, Charles S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Charles S. Ray (NSN: 5687655), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Ray, serving as a Corpsman, was near the battalion aid station during an enemy ambush of the battalion column. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he advanced from a covered position in the face of enemy machine gun and hand grenade fire to a tank that had become stalled when the crewmen were overcome by exhaust fumes. He removed the five crewmen and administered artificial respiration to them while still under heavy enemy fire. The heroic actions of Hospital Corpsman Third Class Ray thereby saved the lives of the five crewmen who were able to re-man their tank and re-enter action. The subsequent actions of this tank neutralized the enemy resistance and permitted passage of the convoy column which had been unable to move because the tank had blocked the road. He thereby contributed materially to the successful completion of the mission of his battalion. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Ray's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 2779 (January 25, 1951).

Ray, Corbit A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Corbit A. Ray (MCSN: 636353), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. With hostile troops launching a counterattack from well-entrenched hill positions, Corporal Ray, on his own initiative, took over a light machine gun post after the gun crew had been wounded and, although several of the enemy had advanced to within ten yards of his position before he could open fire, used hand grenades as well as the machine gun to repulse the hostile assault single-handedly. By his initiative and courage, he permitted the other members of his platoon to take up favorable defensive positions and hold the objective. Remaining at his post, he continued to deliver effective fire until a hasty defense could be established and reorganization completed. His skill, indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty at this critical time were contributing factors in securing the company's objective, thereby reflecting great credit upon Corporal Ray and the United States Naval Service. Born: Hemingway, South Carolina. Home Town: Jacksonville, Florida.

Ray, James H. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James H. Ray, Jr. (MCSN: 376841), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Section Leader of Automotive Maintenance Company, First Motor Transport Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. When his platoon was ordered to attack and occupy a key terrain feature overlooking the bivouac area, Sergeant Ray skillfully led his section in assisting to overrun and seize the objective with a minimum of casualties. Observing a member of his section wounded by hostile fire during the assault, he fearlessly ran to the casualty who was lying in an exposed area and, despite the personal risk, carried the helpless Marine to a covered position. Although suffering from painful wounds sustained during this courageous action, he refused medical aid and continued to lead and direct his men until the platoon had achieved its mission. His unselfish actions, indomitable courage and inspiring devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Sergeant Ray and the United States Naval Service. Born: Maden, Alabama. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri.

Rayburn, Earl J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Earl J. Rayburn (MCSN: 651323), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 and 17 September 1951. When the company headquarters group was subjected to intense small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire while the rifle platoons were in the attack, Sergeant Rayburn bravely made his way from position to position, continually exposing himself to the hostile barrage to direct counterfire upon the attackers. Later that night as the rifle platoons withdrew into a company defense perimeter, he again exposed himself to the hostile fire to set up his guns and assist the platoon leaders in deploying theirs. Courageously moving forward with the attacking element the next morning when it neared its objective under constant enemy danger, Sergeant Rayburn unhesitatingly rushed from gun to gun, directing fire, eliminating stoppages and shouting words of encouragement to his men. Although seriously wounded by the hostile fire during the course of the battle, he steadfastly remained with one gun and continued to designate targets until ordered to be evacuated. By his outstanding fortitude, bold determination and gallant devotion to duty, Sergeant Rayburn served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Marion, North Carolina. Home Town: Marion, North Carolina.

Raymond, Charles

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles Raymond (MCSN: 1217377), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Automatic Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 July 1952. Leaving his position in front of a machine gun emplacement when he discovered that both gunners were wounded and several of the enemy had gained the high ground to the rear of the emplacement and were preparing to destroy it, Private First Class Raymond quickly seized an automatic rifle, single-handedly stormed the high ground and opened fire on the enemy, inflicting casualties and completely routing the attackers. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Raymond was directly instrumental in saving the lives of his two wounded comrades and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kaauhuhu, Hawaii. Home Town: Kohala, Hawaii.

Raymond, Chester C. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Chester C. Raymond, Jr. (NSN: 4265621), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 12 to 16 August 1952. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Hospitalman Raymond continuously exposed himself to heavy enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire while administering aid to the wounded along a trail near an important terrain feature. He repeatedly made trips along the trail to this area until he became so exhausted that he was ordered to stay at the forward aid station on the main line of resistance. While in the aid station he learned that a stretcher party had been ambushed on the trail. Unhesitatingly he proceeded alone to the point of ambush, killing one enemy and driving another away under fire in order to reach the wounded. Despite his exhausted condition he reached the casualties and administered first aid. Hospitalman Raymond's selfless devotion to duty was an inspiration to all who observed him. His gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 33395 (November 4, 1952).

Reagan, Bruce V. Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 91 - 13 March 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Bruce V. Reagan, Jr. (ASN: 0-978561), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Chose-ri, Korea, on 12 November 1951. His company went out on patrol into hostile territory with the mission of finding enemy positions and taking prisoners. Lieutenant Reagan, Platoon Leader, was leading his men at the point of the advance when the entire unit was suddenly pinned down by an intense concentration of fire from enemy automatic weapons situated on commanding terrain. In order to take the pressure off his men, Lieutenant Reagan jumped to his feet and, with complete disregard for his own safety, remained exposed as he swept the enemy emplacement with devastatingly accurate fire. Ordering his platoon to withdraw, he continued firing, inflicting several casualties upon the enemy, until every man had reached safety. As a result of his daring initiative, not one friendly soldier was wounded in the ambush. Lieutenant Reagan's gallant action, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to his comrades reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Pasadena, California.

Reagan, John Kevin (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class John Kevin Reagan (MCSN: 1097169), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with the Mobile Supply Section of Company C, First Amphibian Tractor Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 22 September 1950. Observing a wounded Marine during an intense enemy mortar barrage, Private First Class Reagan immediately ran to the aid of the wounded man despite the intense hostile fire. Struck by shrapnel from an enemy mortar shell while attempting to remove the casualty to a covered position, he received a mortal wound. His fortitude and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Reagan and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 7, 1929 at Fall River, Massachusetts. Home Town: Fall River, Massachusetts. Death: DOW: September 23, 1950 - Buried at: St. Patrick's Cemetery - Fall River, Massachusetts.

Reagan, Joseph A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Joseph A. Reagan (MCSN: 0-45906), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 September 1951. When the platoon commander became a casualty during the assault against a heavily fortified enemy hill position, First Lieutenant Reagan immediately assumed command of the attacking platoon. Skillfully maneuvering his depleted unit in the face of devastating enemy fire, he bravely led his men forward and succeeded in neutralizing key hostile bunkers. When another platoon passed through his area to continue the attacks, he quickly relinquished command of his unit to the company gunnery sergeant and joined the new platoon. Aggressively charging forward through withering enemy fire, he initiated a daring one-man assault against a bunker and single-handedly neutralized the hostile position with hand grenades. Assisting materially in coordinating the efforts of the platoon in completely securing the objective, First Lieutenant Reagan, by his inspiring leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, contributed materially to the success of his company's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fall River, Massachusetts. Home Town: Fall River, Massachusetts.

Recendez, Roberto

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Roberto Recendez (MCSN: 652752), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with the Supply Company, First Service Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 and 29 November 1950. Assigned a sector of the defensive perimeter during a strong hostile attack against his area near Hagaru-ri, Sergeant Recendez fought bravely throughout the action and, when an enemy mortar shell exploded near his position, painfully wounding him and his two Marine companions, promptly administered aid to the others, assured himself that the line was secure and then reported to the battalion aid station for treatment. Observing an enemy soldier setting up a machine gun about twenty yards forward of his sector after returning to his post, he boldly advanced under hostile fire and hurled two grenades over a railroad car near the position and, when they failed to explode, returned and obtained another grenade. Again advancing against the enemy's direct fire, he hurled the third grenade over the car with deadly accuracy, killing the gunner and putting the machine gun out of action. By his daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and cool courage in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Recendez served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed materially to the successful defense of the perimeter. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pasadena, California. Home Town: Five Points, California.

Redalen, Dwain L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Dwain L. Redalen (MCSN: 0-31256), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of an unarmed Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 June 1951. Fully aware of the hazards imposed by an extreme flight range and a limited fuel supply, Captain Redalen unhesitatingly volunteered to proceed eighty miles behind enemy lines to effect the rescue of a downed pilot. Reaching the objective area to find his mission further impeded by the presence of dense foliage, he began a methodical search and, after twenty minutes, located the missing man. Despite continuous fire from nearby enemy positions, he remained undeterred when his first rescue attempt failed and, coolly returning for a second attempt, succeeded in hoisting the pilot from a tree top into the plane. Critically low on fuel after this daring action, he turned his aircraft toward the east coast and, sighting a friendly ship, executed his first helicopter landing on a moving vessel, arriving with barely enough fuel remaining for five minutes of flight. By his courageous initiative, unrelenting determination and selfless efforts on behalf of another, Captain Redalen upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fillmore County, Minnesota. Home Town: Lanesboro, Minnesota.

Redman, Charles B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Charles B. Redman (MCSN: 0-49102), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. When his unit was subjected to a vicious hail of hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire from a hill to the front and two adjacent ridge lines while he was leading his platoon along a narrow, enemy-held ridge line through heavy undergrowth, First Lieutenant Redman fearlessly moved forward through the heavy hostile fire in order to observe and determine the enemy's positions. Seeing that the enemy occupied strong emplacements dominating the only route of approach, he skillfully assisted in calling in artillery and air strikes on the objective and, following the supporting fires, again led his platoon forward in the assault to quickly secure the strategic positions. By his courageous leadership, daring initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Redman served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Draper, North Carolina. Home Town: Kannapolis, North Carolina.

Redmon, Fred G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Fred G. Redmon (MCSN: 0-49525), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 March 1951. When his platoon was subjected to intense enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire during an attack against a well-entrenched hostile force atop an extremely steep hill, Second Lieutenant Redmon continually exposed himself to the enemy fire, inspiring his men to deliver effective return fire. During the reorganization of the platoon, he observed a seriously wounded man lying in an exposed area approximately fifty yards in front of the lines and, in company with another Marine, rushed forward in the face of intense fire to carry the stricken man back to the lines. Subsequently, he led a daring assault against the enemy emplacements, overrunning the positions and forcing the opposition to retreat. By his aggressive leadership, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Redmon contributed materially to the success achieved by the company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Yakima, Washington. Home Town: Yakima, Washington.

Redmond, Walter L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Walter L. Redmond (MCSN: 0-26436), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 August 1951. Locating a group of enemy trucks parked in a ravine while he was participating in a night intruder mission in the Sinmak Area, Captain Redmond immediately initiated a daring attack on his target and scored a direct hit with a napalm bomb which destroyed four of the vehicles. Observing a large convoy in a nearby valley while retiring from the initial attack, he carried out a series of devastating bombing and strafing runs on the objective in the face of a hail of hostile anti-aircraft fire. Although his plane sustained three hits by enemy ground fire during the intensive action, he continued to press home his attacks until his ordnance was expended, completely destroying twelve supply laden trucks and inflicting extensive damage upon four additional vehicles. By his exceptional courage, superb airmanship and unswerving devotion to the fulfillment of his mission, Captain Redmond was directly instrumental in dealing a damaging blow to the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Indian Mills, West Virginia. Home Town: Powellton, West Virginia.

Reed, Harry William (MIA/POW) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant Colonel Harry William Reed (MCSN: 0-11229), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane and Commanding Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMF-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 July 1951. Leading a flight of fourteen planes in a daring strike against enemy installations in the capital city of Pyongyang under extremely adverse weather conditions, Lieutenant Colonel Reed boldly directed his plane toward the target area in the face of intense hostile anti-aircraft fire and, although the clouds and heavy rain frequently precluded visual contact, ably coordinated his squadron in a determined effort to complete the hazardous mission. When the explosion of an enemy anti-aircraft shell threw another plane directly into his flight path and caused a mid-air collision a few miles from the objective, he bravely maintained control of his crippled plane until clear of the remaining aircraft and thereby prevented further damage to his squadron. When last seen, his plane was spiraling downward and apparently out of control. By his marked courage, outstanding ability as an airman and selfless regard for the safety of his fellow pilots, Lieutenant Colonel Reed served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: March 20, 1913 at Cameron, Ohio. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois. Death: MIA: July 30, 1951 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Reed, Howard J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Howard J. Reed (MCSN: 654284), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman in Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 September 1950. While on a combat patrol, Private First Class Reed repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy small arms and machine gun fire to gain more favorable positions from which to deliver his own fire. When the safety of his platoon commander was gravely threatened by the fire from an enemy soldier, Private First Class Reed boldly stood in an open area subjected to intense hostile fire and, taking careful and accurate aim, quickly dispatched the hostile soldier, thereby undoubtedly saving the life of his platoon commander. His outstanding courage and daring initiative reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Reed and the United States Naval Service. Born: Britton, Oklahoma. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Reed, Joseph D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Joseph D. Reed (MCSN: 0-50644), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 June 1951. Observing that leading elements of the company were being subjected to withering enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire and were unable to advance during the company attack of a heavily fortified enemy hill position, Second Lieutenant Reed attempted to maneuver his supporting platoon to flank the objective. Although unable to pass around the enemy stronghold, he courageously led his platoon through the heavy enemy fire in a vicious assault on the position, routing the entrenched foe in hand-to-hand combat, and despite heavy enemy fire from an adjacent hilltop, moved among his men to organize their positions in defense of the ground. By his exceptional courage, aggressive leadership and indomitable fighting spirit, Second Lieutenant Reed served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by the unit, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Dayton, Ohio. Home Town: Dayton, Ohio.

Reed, Louie

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Louie Reed (MCSN: 870433), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 April 1951. With his men forced to take cover when subjected to a concentrated barrage of hostile mortar fire while engaged in a mission to support an attacking infantry company, Staff Sergeant Reed fearlessly remained at his gun and continued to rain devastating fire upon the enemy although suffering from painful multiple wounds sustained from the initial burst of hostile mortar fire. During a period of two and one-half hours, he steadfastly refused to leave his position except to dash across the fire-swept area to eliminate a stoppage in another gun, and sought cover and treatment for his wounds only after the objective had been seized. By his outstanding courage, resolute determination and unswerving devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Reed served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lumpkin, Georgia. Home Town: Ft. Pierce, Florida.

Reese, SGT 1C Kent E.

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 33 - 7 February 1953

The Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to Sergeant First Class Kent E. Reese, US55170703, Infantry, Company I, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 15 August 1952, Company I was assigned the mission of attacking an enemy held hill in the vicinity of Chiro-dong, Korea. Sergeant Reese was serving as a squad leader of the platoon designated as the second assault group. As the elements of the first platoon were approaching their objective, they encountered the small arms and automatic weapons fire of a numerically superior enemy ambush and shortly after the second platoon was brought under enemy fire. Sergeant Reese, immediately after organizing the men of his squad and guiding them safely through the enemy fire, led them in attacking the enemy to prevent the first assault group from becoming isolated. After engaging the enemy in a fire fight, the friendly forces succeeded in repulsing the hostile attack. Sergeant Reese’s gallantry was instrumental in the enemy suffering thirty-seven casualties and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Indiana.

Reese, William E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman William E. Reese (NSN: 5713238), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 and 8 March 1951. Serving as a Medical Corpsman, Hospitalman Reese displayed outstanding courage and initiative in the performance of his duties. Moving with the company in the attack of a series of strongly defended enemy positions, he fearlessly and with complete disregard for his personal safety exposed himself constantly to withering enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire to render aid to casualties despite a painful wound in the hand. When the company was forced to dig in for the night in a small area swept by enemy mortar and sniper fire, he courageously refused to seek cover, remaining exposed throughout the night to give aid and comfort to the wounded. During the continuation of the attack at dawn he continued his fearless devotion to duty until he was wounded for a second time, and forced to submit to evacuation. Hospitalman Reese's great personal bravery and heroic actions were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 60174 (November 30, 1951).

Reeves, Harold

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Master Sergeant Harold Reeves (MCSN: 210802), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Gunnery Sergeant of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against an armed enemy on 7 August 1950 near Sangnyong, Korea. On 7 August 1950 Sergeant Reeves was moving forward with the company to relieve a unit of the United States Army. While moving past a native village, the company came under intense enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire, which forced the company to take cover in ditches alongside the road. Without regard for his own safety, Sergeant Reeves remained in an exposed position, walking calmly up and down the road establishing a base of fire, directing men to take cover and supplying ammunition to his company's machine guns. His coolness under fire and intrepid leadership was an inspiration to all and contributed materially to the success of the mission. Sergeant Reeves' gallantry displayed on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 72 (September 16, 1950). Entered Service From California.

Reeves, Warren A.

Sgt. First Class Warren A. Reeves, a member of the 3rd reconnaissance company, 3rd Infantry Division, has been awarded the Silver Star medal for gallantry in action in Korea.  On January 1, 1951, near Kumyang-jang, Korea, Reeves distinguished himself in action against an armed enemy when the platoon in which he was a member was ambushed.  When the platoon first contacted the enemy, Reeves dismounted from his tank, immediately organized his men and assaulted the enemy positions, successfully eliminating them, thus permitting the platoon to escape from the ambush.  During this engagement Reeves was wounded while helping a wounded compatriot to safety.  His initiative, daring leadership, and heroism are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Home of record: Burlington, Iowa.

Reffner, Thomas P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Thomas P. Reffner (MCSN: 1082704), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 and 24 March 1951. When a small mortar ammunition dump was set afire during a fierce assault by a numerically superior enemy force, Corporal Reffner repeatedly exposed himself to intense automatic weapons, mortar and small arms fire to assist in removing the ammunition to the reverse slope of the ridge. Although painfully wounded by enemy shrapnel, he voluntarily carried out four trips in the face of the heavy fire to secure urgently needed ammunition for machine guns. Returning to his position, he employed a wounded Marine's automatic rifle to furnish protection for the machine gun section throughout the remainder of the night and until the attack was repulsed. By his inspiring initiative, marked courage and steadfast devotion to duty, Corporal Reffner contributed materially to the success of the platoon and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Highlands Park, Michigan. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Regas, William

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major [then Captain] William Regas (MCSN: 0-26574), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Forward Air Controller attached to the Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 July 1952. Assigned the mission of locating a downed aircraft while voluntarily flying with an observation squadron, Major Regas courageously flew his plane at a dangerously low altitude and carried out two passes over the area in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire to make a positive identification and to search for signs of life. When the observer accompanying him was unable to identify the downed aircraft, Major Regas unhesitatingly descended to a lower level despite the heavy volume of enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire. Although his plane was subjected to enemy fire from all directions, he maintained his low-level position to enable the observer to thoroughly search the area. Continuing to circle over the crashed plane, he requested artillery fire to encompass it and protect the occupants, if any, from the enemy, fearlessly remaining over the danger zone until friendly fighter planes arrived to cover the downed aircraft. By his superb airmanship, exceptional initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Major Regas served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Reichard, Donato Roman (posthumous)

HEADQUARTERS 3D INFANTRY DIVISION
GENERAL ORDERS # 360- 15 August 1951

SERGEANT FIRST CLASS DONATO ROMAN REICHARD, RA10405488, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 31 March 1951, during an assault on Hill 398, the lead platoon of Company "B" was pinned down by heavy hostile automatic weapons fire. A second platoon was ordered to advance in an effort to relieve the besieged unit and support it in its attack. In the ensuing action, Sergeant ROMAN REICHARD, rushed in front of his squad, through an area blanketed with small arms fire and bursting grenades, to lead the unit in a charge which routed the enemy from his positions and caused him to flee in complete disorder. Sergeant ROMAN REICHARD'S inspiring leadership greatly contributed to the spirited assault of his company and his gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

HEADQUARTERS 3D INFANTRY DIVISION
GENERAL ORDERS # 372- 21 August 1951

REVOCATION OF GENERAL ORDERS. - So much of section II (award of the Silver Star), General Orders 360, this Headquarters, 1951, as pertains to Sergeant First Class Donato Roman Reichard, RA10405488, Infantry, is revoked.

BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL SOULE:
O.P. NEWMAN
Colonel GS
Chief of Staff
HEADQUARTERS 3D INFANTRY DIVISION
GENERAL ORDERS # 390- 29 August 1951

AWARD OF THE SILVER STAR (POSTHUMOUS). By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded posthumously to the following-named enlisted man:

SERGEANT FIRST CLASS DONATO ROMAN REICHARD, RA10405488, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 31 March 1951, during an assault on Hill 398, the lead platoon of Company "B" was pinned down by heavy hostile automatic weapons fire. A second platoon was ordered to advance in an effort to relieve the besieged unit and support it in its attack. In the ensuing action, Sergeant ROMAN REICHARD, rushed in front of his squad, through an area blanketed with small arms fire and bursting grenades, to lead the unit in a charge which routed the enemy from his positions and caused him to flee in complete disorder. Sergeant ROMAN REICHARD'S inspiring leadership greatly contributed to the spirited assault of his company and his gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

* SFC Donato Roman Reichard, RA10405488, is listed in the Company F roster.

Reid, David F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant David F. Reid (MCSN: 0-54933), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Combat Outpost Commander of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 September 1952. An able and aggressive leader, Second Lieutenant Reid repeatedly exposed himself to hostile mortar and small arms fire to control his men and direct the fire of a friendly outpost against the enemy and, during the height of the two-hour battle for the position, led five counterassaults against an estimated hostile force of fifty men. Personally manning a flame thrower, he repelled an enemy assault on his position, inflicting an unknown number of casualties and forcing the enemy to withdraw. By his daring leadership, marked courage and unyielding devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Reid served to inspire all who observed him and was largely responsible for the successful defense of the outpost, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cincinnati, Ohio. Home Town: Cincinnati, Ohio.

Reid, Lester F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Lester F. Reid (MCSN: 0-47667), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Aerial Observer of an unarmed Observation Plane while attached to the Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. Locating five hostile strong points heavily armed and manned to ambush friendly units during the movement of the FIRST Marine Division from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri, First Lieutenant Reid immediately radioed the location of the enemy and informed the advancing column that he would endeavor to neutralize the emplacements by air strikes. After contacting and briefing close support aircraft, he executed low altitude dives, dropped smoke grenades to pinpoint the positions and, following the completion of each strike, again flew in through heavy rifle and machine gun fire to mark each successive target. Despite damage to his plane by enemy fire, he persisted in his daring runs until all five positions were neutralized and the threat to advancing ground troops removed. His superb airmanship, daring tactics and cool courage at great risk to his own life reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Reid and the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York, Home Town: Hempstead, New York.

Reid, Thomas P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Thomas P. Reid (MCSN: 0-50802), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 June 1951. Participating in an attack against a bitterly contested position, Second Lieutenant Reid succeeded in seizing his objective although enemy fire had reduced his platoon to only twenty riflemen. Before a hasty defense could be assured, the enemy launched a fierce counterattack, employing automatic weapons, small arms and hand grenades and seriously threatened penetration of the battalion's flank. Although all of the platoon's machine guns were knocked out and all but twelve riflemen had become casualties during the ensuing action, he adroitly directed the gallant garrison of Marines in defending the position and successfully repulsed the attackers, leaving the battalion intact. By his aggressive fighting spirit, inspiring initiative and courageous leadership, Second Lieutenant Reid contributed materially to the success of the company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.

Reimers, Earl Raymond

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Ensign Earl Raymond Reimers (NSN: 0-508247), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action, as pilot of a jet fighter plane in Fighter Squadron One Hundred Eleven (VF-111), based aboard the U.S.S. Valley Forge (CV-45). During a strike mission over North Korean territory on 3 January 1952, Ensign Reimers located an enemy supply train on the Hyesanjin to Kilchu-ri rail line. Ignoring the fact that his aircraft had been damaged seriously by anti-aircraft fire from camouflaged positions and from the train itself, he relentlessly pressed home his attack, completely disregarding his own personal safety in the accomplishment of his mission. This action resulted in the destruction of the locomotive and several boxcars loaded with supplies. Although Ensign Reimers' plane was in danger of an internal explosion from leaking fuel he attempted to fly it home rather than abandon it in enemy-controlled territory. Ensign Reimers' outstanding devotion to duty and intrepid judgment in the face of perilous danger, reflected upon himself the greatest credit while upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1626 (July 1, 1952).

Reinburg, Joseph Hunter

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Joseph Hunter Reinburg (MCSN: 0-7464), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane and Commanding Officer of Marine All Weather Night Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)(N)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 August 1950. Flying at extremely low altitudes in absolute darkness and over mountainous terrain in search of positions from which hostile artillery had pinned down and inflicted heavy casualties on friendly forces, Major Reinburg located the enemy guns by their flashes and, ignoring his personal safety, executed repeated bombing, rocket and strafing attacks against the hostile positions which later were reported destroyed by the ground controller. After all armament was expended, he remained in the area and made repeated passes over enemy positions until friendly troops could move out. By his cool courage, skilled airmanship and aggressive determination, Major Reinburg upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fort Worth, Texas. Home Town: Washington, D.C.

Reisler, Joseph W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Joseph W. Reisler (MCSN: 0-49608), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 March 1951. When three heavily defended enemy pillboxes impeded the entire company advance during an assault on a hill near Hoengsong, Second Lieutenant Reisler boldly led an attack against the strong points in the face of intense hostile automatic weapons fire and completely routed the enemy from their positions. After clearing the objective, he skillfully deployed his rifle squads and accurately controlled their fire while continuing to maneuver the platoon up the ridge line, thereby eliminating eleven more enemy bunkers which were menacing his company. By his daring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, he served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the operation. Second Lieutenant Reisler's marked courage, professional competence and steadfast devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York.

Reissner, Pierre D. Jr. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Pierre D. Reissner, Jr. (MCSN: 0-50391), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 April 1951. With the advance of his platoon temporarily delayed by devastating enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire from a well-concealed enemy bunker while he was spearheading the attack against a strongly defended enemy position, Second Lieutenant Reissner fearlessly charged forward over the fire-swept ground with one of his men in a daring assault on the bunker. When his comrade sustained serious wounds, and the enemy fire increased in intensity, he remained in an exposed position to administer aid to the wounded man and to remove him to safety, meanwhile shouting directions to his men. While the enemy was delivering intense fire in his direction, the platoon was able to maneuver to more advantageous positions and continue its mission. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous leadership and selfless devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Reissner served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Reissner, Pierre D. Jr. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Pierre D. Reissner, Jr. (MCSN: 0-50391), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Leader of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. With his platoon assigned the mission of guarding the rear of the battalion in its attempt to break out of an enemy encirclement and regroup south of a river near Tangam-ni, Second Lieutenant Reissner took position on a low ridge covering the road, effected a prompt reorganization of his men and directed them in maintaining a stubborn defense of the area as the enemy laid down intense mortar, machine gun and small arms fire. Ordering his men to withdraw as the fire gained momentum and his platoon suffered heavy casualties under the devastating barrage, he stood up in an exposed position where his men could see him and personally supervised the evacuation of all who could walk before guiding his five remaining men in carrying the seriously wounded to safety. Dashing alone through an area raked by hostile mortar and machine gun fire, he brought a mortally wounded Marine to a tank, assisted him onto the vehicle and stayed with him until he succumbed. With the rapidly closing hostile troops already firing from the ridge which his group had just vacated, he coolly helped to carry another casualty across an open area to a covered position and, only after confirming that all his men had reached safety, sought shelter for himself. His inspiring leadership, dauntless perseverance and selfless concern for others reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Reissner and the United States Naval Service. Born: Birmingham, Alabama. Home Town: New York, New York.

Remington, Edgar F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Edgar F. Remington (MCSN: 0-37430), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three (VMA-323), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 October 1952. When a flight of three attack aircraft was assigned the mission of escorting an unarmed rescue helicopter deep into hostile territory, Captain Remington, braving heavy enemy anti-aircraft fire, skillfully led the group over the enemy's main line of resistance to effect an expeditious rendezvous with the rescue aircraft. Upon joining with the helicopter and its escort of naval aircraft, he assumed leadership of the rescue mission and established a protective circle around the vulnerable helicopter. In the face of intense and accurate automatic weapons fire, he initiated a series of daring low-level strafing sweeps which effectively silenced the weapons. Because of low fuel the Naval aircraft were forced to leave the formation and return to their base, and the helicopter was forced to retire because of fuel shortage and impending darkness. As the rescue aircraft reversed its course, Captain Remington's wingman lost contact and could not locate the helicopter. Despite the danger imposed by mountainous terrain and intensive hostile fire, Captain Remington remained below the slow moving helicopter in order to maintain visual contact. Remaining in this hazardous position in total darkness he continued to provide protective escort by intermittently turning on his own external lights to draw enemy ground fire away from the unarmed helicopter. Through his heroic efforts, Captain Remington was largely responsible for the safe and successful retirement of the rescue aircraft. His inspiring leadership, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cranston, Rhode Island. Home Town: Cranston, Rhode Island.

Reyes, Vidal

HEADQUARTERS 3D INFANTRY DIVISION
GENERAL ORDERS # 499 - 31 October 1951

SERGEANT (then CORPORAL) VIDAL REYES, RA10403872, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 4 June 1951, "A" Company's First Platoon was assaulting an objective, near Unchon-ni, Korea, when a powerful enemy counterattack severed it from the main body of the company and left it without communication. Sergeant REYES, realizing the seriousness of this situation, volunteered to lay wire across the embattled area and establish communication with the isolated platoon. Creeping and crawling forward through the rock strewn and bullet-swept terrain, he edged his way along stringing the ground wire behind him. During the hazardous mission, he was brought under fire by two enemy snipers, but, taking calm and careful aim with his own rifle, Sergeant REYES killed them both. He then continued on his way, and reaching the cut-off unit, restored communication between it and the rest of the company. The steadfast gallantry displayed by Sergeant REYES reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Reynolds, Ernest D. (KIA - DMZ)

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Ernest D. Reynolds (US-55881470), Private, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private Reynolds distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 2 November 1966, in the Republic of Korea, by sacrificing his own life in the defense of his fellow soldiers. Private Reynolds was a member of a patrol operating near the southern boundary of the Demilitarized Zone in Korea when his patrol was attacked and overrun by an armed patrol of the North Korean Army. Prior to the attack, as rear security man, he had occupied a concealed position and opened fire upon the enemy, and he continued to fire until he himself was killed. His indomitable courage, determination, and profound concern for his fellow soldiers, are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 2d Infantry Division, and the United States Army. Department of the Army, General Orders No. 16 (April 4, 1967) Home State: Missouri Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea-1966), Purple Heart

Reynolds, Max K.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Max K. Reynolds (MCSN: 1044736), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 July 1953. With his platoon assigned the extremely dangerous and hazardous mission of assaulting a forward outpost that had been previously overrun by the enemy, Sergeant Reynolds placed himself near the point of the assaulting force and led his men forward to the hostile position. Assigned command of the platoon when the commander was severely wounded, he gallantly continued to advance and skillfully directed fire upon the enemy. Although painfully wounded, he refused medical aid to remain with his men and direct their fire, and then personally checked the hill to ascertain that all casualties had been evacuated. Aware that his unit was outnumbered by the overwhelming enemy force, he effectively supervised an orderly withdrawal and refused medical treatment until all other wounded had been aided. By his skilled leadership, aggressiveness and marked courage, Sergeant Reynolds contributed materially to the infliction of numerous casualties on the enemy force and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sulphur, Oklahoma. Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Reynolds, Oliver J.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Oliver J. Reynolds (MCSN: 668464), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against an armed enemy on 17 August 1950 near Taebong-ni, Korea. On 17 August 1950 Private Reynolds was a member of a rifle squad which was advancing over open terrain in an attack on an enemy position when the squad was pinned down by heavy enemy machine gun fire. The machine gun was well concealed and could not be located. Without regard for his own personal safety, Private Reynolds rose to his feet and deliberately exposed himself in order to draw fire and locate the machine gun. As a result of his courage and determination the machine gun was located and destroyed. Private Reynolds' gallantry displayed on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 72 (September 16, 1950). Entered Service From South Carolina.

Reynolds, Paul R. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Paul R. Reynolds (MCSN: 931096), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. When his company was counterattacked by a numerically superior enemy force, Corporal Reynolds fearlessly led his squad to a favorable position under intense automatic weapons fire and, skillfully deploying his troops and directing effective fire, succeeded in holding despite the tremendous odds. With his sector in danger of penetration by the outnumbering enemy, he continued to move among his men, offering words of encouragement and inspiring them to greater efforts until he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his cool and aggressive leadership, courageous fighting spirit and unrelenting devotion to duty, Corporal Reynolds served as an inspiration to his squad in subsequently repelling the vicious onslaught, and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: November 24, 1925 at Lena, Illinois. Home Town: Pearl City, Illinois. Death: KIA: December 3, 1950.

Reynolds, Philip A. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Philip A. Reynolds (MCSN: 1078521), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a machine gunner of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. With his company under attack by a vastly outnumbering hostile force, Corporal Reynolds repeatedly exposed himself to a devastating barrage of enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire to deliver a large volume of accurate fire on the attackers. Mortally wounded while attempting to clear his gun and put it back in operation after it had jammed during the furious action, Corporal Reynolds served to inspire his comrades to heroic efforts and contributed immeasurably to the successful repulse of the enemy attack. His outstanding courage and loyal devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: Freehold, New Jersey. Home Town: Freehold, New Jersey. Death: KIA: November 29, 1950 - Buried at: St. Rose of Lima Cemetery - Freehold, NJ.

Rheman, George A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain George A. Rheman, Jr. (MCSN: 0-17742), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Liaison Officer of the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. When a strong enemy force launched a vicious attack against his battalion en route with the Division from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri, Captain Rheman unhesitatingly dashed through a fire-swept area to move seriously wounded Marines from exposed vehicles to covered positions along the road. Rapidly organizing the remaining men into a provisional defensive unit, he steadfastly held the position against fierce hostile attacks for more than four hours until a relief force arrived. By his daring initiative, inspiring leadership and valiant devotion to duty in the face of heavy enemy fire, Captain Rheman was instrumental in saving many of the wounded from death or capture and aided directly in maintaining the security of the column, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Courtney, Texas. Home Town: Brookshire, Texas.

Rhoades, Charles Junior (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Master Sergeant Charles Junior Rhoades (MCSN: 447284), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Reconnaissance Chief of the First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 January 1953. Although critically wounded when his patrol was ambushed by a numerically superior hostile force while returning to the main line of resistance from a reconnaissance mission deep in enemy territory to secure urgently needed information, Master Sergeant Rhoades courageously retained control of his men during the ensuing fire fight and, skillfully employing the fires of supporting weapons by radio, continued to direct the fire and movement of the members of his patrol until the enemy was forced to withdraw. Succumbing to his wound upon reaching the main line of resistance, Master Sergeant Rhoades, by his outstanding bravery, aggressive fighting spirit and marked fortitude in the face of heavy odds, was directly instrumental in ensuring the return and safe delivery of vitally important information and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 11, 1924 at Portland, Oregon. Home Town: Willamette, Oregon. Death: KIA: January 29, 1953.

Riccardi, Thomas P. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Thomas P. Riccardi (MCSN: 669664), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving s a Messenger in Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 October 1950. Assigned the mission of contacting and bringing to a rendezvous the different units of his company which had become separated during an attack near Seoul, Private First Class Riccardi boldly exposed himself to intense hostile small arms, anti tank and machine gun fire which was pinning down the entire company. Successfully accomplishing his mission, he was responsible for effecting the rendezvous which materially aided the company in its ultimate success against the hostile force. Later, during the action, he voluntarily crawled into the path of vicious enemy fire to rescue a wounded comrade, evacuate him to a place of comparative safety and administer first aid. By his daring initiative, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Private First Class Riccardi served to inspire the other members of his company and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Riccardi, Thomas P. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Private Thomas P. Riccardi (MCSN: 669664), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Carrier in Weapons Company, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 September 1951. With the assault elements of the company pinned down by fire from an enemy machine gun during an attack against a strongly defended hostile stronghold, Private Riccardi bravely charged through the enemy fire to hurl a grenade into the gun emplacement. When the missile proved ineffective, he promptly set up a machine gun in an exposed area and delivered accurate fire upon the hostile emplacement, killing both members of the enemy gun crew. Later in the action, when his unit was subjected to flanking automatic weapons fire, he again rushed forward of the assault elements and, drawing hostile fire upon himself in a daring effort to locate the enemy positions, killed two of the enemy with his carbine. By his outstanding courage, exceptional initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Private Riccardi served to inspire all who observed him and greatly aided the company in successfully accomplishing its mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Ricci, Sirio A. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Sirio A. Ricci (MCSN: 1270525), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner in Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 November 1952. When a fanatical enemy force launched an intense mortar and artillery barrage and partially overran a strategic outpost well forward of the main line of resistance during the hours of darkness, inflicting heavy casualties on the defending unit, Private First Class Ricci, observing that his section leader had been seriously wounded, unhesitatingly dashed through the murderous hostile fire and carried the wounded man to a position of safety. Upon returning to the section, he discovered many men wounded and the unit disorganized and partially inoperative. Quickly assuming command, Private First Class Ricci reorganized the group and directed the gunners in delivering effective fire on the attackers. Throughout the remainder of the fierce encounter with the enemy, he bravely maintained control of the section, ensuring an adequate supply of ammunition for each gun and speedy evacuation for the casualties. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Ricci materially aided in repulsing the hostile attack and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: July 31, 1931 at Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois. Death: KIA: March 29, 1953.

Rice, Curtis Ray (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 42 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Curtis Ray Rice (ASN: US-54025085), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Chinhyon-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. During an assault on enemy positions, his company encountered exceedingly stiff resistance. Private Rice and a small group of men moved around the base of the hill onto a ridgeline to drive into the flank of the enemy positions. He exposed himself constantly to the murderous enemy fire as he led his men in close combat with the enemy and personally advanced until he was in the trenches with the enemy soldiers, clearing them with devastatingly accurate fire. As a result of his fearless aggressiveness, the enemy suffered severe losses and his comrades were able to secure the objective with a minimum of casualties. Private Rice's courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: March 1, 1928. Home Town: Lytle, Texas. Death: KIA: October 13, 1951.

Rice, John J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 72 - 17 January 1951

By direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry is awarded to First Lieutenant John J. Rice, 01108264, Engineer Corps, U.S. Army, a member of Company A, 3rd Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Suan, Korea, on 5 December 1950. He was in command of a small force assigned the mission of eliminating an enemy roadblock where friendly troops in a motor convoy were ambushed. Moving into the area, he placed his men in positions from which they could bring fire to bear on the enemy. With utter disregard for his own safety, he then ran the gauntlet of the enemy roadblock in order to alert the beleaguered friendly troops of his plan of action and returned, leading three wounded soldiers, to direct his men in the fight. During the ensuing action, he repeatedly exposed himself to a hail of deadly fire in directing the successful relief of the column and the dispersal of the enemy force. Lieutenant Rice’s fearless actions and exemplary leadership reflect great credit on himself and the U.S. Engineer Corps. Entered military service from New York, NY.

Rice, Thomas K.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Thomas K. Rice (MCSN: 1210808), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Combat Patrol of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 June 1952. When the combat patrol was attacked by a numerically superior hostile force during a mission deep in hostile territory, Private First Class Rice, responsible for the security of the left flank and rear of the patrol, bravely refused to yield ground despite four enemy attempts to penetrate his sector. Although stunned by the concussion of mortar shells and hand grenades and exposed to intense hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire, he defiantly repelled fierce enemy onslaughts which came within six feet of his position, personally killing eight of the attackers and driving off the others. By his outstanding courage, initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, Private First Class Rice served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cherokee County, South Carolina. Home Town: Charlotte, North Carolina.

Rich, Richard Usher (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Richard Usher Rich (MCSN: 0-50980), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 27 to 29 October 1952. Ordered to counterattack against an enemy-held portion of the main line of resistance, First Lieutenant Rich advanced to the foremost platoon and directed effective supporting fires for his unit. Fearlessly leading his men through intense hostile fire, he succeeded in recapturing the position and two opposing outposts and, skillfully reorganizing his company, aided in the successful repulse of a savage enemy attack on the following night. Later, during another heavy enemy mortar barrage, he directed the efforts of his unit until he fell, mortally wounded. His courage, inspiring leadership and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Rich and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 21, 1928 at New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York. Death: KIA: October 29, 1952 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Rich, Theodore L. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 194 - 18 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Theodore L. Rich (ASN: RA-6152599), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Kyong-ju, Korea, on 10 September 1950. During an attack by a numerically superior enemy force, the friendly troops were forced to withdraw to a new position. With complete disregard for his own safety, Private Rich elected to remain and operate his machine gun. Through the volume and accuracy of his fire, the enemy was halted after suffering heavy casualties. Although the enemy regrouped and again attacked, he with fearless devotion to duty, remained in his exposed position and continued to fire. In this heroic action, Private Rich was killed. His gallantry in action against a numerically superior enemy force reflects the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Born: 1921. Home Town: Cavendish, Vermont. Death: KIA: September 12, 1950.

Richter, Robert J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert J. Richter (MCSN: 0-44434), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 and 7 December 1950. With his company assigned the mission of defending the battalion's right half of the defense perimeter near Hagaru-ri, First Lieutenant Richter was quick to act when a hostile force of estimated regimental strength attacked his platoon's sector with heavy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire. Fearlessly exposing himself to the intense barrage, he boldly walked upright along the defense sector, scouting and relocating his men in advantageous firing positions, pointing out and directing effective fire, shouting words of encouragement and supervising the evacuation of casualties. Climbing upon a tank which had been assigned to assist in the defense, he personally trained the vehicle's machine guns on approximately fifty of the enemy within thirty-five yards of his position, thereby assisting in the repulse of the attackers with a loss of one hundred and forty enemy dead in front of his platoon's sector of defense. By his forceful leadership, daring tactics and valiant fighting spirit in the face of heavy odds, First Lieutenant Richter served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Minneapolis, Minnesota. Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Rickert, Robert W.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Colonel Robert W. Rickert (MCSN: 0-5407), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy while serving with the First Marine Division (Reinforced), during the period 29 November 1950 to 4 December 1950. His actions contributed materially to the break-through of United Nations troops in the Chosin Reservoir area and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 66 (December 15, 1950). Born: December 23, 1912. Entered Service From Montana. Death: March 21, 1995 - Buried at: Beaufort National Cemetery - Beaufort, South Carolina.

Rideout, Hugh D.

[From the Sebree Banner, Sebree, KY, Thursday, January 3, 1952]

"Corp. Hugh D. Rideout, of 16 West Maryland street, Evansville and formerly of Sebree, has been awarded the Silver Star, the nation's third highest award for gallantry in action. It was given in Korea for his heroic achievement while serving as an automatic rifleman with A company of the Seventh division's 17th infantry regiment. When Corp. Rideout's platoon was pinned down by enemy fire, he left the comparative safety of his position and charged the hostile emplacement. His citation reads in part, "Even though wounded by enemy fire, Corp. Rideout limped up the hill firing his weapon. After he was wounded again, he dragged himself to a prone position and continued firing, enabling his platoon to rout the enemy from their defensive positions." He received the award from Maj. Gen. C.B. Ferenbaugh, former commanding general of the Seventh division, who is a member of the United Nations armistice delegation meeting at Panmunjom. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Rideout, he was employed by Chrysler corporation before entering the army Nov. 6, 1950."

Ridge, Thomas L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Thomas L. Ridge (MCSN: 0-5833), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the streets of Seoul, Korea, on 25 September 1950. Observing that hostile forces were stubbornly resisting the forward movement of his battalion, Lieutenant Colonel Ridge fearlessly moved elements of his command post to the immediate vicinity of the front lines in order to keep abreast of the situation and, repeatedly braving heavy hostile sniper and machine gun fire, skillfully directed his battalion's operations. Accurately estimating the enemy's capabilities and foreseeing a counterattack in the early hours of the next day, he expertly placed the units of his command on their night main line of resistance and, when the attack materialized, was primarily responsible for the success of the battalion in decisively defeating and throwing back the enemy with great loss in manpower and materiel. Although suffering from the pain of severe wounds to his hands, which had been inflicted when hostile phosphorous artillery shells landed in the command post, he courageously remained at his post throughout the night. His indomitable fighting spirit, tactical skill and heroic leadership during this aggressive action reflect great credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Ridge and the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Elgin, Illinois.

Ridgway, Maurice D. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 16 - 9 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Maurice D. Ridgway (ASN: RA-18354878), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company I, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Somak Tong, Korea, on 26 June 1951. His company had the mission of attacking and securing Objective Queen, a strategic hill occupied by approximately three companies of enemy troops. Advancing up a narrow ridge, the friendly infantrymen were suddenly subjected to an intense concentration of small arms, grenade and mortar fire. The unit took a stand and returned the withering hail with deadly accuracy. After several hours of hard fighting, however, the company had expended most of its ammunition in making only a short advance. The situation became perilous because of an imminent enemy counterattack. It was then that Corporal Ridgway arrived, leading a group of 65 South Koreans laden down with ammunition. Although having just brought the supply barges through a rugged, 1,000-yard gauntlet of enemy fire, he refused to rest. He immediately loaded part of the carrying party with litters of wounded soldiers and assigned the rest to assisting the injured who could stand. Despite murderous enemy fire and the panic of the Koreans, Corporal Ridgway successfully led the group back to the rear, where proper medical attention was available. He continued to bring critically needed supplies to front line positions. Although each trip meant difficult maneuvering over treacherous mountain terrain and almost continuous exposure to enemy fire. As a direct result of his tireless efforts and indomitable determination, his comrades were afforded the means to repel enemy counterattacks, and to make a progressive, although highly contested advance. With the capture of the objective assured, Corporal Ridgway was completing his last return trip to the rear when an enemy mortar round landed in his immediate vicinity, and mortally wounded him. Corporal Ridgway's courageous action, magnificent intrepidity and self-sacrificing devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission, reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the United States Infantry. Born: December 15, 1930. Home Town: Austin, Texas. Death: KIA: June 26, 1951.

Rike, James R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James R. Rike (MCSN: 625389), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 June 1951. When the assault platoon to which his section was attached was subjected to withering enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire during the attack against a well-fortified hill position, Sergeant Rike bravely exposed himself to the hostile fire and skillfully maneuvered his guns to advantageous firing positions. Although painfully wounded during the early stages of the assault, he refused medical attention and continued to shout words of encouragement to his men and direct their fire against the enemy. By his outstanding courage, exemplary leadership and gallant devotion to duty, Sergeant Rike materially aided the platoon in seizing the objective and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Atlanta, Georgia. Home Town: Memphis, Tennessee.

Riley, Joseph C.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 207 - 27 September 1950

Sergeant Joseph C. Riley, RA15357504, Infantry, Company K, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  Sergeant Riley's weapons squad was laying a base of fire to permit advance of the weapons platoon near Hadong, Korea on 27 July 1950 where stiff enemy opposition had been encountered.  After his machine gun crew was eliminated, he twice crossed a stream to bring up ammunition so that he could operate the weapon himself.  As the enemy action increased in intensity and threatened to bring direct fire on the platoon, Sergeant Riley moved to a highly vulnerable spot from which he could command the hostile lines and delivered such effective fire that he stopped the enemy long enough to allow the weapons platoon to displace.  Sergeant Riley's bold, valorous actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Armed Forces.  Entered the military service from Ohio.

Riley, Reginald Alvin (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Reginald Alvin Riley (MCSN: 533611), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in a Rifle Platoon of the First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Seoul, Korea, on 27 September 1950. Voluntarily assuming command of his squad after its leader had been killed by intense hostile fire concentrated on the platoon, Private First Class Riley promptly and skillfully directed his men in delivering effective fire which inflicted numerous casualties on the enemy and relieved the pressure on his platoon. Observing a wounded Marine lying in an exposed position, he seized an automatic rifle, courageously moved through the heavy fire to aid the fallen man and directed accurate fire to furnish cover for the successful evacuation of the casualty by other platoon members. His quick initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Private First Class Riley and the United States Naval Service. Born: September 15, 1927 at Oakland, California. Home Town: Oakland, California. Death: KIA: March 23, 1951.

Riley, William P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William P. Riley (MCSN: 1284315), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 - 7 October 1952. When a devastating barrage of enemy mortar fire blanketed the area while he was advancing with the forward elements of the platoon during an assault to retake an outpost, Private First Class Riley immediately grabbed several grenades and, fully aware that the objective was defended by approximately two enemy squads and a machine gun, single-handedly advanced on the position in an effort to neutralize the hostile fire. Despite the intense enemy small arms fire, he fearlessly moved forward to a position close to the enemy bunker, hurling his grenades and partially destroying the emplacement. Although painfully wounded during the action, he succeeded in killing and wounding most of the gun crew, thereby enabling his comrades to overrun and reoccupy the outpost. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and resolute determination in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Riley served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Denver, Colorado. Home Town: Phoenix, Arizona.

Risendal, John A.

Full citation not yet found.

"For an act of heroism, 1st Lt. John A. Risendal, Detroit Lakes (MN) and former claim agent for the Northern Pacific railroad here (Brainerd, MN) with the First Cavalry Division in Korea, recently received the Silver Star medal.  Risendal broke up an enemy attack in a one-man charge and rescued his wounded radio operator near Okkya-ri recently.  Risendal's unit, Company B of the 8th Cavalry Regiment, was attacking enemy positions in a small wooded area when it was pinned down by enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire from three sides.  The citation accompanying the medal explained that the 1st Lieutenant "fearlessly charged the group firing his .45 caliber pistol and throwing grenades wounding several of the foe.  His courageous action broke up the attack and aided his comrades in establishing a new base of fire, disregarding himself, he carried his wounded radio operator to a position of safety and returned to organize a withdrawal."  Risendal was married last February shortly after leaving Brainerd.  He was a reservist and was called to duty about a year ago, arriving in Korea in May.  In addition to the Silver Star he is also reported to have the Purple Heart award. - The Brainerd Daily Dispatch, page 10, Dec. 5, 1951

Risk, Leon

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 533 - 16 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Leon Risk, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action as Pilot of a B-26 bomber, 728th Bombardment Squadron (L), Fifth Air Force, on 5 May 1951, while participating in a tactical low level bombing mission against an enemy at Pyongyang, Korea. Captain Risk displayed exceptional airmanship and courage in pressing the attack against enemy supply installations with rockets, bombs and machine gun fire. In the first attack, enemy anti-aircraft fire inflicted numerous hits on the plane and wounded the flight maintenance gunner. In spite of the heavy damage, Captain Risk made repeated attacks which resulted in complete destruction of ten enemy supply buildings and precipitated intense fires throughout the entire supply area. At the dangerously low altitude of 25 feet, the aircraft sustained further damage including the loss of the right engine, radio and remote compass. Captain Risk, through keen ability, managed to keep the plane airborne and maneuvered it back to friendly lines where a successful landing was made at an emergency airfield. Captain Risk's courage, skill and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Risner, Robinson

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 653 - 29 December 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain James Robinson Risner, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy as Pilot of an F-86 type aircraft, 336th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, FIFTH Air Force on 15 September 1952. After dispelling four MiG's attacking friendly fighter-bombers, Captain Risner fearlessly pursued one of them through extremely hazardous low level flight and heavy concentrations of flak until the enemy was destroyed. Withdrawing, Captain Risner fearlessly pursued one of them through extremely hazardous low level flight and heavy concentrations of flak until the enemy was destroyed. Withdrawing, Captain Risner noticed fuel streaming from a flak hole in his wingman's aircraft and quickly realized that his wingman would soon flameout. Although low on fuel himself, Captain Risner unhesitatingly, and without regard for his own personal safety, attempted twice to push his wingman home. However, each time he made contact with the tail of his wingman's aircraft, leaking fuel and hydraulic fluid covered his canopy, rendering such action extremely dangerous. Still refusing to leave his wingman, Captain Risner shut down his engine and glided to his base. He made a successful air start over the field but flamed out, and was forced to make a dead-stick landing. The outstanding gallantry and exceptional airmanship displayed by Captain Risner, both in the facer of the enemy and in his unselfish desire to safeguard his wingman, were in keeping with the highest tradition of the military service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Rivera, Norberto

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 374 - 22 December 1952

Private First Class Norberto Rivera, US50109255, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 20 July 1952, a platoon of Company "A", of which Private Rivera was a squad leader, was assigned the mission of assaulting enemy fortifications on a hill in the vicinity of Chokko-ri, Korea. As the forward elements of the friendly unit neared their objective, they encountered intense enemy machine gun fire and were ambushed by the foe. Seeing that his squad was becoming disorganized, Private Rivera immediately regrouped the members of his unit, personally led them to within a few yards of the nearest machine gun emplacement and succeeded in silencing the enemy weapon. Realizing the foe had the advantage of fire power and fortifications and that it would be fatal to press the attack, Private Rivera ordered his men to withdraw. During the withdrawal he remained behind and provided his squad with effective covering fire. Upon rejoining his unit at a position of safety and noticing that a member of his unit was missing, he disregarded his personal safety, returned to the fire swept terrain, located the wounded man and personally carried him to the safety of friendly positions. the gallantry and selfless actions displayed by Private Rivera were instrumental in saving the life of a fellow soldier and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Rivera-Carrion, Jose A.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 177 - 5 June 1951

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jose A. Rivera-Carrion, RA57011159, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 19 February 1951, near Myongil-li, Korea, G Company's mission was to capture Hill 88 and, as the company moved into the assault, it immediately received intense enemy small arms fire. Because of the enemy's almost perfect use of camouflage and color, detection of their emplacements was difficult. When the order for the final assault was given, Private RIVERA-CARRION, with complete disregard for his personal safety, immediately ran in front of the advancing company to charge the enemy positions with hand grenades. He blasted the enemy out of the dugouts so that his advancing comrades were able to inflict heavy casualties and drive the enemy from the hill. After Hill 88 was secured, heavy enemy mortar fire caused several casualties in other platoons and Private Rivera-Carrion voluntarily assisted in the evacuation of the wounded although mortar rounds were still falling in the area. The gallantry and courage displayed by Private Rivera-Carrion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Roach, Maurice E. (1st award)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Major Maurice E. Roach (MCSN: 0-8492), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the period 2 November 1950 to 8 November 1950. On 6 November 1950, his battalion, assigned to advance and destroy the enemy in its zone of action, was held up by a well organized enemy defense. Major Roach moved to an observation post on the front lines so as to coordinate the attack. He continually exposed himself to heavy enemy fire for several hours while in this observation post until he was assured that his command had broken the enemy defense. His display of leadership, courage and initiative was an inspiration to the officers and men of his command. It was through his coordination and leadership that the Third Battalion broke the enemy defense and advanced to accomplish its mission. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 25 (February 10, 1951).

Roach, Maurice E. (2nd award)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major Maurice E. Roach (MCSN: 0-8492), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 26 September to 4 October 1950. During its first combat engagement on 26 September, Major Roach expertly directed and supervised his unit in overcoming an elaborate enemy defense position on a hill guarding the northwest approaches to Seoul. When the battalion was halted by strongly fortified hostile positions near Uijongbu on 2 October, he exercised a complete knowledge of the situation which was responsible for permitting his men to overrun the hostile strong points in a minimum amount of time. Despite grave hazards, he constantly operated in the forward areas, maintaining close contact with the front lines in order to direct efficiently the tactical employment of his unit. By his cool courage, inspiring leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, Major Roach was directly instrumental in the success achieved by his battalion and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Covington, Tennessee. Home Town: Memphis, Tennessee.

Robbins, John W.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders  o. 51 - 22 July 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant John W. Robbins (ASN: RA-38132178), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Chonan, Korea, on 5 July 1950. During an attack by a large enemy force he noticed that a machine gun in his position was not being fired. He took over the machine gun and started firing it. He delivered a large volume of accurate and effective fire on the enemy as they approached his position. As the enemy assault progressed toward his position he continued to operate the machine gun. He was ordered to withdraw to a position 200 yards to the rear and cover the withdrawal of Company B. He again set up the machine gun and delivered such effective fire as to inflict heavy casualties on the enemy thereby enabling Company B to withdraw and set up in their new positions. The enemy assault continued to the new position where Sergeant Robbins was and at this time he saw that his position was going to be overrun. He destroyed the machine gun and joined its organization. During this action Sergeant Robbins was under intense small arms, machine gun, and mortar fire. This conspicuous act of gallantry on the part of Sergeant Robbins reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Robbins, William A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant William A. Robbins (MCSN: 1087784), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Battery F, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 July 1951. When the combat patrol was subjected to intense hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire and suffered several casualties, including the patrol commander, Sergeant Robbins bravely exposed himself to the enemy fire and directed reorganization of the patrol, setting up a hasty defense and administering first aid to the wounded. Continuing in command until aid arrived from a friendly unit, Sergeant Robbins, by his outstanding skill, inspiring leadership and courageous devotion to duty, contributed materially to the saving of many lives and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hawesville, Kentucky. Home Town: Hawsesville, Kentucky.

Roberts, Charles D. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Charles D. Roberts, Jr. (MCSN: 0-52163), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 July 1952. Participating in a company attack against a strongly defended enemy hill, Second Lieutenant Roberts led his platoon in the assault, passing through the leading platoon which had been pinned down by intense hostile fire. Painfully wounded during the ensuing action, he refused evacuation, set up a hasty defense and delivered a deadly base of fire upon the enemy trenches for a period of approximately an hour. Rallying his platoon for a second attack, he fearlessly led them forward and succeeded in gaining higher ground, steadfastly refusing evacuation when again seriously wounded. While checking the defense of the newly gained high ground and insuring a further vicious base of fire on the hostile troops, Second Lieutenant Roberts sustained a third wound which partially blinded him and, weak from the loss of blood and from suffering severe pain for over two and one-half hours, could no longer continue his gallant undertaking. By his exceptional fortitude, valorous fighting spirit, courageous leadership and loyal devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Roberts served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: March 28, 1930 at Kansas City, Missouri. Home Town: Alexandria, Virginia.

Roberts, Donald R.

Headquarters 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 86

Private First Class Donald R. Roberts, ER57501115, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company E, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 13 January 1951 in the vicinity of Oneamsong, Korea.  Company E had the mission to defend high ground when its forward platoon came under a fierce attack by numerically superior enemy forces.  Private Roberts immediately volunteered to leave his relatively safe position in the rear to join the front line defense.  When he attempted to open fire, his weapon refused to function.  He then began to hurl hand grenades at a group of rushing enemy, causing heavy casualties among them and causing them to retreat.  When the attack had been repelled, eight enemy killed by hand grenades were found to the front of his position.  The gallantry displayed by Private Roberts reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Roberts, Michael Franklin


Michael F. Roberts
(Click picture for a larger view)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Michael F. Roberts, Hospitalman, United States Navy, for service as set forth in the following Citation:

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Battalion in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 and 13 August 1952.  When his unit was cut off by a large hostile force during a mission to probe a critical ridge forward of the main line of resistance to determine the enemy's strength and position of its flanks, Roberts repeatedly exposed himself to an intense hostile mortar and artillery barrage to render aid to several wounded Marines.  After reorganizing, the unit again moved forward in the face of heavy enemy fire to increase the protection of the company's exposed left flank.  Although the hostile troops attacked at regimental strength during the night with devastating rounds of artillery and mortar fire for a period of eight and one-half hours, Roberts fearlessly made his way along the entire company front to treat the wounded and insure evacuation.  Discovering, early the next morning, that the enemy had increased their mortar barrages and succeeded in inflicting heavy casualties upon the company, he again moved from one position to another, despite intense hostile fire, for over a period of six hours, treating the wounded and lending words of encouragement.  By his marked courage, outstanding skill and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Roberts materially aided in saving many lives and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."

Roberts, Richard A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 204 - 26 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Richard A. Roberts (ASN: RA-15280697), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Medical Company, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Pohang-dong, Korea, on 2 September 1950. Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment to which he was attached, was pinned down by intense artillery, mortar and automatic weapons and suffered many casualties. Locating a position offering partial cover, he made repeated trips, through a hail of withering fire, carrying the more seriously wounded to relative safety. He remained with the wounded, administering first aid until they were safely evacuated under the cover of darkness. Private Roberts' heroic actions and complete devotion to his comrades, with utter disregard for his own safety, reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Army Medical Service. Home Town: Cincinnati, Ohio.

Roberts, Robert D.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 25 - 27 June 1956

Sergeant Robert D. Roberts, then Corporal, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company G, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 7 September 1950, near Waegwan, Korea.  During the night, while the company was in a retrograde movement, and had to attack to the rear to avoid being encircled, it was noticed that the Company's Commanding Officer and third and fourth platoon were missing.  Since no one had any knowledge of their whereabouts, Sergeant Roberts, with selfless disregard for his own personal safety, volunteered to lead a small patrol back into the strongly infested enemy territory, in search of them.  As a result of his dauntless courage and conspicuous devotion to duty contact was made with the separated troops and the Commanding Officer.  Sergeant Roberts' gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Summit County, OH.

Roberts, William Melvin (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class William Melvin Roberts (MCSN: 1247693), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 July 1953. During the initial assault by a numerically superior hostile force on his unit's outpost position, Private First Class Roberts skillfully delivered a withering hail of fire on the attackers, inflicting a large number of casualties and thereby forcing the enemy to halt the attack. When the hostile force again assaulted the position, and two machine guns on his left flank failed to fire, he fearlessly moved from his bunker through the trench line toward the disabled weapons. Encountering a hostile soldier who was moving through the friendly trench line in an attempt to silence the machine guns, he quickly overpowered his adversary, continued toward the disabled guns and succeeded in putting them back into action. With the enemy intensifying the attack, he inflicted numerous casualties on the hostile troops with his deadly fire before sustaining critical wounds from an enemy mortar round. Gallantly refusing evacuation, he steadfastly remained at his gun, firing on the enemy until he succumbed to his wounds. By his indomitable fighting spirit, marked fortitude and inspiring courage, Private First Class Roberts contributed greatly to the successful defense of a vital outpost and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 12, 1931 at Baltimore, Maryland Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland. Death: KIA: July 8, 1953 - Buried at: Baltimore National Cemetery - Baltimore, Maryland.

Robicheau, Joseph P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Joseph P. Robicheau (MCSN: 285432), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. Assigned the mission of placing his platoon forward along the main supply route to direct counterfire on well-entrenched enemy hill positions which were impeding the advance of the head of the column during the vital redeployment from Hagaru-ri, Staff Sergeant Robinson bravely made his way through intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire and succeeded in setting up a section on an exposed railroad track affording the only advantageous position from which his task could be accomplished. Throughout the ensuing four and one-half hour fire fight, he constantly exposed himself to enemy fire to direct accurate counterfire on the hostile strong points, and when six gunners were wounded one after another, he either assisted each to safety or fired the weapon until relief arrived. While maintaining effective control of his section, he skillfully designated targets for the mortar platoon, enabling that unit to deliver devastating fire which forced the enemy from their bunkers and exposed the hostile troops to the fire of his machine guns. By his exceptional courage, inspiring leadership and unswerving devotion to the fulfillment of his mission, Staff Sergeant Robicheau contributed immeasurably to the success of the operation and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Boston, Massachusetts. Home Town: Quincy, Massachusetts.

Robinson, James B. Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 42 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal James B. Robinson, Jr. (ASN: US-54001859), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 20 October 1951. His company, situated in defensive positions on a hill, was subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage. Corporal Robinson, Squad Leader, saw one of his men get wounded by shrapnel. With complete disregard for his own welfare, he left his position of relative safety and made his way forward and dragged the soldier 20 yards, still subjected to enemy fire, to his own foxhole. He had just placed his wounded comrade safely in the emplacement when a mortar round exploded nearby and mortally wounded him. Corporal Robinson's courageous action and self-sacrificing devotion to a wounded comrade undoubtedly saved a life which would otherwise have been lost and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Born: February 26, 1927. Home Town: Mariamma, Arkansas. Death: KIA: October 20, 1951 - Buried at: Little Rock National Cemetery - Little Rock, Arkansas.

Robinson, Robert C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Robert B. Robinson (MCSN: 0-33286), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Forward Air Controller attached to a Rifle Company of the First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 December 1950. Assigned to conduct an air strike in support of an attack against vigorously defended enemy entrenchments located along the ridge of a vital position overlooking Koto-ri Pass, Captain Robinson staunchly maintained a position inside the enemy defense perimeter despite heavy and accurate hostile small arms, automatic weapons, machine gun and mortar fire. Risking his life in the face of an intense barrage, he skillfully directed air strikes to within 100 yards of his own position and, by his cool and effective direction, was in large measure responsible for the destruction of many hostile troops and for the overwhelming success of his company's assault as it closed and destroyed the enemy. By his professional ability, brilliant supervision and heroic actions in the face of heavy odds, Captain Robinson served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Orange, California. Home Town: Orange, California.

Robinson, Stanley Shelton

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Stanley Shelton Robinson (MCSN: 1082138), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Squad Leader of Company E, 2d Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 September 1950. When a strong hostile force attacked his company's position and overran a portion of his squad's sector, Private Robinson launched a single-handed assault against the outnumbering enemy and succeeded in re-capturing the position. With his squad's ammunition almost exhausted, he again exposed himself to the intense fire to run to the supply point and obtain a resupply, subsequently returning and fighting gallantly on until the defense of his company was assured. By his daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and cool courage in the face of heavy odds, Private Robinson served as an inspiration to all who observed him, and his heroic efforts were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Wichita, Kansas. Home Town: Plains, Kansas. Death: December 5, 1958 - Buried at: Juniper Haven Cemetery - Prineville, Oregon.

Robles-De Jesus, PFC Ismael (posthumously)

General Orders No. 539 - 25 November 1951
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Private First Class Issmael Robles-De Jesus, US50100874, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 18 September 1951, near Chorwon, Korea, Company "I", advancing up the steep slopes of Objective Scare under cover of darkness and fog, was subjected to the intense fire of four enemy machine guns located above the company. Private Robles-De Jesus, aware of the seriousness of the situation, voluntarily exposed himself to the withering hostile fire by advancing to the crest of the hill and single-handedly assaulting one of the machine gun emplacements, killing the occupants with rounds from his weapon. However, in so doing, he was struck and mortally wounded by the fire of another enemy machine gun. The selfless gallantry and courageous initiative displayed by Private Robles-De Jesus  reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Rockey, William Keller

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant William Keller Rockey (MCSN: 0-50776), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Konmi-chi, Korea, on 10 June 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Rockey, a rifle platoon commander, was leading his platoon in an attack on Hill 676, when it became pinned down by intense enemy fire. Without regard for his personal safety, he led three volunteers up the steep slope, throwing hand grenades into the enemy positions. This courageous action permitted his platoon to continue the assault, and ultimately secure the objective. The gallantry, initiative and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Rockey on this occasion contributed immeasurably to the success of the unit's mission, and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 176 (August 16, 1951). Home Town: Washington, D.C.

Roderick, Stanley L. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Stanley L. Roderick (NSN: 3305154), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. As a Corpsman in a Rifle Platoon, Hospitalman Roderick was in the attack with his unit when the platoon was ordered to withdraw temporarily from the steep hill and wait for supporting fire. At this moment he noticed a Marine, wounded in both arms and legs, located very close to the enemy and unable to move to safety. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he rushed forward in the face of intense enemy automatic weapons, small arms and grenade fire to reach the wounded man. He then moved the disabled Marine all the way down the precipitous slope, still exposed to heavy enemy fire, until he secured the evacuation of his patient. His exceptional courage and devotion to duty under fire were an inspiration to all who observed him, and contributed to saving the life of a Marine. Hospitalman Roderick's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 59700 (November 25, 1951).

Roderick, Stanley L. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Hospitalman Stanley L. Roderick (NSN: 3305154), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 June 1951. Hospitalman Roderick displayed outstanding qualities of professional skill and courage in the performance of his duties as a Corpsman. During the attack on a steep and well defended hill near Inje, the assault elements of the company were taken under intense fire from a cleverly camouflaged enemy machine gun only twenty yards to their front, and from automatic weapons on both flanks. Three men were instantly killed, seventeen wounded and the company advance halted. Unhesitatingly, he rushed through the withering fire and, completely disregarding his own safety, began to administer first aid to the wounded. Although the enemy added mortars to the heavy fire already sweeping the area, he continued to move from man to man treating their wounds and helping to move them to covered positions for a period of over forty-five minutes. Only after all the casualties had been removed from the danger zone, did he seek cover himself. Hospitalman Roderick's courageous actions undoubtedly saved the lives of several wounded comrades, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 63911 (December 31, 1951).

Rodgers, Charles Edward

News clipping with partial citation:

"Pvt. Charles Edward Rodgers, route 1,Hermitage, Tennessee, 1st Cavalry Division, awarded the Silver Star Medal.  The enemy's objective was to overrun and destroy our forward observation post.  Private Rodgers' section was assigned to the mission of maintenance and repair of the forward observation telephone lines.  Fearlessly he remained at his post until the position had been overrun by the enemy.  when last seen he was manning a machine gun against numerically superior enemy forces."

Rodney, Glenn W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Glenn W. Rodney (MCSN: 0-47079), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 29 March 1953. Assigned the hazardous mission of effecting the night relief of a company which had suffered many casualties on a bitterly contested outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, Captain Rodney led his men forward over unfamiliar terrain and along mine-infested routes in the face of a murderous barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire. After successfully effecting the relief of the strategic position, he commenced establishing its defense. Dauntlessly moving among his men, he assigned fields of fire to cover enemy avenues of approach, encouraged his men and insured the integrity of the outpost. Through his heroic actions in effecting the dangerous relief, his marked bravery under fire and his ability to grasp the complete tactical situation, Captain Rodney materially aided the company in repulsing repeated savage hostile attacks. His courageous leadership and resolute determination were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Joplin, Missouri. Home Town: Joplin, Missouri.

Rodriguez Balinas, Antonio (1st award)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 278 - July 13, 1951

Second Lieutenant Antonio Rodriguez Balinas, 01685780, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On April 23, 1951, while occupying defensive positions on Hill 305, in the vicinity of Ognyo-bong, Korea, Company "F" was subjected to a furious attack by an estimated 300 enemy. During the ensuing attack, Lieutenant Rodriguez Balinas, leader of the Second Platoon, continuously moved through withering hostile fire, encouraging and directing his men. Upon learning that the platoon's left flank was exposed, he personally went to the imperiled position to evaluate the situation and later returned with a squad to reinforce the weakened flank. Although the supply of ammunition was becoming critically low, he determinedly fought on until a re- supply of ammunition arrived. Lieutenant Rodriguez Balinas's gallantry under fire inspired the members of his unit to contain the enemy attack and reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Rodriguez Balinas, Antonio (2nd award)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 197 - May 29, 1952

First Lieutenant Antonio Rodriguez Balinas, # 01685780, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On December 23, 1951, Company "G", reinforced by the weapons platoon of Company "F", attacked heavily fortified hostile positions on Hill 200, near Sangyon-Myon, Korea. Lieutenant Rodriguez Balinas, platoon leader of the weapons platoon, attached himself to the assault platoon in order to direct close support fire from the mortars and 57 millimeter rifles of his platoon. After the supporting fire was lifted, he joined the assault platoon in its attack on the well entrenched enemy. Firing his carbine and throwing hand grenades, he effectively destroyed one hostile position. During the course of this vicious fighting, Lieutenant Rodriguez Balinas lost his carbine but, armed with only two hand grenades, he undauntedly charged another position manned by an enemy machine gun crew. He fearlessly walked through the lethal hail of fire directly toward the hostile bunker, hurled his hand grenades and completely destroyed the position and its occupants. Although painfully wounded in this action, he refused evacuation until the last of the wounded men had been removed to safety. Lieutenant Rodriguez Balinas' outstanding gallantry and inspirational leadership were instrumental in the success of the mission and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Puerto Rico.

Rodriguez, Arcadio Santiago

General Orders No. 188 - 13 June 1951
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Private First Class Arcadio Santiago Rodriguez, ER30432991, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 27 April 1951, near Hongbok, Korea, while approaching through a pass, a reinforced enemy battalion was fired on by the 3d Platoon, Company "K", which had taken a blocking position astride the pass. When his squad leader was mortally wounded, Private Santiago Rodriguez voluntarily assumed command of the squad. Receiving orders to withdraw he organized the squad and led it to more tenable positions. During a later assault to drive the enemy from the ridge, Private Santiago Rodriguez volunteered to carry a wounded comrade to safety. Suddenly encountering five enemy soldiers, he placed his wounded comrade on the ground, and opened fire on the enemy, After killing four hostile troops, he captured the fifth and forced him to evacuate the wounded man to the battalion aid station. The gallantry and initiative displayed by Private Santiago Rodriguez reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Rodriguez, Guillermo Rodriguez

SILVER STAR
HEADQUARTERS 3D INFANTRY DIVISION
GENERAL ORDERS # 143 - 23 May 1953

Corporal GUILLERMO RODRIGUEZ RODRIGUEZ, US50113919, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 23 February 1953, a patrol of Company "C", of which Corporal RODRIGUEZ RODRIGUEZ was a member, was assigned the mission of destroying an enemy patrol in the vicinity of Chich-on, Korea, and to capture prisoners for intelligence purposes. When the patrol was ambushed by a hostile force, the patrol leader was seriously wounded in the initial burst of fire and lay within yards of the enemy positions. After the friendly elements withdrew from the engagement to reorganize, Corporal RODRIGUEZ RODRIGUEZ crawled back into the intense hail of fire to locate the patrol leader and evacuate him to safety. The corporal was subjected to a barrage of enemy grenades and small arms fire as he worked his way forward, accompanied by a fellow soldier, searching for the wounded officer. The intense enemy fire continued as he slowly moved back to the friendly elements, tediously crawling and dragging the patrol leader to safety. Corporal RODRIGUEZ RODRIGUEZ' outstanding gallantry, initiative and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Puerto Rico.

Rodriguez, Jose E. Navarro (KIA)

SILVER STAR
HEADQUARTERS 3D INFANTRY DIVISION
GENERAL ORDERS # 543 - 26 November 1951

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS JOSE E. NAVARRO RODRIGUEZ, US50100816,Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 30 September 1951, Company "I" attacked a hill near Chorwon, Korea, which was strongly held by a well entrenched and fanatically determined enemy force. As the unit advanced upon the hostile defenses, it was subjected to intense automatic weapons and mortar fire from two advantageously located wooden bunkers. Realizing that the destruction of these lethal obstacles was necessary to allow the company to continue its advance, Private NAVARRO RODRIGUEZ quickly dashed across the exposed terrain to within grenade range of the enemy emplacements, and although fully revealed to the fury of the hostile counterfire, threw hand grenades into the positions, completely destroying them. When this was done, the enemy defense crumbled and the rest of the hostile troops fled the area, hotly pursued by Company "I". Joining in the advance, Private NAVARRO RODRIGUEZ bore a machine gun to the top of the hill and mounted it to pour heavy fire into the ranks of the dispersed and retreating enemy. As he was engaged in this action, he fell mortally wounded from the desperate hostile return fire. The fearless contribution that Private NAVARRO RODRIGUEZ made to his unit's mission and the completely selfless gallantry with which it was accomplished, reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.


Luis R. Rodriguez
(Click picture for a larger view)

Rodriguez, Luis R.

HEADQUARTERS 3D INFANTRY DIVISION
GENERAL ORDERS #188 - 13 June 1951

FIRST LIEUTENANT LUIS R. RODRIGUEZ, 01338514, Infantry, Company "F" 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 1 February 1951, in the vicinity of Tongchon-ni, Korea, Company "F" encountered stubborn enemy resistance while attacking firmly entrenched hostile positions on Hill 297. When extremely mountainous terrain hindered the maneuverability of the attacking elements, Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ repeatedly rallied the troops and, although frequently exposed to intense hostile small arms fire, successfully deployed his unit and pointed out enemy positions. Although he was painfully wounded in the ensuing action, Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ courageously refused medical treatment and stayed with his men for approximately one hour, encouraging them and controlling their fire. Inspired by their leader's display of outstanding bravery, Company "F" increased the intensity of its attack, forcing the enemy to withdraw with heavy casualties. Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ'S gallant actions reflect great credit upon himself and exemplify the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Rodriguez, Pedro (1st citation)

Headquarters - 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 196 -17 June 1951

Master Sergeant Pedro Rodriguez, RA6674697, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 24 March 1951, near Kopi-Dong, Korea, Sergeant Rodriguez, acting as platoon leader in the absence of a commissioned officer, was leading his unit to secure Hill 476, when the enemy opened fire from a well camouflaged machine gun nest. Although he did not know the exact location of the gun, Sergeant Rodriguez ordered one squad to fix bayonets and assault the general area from which the fire was coming. After the enemy weapon fired again, Sergeant Rodriquez charged the position, yelling and shooting his rifle demoralizing the enemy and causing him to flee in haste, taking his gun with him, but leaving ammunition and rations behind. The gallantry and extreme devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Rodriguez reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Rodriguez, Pedro (2nd citation)

SILVER STAR
HEADQUARTERS 3D INFANTRY DIVISION
GENERAL ORDERS # 261 - 8 July 1951

MASTER SERGEANT PEDRO RODRIGUEZ, RA6674697, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 31 March 1951, near Choksong-myon, Korea, Company "F" was attacking Hill 398, defended by a firmly entrenched enemy supported by mortars. At some distance from the top of the hill, the lead platoon was halted by intense machine gun fire and fragmentation grenades, suffering several casualties. When Sergeant RODRIGUEZ received the order to move his platoon to assist the stalled unit, he ran forward and led his troops in a furious assault, causing the enemy to retreat hastily, thereby relieving the besieged lead platoon. Continuing his charge, Sergeant Rodriguez pursued the fleeing enemy and covered by friendly machine gun fire, he personally searched the area to rout any enemy troops which might have been left behind. The aggressive leadership and personal gallantry exhibited by Sergeant Rodriguez reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Rodriguez-Amaro, Vidal (1st citation)

SILVER STAR
HEADQUARTERS
3d INFANTRY DIVISION
GENERAL ORDERS #384 - 30 December 1952)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to VIDAL RODRIGUEZ-AMARO, (0-12034123), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. In the early morning hours of 7 August 1952, Company I, of which Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ-AMARO was a platoon leader, was assigned the mission of assaulting an enemy stronghold in the vicinity of Chu-dong, Korea. As the elements of the two friendly assault platoons approached their objective, they encountered the fierce small arms and automatic weapons fire of an enemy ambush, inflicting several casualties among them and forcing them to halt in their advance. Immediately and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ-AMARO moved about the fire swept terrain shouting words of encouragement to his men, directing their fire and evacuating four wounded soldiers. Upon realizing that one of the assault platoons was disorganized, he quickly reorganized the men and led them in engaging the enemy. Employing grim determination and aggressive leadership, he boldly made a one man charge upon the foe, personally killing ten of them by subjecting them to a deadly hail of fire from his carbine and accurately hurling grenades among them. When an intense barrage of hostile mortar and artillery fire necessitated the withdrawal of the friendly unit, Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ-AMARO, oblivious to the enemy fire, directed the withdrawal of his platoon and courageously assisted in evacuating another friendly casualty. Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ-AMARO's extreme gallantry, intrepid actions, and inspirational leadership were responsible for inflicting numerous casualties among the enemy, allowed the friendly unit to elude the hostile ambush, and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Rodriguez-Amaro, Vidal (2nd citation)

SILVER STAR
HEADQUARTERS
3D INFANTRY DIVISION

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting an Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Silver Star Medal to VIDAL RODRIGUEZ-AMARO, (0-12034123), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On the morning of 26 September 1952, a platoon of Company I, led by Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ-AMARO, was assigned the mission of making contact with and locating enemy positions on a hill known as KELLY in the vicinity of Koyangdae, Korea. While leading his men to the crest of the hill, Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ-AMARO sustained a serious leg wound when the friendly unit was subjected to intense hostile machine gun fire. Disregarding his painful wound and ignoring the heavy hostile fire, he ordered his men to fix bayonets and fearlessly continued in the attack. The foe immediately counteracted the bayonet charge by subjecting the friendly forces to an intense barrage of mortar and artillery fire. Realizing that it would be fatal to continue in the attack in the face of such devastating fire, Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ-AMARO ordered his men to withdraw. Refusing medical aid and evacuation, he directed the withdrawal of his unit. Upon seeing a wounded soldier that was unable to participate in the retrograde, he selflessly and with complete disregard for his personal safety, carried the casualty through the shrapnel torn area towards a position of safety. During this act, he received additional wounds of a serious nature but again refused medical aid and evacuation until all friendly casualties had been removed to positions of safety. Lieutenant RODRIGUEZ-AMARO's outstanding gallantry and inspirational leadership were highly instrumental in the unit successfully accomplishing its mission and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Rodriguez-Balinas, Antonio (1st citation)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 278 - 13 July 1951

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Antonio Rodriguez-Balinas (0-1685780), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company F, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 23 April 1951, while occupying defensive positions on Hill 305, in the vicinity of Ognyo-bong, Korea, Company F was subjected to a furious attack by an estimated 300 enemy. During the ensuing attack, Lieutenant Rodriguez-Balinas, leader of the Second Platoon, continuously moved through withering hostile fire, encouraging and directing his men. Upon learning that the platoon's left flank was exposed, he personally went to the imperiled position to evaluate the situation and later returned with a squad to reinforce the weakened flank. Although the supply of ammunition was becoming critically low, he determinedly fought on until a re- supply of ammunition arrived. Lieutenant Rodriguez-Balinas' gallantry under fire inspired the members of his unit to contain the enemy attack and reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Rodriguez-Balinas, Antonio (2nd citation)

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting an Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Silver Star Medal to Antonio Rodriguez-Balinas, (0-1685780), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 23 December 1951, Company G, reinforced by the weapons platoon of Company F, attacked heavily fortified hostile positions on Hill 200, near Sangyon-Myon, Korea. Lieutenant Rodriguez-Balinas, platoon leader of the weapons platoon, attached himself to the assault platoon in order to direct close support fire from the mortars and 57 millimeter rifles of his platoon. After the supporting fire was lifted, he joined the assault platoon in its attack on the well entrenched enemy. Firing his carbine and throwing hand grenades, he effectively destroyed one hostile position. During the course of this vicious fighting, Lieutenant Rodriguez-Balinas lost his carbine but, armed with only two hand grenades, he undauntedly charged another position manned by an enemy machine gun crew. He fearlessly walked through the lethal hail of fire directly toward the hostile bunker, hurled his hand grenades and completely destroyed the position and its occupants. Although painfully wounded in this action, he refused evacuation until the last of the wounded men had been removed to safety. Lieutenant Rodriguez-Balinas'' outstanding gallantry and inspirational leadership were instrumental in the success of the mission and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Rodriguez-Forty, Juan F.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 546 - 30 November 1951

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Juan F. Rodriguez-Forty, (US29129750), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 3 June 1951, Company C launched an attack on the enemy, holding Hill 466 near Sunbong-ni, Korea. From the advantageously located enemy positions on sheer rocky cliffs approaching the hill, the hostile troops brought the First Platoon under intense fire, slowing the advance. Private Rodriguez-Forty, to facilitate the attack and with complete disregard for his personal safety, climbed the cliffs in the face of hostile fire, pausing only to throw some of the enemy's own hand grenades back at them. Assisted by another enlisted man, he successfully charged and destroyed two enemy machine guns and killed the gunners. Private Rodriguez-Forty's gallantry and courage greatly aided the company in seizing its objective and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Rafael

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Rafael Rodriguez-Gonzalez (MCSN: 1240178), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 19 - 20 March 1953. When an outpost forward of the main line of resistance was attacked by a large enemy force, Private First Class Rodriguez-Gonzalez courageously manned a fighting position and succeeded in delivering accurate and killing fire upon the attackers, although he was knocked to the ground on several occasions by the concussion of hostile grenades and mortar rounds. Learning that communications between the outpost and the machine gun positions had been destroyed by the intense hostile fire, he moved through open trenches in the face of enemy mortar fire to re-lay wire to the machine gun emplacements. After re-establishing the vital communications, Private First Class Rodriguez-Gonzalez moved to a critical area where the enemy had directed heavy fire and, through his savage and fierce fighting, prevented the enemy from gaining access to the trench and outpost. His inspiring leadership, indomitable courage and aggressive fighting spirit were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Orocovis, Puerto Rico. Home Town: Vega Baja, Puerto Rico.

Rodriguez-Martinez, Alfonso

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 93 - 5 March 1952

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Alfonso Rodriguez-Martinez, (US50104347), Corporal, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 11-12 December 1951, elements of Company E assaulting a well-entrenched foe on Hill 168 near Toyon-ni, Korea, were subjected to heavy hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire. Corporal Rodriguez-Martinez, a machine gunner, immediately selected a position from which he could deliver maximum fire into the enemy positions, and from this advantageous but exposed location, he laid down such an effective volume of fire that his comrades were able to continue their advance. Later during the engagement, due to the enemy's numerical superiority, the friendly forces were ordered to withdraw. Choosing to remain in his position, Corporal Rodriguez-Martinez continued to fire this weapon with devastating results, forcing the enemy to concentrate all their fire power upon him. With such a lethal hail of fire directed at him, he was struck and mortally wounded. His courage and determination were instrumental in the safe withdrawal of his platoon and undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades. Corporal Rodriguez-Martinez's selfless gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Rodriguez-Pacheco, Rafael

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 166 - 29 April 1952

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Rafael Rodriguez-Pacheco (RA30431299), Corporal, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 21 February 1951, Corporal Rodriguez-Pacheco was attached to a platoon which came under heavy enemy fire near the Han River, Korea. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire to go from man to man giving first aid. Corporal Rodriguez-Pacheco was wounded in the right arm but refused to stop and have his wound dressed until he had given first aid to all the others. The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Rodriguez-Pacheco reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Guillermo

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orfders No. 143 - 23 May 1953

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Guillertmo Rodriguez-Rodriguez, (US50113919), Corporal, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On the night of 23 February 1953, a patrol of Company C, of which Corporal Rodriguez-Rodriguez was a member, was assigned the mission of destroying an enemy patrol in the vicinity of Chich-on, Korea, and to capture prisoners for intelligence purposes. When the patrol was ambushed by a hostile force, the patrol leader was seriously wounded in the initial burst of fire and lay within yards of the enemy positions. After the friendly elements withdrew from the engagement to reorganize, Corporal Rodriguez-Rodriguez crawled back into the intense hail of fire to locate the patrol leader and evacuate him to safety. The corporal was subjected to a barrage of enemy grenades and small arms fire as he worked his way forward, accompanied by a fellow soldier, searching for the wounded officer. The intense enemy fire continued as he slowly moved back to the friendly elements, tediously crawling and dragging the patrol leader to safety. Corporal Rodriguez-Rodriguez's outstanding gallantry, initiative and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Rodriguez-Sepulveda, Dario

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 222 - 3 July 1953

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Dario Rodriguez-Sepulveda (US50110568), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On the morning of 19 September 1952, Sergeant First Class (then Private First Class) Rodriguez-Sepulveda, a squad leader of Company F, volunteered to return to positions which the company had occupied on Kelly Hill, in the vicinity of Koyuandoc, Korea, and search for wounded friendly soldiers. Knowing the hill was occupied by hostile forces, he nevertheless advanced over the open terrain and infiltrated the enemy trenches. His search revealed a seriously wounded sergeant. The sergeant informed Sergeant Rodriguez-Sepulveda to leave the hill as the enemy had placed a mine beneath him and to move him would mean death. Using extreme caution, he skillfully removed the wounded man from the mine. Exposed to enemy fire, he again moved over the open terrain and brought the wounded man to the safety of friendly lines. Sergeant Rodriguez-Sepulveda's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Roessner, Ernest (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Master Sergeant Ernest Roessner (MCSN: 245359), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. Aware that his company had exhausted its ammunition supply during an engagement with enemy forces, Master Sergeant Roessner organized a supply detail and personally delivered ammunition to front line troops in the face of hostile fire. Moving among the positions occupied by his men in order to provide the necessary ammunition, he was fatally wounded by enemy mortar fire. His courage, leadership and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 22, 1914 at Burke, South Dakota. Home Town: San Diego, California. Death: KIA: September 24, 1950 - Buried at: Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery - San Diego, California.

Rogers, Forrest L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Forrest L. Rogers (MCSN: 1175711), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 July 1953. With the assault platoon subjected to an intense barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire which blanketed the entire area of approach as the unit prepared for an attack to retake a vitally important combat post forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Rogers leaped from the trench line when the order was given to attack and, shouting for his men to follow, fearlessly raced across open terrain through the murderous hostile fire toward the enemy-held position. Although painfully wounded and thrown to the ground by enemy mortar fire, he quickly regained his feet and gallantly continued to lead his men in the attack. The first to reach the crest of the hill, he traversed the entire hostile trench line and personally destroyed one emplacement occupied by five enemy soldiers. Refusing to be evacuated, he continued to shout words of encouragement and to direct his men throughout a two hour period until the position was secured. After establishing a defense, he moved about the sector to check his positions and to assist in the treatment of the wounded, remaining in the area when the platoon was relieved until all members of his squad had reached the main line of resistance. By his skilled leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty, Sergeant Rogers contributed in large measure to the success of the platoon in securing its objective and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Yorktown Township, Illinois. Home Town: Tampico, Illinois.

Rogers, John F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant John F. Rogers, Jr. (MCSN: 0-54959), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 and 13 August 1952. Although the company was isolated by a numerically superior enemy force employing intense mortar and artillery fire while his unit was engaged in defending a strategically important hill position, Second Lieutenant Rogers repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire to select better positions for his men, to direct their fire and to shout words of encouragement to them. Although the enemy assaulted his position five times during the night, he expertly directed his men in repelling each attack, inflicting many casualties upon the opposition. On the morning of 13 August, he led his platoon into enemy territory in an attempt to destroy fortifications which were causing many friendly casualties and fearlessly continued forward in the face of the well-entrenched enemy until he was forced to withdraw, ensuring at all times the prompt evacuation of casualties. Upon returning to the company's defensive perimeter, he quickly reorganized his platoon and again went forward to rescue a wounded Marine. By his outstanding leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Rogers served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cincinnati, Ohio. Home Town: Cincinnati, Ohio.

Rogers, Joseph W.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 146 - 8 April 1951

Captain (then 1st Lt) Joseph W. Rogers, United States Air Force. Captain Rogers distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy on 8 October 1950 while flying a combat mission in support of United Nations forces in the Myongad-dong area, Korea. Volunteering to aid British troops hemmed in by numerically superior enemy forces in that location, he led a formation of F-51 fighter aircraft to the target under a ragged 700 foot ceiling. Flying in and out of clouds, below the level of surrounding terrain and employing exceptional navigational and instrument flying ability, he performed a series of 360 degree turns to make repeated attacks. Despite heavy antiaircraft fire, he continued striking the enemy with napalm, rockets and 50 caliber machine gun fire with such remarkable success that the encircled United Nations troops were able to withdraw intact. The conspicuous gallantry displayed by Captain Rogers in the performance of an extremely hazardous mission was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Rogers, Walter M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Walter M. Rogers (MCSN: 655298), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving with an infantry company as an ammunition carrier in a 3.5" rocket squad, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 June 1951. When his unit was temporarily halted by heavy enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire while engaged in an attack up a precipitous slope, Private First Class Rogers, quick to observe that the fire was emanating from an entrenched position on the top of the ridge, bravely made his way forward in a daring attempt to neutralize the emplacement. Charging the hostile stronghold in the face of devastating enemy fire, he completely destroyed the position with two hand grenades and thereby greatly aided the company in successfully seizing its assigned objective. By his outstanding courage, exceptional initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Rogers served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Scranton, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Rogge, William F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal William F. Rogge (MCSN: 1083518), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with a Machine Gun Squad of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 January 1951. When an enemy patrol, employing small arms and machine guns, overran his machine gun squad and physically occupied the position, Corporal Rogge refused to abandon his machine gun and remained alone. Fighting furiously in the ensuing battle, he killed one of the attackers, wounded another and completely disorganized the attack, thereby enabling his platoon to reorganize and launch a counterattack. By his daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and cool courage in the face of extreme peril, Corporal Rogge served as an inspiration to all who observed him and was in large measure responsible for the success of his platoon in retaking the vital position so necessary to the defensive perimeter. His heroic actions throughout reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Born: Baltimore, Maryland. Home Town: Fork, Maryland.

Rohde, Bernard E.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 320 - 11 November 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class Bernard E. Rohde, Infantry, Company A, Fifth Infantry Regiment, United States Army.  At about 0400 hours, 27 August 1950, the enemy launched a vigorous attack on the company which was defending the high ground near Sobuk San, Korea.  Although weak from wounds, Private First Class Rohde crawled forward to advise the unit of the flank threat.  On reaching an advance post and finding a machine gunner dead, he manned the gun, although he had never fired one before, and delivered effective fire on the enemy.  By his exceptional courage and bold initiative, Private First Class Rohde enabled the hard pressed platoon to dig in and hold.  His vigorous and resolute action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Enter the military service from Minnesota.

Rohwer, Gaylen F. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Gaylen F. Rohwer (MCSN: 516324), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner in Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. When the pintle to his heavy machine gun became lost, Corporal Rohwer courageously assumed an exposed position and, placing the water jacket on his leg, held on to the pistol grip and allowed the belt to feed under his left arm. In this difficult and vulnerable position, he fired more than four belts against the enemy, destroying six of them and wounding an unknown number. After his gun jammed due to excessive heat, Corporal Rohwer, with some help, mounted the gun with a make-shift pintle on a tripod and put the weapon back in action. Mortally wounded while firing on the enemy, Corporal Rohwer, by his heroic action and cool initiative in the face of grave peril, served as an inspiration to his companions and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 11, 1924 at Brunswick, Nebraska. Home Town: Venice, California. Death: KIA: September 24, 1950 - Buried at: Mount Auburn Cemetery - Saint Joseph, Missouri.

Roise, Harold Sigward

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Colonel Harold Sigward Roise (MCSN: 0-6134), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion, in Korea, on 17 September 1950. Lieutenant Colonel Roise, Commanding Officer, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), leaving the western outskirts of Pupyong after successfully repelling an enemy counter-attack at dawn, aggressively led his battalion in an attack over a distance of about eight miles to seize the vital objective of Kimpo Airfield. During this attack Lieutenant Colonel Roise remained well forward, constantly exposing himself to enemy fire, without regard for his own personal safety, so as to expedite and control the advance of his assault elements. When darkness approached he aggressively directed his companies to continue forward, and as darkness fell his assaulting companies, using attached tanks, advanced and seized Kimpo Airfield. Due to the excellent disposition and control of all elements in his command, Lieutenant Colonel Roise seized the objective and established a night defense that was successful in repelling a night counter-attack, of several hundred enemy just prior to dawn. By his audacious and superb leadership and his heroic bravery, Lieutenant Colonel Roise successfully attained this important objective thereby materially contributing to the success of this campaign. His actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 24 (November 5, 1950). Born: Moscow, Idaho. Home Town: Moscow, Idaho.

Rolando, Epifanio A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Epifanio A. Rolando, Jr. (MCSN: 662699), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Provisional Rifle Platoon of Battery K, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. With his platoon assisting a Marine Infantry Company during the assault and seizure of a prominent terrain feature, Private First Class Rolando fought gallantly throughout the fierce engagement. When a machine gun, which had been captured by several platoon members, jammed while being employed against the enemy during ensuing counterattacks, and seven of the nine Marines protecting the gun were wounded, he voluntarily exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to move among hostile positions and secure critically needed ammunition for the weapon. On One occasion, he moved to an exposed fire-swept area and evacuated a wounded Marine. During four mass assaults by the enemy, he aided in driving them from the area with accurate rifle fire and hand grenades picked up from hostile positions and, with the assistance of two other Marines at the machine gun, annihilated an estimated enemy company. By his daring initiative, aggressive determination and bold actions in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Rolando contributed materially to the successful repulse of the enemy, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Buffalo, New York. Home Town: Buffalo, New York.

Rollins, William T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William T. Rollins (MCSN: 1137309), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with a Machine Gun Squad of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 5 to 7 September 1952. With his squad engaged in relieving a hard-pressed force manning a forward outpost, Private First Class Rollins repeatedly exposed himself to enemy artillery and mortar fire to expeditiously aid and evacuate the wounded, thereby materially aiding in saving the lives of several Marines. Although painfully wounded during a night attack, he continually manned his machine gun, despite heavy enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire, inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy. When a hostile machine gun was delivering fire on the outpost from a position approximately 300 yards away, he quickly silenced the weapon, thereby removing the covering fire for an assaulting enemy force and contributing to the successful repulse of the attack with a minimum of friendly casualties. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Rollins served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Colusa, California. Home Town: Williams, California.

Romain, John M.

Sergeant First class John M. Romain, ER13007955, (then Sergeant), Army of the United States, a member of Company C, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 13 September 1951 in the vicinity of Satas-ri, Korea.  On that date Sergeant Romain was an assistant squad leader with a unit which had the mission to attack a well entrenched hostile force.  During the attack the squad leader was mortally wounded and Sergeant Romain assumed command of his unit.  With complete disregard for his own safety he led his men in the attack.  Intense enemy fire wounded his entire squad and without hesitating Sergeant Romain took command of another squad.  Upon reaching the objective he immediately ordered his men into defensive positions to prepare for a hostile counter-attack.  The fanatical enemy attempted to dislodge the friendly elements from their newly-won positions but Sergeant Romain, undaunted by the hostile lfire directed at him, continuously exposed himself while moving among his men, giving directions and shouting words of encouragement.  It was through his skillful leadership and immediate action, that his unit was able to successfully defend its position.  The gallantry in action displayed by Sergeant Romain on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Maryland.

Roman-Lugo, Oscar

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 144 - 23 May 1953

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Oscar Roman-Lugo, (US50114547), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On the night of 23 February 1953, a patrol of Company C, of which Private Roman-Lugo was a member, was assigned the mission of destroying an enemy patrol in the vicinity of Chich-on, Korea, and to capture prisoners for intelligence purposes. When the patrol was ambushed by a hostile force, the patrol leader was seriously wounded in the initial burst of fire and lay within yards of the enemy position. After the friendly elements withdrew from the engagement to reorganize, Private Roman-Lugo volunteered to accompany another member of the patrol to search for the wounded officer. He was subjected to intense hostile fire, but continued in the search until the wounded officer was located. Private ROMAN-LUGO then assisted the other volunteer in dragging him back through the enemy fire to safety. Private Roman-Lugo's outstanding gallantry, initiative and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Roman-Reichard, Donato (Posthumously)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 360 - 15 August 1951

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Donato Roman-Reichard, (RA10405488), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 31 March 1951, during an assault on Hill 398, the lead platoon of Company B was pinned down by heavy hostile automatic weapons fire. A second platoon was ordered to advance in an effort to relieve the besieged unit and support it in its attack. In the ensuing action, Sergeant Roman-Reichard, rushed in front of his squad, through an area blanketed with small arms fire and bursting grenades, to lead the unit in a charge which routed the enemy from his positions and caused him to flee in complete disorder. Sergeant Roman-Reichard's inspiring leadership greatly contributed to the spirited assault of his company and his gallantry reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.

Romano, Florentino V.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 102 - November 27, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Florentino V. Romano (ASN: RA-10733902), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company A, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Hagngye, Korea, on 25 April 1951. Advancing up a narrow, mountainous draw, Sergeant Romano's company encountered withering fire from both flanks, which halted the advance. During this action, he constantly braved vicious, hostile fire when moving among forward elements shouting words of encouragement and aiding and evacuating the wounded. Later, when the company was ordered to withdraw, he repeatedly traversed the fire-swept area searching for and bringing stricken comrades to safety. Sergeant Romano's calm demeanor and steadying influence bolstered morale, contributed significantly to the orderly withdrawal of the troops, and, through his vigilance and selfless concern, approximately 20 wounded were evacuated to safety. Sergeant Romano's courageous actions reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Romere, Joseph S. Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 121 - 5 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Joseph S. Romere, Jr. (ASN: RA-38675705), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company H, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 17 and 20 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. During the defense of the Kum River Corporal Romere was a company cook and the company position was under heavy enemy artillery fire. A two and one-half ton truck loaded with high explosives had been hit by enemy fire and had been abandoned by the driver. The truck was causing a traffic jam on the road. Corporal Romere with disregard for his own safety went to the truck and drove it back out of danger. Again on 20 July 1950, after five men from one of the machine gun crews had been wounded, he volunteered to operate the machine gun. While firing the machine gun he was wounded in both arms and legs but continued to fire on the enemy until the other wounded men could be evacuated. Later he was able to crawl back to safety. These gallant acts displayed by Corporal Romere reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Sour Lake, Texas.

Romero, Ardis Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Ardis Romero, Jr. (MCSN: 662583), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Observing a group of the enemy in their foxholes during an assault on a hostile position by his company, Private First Class Romero organized his squad and led the men in a vigorous attack against the enemy positions. Pressing the attack with aggressive determination, he personally killed four of the enemy and drove the rest from their foxholes. By his courageous actions, he materially aided his squad in destroying an additional eleven of the enemy and, upon reorganization, in successfully continuing the attack. His courage, daring initiative and outstanding leadership reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Romero and the United States Naval Service. Born: Port Arthur, Texas. Home Town: Port Arthur, Texas.

Rooney, Rev. Daniel Joseph (2nd award)

[The following citation is for the 2nd Silver Star received by Father Rooney.  The first Silver Star award to Father Rooney was for heroism on Triangle Hill October 1952.  Father Rooney was from Galesburg, IL.]

Chaplain (First Lieutenant) Daniel Rooney, 0998396, Chaplains, United States Army, a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 17th Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sok-Kog-Ae, Korea. On April 18, 1953, an outpost held by friendly forces was subjected to an intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage. Chaplain Rooney, with complete disregard for his personal safety immediately moved to the outpost to assist in the evacuation of wounded personnel and administer spiritual and medical aid to friendly casualties. Repeatedly exposing himself to the severe enemy fire, Chaplain Rooney made numerous trips between the aid station and the beleaguered outpost, encouraging the men and providing immeasurable consolation and assistance to the friendly casualties. The courageous devotion to God and country and the selfless regard for his fellow soldiers which Chaplain Rooney displayed on this occasion were great sources of inspiration to all who witnessed his actions and contributed immeasurably to the success of the combat mission of his organization. The gallantry displayed by Chaplain Rooney reflects great credit on himself and on is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. [Entered federal service from Illinois.]”

Rosa, Armando

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 360 - 15 August 1951

Corporal Armando Rosa, RA10400052, Infantry, Company "D", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 27 April 1951, Company "B", to which Corporal Rosa was attached, had the mission of delaying the enemy by occupying a blocking position on Hill 476 near Uijongbu, Korea. After being harassed through the night the unit was heavily attacked by a reinforced enemy which succeeded in surrounding the valiant company. Corporal Rosa voluntarily and single-handedly attempting to create a break in the encirclement, rose from his automatic weapon's emplacement and supporting the machine gun against his hip moved out into the open area, firing round after round into the nearby hostile positions. He succeeded in keeping the enemy troops pinned down in the entrenchment's rendering them ineffective to prevent the company from withdrawing to a more tenable defense line. Corporal Rosa's gallantry and inspiring bravery reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Rosa-Claudio, Tomas

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 214 - 22 June 1951

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Tomas Rosa-ClaudioO (ER30443526), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 31 March 1951, Company F was attacking enemy positions on Hill 398 in the vicinity of Choksong-myon, Korea. As scout of the lead platoon, Private Rosa-Claudio was in front of the advance assault elements. In crossing an open area, he found himself being subjected to severe mortar fire and hand grenades which the enemy was directing toward his unit as it moved up the hill. Private Rosa-Claudio, seeing that the barrage of grenades was causing casualties among his platoon, deliberately advanced toward the concealed foe and engaged him with small arms fire at close range. With great risk to his own life, he secured a position, despite the pressure of enemy fire, and held it, until a second platoon assaulted and drove the enemy before them. Private Rosa-Claudio's inspiring example of bravery and gallant action reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Rosario-Lorenzana, Jose

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 545 - 30 November 1951

Second Lieutenant Jose Rosario-Lorenzana, 02263390, Infantry, Company "L", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 30 September 1951, "L" Company's First Platoon was given the mission to capture and hold Hill 77, near Packsonk-tong, Korea. After informing his unit as to the plan of attack, Lieutenant Rosario-Lorenzana led the platoon forward until it had come within 30 yards of the enemy positions, at which time the desperately resisting enemy sufficiently increased their firepower to pin the unit down. Well aware of the acute danger of this immobile position, Lieutenant Rosario-Lorenzana unhesitatingly crawled aggressively forward and hurled grenades into the hostile entrenchments. His devastating barrage broke the hostile resistance and the enemy soldiers fled from their positions abandoning all equipment, thus permitting the platoon to take its objective. The dauntless courage and bold gallantry exhibited by Lieutenant Rosario-Lorenzana on this occasion reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Ross, Frank M.

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Frank M. Ross, RA13441717, Corporal, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the 223d Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division, in action near No-Jonp-Yong, Korea, on 27 February 1953. During a murderous fanatical enemy assault of company size strength upon friendly positions, Corporal (then Private First Class) Ross called in supporting mortar fire within yards of his own position with such skill and precision that the enemy temporarily withdrew to regroup. During a second assault, Corporal Ross, with complete disregard for his own safety, rallied his comrades and personally lead the counterattack with fixed bayonets, hurling hand grenades as they advanced and engaged the enemy in hand to hand combat, inflicting heavy casualties. As the fighting raged among the trenches, Corporal Ross regrouped his men and withdrew to the command post bunker, continuing to fight from this advantageous position, and at the same time directing mortar fire upon friendly trenches containing enemy forces. At one critical point in the two and one half hour skirmish, the calm demeanor, tenacity and aggressive actions of Corporal Ross were an inspiration to his comrades, causing them to repel the enemy without hesitation and were instrumental in the valiant defense of the tactical position. When the enemy finally withdrew, after suffering heavy casualties and loss of equipment, Corporal Ross led a pursuit party inflicting casualties upon the fleeing enemy. The exceptional courage, heroic actions and unstinting devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Ross reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Ross, John J. III

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant John J. Ross, III (MCSN: 0-52266), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Artillery Forward Observer of Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 July 1952. Moving out with the assault company during the support of an infantry battalion which was engaged in a night attack against enemy-held positions, Second Lieutenant Ross skillfully adjusted artillery fires on enemy pockets of resistance to assist the advance of the infantry. Forced to leave his wire communication behind as hostile mortar and small arms fire increased, he continued the advance with his radio operator and scout sergeant and, when the infantry company commander and his executive officer were wounded, bravely moved forward with the assault elements, calmly calling in artillery fire. Although painfully wounded by flying shrapnel, he remained with the assaulting elements and, upon withdrawal of the infantry company, maintained his position to direct vital artillery covering fire. Before returning to friendly lines, he succeeded in removing a seriously wounded member of his team to a safe position. By his inspiring leadership, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Ross upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Woodhaven, Long Island, New York.

Rossin, Kenneth A. (posthumous)

Pfc Rossin, a wireman for a communications team, was accompanying an attack unit near Saemal, Korea, on March 9, 1951, when they suddenly received direct severe fire from a strongly entrenched enemy force.  Realizing the importance of communications to the successful completion of the attack mission, Pfc. Rossin voluntarily remained in a precarious position in order to fulfill his duties.  With utter disregard for his personal safety he moved to intense enemy rifle and mortar fire to extend and maintain the communication line.  Courageously and bravely he continued his operations until he was eventually mortally wounded.  Pfc. Rossin's devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire was an inspiration to his comrades.

Pfc. Rossin was the son of Arthur Rossin and Mrs. Roy W. Johnson, Minneapolis, MN.  A member of the Reserves following World War II service, he was recalled in the fall of 1950 and was sent then to Korea.  He was 22 years old when killed.  Pfc. Rossin was survived by his father and stepmother of Winona, WI; his mother and stepfather of Minneapolis; and a sister Carolyn Johnson, Minneapolis.  He attended high schools in Minneapolis and Hamline University in St. Paul.  He was a member of the 17th Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

Rossner, Richard B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Richard B. Rossner (MCSN: 1180424), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 November 1951. When his patrol was subjected to intense enemy automatic weapons fire and a land-mine explosion inflicted heavy casualties on the unit while it was engaged in retrieving wounded Marines in a forward area, Private First Class Rossner, although painfully wounded, bravely led his comrades to a sheltered position, administered first aid to the stricken men and, making his way back to friendly lines, guided another patrol to the scene to evacuate the casualties. By his outstanding courage, marked fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of his fellow Marines, Private First Class Rossner served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Roth, Robert B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert B. Roth (MCSN: 0-48786), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1951. Assigned the mission of seizing a heavily fortified hill position defended by a determined enemy force, First Lieutenant Roth skillfully maneuvered his men up the slopes until he had reached an advantageous position close to the hostile strong point and, unable to coordinate his attack with other units in the approaching darkness, effectively deployed his platoon in defense for the night. When morning disclosed the enemy moving freely about their positions in the belief that his platoon had been withdrawn, he promptly adjusted preparatory fires, launched a furious assault against the hostile stronghold, which took the enemy completely by surprise, and bravely led his men forward through increasing hostile fire to seize his sector of the objective before deploying his squads to assist the advance of an adjacent friendly unit. By his courageous leadership, outstanding tactical skill and zealous devotion to the fulfillment of a vital mission, First Lieutenant Roth served to inspire all who observed him and contributed immeasurably to the success achieved by the company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Roundtree, Louis

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Louis Roundtree (MCSN: 662089), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Although his weapon was rendered inoperative by hostile bullets and he suffered a painful wound in the hand during an attack against a strongly defended enemy position, Corporal Roundtree picked up the rifle of a wounded comrade and bravely charged forward up the fire-swept hill in an assault on a hostile bunker. Upon nearing the bunker, he was literally swept from his feet by a hostile satchel charge and, although rolled back down the steep slope, bruised and bleeding, refused medical attention, rendering assistance to other casualties until the serious nature of his wounds compelled his evacuation. By his aggressive fighting spirit, outstanding courage and selfless devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Roundtree served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Division, Serial 60174. Born: Kathwood, South Carolina. Home Town: Kathwood, South Carolina.

Rowland, Eugene E. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Eugene E. Rowland (MCSN: 605440), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 November 1950. Observing members of an adjacent platoon being subjected to intense enemy small arms, machine gun, mortar and grenade fire while attempting to evacuate wounded Marines from a nearby hill, Corporal Rowland unhesitatingly carried a light machine gun to an exposed position and manned it single-handedly in support of the harassed platoon. Steadfastly remaining in this position while the casualties were removed, he placed accurate and effective fire on the hostile force until he fell, mortally wounded. By his aggressive determination, heroic initiative and unflagging devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Rowland served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the successful evacuation of the casualties thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 20, 1928 at Girard, Ohio. Home Town: Girard, Ohio. Death: KIA: November 6, 1950.

Rowland, Harold W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Harold W. Rowland (MCSN: 617245), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. When his platoon was pinned down under intense hostile fire during the advance of his company, Sergeant Rowland unhesitatingly moved forward to assault an enemy machine gun nest with grenade and rifle fire. Courageously executing his attack, he succeeded in destroying the gun and its crew, and returning to his squad, proceeded to dress the wounds suffered by five of his men. By his inspiring leadership, aggressive determination and unswerving devotion to duty in the face of grave danger, Sergeant Rowland contributed materially to the success of his company and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Jersey City, New Jersey. Home Town: Jersey City, New Jersey.

Rowlands, Richard A.

Captain Richard A Rowlands, O387550, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 20 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. Captain Rowlands as liaison officer with the 34th Infantry Regiment was accompanying the withdrawal of that unit from Taejon, when the motor column came under intense machine gun fire which closed the route of withdrawal by destruction of the leading vehicles. Captain Rowlands with complete disregard of his own personal safety returned twice to the abandoned vehicles to remove wounded men to a place of relative safety. After nightfall, he assembled, organized and led a group of ten men safely back to their unit. The withdrawal of this group of men covered thirty-five miles through enemy infested mountainous terrain. During the withdrawal, Captain Rowlands on several occasion used his small group as a decoy in a successful effort to lead enemy patrols away from smaller groups of soldiers who were attempting to rejoin their units. The gallant act displayed by Captain Rowlands reflects great credit on himself and the Military Service. GO 64, 1 Aug 1950Entered service from Casper, WY.

Royer, Larry E. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Larry E. Royer (NSN: 4265056), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 July 1952. Hospitalman Royer, serving as a Corpsman, participated in a night raid against a heavily defended enemy position. Discovering that a Marine had been wounded forward of the friendly base of fire, Hospitalman Royer left his covered position and ran through the intense enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire to the side of the wounded Marine. He dragged the man into a shell crater and began to administer first aid. Although an enemy machine gun was firing directly over his head and, on one occasion a mortar blast blew the medical scissors from his hand, he fearlessly continued to administer first aid and encourage the painfully wounded man. While waiting for friendly fire to destroy the enemy machine gun, Hospitalman Royer fought off several enemy grenadiers with his pistol. During the withdrawal he assisted in carrying the wounded back into friendly positions. His outstanding attention to duty, without regard for his own safety was an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospitalman Royer's courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 28118 (September 20, 1952).

Royer, Larry E. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Hospitalman Larry E. Royer (NSN: 4265056), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 September 1952. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospitalman Royer displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty when the outpost was subjected to heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire. As the enemy launched numerically superior infantry assaults on the small outpost, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and moved about the exposed area, treating the casualties and helping them to the few covered positions available. When he had exhausted his supply of medications, he continued to move from position to position, encouraging the wounded Marines and checking on their condition. A the enemy pressed the assault, he protected the casualties although armed only with a pistol. He personally killed or wounded seven of the hostile troops and when the attack had subsided, he assisted in the evacuation of the injured men. Hospitalman Royer's gallant and courageous actions were instrumental in saving the lives of many of the wounded Marines and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 1917 (January 17, 1953).

Rubio, Juan Charles Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Juan Charles Rubio, Jr. (MCSN: 573071), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 October 1952. Although painfully wounded during the initial action when his machine gun position on an outpost forward of the main line of resistance was subjected to devastating mortar and artillery fire, followed by a vicious assault by a numerically superior hostile force, Staff Sergeant Rubio bravely continued to direct the defensive fire of his group and displaced them to positions from which to deliver deadly fire upon the oncoming enemy. Undeterred by his severe wounds, he dauntlessly moved among his men, shouting words of encouragement, resupplying them with ammunition and directing their efforts in a valiant battle to preserve the integrity of the outpost against overwhelming odds. By his outstanding leadership, fortitude and indomitable devotion to duty in the face of grave peril, Staff Sergeant Rubio served to inspire all who observed him and materially aided in holding back the enemy assault against that sector of the main line of resistance directly behind the outpost. His valorous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: August 8, 1927 at Trinidad, Colorado. Home Town: Trinidad, Colorado. Death: KIA: October 27, 1952.

Ruble, Richard Waynick

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Army Award) to Rear Admiral Richard Waynick Ruble (NSN: 0-58209), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commander, Carrier Division Fifteen, Joint Task Force SEVEN, United Nations Command, in the Inchon-Seoul operation during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Rucker, John Dooley (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal John Dooley Rucker (MCSN: 300504), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Leader of a Light Machine Gun Section of the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. Temporarily transferred from a Headquarters and Service Company and assigned to an infantry company the previous day, Corporal Rucker was quick to act when leading elements were subjected to accurate and intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire during the advance from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri. Moving forward with his section of guns in sub-zero temperatures and under hostile fire, he calmly directed and supervised their emplacement, promptly put them in action and personally made several trips to the ammunition supply point. After the enemy fire had been neutralized, he immediately advanced with his guns to a commanding ridge and continued his valiant efforts to wipe out the position, before he fell, mortally wounded. His courageous leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and unrelenting devotion to duty served as an inspiration to his comrades and reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Rucker and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 16, 1915 at East St. Louis, Illinois. Home Town: East St. Louis, Illinois. Death: KIA: December 6, 1950.

Ruyffelaere, Raymond F.

General Orders No. 18 - 6 February 1954

Major (then Captain) Raymond f. Ruyffelaere, 025814, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army.  During the night of 13 June and early morning hours of 14 June 1953, in the vicinity of Chat-kol, Korea, the right flank of Company "F" was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force.  Despite the heavy defensive fire, the attacking force penetrated the main line of resistance and the Battalion reserve company was ordered into action.  Aware that the company commander's knowledge of the area to be occupied had been acquired through map reconnaissance only, Major Ruyffelaere voluntarily guided the unit into position.  Following this, he observed that supporting mortar elements were inactive and immediately rushed to their position.  Disregarding the constant enemy artillery and mortar barrages, Major Ruyffelaere aggressively re-employed the mortar sections and directed their fire upon the advancing enemy.  Returning to the main line of resistance, he was informed of a serious ammunition shortage among elements in combat on the right flank.  Climbing from the trench, he courageously initiated and supervised a supply line which rapidly relayed the critically-needed ammunition from a left flank supply point to the hard-fighting defenders.  Major Ruyffelaere valiantly remained atop the parapet throughout this operation despite the intense enemy supporting fire.  His inspirational leadership and ability to analyze critical situations accurately and rapidly were instrumental in the ensuing defeat of the enemy assault.  Major Ruyffelaere's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Massachusetts.  This award supersedes the award of the Bronze Star Medal with Letter "V" device to Major Raymond F. Ruyffelaere for heroic achievement from 14 June to 15 June 1953 as published in General Orders 324, this headquarters, dated 9 August 1953.

Rumbaoa, Prudencio

General Orders No. 580 - 14 August 1951

Award of the Silver Star. By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following-named enlisted man:

Corporal Prudencio E Rumbaoa, RA 29 044 898, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division distinguished himself by courageous action near Chaechi-hyon, Korea on 3 June 1951. His company was attacking with the mission of securing a very high and steep-aided hill from an estimated reinforced enemy company, stubbornly defending the hill from well-prepared, sandbagged and camouflaged positions. The enemy had a preponderance of automatic weapons strategically placed on the forward slope which made it necessary for the attacking platoons to work in and destroy them from very close range. As the company advanced up the slope, the lead platoon was pinned down by one of these automatic weapon positions. Corporal Rumbaoa, a rifleman, refused to take cover and continued to advance through the intense enemy fire. Firing his rifle as he attacked, he succeeded in killing the gunner, momentarily silencing the position. Running the next 20 yards with complete disregard for his personal safety, he jumped into the enemy hole. With slashing bayonet and crushing rifle butt smashes, he overpowered and killed the 3 remaining enemy and signaled his company to advance. From this forward and exposed position, he delivered accurate and devastating covering fire for the advancing company as he killed 4 grenadiers who attempted to slow the advance from high ground overlooking the company. Throughout the entire action, he killed 8 enemy and allowed his company to advance and secure the objective. Corporal Rumbaoa's courageous action and deep devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii.

Rupp, Russell D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Russell D. Rupp (MCSN: 0-6069), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMF-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 13 August 1951 to 5 January 1952. Throughout this period, Lieutenant Colonel Rupp achieved a marked degree of success as a combat leader in more than sixty missions against the enemy and effectively welded the personnel of his squadron into an inspired and smoothly functioning team. Leading an eight-plane strike against a group of hostile artillery and troop emplacements in the vicinity of Sangchongson, he instructed his flight to remain clear of the target and personally reconnoitered the area at extremely low altitude in the face of constant enemy fire until he had ascertained the exact locations of the hostile strong points. Calling in the remainder of his flight, he led a series of daring napalm, rocket and strafing attacks on the objective throughout a period of thirty minutes in the face of intense enemy automatic weapons fire, scoring five direct hits with his own ordnance, inflicting numerous casualties on the hostile troops and destroying six heavy-caliber artillery pieces. By his outstanding courage, superb airmanship and unswerving devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel Rupp was greatly instrumental in neutralizing the enemy gun emplacements and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Archbold, Ohio. Home Town: Toledo, Ohio.

Rush, Raymond J. Jr.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 534 - 24 November 1951

Captain Raymond J. Rush, Jr., 01286897, Infantry, Company "B". 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 27 September 1951, Company "B", occupying defensive positions on Hill 246 near Pangsok-tong, Korea, was fiercely attacked and overrun by an estimated 300 enemy troops. As elements of the company began to fall back, Captain Rush, Company Commander, left the comparative safety of his foxhole and, shouting encouragement and firing his weapon into the assaulting enemy, inspired the men to turn and resist the foe. Although wounded by an enemy grenade, he refused medical attention and continued to move among his soldiers, his confident manner and vigorous exhortations instilling in them a will to fight. The gallant leadership and personal courage displayed by Captain Rush were instrumental in repulsing the hostile attack and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Ohio.

Russell, Donald R.

Citation not yet found.

"Sgt. Donald R. Russell, Gettysburg [South Dakota] has been awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in Korea, according to word received here.  He was cited for action while his task force was rescuing an encircled infantry regimental combat team last February." - 9/27/1951 - The Huronite and The Daily Plainsman, Huron, South Dakota

Russell, George H. (2nd Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

Major George H. Russell, 059499, Infantry, United States Army, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action on 13 and 15 February 1951 in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea.  His battalion was under heavy enemy attack.  When it became apparent that one of his companies would have to be reinforced to prevent enemy penetration, Major Russell personally led two platoons from another company into a supporting position.  When the enemy attacked again in force, he exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to lead necessary reinforcements into position to support the unit under heaviest attack.  His inspiring and heroic leadership resulted in the complete repulsion of the enemy attack.  The gallant conduct displayed by Major Russell reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Washington.

Ruthazer, Warren Calvin

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Warren Calvin Ruthazer (MCSN: 0-55987), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 - 27 March 1953. Although many of his men were killed or wounded when the platoon was pinned down by intense hostile mortar, artillery and small arms fire during a counterattack against an enemy-held outpost, Second Lieutenant Ruthazer continued to press the attack. When a numerically superior hostile force came charging over the hill toward his platoon, he stood up in full view of the enemy and directed devastating mortar fire upon them. After his radioman became a casualty, he took over the radio, operated it and, simultaneously firing his pistol and throwing hand grenades, personally inflicted several casualties upon the enemy. A brave and determined leader, he remained under direct hostile fire and observation for over six hours to adjust friendly mortar fire upon the enemy, which materially aided in keeping his unit from being overrun by the hostile force. By his outstanding leadership, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Ruthazer served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York.

Ruthhardt, John D.


(Click picture for a larger view)

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 664 - 2 November 1951

Corporal John D. Ruthardt, RA12267192, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company M, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 29 July 1951 in the vicinity of Hoam, Korea.  On this date Company I had secured a strategic hill and was in defensive positions when the enemy launched a vicious counterattack.  During this enemy attack the crew of one of the machine guns was wounded.  Corporal Ruthardt, assigned to the unit as a 75mm recoilless rifleman, crawled to the machine gun position through intense enemy fire.  Reaching the weapon, he directed heavy and effective fire upon hostile forces, inflicting numerous casualties upon them.  His accurate fire halted the enemy attack long enough for him to render medical aid to his wounded comrades.  Returning to his weapon, Corporal Ruthardt commenced firing upon enemy positions and directly aided friendly units in repulsing the hostile forces.  The gallantry in action and devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Ruthardt on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New York.

Rutledge, Charles M.

Sergeant First Class CHARLES M. RUTLEDGE, RA16327641, Infantry, Company A, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  During the early morning hours of 6 September 1952, Sergeant RUTLEDGE's unit was attempting to reoccupy positions which the enemy had overrun near Sateo-ri, Korea.  Having volunteered to participate in an assault against the well entrenched enemy force, Sergeant RUTLEDGE advanced with his comrades until intense enemy mortar, grenade and small arms fire broke the attack and divided the assaulting force.  Several patrol members were wounded including Sergeant RUTLEDGE.  Disregarding his painful wounds, Sergeant RUTLEDGE reorganized the men in his vicinity and led them toward the point where the platoon leader and another man were pinned down.  Standing fully exposed to the enemy, he killed one enemy soldier who was about to throw a grenade.  Another enemy soldier appeared and Sergeant RUTLEDGE, again exposing himself, killed him also.  As the ferocity of the enemy fire increased, the friendly force was slowly driven back.  Sergeant RUTLEDGE regrouped his men and led an aggressive counterattack.  While leading this heroic assault he received serious injuries which forced his evacuation.  Sergeant RUTLEDGE killed two enemy soldiers and, by his courageous actions, enabled his unit to continue the attack against the enemy.  His inspirational leadership, tactical skill, and determined devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.  Entered the Federal service from Illinois.

Ryan, Donald F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Donald F. Ryan (MCSN: 1195224), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 and 9 April 1952. When a combat patrol leader failed to return to friendly lines, Private First Class Ryan immediately volunteered to accompany a rescue party in an attempt to locate the missing man. Fearlessly advancing across an open rice paddy under intense enemy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire, he located the body of the fatally wounded officer and, although a numerically superior enemy force occupied positions at extremely close range, assisted in carrying the casualty back to friendly lines. By his daring initiative, marked courage and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Ryan served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Rawlins, Wyoming. Home Town: Rawlins, Wyoming.

Ryan, John Edward

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 28 - 14 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Coast Artillery Corps) John Edward Ryan (ASN: 0-59365), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery B, 26th Antiaircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self-Propelled), 24th Infantry Division, near Paegyangni, Korea, on 8 November 1951. A platoon of M-16 half-track weapons was dispatched to provide fire support for infantry elements attacking an enemy-held objective. Lieutenant Ryan, Battery Executive Officer, arrived at the forward patrol base to check administrative details and learned that enemy mortar fire had disabled two vehicles, wounding several men. He immediately advanced into the combat area and assumed command of the platoon. Previous attempts to rescue a seriously wounded man, trapped in one of the crippled vehicles, had been unsuccessful because of the extremely intense concentration of enemy fire blanketing the area. Lieutenant Ryan, with complete disregard for his own safety, commandeered a vehicle and personally recovered the wounded man. He was wounded in the act but resolutely returned twice more to retrieve the damaged half-tracks. He then reorganized the crew members on the two remaining half-tracks and skillfully placed them in position to support the infantrymen in their task force operation. Lieutenant Ryan's courageous action, bold initiative and outstanding performance of tasks far beyond the call of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Born: January 16, 1927 at at Utica, New York. Home Town: New York, New York. Death: December 22, 1996.

Ryan, Lawrence Joseph Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Lawrence Joseph Ryan, Jr. (MCSN: 659223), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. When heavy enemy automatic weapons, mortar and small arms fire inflicted many casualties on his company during an attack against a hostile force south of Seoul, Private First Class Ryan bravely exposed himself to direct enemy fire to rescue a wounded Marine. While carrying the stricken man to a position of comparative safety, he was himself mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his marked courage, devotion to duty and selfless efforts in behalf of a comrade, Private First Class Ryan served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 27, 1930 at New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana. Death: KIA: September 25, 1950.

 

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