Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
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Saccomano, Richard E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Richard E. Saccomano (MCSN: 1072773), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. Despite a veritable hail of hostile hand grenades and automatic weapons fire emanating from a strongly fortified enemy hill position, Corporal Saccomano skillfully maneuvered his men forward in a bayonet assault, knocking out three automatic weapons and accounting for five enemy dead and six captives. Bringing full firepower to bear on a large group of hostile troops retreating down the reverse slope, he led his men in a physical pursuit of the fleeting troops, causing heavy enemy casualties until he was seriously wounded and forced to submit to evacuation. By his great personal bravery and inspiring leadership, Corporal Saccomano contributed materially to the success achieved by his company. His heroic actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Green River, Utah. Home Town: Helper, Utah.

Sager, Wayne B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Wayne B. Sager (MCSN: 617397), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader attached to a Rifle Platoon of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 February 1951. When the platoon was subjected to intense hostile fire from entrenched positions on commanding ground during a mission near Chiga-dong, Sergeant Sager bravely exposed himself to the heavy fire which had already wounded many of his comrades, quickly set up his mortar and delivered accurate fire on the enemy. Although he was temporarily blinded by flying rock fragments, Sergeant Sager succeeded in locating the tube of his weapon by sense of touch and continued to fire upon the attackers until he suffered painful wounds in the face and chest. By his marked courage, skill and aggressive fighting spirit, Sergeant Sager materially aided the platoon in deploying during the attack and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Irvington, New Jersey. Home Town: Verona, New Jersey.

Salazar, Augustine E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Augustine E. Salazar (MCSN: 1208286), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 June 1952. Although wounded by shrapnel when his patrol was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force employing small arms and grenades, Private First Class Salazar courageously remained at his post until ordered to withdraw. Despite his own painful wounds, he administered first aid to a seriously wounded Marine and carried him toward friendly lines until help arrived. By his exceptional courage, coolness under fire and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Salazar was largely responsible for saving the life of a comrade and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Las Vegas, New Mexico. Home Town: Las Vegas, New Mexico.

Salena, Anthony Ray (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Anthony Ray Salena (MCSN: 601393), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Company A, Seventh Motor Transport Battalion, Service Command, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. Fearlessly exposing himself to hostile small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire from well-entrenched enemy forces who had succeeded in pinning down friendly elements, Corporal Salena voluntarily led a group of three riflemen in a flanking maneuver up a hill overlooking a division supply dump at Hagaru-ri. Severely wounded in the foot by a hostile hand grenade, he refused evacuation and, after obtaining first aid, boldly continued to lead his group in an attempt to rout the numerically superior enemy forces from their strong positions until he was struck again by hostile fire and fell, mortally wounded. By his inspiring leadership, indomitable courage and steadfast devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming hostile opposition, Corporal Salena upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 13, 1928 at Wheeling, West Virginia. Home Town: Bridgeport, Ohio. Death: KIA: November 29, 1950 - Buried at: Mount Calvary Cemetery - Wheeling, West

Salgado, Frank R. Jr.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 160 (1951)

[Full citation not yet found.]

The Silver Star posthumously awarded to Sergeant Frank R. Salgado, Jr., of Marfa, Texas, was presented to his father, Francisco Salgado, Sr., in a ceremony at Fort Bliss, January 18, 1952.  The award was made to Sergeant Salgado for his heroic actions at Poncho, Korea, on September 5 and 6, 1951. After being wounded and having his wound dressed at an aid station, he returned to his position and directed the fire of the mortars until further wounded by flying shrapnel.

Salmona, Staleo

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Staleo Salmona (MCSN: 1073644), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 April 1952. When enemy burp-gun fire-swept the platoon while it was on a combat patrol forward of the main line of resistance, Staff Sergeant Salmona single-handedly charged the hostile position and, armed only with his carbine, accounted for two enemy casualties. After his weapon failed to fire, he moved into the enemy emplacement and, skillfully employing his bayonet, succeeded in capturing one of the enemy. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Salmona served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the patrol's mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Wellesley, Massachusetts.

Salter, Chester D.

Headquarters, 24ID
General Orders No. 72 - 17 January 1951

By direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action, is awarded to Corporal Chester D. Salter, RA17278280, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company E, 19th Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Anju, Korea, on 5 November 1950. His company was attacked by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength and was ordered to withdraw to more tenable positions. During the fight, Corporal Salter’s automatic rifle jammed, rendering it mechanically useless. Although he was now unarmed, except for his trench knife, he moved to a comrade’s foxhole when he saw three of the enemy, armed with automatic weapons, approaching his comrade’s position. With utter disregard for his own safety, he rushed at the leading enemy soldier and choked him to death with his bare hands. Taking up the dead man’s weapon, he killed the second of the enemy soldiers while his comrade dispatched the third. He then continued to fight off the remainder of the advancing enemy as he withdrew to rejoin his company. Corporal Salter’s fearless actions reflect great credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered service from Pleasant Valley, Iowa.

Sanchez, Aurelio C. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Aurelio C. Sanchez (MCSN: 617547), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. When his squad was subjected to withering hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire from well-fortified emplacements during the attack against an enemy hill position, Sergeant Sanchez, braving the intense hostile fire, led his men forward in a frontal assault of the bunkers. Although literally blown from his feet by an enemy grenade, he immediately arose and moved forward up to the crest of the hill, where he personally neutralized two hostile bunkers in hand-to- hand combat and with hand grenades. Quickly reorganizing his squad, he skillfully led his men through heavy fire in pursuit of the fleeing enemy until ordered to consolidate the ground, whereupon he established a base of fire to assist the advance of other friendly elements. By his outstanding courage, aggressive leadership and gallant devotion to duty, Sergeant Sanchez contributed materially to the success of his company and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Sanchez, Aurelio C. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Sergeant Aurelio C. Sanchez (MCSN: 617547), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. Observing that the assaulting platoon urgently needed a machine gun during an attack against heavily fortified hill positions, Sergeant Sanchez bravely rushed through a hail of enemy fire to deliver the weapon. Upon reaching the leading elements, he retrieved an abandoned weapon and voluntarily charged two hostile bunkers, neutralizing them with grenades. Courageously continuing to lead the assault until he reached the summit of the final objective, Sergeant Sanchez, by his aggressive fighting spirit, daring initiative and zealous devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Harlingen, Texas. Home Town: Harlingen, Texas.

Sanchez, Guadalupe L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Guadalupe L. Sanchez (MCSN: 659868), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with the Military Police Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. When the convoy to which he was attached as a guard for a group of prisoners of war was attacked by a numerically superior hostile force during the movement of the First Marine Division from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri, Corporal Sanchez boldly remained in position and delivered accurate fire against the fanatical attackers until his ammunition was expended. Sighting a machine gun approximately forty yards to the left of the defense line, he brought the weapon back through the enemy's heavy fire and put it into action, firing with deadly accuracy until he again ran out of ammunition. Seizing a rifle from a wounded comrade, he employed it to fight off the foe and then located a rocket launcher and several grenades, employing each weapon in turn for maximum striking power to inflict heavy casualties in the enemy's ranks. By his dauntless perseverance, indomitable fighting spirit and heroic actions in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Sanchez contributed materially to the repulsing of the hostile attack and to the subsequent arrival of the convoy at its destination with a minimum of casualties. His cool courage throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Victoria, Texas. Home Town: Victoria, Texas.

Sanders, Antonio D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Antonio D. Sanders (MCSN: 305337), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rocket Section Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. Occupying a portion of the company defense line during the hours of darkness when a large hostile force launched a violent attack on the position, employing devastating mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire, Sergeant Sanders bravely continued the defense of his sector alone when all the other members of his section became casualties and, withstanding numerous enemy attempts to overrun the position, joined the company in a counterattack at dawn. Moving forward through intense hostile fire to pursue the enemy by fire, he observed a hostile mortar crew attempting to set up on a distant ridge line and, loading his rocket launcher, fired at extreme range, scoring a direct hit which killed the enemy crew members and demolished the mortar. By his valiant fighting spirit, exceptional skill and unswerving devotion to duty, Sergeant Sanders contributed materially to the success achieved by his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Sanders, Blanton

General Orders No. 95 - 16 August 1950
24th Infantry Division

Corporal Blanton Sanders, RA15420860, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 11 July 1950 near Chonui, Korea. On the morning of 11 July 1950 when attacked by the enemy, Corporal Sanders assumed the command of his platoon after the platoon Sergeant had been killed. Corporal Sanders attacked and destroyed an enemy machine gun and the reorganized his platoon and fought until overrun. After a withdrawal he reformed his platoon and fought a successful delaying action for a distance of approximately two miles. Several times in the face of heavy enemy fire he succeeded in rescuing wounded men. This display of daring courage and cool leadership in the face of heavy enemy fire by Corporal Sanders is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  He entered the service from Carlisle, KY.

Sanders, Edward

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 2 - 25 January 1951

Private First Class Edward Sanders, Corps of Engineers, United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Haman, Korea, from 8 to 11 August 1950.  Following an attack on his platoon by numerically superior enemy forces, he, with four other seriously wounded men, crawled through the brush to a secluded spot which afforded shade and water.  After 2 days without food and no apparent relief, he overcame vehement objections and obtained permission to attempt the hazardous trip to friendly forces for help.  Departing at night, he painfully crawled and dragged his way toward friendly lines.  During the first day of his tortuous journey, he encountered a group of enemy soldiers and feigned death while they kicked and beat his face and body before leaving him for dead.  Later, a poisonous snake bit his hand, adding further torture to his progress.  Driven by his desire to help those depending upon him, he finally succeeded in crawling to a friendly position, where he refused evacuation until he made sure that a rescue party was dispatched to his helpless comrades.  Private Sanders' indomitable spirit and tenacious devotion in insuring the rescue of his comrades reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Sanders, Harvey B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Harvey B. Sanders (MCSN: 655617), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, Firsdt Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. Although painfully wounded by the initial burst of enemy automatic weapons fire while he was leading his unit in an assault on a heavily defended and well-entrenched position, Sergeant Sanders refused medical aid and continued to advance through intense grenade, small arms and automatic weapons fire. Skillfully maintaining complete control of his men, he effectively directed their fire and personally destroyed an enemy machine gun emplacement, killing the crew and the riflemen who were protecting the position. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Sanders served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sallisaw, Oklahoma. Home Town: Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Sanders, Paul W.

Corporal Paul W. Sanders, RA15579141, (then Private First Class), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 31 July 1951 in the vicinity of Taeusan, Korea.  On that date Company L was in defensive positions on a strategic hill.  During an enemy assault Corporal Sanders noticed that a group of enemy soldiers were moving to the rear of his platoon's position in an attempt to encircle and cut off the unit.  Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Corporal Sanders, with complete indifference to the intense enemy fire, left the safety of his position and made his way through the fire-swept area to warn his platoon leader of the impending danger.  As a result of his courageous and intrepidness his platoon was able to prepare for the encircling movement and repulse the hostile attack.  His actions undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades.  The gallantry in action and loyal devotion to duty demonstrated by Corporal Sanders on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Kentucky.

Sanders, Robert C.

General Orders No. 273 - 11 July 1951
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

First Lieutenant Robert C. Sanders, 059272, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 27 April 1951, near Uijongbu, Korea, a furious bayonet charge opened a gap in the enemy troops which had surrounded Company "B", on Hill 476. When Lieutenant Sanders was ordered to move his platoon through the breach in the enemy lines, he directed his platoon sergeant to lead the unit, while he remained behind to cover the withdrawal. After his troops had made their way out of the encirclement, Lieutenant Sanders, under vicious enemy fire, began to follow the route of withdrawal, when he discovered a seriously wounded soldier who could not walk. Unable to obtain a litter, Lieutenant Sanders lifted the man and carried him through the embattled area to where first aid could be administered. The gallantry and selfless concern for the safety of a fellow soldier displayed by Lieutenant Sanders reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of North Carolina.

Sanders, Wade E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 110 - 1 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Wade E. Sanders (ASN: 0-1315451), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer of Company D, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Chuktae-ri, Korea, on 18 October 1951. His company was participating in its sixth day of a battalion attack against strong, well-entrenched enemy forces. The accuracy and tremendous volume of enemy fire inflicted heavy casualties upon the friendly element, reducing it to half its effective size, and prevented a successful advance. Lieutenant Sanders, with complete disregard for his own safety, placed himself in a foremost position, completely exposed to the enemy, and skillfully directed his company's machine gun fire and supporting mortar and artillery barrages upon the enemy. During intervals between fire missions, he repeatedly exposed himself to deliver fire upon snipers in well concealed positions. Undaunted by the extreme physical danger, he continually moved from one position to another, directing a devastatingly effective concentration of fire upon hostile emplacements. As a result of his fearlessness and professional ability, sixty key bunkers were destroyed, over 100 enemy soldiers killed and an untold number wounded. Lieutenant Sanders' gallant action, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered Service From Indiana.

Sanko, Joseph Daniel (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant Joseph Daniel Sanko (NSN: 0-407105), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in combat as a pilot of a fighter plane in Fighter Squadron Six Hundred Fifty-Three (VF-653), attached to U.S.S. Valley Forge (CV-45), during action against enemy North Korean and Chinese Communist Forces over hostile North Korean territory on 13 May 1951. While carrying out a special interdiction mission against vital enemy locomotives located in the most heavily defended sections of Northeast Korea, Lieutenant Sanko, with a division of Corsairs, relentlessly pressed home repeated attacks in the face of a storm of heavy, medium, and light caliber anti-aircraft fire to destroy a locomotive, tender and sixteen boxcars, and severely damage a second locomotive in the vicinity of Hamhung. He continued his unrelenting pursuit of the enemy targets by flying low altitude through Kowon, an area normally prohibited to friendly aircraft because of the tremendous concentration of fire power, in his search for a reported train. Despite the fact that he was instructed by Commander Task Force 77 to proceed to the Munchon areas only at his own discretion because of the formidable array of anti-aircraft batteries surrounding that strategic location, he continued without hesitation to that village, and with his flight commenced an attack upon the train located there. During this coordinated attack upon the locomotive and the defending gun positions, Lieutenant Sanko, completely heedless of the vicious barrage of withering 37-mm. and 20-mm. fire, pressed home a ferocious and determined attack upon a battery of five 37-mm. weapons, to protect the other aircraft of the flight and enable them to carry out bombing assaults against the trains. Because of the tenacity and boldness of his attack, Lieutenant Sanko's aircraft was hit at a low altitude, causing the plane and pilot to crash into the ground. It was largely through Lieutenant Sanko's unselfish devotion to duty which caused him to press home his attack with such bold determination that he lost his life, that the enemy batteries were sufficiently suppressed to permit the flight to completely destroy one locomotive and tender and inflict severe damage upon a second. His intrepidity and gallant courage in the face of the gravest odds are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service and his Nation for which he gave his life. Board Serial 771 (September 5, 1952). Born: December 12, 1921. Home Town: New Salem, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: May 13, 1952.

Sansky, Michael J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 9 - 17 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Michael J. Sansky (ASN: 0-2018928), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division in action against the enemy on 16 July 1950, along the Kum River, North of Taejon, Korea. In order for his regimental commander to have communication, Lieutenant Sansky voluntarily carried a 610 radio over very rugged and hilly terrain during the attack of a hill. When his commanding officer left the hill to order a tank and half track vehicle into the fighting, Lieutenant Sansky put the radio on a jeep and without hesitation mounted the tank. He manned a .50 caliber machine gun throughout the fighting killing at least three of the enemy and wounding many more. Reaching the river, a sniper hit him on the arm, shattering his arm and knocking him from the tank. His fearlessness in moving forward while completely exposed on top of the tank reflected the highest courage and played a major part in the successful counterattack. His outstanding devotion to duty and courage in the face of great danger is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Santana-Camacho, Pedro A.

General Orders No. 197 - 19 June 1953
3rd Infantry Division

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Pedro Santana-Camacho, US50106679, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Medical Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. During the early evening of 14 February 1953, a friendly truck was struck by an enemy mortar round while proceeding up a road directly behind the Company F sector of the main line of resistance in the vicinity of Songdong-ni, Korea. The two men riding in the truck were critically wounded as a result of receiving the direct hit. Having observed the entire incident, Private Santana-Camacho, a medical aid man of Company F, left the comparative safety of his bunker, and set out for the wounded men in a litter truck. After stopping several times to avoid being hit by enemy fire, he succeeded in reaching the wounded men and began to administer first aid to them. He then placed the men on litters and put them into the truck. The increasing mortar fire forced him to place the truck under cover. Realizing that the delay in evacuating the men to the rear placed their lives in further jeopardy, he braved the hail of fire and started down the road leading to the 2d Battalion Aid Station. He arrived safely there and delivered the casualties to the surgeon. As a result of his actions, the lives of two critically wounded men were saved. Private Santana-Camacho's outstanding heroism and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Santiago-Rodriguez, Arcadio

General Orders No. 188 - 13 June 1951
3rd Infantry Division

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Arcadio Santiago-Rodriquez, ER30432991, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On 27 April 1951, near Hongbok, Korea, while approaching through a pass, a reinforced enemy battalion was fired on by the 3d Platoon, Company K, which had taken a blocking position astride the pass. When his squad leader was mortally wounded, Private Santiago-Rodriguez voluntarily assumed command of the squad. Receiving orders to withdraw he organized the squad and led it to more tenable positions. During a later assault to drive the enemy from the ridge, Private Santiago-Rodriguez volunteered to carry a wounded comrade to safety. Suddenly encountering five enemy soldiers, he placed his wounded comrade on the ground, and opened fire on the enemy, After killing four hostile troops, he captured the fifth and forced him to evacuate the wounded man to the battalion aid station. The gallantry and initiative displayed by Private Santiago-Rodriguez reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Santiago-Roque, SFC Ramon

General Orders No. 114 - 23 April 1951
Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division

Sergeant First Class Ramon Santiago-Roque, RA30423607, Infantry, Company "L", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 21 February 1951,the 3d Platoon of Company "L" was gathering river crossing data along the Han River in Korea, when it came under incessant fire from a well dug-in enemy force on the other side of the river. When the platoon leader and five other members of the platoon were killed and the remainder of the men pinned down, Sergeant Santiago-Roque took command of the platoon. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he ran from man to man directing fire and reorganizing the platoon. When an order to evacuate the wounded and withdraw from the area was given, Sergeant Santiago-Roque braved the heavy fire to inform each man. Four times he exposed himself upon the barren slope approaching the bank of the river in order to evacuate the wounded. The gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Santiago-Roque reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Santos, Antonio

General Orders No. 12 - 20 January 1951
Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division

Corporal Antonio Santos, RA10401718, Infantry, Company "D", 65th Infantry,3d Infantry Division. United States Army. On 22 December 1950, near Tong-ni, Korea, Corporal Santos. a machine gunner on the Hungnam defense perimeter, opened fire on a company size, enemy column when it was approximately one-hundred yards from his position. The enemy concentrated their fire on his position firing mortars, automatic weapons, and small arms. While engaged in the fire fight Corporal Santos' machine gun failed, and he, with utter disregard for his personal safety, remained, calmly repaired the gun, and continued carrying out his duties in an outstanding manner. When enemy mortar fire forced him to quit his position, he moved the machine gun into the open field and carried on his mission. Due to Corporal Santos' heroic actions, the enemy was forced to withdraw leaving behind many casualties. Corporal Santos' intrepid heroism on this occasion is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Sargent, Ray

Source: http://www.dailynexus.com (a newspaper)  See February 11, 2003, Issue 74, Volume 83.

Sarianides, Ernest A.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 252 - 28 October 1950

Sergeant Ernest A. Sarianides, RA35393368, Army Medical Service, Medical Detachment, 89th Medium Tank Battalion, United States Army.  On 26 September 1950 when a member of a beleaguered engineer squad was wounded, Sergeant Sarianides waded the river under intense hostile fire, rendered first aid to the casualty beneath a wrecked bridge near Sinan, Korea, and assisted in his removal by litter.  Later during the day, Sergeant Sarianides was informed of other casualties resulting from an intense fire fight in progress on top of a nearby hill.  Proceeding to the top of the hill with a volunteer litter team, he was unable to reach the casualties because of the heavy mortar and machine gun fire directed at the position.  Contacting a machine gunner, Sergeant Sarianides directed his fire to neutralize the enemy machine gun while he evacuated three casualties.  Although wounded by a mortar fragment, Sergeant Sarianides braved the intense enemy fire four times to recover wounded soldiers.  Sergeant Sarianides's conspicuous bravery and selfless regard for the welfare of his comrades reflect great credit upon himself and the Army Medical Service.  Entered the military service from Ohio.

Sartor, Louis J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Louis J. Sartor (MCSN: 0-22584), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 24 - 25 July 1953. Assigned the mission of reinforcing another company that was engaged in close combat with a numerically superior enemy force far forward of the main line of resistance, Captain Sartor skillfully led his company over an unfamiliar route through a devastating barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire to the objective. Although painfully wounded and despite the numerous casualties sustained by his unit, he arrived with his company in time to attack, break the enemy assault and regain control of the vital position. Assuming overall command, he launched a counterattack which restored critical areas and regained the tactical superiority. Continually moving from one position to another, he proceeded to reorganize the defense, organizing and supervising parties to recover, repair and re-issue weapons, move ammunition and grenades to forward positions, and carry the wounded to evacuation points. By his inspiring leadership, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Captain Sartor contributed in large measure to the success of the battalion's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Palm Beach, Florida. Home Town: Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Sartwell, Paul P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Paul P. Sartwell (MCSN: 0-42647), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander in Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 September 1950. Although severely wounded in both legs and unable to walk after his company was subjected to a fierce attack by a numerically superior and well-concealed enemy force, First Lieutenant Sartwell repeatedly exposed himself to heavy machine gun and small arms fire to direct his platoon in delivering effective fire on the hostile strong points. Greatly weakened by profuse bleeding and suffering intense pain, he refused to be evacuated and bravely remained at the scene of action, shouting words of encouragement to his men and skillfully coordinating their fire. Unmindful of his serious injuries when he was later ordered to be evacuated, he constantly inquired about the safety of his platoon and care of the wounded before he finally became unconscious due to loss of blood and exposure. By his sustained and accurate direction of fire, First Lieutenant Sartwell served to inspire all who observed him and contributed directly to the reduction of several enemy key positions, thereby making a vital contribution to the successful completion of his company's mission. His superb courage, relentless perseverance and outstanding devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Marion, Idaho. Home Town: Colfax, Washington.

Savage, Calvin

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 60 - 27 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Calvin Savage (ASN: RA-12342), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 8 December 1951. His platoon was occupying defensive positions on a mountainous terrain feature when it was attacked by a strong enemy force, deploying intense grenade, small arms and automatic weapons fire. Private Savage noticed that three men manning a machine gun on the platoon's left flank were seriously wounded. He crawled under heavy enemy fire to this position and began firing the weapon into the hostile masses with devastating accuracy until the gun was put out of commission by an enemy-thrown grenade. Private Savage defended his position with his pistol and hand grenades until the platoon was forced to withdraw to more tenable positions. It was then noticed that the grenade supply was dangerously low. He volunteered to obtain more, and crawling through enemy-infiltrated territory, moved from one bunker to another, accumulating abandoned grenades. He returned under enemy fire and distributed them among his comrades. With this new supply of ammunition, the friendly troops successfully repulsed the attack, inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy. Private Savage's courageous actions, fearless initiative and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Newark, New Jersey.

Savage, Charlie E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charlie E. Savage (MCSN: 1215764), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 October 1952. Although painfully wounded during a raid on an enemy-held hill position forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Savage continued in the assault until the raid had been completed and the withdrawal had commenced. Observing that a wounded comrade was still lying on the hill, he unhesitatingly returned to the area in the face of devastating enemy fire and carried the casualty to the base of the fire-swept hill where a stretcher party was waiting, subsequently covering the withdrawal of the raiding party. Although suffering intense pain from his wounds, he refused medical treatment until he returned to friendly lines. By his outstanding courage, indomitable spirit and daring initiative in the face of extreme peril, Private First Class Savage served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Accomac County, Virginia. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.

Savage, Robert

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 100 - 12 December 1950

Private Robert Savage, RA17279514, Company A, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against an armed enemy.  Near Majon-ni, Korea on 29 November 1950, Private Savage was a rifleman in a platoon which was ambushed by superior enemy forces.  In the initial fire fight, a machine gun was abandoned by its crew in an exposed area, after it had jammed and two of its crew wounded.  Private Savage, with complete disregard for his own personal safety and under intense enemy fire, dashed into the open area and recovered the machine gun.  After placing the machine gun in a covered position he again returned to its original location and brought back much needed ammunition.  He then assisted in repairing the weapon and firing it upon the enemy.  His courageous and heroic actions under fire reflects great credit upon himself and upon the military service.

Sawina, Victor (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain Victor Sawina (MCSN: 0-41354), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 October 1951. Assuming command of a company which had suffered numerous casualties in the face of devastating enemy fire from commanding ground during several days of bitter fighting, and assigned the mission of holding the fiercely contested defensive position, Captain Sawina promptly moved through the fire-swept area to encourage the men while skillfully directing the construction of improved bunkers, trenches and gun emplacements. Despite the hostile artillery, mortar and small arms fire, he continued to direct his company efficiently, thereby encouraging the men and materially diminishing the number of casualties. When the foremost elements of his unit were subjected to direct fire from an enemy 78-mm. gun, Captain Sawina bravely rushed to the danger area and personally directed his men until he fell mortally wounded. By his marked courage, brilliant leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: May 27, 1922 at Libby, Montana. Home Town: Chehalis, Washington. Death: KIA: October 6, 1951 - Buried at: Greenwood Memorial Park - Chehalis, Washington.

Sawyer, Webb Duane (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Major Webb Duane Sawyer (MCSN: 0-7847), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, from 2 to 8 November 1950./ On e November 1950, the enemy conducted a fierce night attack against the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines. Major Sawyer moved along the line, constantly closing gaps caused by the enemy action, reforming the defense to meet the changing situation and continually exposing himself to heavy enemy fire without regard for his own personal safety. Major Sawyer's display of courage, leadership and initiative, coupled with his ability to coordinate the actions of his battalion, contributed in a high degree to the successful repulsion of the enemy. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 25 (February 10, 1951).

Sawyer, Webb Duane (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Army Award) to Major Webb Duane Sawyer (MCSN: 0-7847), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while Commanding the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 8 December 1950. His battalion had been assigned as the advance guard of an infantry Regiment and was ordered to attack, seize and occupy the vital key terrain feature, Hill 1304, which was being strongly defended by the enemy. This hill controlled the critical passage through which the entrapped First Marine Division had to move from Koto-ri to Chinhung-ni. In addition, his Battalion was to afford flank protection to the advance elements of the Regimental and Division vehicle train. The morning dawned in a driving snowstorm which limited visibility and ceiling to only a few feet throughout the entire day, and was punctuated by sub-zero temperature ranging to 22 degrees below zero. His battalion had become severely depleted from casualties and was virtually exhausted after more than eleven days of bitter fighting. During the attack of Hill 1304, which was being defended by a tenacious enemy from deeply entrenched and well camouflaged positions, seeing that one of his rifle companies was being outflanked by a numerically superior enemy, Major Sawyer, in spite of a painful foot wound received the previous day, traversed the tortuous terrain, to reach the dangerous flank. Constantly exposing himself to heavy enemy small arms, automatic weapons and sniper fire, he personally directed and led the attack of his depleted Battalion with such calculated precision and aggressiveness as to completely outmaneuver the enemy and in so doing, routed him from his defensive positions, inflicted innumerable casualties upon his foe and captured the vital objective. He then led elements of his battalion down a steep mountain pass for four miles to join friendly forces and open the road for the entrapped First Marine Division. Major Sawyer's devotion to duty, his aggressiveness, skill and heroic action served as a constant inspiration and example to all his officers and men.

Sawyer, Webb Duane (3rd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in addition to a previously awarded Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Major Webb Duane Sawyer (MCSN: 0-7847), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Executive Officer of Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 6 December 1950. When his battalion encountered fierce enemy resistance from strong hostile positions which dominated and blocked the road from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri, Major Sawyer skillfully led elements of his group in an enveloping movement around the enemy's left flank and, with brilliant leadership, successfully aided in countering and repelling the hostile attack. For twenty-two hours he voluntarily and continually remained exposed to a vicious hail of hostile fire and, though painfully wounded by mortar fire, steadfastly refused evacuation in order that he might assist in the direction and control of the fighting. By his valiant courage, daring initiative and staunch devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds, Major Sawyer contributed materially to the successful accomplishment of the battalion objective, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Toledo, Ohio. Home Town: Toledo, Ohio.

Saxon, Bill D.

Silver Star - General Orders No. 400
Headquarters X Corps

Second Lieutenant Bill D. Saxon, 065371, Artillery, United States Army, Lieutenant Saxon, as an Artillery Forward Observer, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 22 September 1952 in the vicinity of Hill 854, Korea.  On that date Lieutenant Saxon was given the mission of contacting and directing supporting artillery fire for United Nation Forces counterattacking Hill 854, which, with his Battalion's Observation Post, had been lost to the enemy during the previous night.  Lieutenant Saxon and the two enlisted members of his party were subjected to intense enemy artillery, mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire at several points while en route to the Line of Departure, which was also under heavy enemy fire.  After failing to locate friendly infantry elements initially, Lieutenant Saxon made two attempts to climb the fire-swept hill alone to contact an infantry commander.  On his third attempt he was successful in getting approximately two-thirds of the way to the top by persuading one of three American tank commanders to permit him to ride a tank.  When further progress of this tank was blocked by a burning tank, Lieutenant Saxon dismounted and continued to climb.  He reached the crest at approximately the same time the counterattacking forces gained the top from another approach.  He immediately began adjusting artillery fire as the friendly forces closed with the enemy in hand to hand fighting which lasted an hour.  By sending back accurate and timely information during this entire period artillery support was rendered at the critical phase of the operation, which contributed materially to the recapture of Hill 854.  His presence of mind, coolness under fire, and determined aggressive actions were an inspiration to all personnel in the vicinity.  The extraordinary heroism and intrepidity displayed by Lieutenant Saxon on this occasion reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Oklahoma.

Scarpato, Patsy J.

General Orders No. 338 - 15 August 1953
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Second Lieutenant Patsy J. Scarpato, 01935200, Infantry, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June and during the early morning hours of 15 June 1953, Company "E" made a raid on an enemy outpost in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. As the force approached the objective, intense enemy shelling and small arms fire inflicted many friendly casualties. Lieutenant Scarpato, a platoon leader, immediately rushed forward, offering encouragement, organizing his men and urging them to fight aggressively despite all resistance. Twice, in the assault, he was knocked to the ground from the concussion of enemy grenades. Nevertheless, he continued to lead his men in the advance. When the order came to return to friendly lines, with complete disregard for his personal safety, he advanced to within close proximity of enemy strongholds to evacuate a wounded comrade. Although weakened by his wounds and exhausted from the battle, he carried the wounded man to the comparative safety of the friendly lines. Lieutenant Scarpato's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from New York.

Schaedel, Richard T.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Richard T. Schaedel (MCSN: 1062410), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 18 August 1950. Corporal Schaedel, as a communications non-commissioned officer assigned to a tank platoon, efficiently restored communications that were necessary to coordinate the action of the infantry and supporting tanks. Observing that communications in three tanks had become inoperative, Corporal Schaedel voluntarily moved from tank to tank repairing the radio sets. In order to accomplish this task, it was necessary for Corporal Schaedel to climb upon each tank and enter through the turret, thereby exposing himself to further observation and fire by the enemy. Corporal Schaedel's heroic actions, his efficiency and devotion to duty contributed greatly to the success of the operation. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Schaedel reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea, General Orders No. 200 (December 18, 1950).

Schanning, Harry F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Harry F. Schanning (MCSN: 0-50460), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. Assigned the mission of seizing a strongly fortified enemy hill position, Second Lieutenant Schanning skillfully maneuvered his platoon forward over precipitous terrain. When the unit was subjected to devastating hostile mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire from concealed entrenchments, and the platoon was temporarily pinned down within 100 yards of its objective, he fearlessly moved forward through the heavy fire to locate the concealed positions, realizing that the objective must be secured as rapidly as possible. Although his vision was extremely limited by the smoke and fire of shell bursts, he crawled to within a few feet of a hostile bunker and engaged the enemy in a hand grenade fight. Despite concussion from hostile grenades which exploded directly in front of him, he quickly neutralized the bunker, killing all occupants and inspiring his men to sweep on, overrun and secure the vital objective. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous leadership and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Schanning contributed in large measure to the success of his platoon and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Schelling, Robert Ayres

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Robert Ayres Schelling, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in Korea as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Lyman K. Swenson (DD-729). Commander Schelling navigated his ship through an enemy mine field, engaged enemy shore batteries at close range, and contributed greatly to the successful amphibious landings at Inchon. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 918 (October 14, 1950). Born: May 23, 1917. Death: February 14, 2003.

Schemmel, Charles Frederick (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Charles Frederick Schemmel (MCSN: 1113428), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. When his unit was subjected to intense hostile automatic weapons fire from concealed bunkers while he was leading his fire team in an assault against a strongly defended hill position, Corporal Schemmel ordered his men to stay under cover and bravely exposed himself to the deadly enemy fire in order to locate the hostile gun emplacements. Mortally wounded by enemy fire while attempting to safeguard the lives of his comrades, Corporal Schemmel, by his outstanding courage, exceptional leadership and daring initiative, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: July 12, 1931 at Monticello, Minnesota. Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota. Death: KIA: June 10, 1951.

Schening, Richard J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Richard J. Schening (MCSN: 0-42275), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 March 1951. With his company vigorously engaging the enemy when a fire, ignited by a hostile mortar burst, rapidly spread and separated the advancing unit from his company, First Lieutenant Schening immediately summoned a support platoon and quickly rushed into the fire-swept area. Braving intense enemy fire, he skillfully formed a base of gunfire to cover the endangered unit and calmly led the trapped men through dense smoke back to safety. After assisting in the reorganization of the platoon, he aided the platoon leader in leading an aggressive, final assault against the enemy, overrunning the positions and seizing the objective. By his outstanding leadership, marked courage and unswerving devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Schening served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Terryville, Connecticut. Home Town: Copiague, New York.

Scherzinger, Herbert Anthony (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Herbert Anthony Scherzinger (MCSN: 1070718), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 February 1951. Subjected to direct hostile small arms, mortar and machine gun fire during an attack on a heavily defended, deeply entrenched enemy strongpoint, Private First Class Scherzinger unhesitatingly advanced to a favorable location to bring accurate fire to bear upon the hostile force. With his ammunition supply critically low, he charged directly into the position, utilizing his remaining ammunition to best advantage and inflicting maximum casualties on the enemy. Fatally struck down during the bitter conflict, Private First Class Scherzinger, by his daring initiative, courageous fighting spirit and grave concern for others at the risk of his own life, contributed to the success of his platoon in achieving its objective with minimum loss, and his unrelenting devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 27, 1930 at Corvallis, Oregon. Home Town: Portland, Oregon. Death: KIA: February 6, 1951.

Schiavone, Frank

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 192 - 26 September 1950

Corporal Frank Schiavone, RA13311382, Infantry, Company F, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On the evening of 19 August 1950 near Soi-ri, Korea, a forward observer reported tanks advancing on the company area.  Going forward immediately in the face of severe fire from the tanks and automatic weapons, Corporal Schiavone fired his 3.5 rocket launcher at the tanks and supporting infantry from range as close as ten yards until he destroyed the lead tank, heavily damaged another and put the entire enemy force to flight.  Corporal Schiavone's gallant initiative and determination to destroy the enemy reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New Jersey.

Schick, Paul Gerhardt (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumous) to Sergeant Paul Gerhardt Schick (MCSN: 1159245), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 March 1953. With hostile troops overrunning the position during a savage enemy attack against a vital combat outpost which his platoon was defending far forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Schick courageously moved through the trench line and delivered a withering hail of deadly, accurate fire upon the enemy. When his sub-machine gun ceased to function, he quickly picked up an automatic weapon from a nearby wounded comrade and, continuing to move along the defensive line in the face of enemy fire, shouted words of encouragement to his comrades, hurled grenades and fired his weapon with exceptional accuracy, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. By his aggressive fighting spirit, resourceful initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Sergeant Schick served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: June 20, 1932 at Fort Wayne, Indiana. Home Town: Clayton, Missouri. Death: MIA: March 21, 1953.

Schilling, Joseph E. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Joseph E. Schilling, Jr. (MCSN: 1192380), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine gunner of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 5 to 7 September 1952. Although wounded during an enemy artillery and mortar barrage while participating in the defense of a strategic outpost more than one mile forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Schilling courageously refused evacuation and remained with his weapon. On the following evening, when the outpost again was brought under intense artillery and mortar fire proceeded by an attack by numerically superior enemy forces, he continued to man his machine gun, inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy, until wounded a second time and evacuated. By his exceptional courage, initiative and unyielding devotion to duty in the face of extreme peril, Private First Class Schilling served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Baltimore, Maryland. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.

Schlansky, Arthur Henry (posthumous)

The pursuit of the NKPA and the subsequent capture of Uijongbu took place between September 28 and October 3, 1950.  It was during this same period, sometime on September 28, that 19-year old Corpsman Schlansky lost his life in his effort to provide care to his Marines. For this he was posthumously awarded the Silver Star. His citation reads as follows:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Corpsman to a Marine Corps Infantry Company, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 September 1950. Voluntarily exposing himself to a shattering hail of hostile fire during a vicious attack by a fanatical and numerically superior enemy force, Schlansky continually moved from position to position administering aid to wounded Marines. Fully aware that the intensity of enemy machine-gun, mortar and small-arms fire virtually precluded his escape without injury, he steadfastly remained in an exposed position, resolutely persisting in his efforts to relieve the suffering of his comrades until he himself fell mortally wounded. By his outstanding skill, unwavering courage and selfless devotion to duty in the face of grave danger, Schlansky was directly responsible for saving many lives, served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States naval Service. He gallantly gave his life that others might live.”

Schlesinger, Francis R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Francis R. Schlesinger (MCSN: 0-8167), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of the First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. With his unit assigned to guard the rear elements of the battalion column while in convoy, Major Schlesinger fearlessly braved heavy and accurate fire from well-entrenched hostile positions on both sides of the road to advance to the forward part of the column. Observing that enemy fire concentrated on the battalion was inflicting many casualties, he quickly organized and directed an evacuation team and, despite hostile mortar, machine gun and sniper fire, succeeded in evacuating all the wounded before rejoining the convoy. By his skilled leadership, indomitable courage and inspiring devotion to duty, Major Schlesinger materially aided the casualties in receiving medical attention much sooner than would otherwise have been possible, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Franklin, New Hampshire. Home Town: Franklin, New Hampshire.

Schlimgen, Clement Joseph (posthumous)

General Orders: Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 8 - January 7, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (posthumously) to Sergeant Clement Joseph Schlimgen (ASN: US-56094629), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company B, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action near Chup'a-ri, Korea.  On 4 September 1951, the defensive positions of Sergeant Schlimgen's company were counterattacked by a fanatical enemy force.  A rifle and machine gun squad assigned as the outpost guard bore the brunt of the attack.  Sergeant Schlimgen, the assistant squad leader, immediately left his position of cover and exposed himself to the enemy fire to encourage and organize his men.  He directed accurate machine gunfire on the enemy and inflicted heavy casualties before being ordered to withdraw.  Then Sergeant Schlimgen, with complete disregard for his personal safety, ordered his comrades to withdraw and voluntarily remained behind to provide covering fire and to act as a rear guard.  While performing this courageous feat, Sergeant Schlimgen was mortally wounded when his position was overrun by the numerically superior enemy force.  The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Schlimgen reflect great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Schlinghoff, Leonard M. (posthumous)*

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 46 - 20 July 1950

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Private Leonard Schlinghoff, RA39470263, Infantry, Army of the United States.  On the morning of 16 July 1950, the Second Platoon, Heavy Mortar Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, was in support of Company C which was subjected to a number of attacks by enemy infantry.  After a number of such attacks had been repulsed, the enemy succeeded in flanking the position of Company C and attacked between the rear of that organization and the heavy mortar position.  Since the enemy was inside heavy mortar range, the platoon defended its perimeter position with small arms fire.  When the position became untenable, the Platoon Leader gave the order to withdraw.  Private Schlinghoff, and three other soldiers, although unwounded and perfectly able to withdraw, volunteered to remain in the platoon position and hold off the enemy while the rest of the platoon withdrew.  During the time the platoon was withdrawing, Private Schlinghoff and his companions repulsed two assaults, killing at least nineteen of the enemy.  Defying odds of about thirty to one these soldiers enabled the main body of the platoon to withdraw and to take their wounded with them.  On the final enemy assault their position was overrun and all were killed.  Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

*It wasn't learned until later that Schlinghoff was not killed.  He was captured and he was released during the prisoner of war exchanges on August 26, 1953.  This action took place along the Kum River.

Schmidt, Arthur J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 31 - 15 January 1952

By direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action, is awarded to Sergeant Arthur J. Schmidt, US55034193, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company D, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Pangdangdong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. During an assault against determined enemy forces, his company’s advance was halted by intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire. Sergeant Schmidt, Recoilless Rifleman, fearlessly exposed himself to the devastating enemy fire as he set up his weapon and fired into enemy bunkers. So accurate and intense was his fire that he personally killed between twenty and thirty enemy soldiers and contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit’s mission. Sergeant Schmidt’s courageous action, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered service from Montevideo, Minnesota.

Schmidt, Charles M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Charles M. Schmidt (MCSN: 295070), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Rifle Platoon Commander in Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. When his company was ordered to reinforce an adjacent friendly company which was under attack by a numerically superior enemy force employing heavy and accurate small arms, machine gun and mortar fire, Staff Sergeant Schmidt led his unit forward and employed the men while subjected to hostile fire, sub-zero temperatures and a heavy snow storm. Moving among the positions occupied by his platoon, he assigned and checked sectors of fire, encouraged his men, supervised the distribution of ammunition and assisted in the rapid evacuation of casualties. Although sustaining painful wounds from hostile grenade fragments during the early part of the engagement, he remained with his platoon to lead and encourage his men in the successful defense of their sector of the defense line. On one occasion when he observed hostile troops massing to his front, he immediately requested mortar fire which he personally observed and directed, resulting in the infliction of numerous casualties upon the enemy and in the disorganization of the troops. By his inspiring leadership, outstanding courage and aggressive fighting spirit, Staff Sergeant Schmidt contributed directly to the successful repulse of repeated hostile attacks, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Rouen, France. Home Town: Biloxi, Mississippi.

Schmidt, Valdemar Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Valdemar Schmidt, Jr. (MCSN: 0-22476), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Helicopter Pilot in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), in action against enemy aggressor forces during a rescue mission in Korea on 13 April 1951. A skilled and courageous airman, Captain Schmidt voluntarily flew his slow, unarmed aircraft 25 miles behind hostile lines to attempt the rescue of a downed pilot in an area reported to be occupied by approximately 9,000 of the enemy. Encountering hostile anti-aircraft, small arms and automatic weapons fire as he approached the area, he continued to the position of the crashed plane despite continued, intense fire which struck his aircraft repeatedly, ultimately disabling it and causing it to crash. Steadfast in his purpose to complete the mission in the face of an apparently hopeless situation, he was subsequently instrumental in the rescue of the downed pilot, his own crewman and himself by another helicopter. His daring efforts, perseverance and courage throughout reflect great credit upon Captain Schmidt and the United States Naval Service. Born: Pasadena, California. Home Town: South Pasadena, California.

Schmuck, Donald M. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Donald M. Schmuck (MCSN: 0-5914), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 26 November to 11 December 1950. Braving intense hostile small arms, machine gun and mortar fire, Lieutenant Colonel Schmuck personally led elements of his battalion in a series of daring tactical combat patrols which completely destroyed an enemy force of estimated battalion strength that was operating against the Division's main supply route and railhead. Ordered to launch an attack to seize and occupy a vital terrain feature in order to cover the movement of the Division, he fearlessly spearheaded an aggressive assault, courageously leading his unit up six miles of tortuous and precipitous ice-covered slopes to overcome strong positions fiercely defended by a hostile battalion. A skilled leader and tactician, Lieutenant Colonel Schmuck, by his indomitable courage and inspiring devotion to duty, was primarily responsible for the success of his battalion in accomplishing its assigned mission and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Schmuck, Donald M. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Donald M. Schmuck (MCSN: 0-5914), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 February 1951. Assigned the mission of seizing a strategic hill position, which dominated the approaches to Hoengsong, Lieutenant Colonel Schmuck advanced close behind his assaulting rifle companies to direct and control the attack. Although constantly exposed to devastating enemy automatic weapons, small arms and grenade fire, he courageously directed the assault and seizure of the heavily defended crest of the vital hill and personally reorganized his companies for the continuation of the attack, inspiring his men to sweep forward and completely rout the entrenched enemy in hand-to-hand combat. His outstanding leadership, forceful initiative and unwavering devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Schmuck and the United States Naval Service. Born: August 16, 1915 at Woodford, Illinois. Home Town: Walden, Colorado. Death: July 24, 2004 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Schmuhl, Robert A. (2nd award) (1st award in World War II)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 143 - 23 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Robert A. Schmuhl (ASN: 0-1998029), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 19 October 1951. His company was moved to a position behind forward elements in preparation for an expected enemy counterattack. The numerically superior foe charged with such force that the forward unit was ordered to withdraw. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Lieutenant Schmuhl, Executive Officer, moved fearlessly throughout the exposed positions, coordinating the fires of all elements and personally reconnoitering to determine the best possible route for the withdrawal of the friendly unit. When the counterattack had been repulsed, his unit moved forward and by dawn was in assault positions. On his own initiative, Lieutenant Schmuhl moved from his rear position, took command of the assault elements and led them in a courageous attack. By moving forward against the overwhelming enemy forces, he inspired his men to fight their way across a barren knoll and to rout the enemy with small arms fire, grenades and bayonets. Lieutenant Schmuhl's gallant actions, exemplary leadership and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the successful capture of the objective and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Long Beach, New York.

Schofield, Eugene

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 186 - 15 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Eugene Schofield, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the Medical Company, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action at Pohang-dong, Korea, on 2 September 1950. During an attack, Corporal Schofield's company was held up by heavy mortar, machine gun, and small arms fire, from an enemy strongpoint, and suffered numerous casualties. Because of the extremely mountainous terrain, it was impossible to remove the wounded. On hearing of the situation, Corporal Schofield unhesitatingly advanced over 300 yards through a hail of withering fire to minister to his fallen comrades. Unable to move the wounded, he remained with them in an exposed position covered by enemy fire throughout the day. Under cover of darkness he led three separate litter parties into the area, directing the evacuation of the wounded. Corporal Schofield's gallant actions and selfless devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army Medical Services. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Schooley, Ernest William (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Technical Sergeant Ernest William Schooley (MCSN: 572731), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Outpost Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 October 1952. When high winds and hostile fire dissipated a smoke screen which had been laid down to aid a Corpsman in reaching three wounded Marines, during a devastating barrage of enemy mortar fire on a combat outpost, Technical Sergeant Schooley promptly leaped out of his foxhole and threw white phosphorous grenades from his exposed position, enabling the Hospitalman to advance with comparative safety. Immediately responding to the shouts of the Corpsman for assistance in freeing the half-buried men, he hurled two additional grenades for momentary protection and bravely raced forward in the face of intense hostile mortar and sniper fire in an effort to aid the Hospitalman and the casualties. Mortally wounded while extricating his comrades, Technical Sergeant Schooley, by his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 30, 1928 at Caldwell, Michigan. Home Town: Lake City, Michigan. Death: KIA: October 7, 1952.

Schreiner, George W. Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 169 - 11 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers) George W. Schreiner, Jr. (ASN: 0-2014716), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. During the withdrawal under intense enemy fire, Lieutenant Schreiner repeatedly stopped his jeep to lead wounded soldiers seeking transportation to safety. Fired on from an enemy road block cutting off the approach to a bridge, his jeep received a direct hit, killing the occupants of the back seat and forcing the vehicle off the road into a creek bed. Enemy machine gun fire soon swept the creek bottom killing those wounded remaining on the hood of the damaged vehicle. Braving the intense fire, Lieutenant Schreiner carried a wounded officer and enlisted man to the shelter of the bridge foundation to render necessary first aid. Although the enemy machine gunners were soon disposed of, a fire fight developed between his party and three ammunition bearers. In the ensuing exchange of fire, the officer and enlisted man were killed. Lieutenant Schreiner's accurate carbine fire, however, eliminated all three of the enemy. Stopping a friendly vehicle, he loaded the wounded aboard and continued on to the safety of friendly lines. Although many of the bridges en route had been prepared for demolition, he personally removed the charges before allowing the vehicle to cross. His gallantry, unhesitant devotion to duty and complete disregard for his own safety won the admiration of his men and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Army.

Schrock, Donald R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Donald R. Schrock (MCSN: 490871), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 March 1951. Assuming command of the platoon when both his platoon leader and platoon sergeant became casualties during the attack against a well-fortified hostile position, Sergeant Schrock exposed himself to devastating enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire to effect a hasty reorganization of his unit and direct the evacuation of the casualties. Displaying sound tactical ability, he maneuvered his men so effectively that they were able to place a large volume of accurate fire on the enemy positions, permitting the assaulting element to seize the objective and rout the entrenched hostile force. By his outstanding courage, expert leadership and resolute determination, Sergeant Schrock served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Deadwood, South Dakota. Home Town: Redding, California.

Schrum, David Allen

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private David Allen Schrum (MCSN: 443357), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Jeep Driver in Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. While his Battalion was under intense enemy fire, Private Schrum repeatedly volunteered to drive to the front lines to evacuate the wounded in his jeep. Although painfully wounded in the hand on one occasion when he left his jeep to assist in carrying the wounded from the battle line, he refused medical attention and continued to assist in the evacuation of the casualties for a period of approximately four hours while under intense hostile fire, until all the wounded were removed from the front lines. His outstanding courage and initiative reflect great credit upon Private Schrum and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: York, Pennsylvania. Home Town: York, Pennsylvania.

Schryver, Hugh C. Jr.

General Orders No. 160 - 13 November 1950
Headquarters Eighth Army (EUSAK)

Second Lieutenant Hugh C. Schryver Jr., O49849, United States Marine Corps, Platoon Leader, 1st Platoon, Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy at Obong-ni Ridge, four and one-half miles west of Yangsan, Korea, during the period 17 August to 18 August 1950.  On 17 August elements of the 1st Battalion, 5th Marines assaulted the heavily defended Ridge at Obong-ni with loss of many casualties.  By nightfall the companies succeeded in securing only a small portion of the Ridge.  The precarious positions were ordered to be defended while strongly opposed by the enemy 4th Division.  Lieutenant Schryver's Platoon played a vital part in the initial assault on the Ridge.  At about 0230, 18 August, the enemy counterattacked B Company's zone.  During the counterattack Lieutenant Schryver while directing the defense suffered a severe fragment wound on his forehead when a hand grenade exploded near his helmet, knocking him unconscious.  He was evacuated to the Battalion aid station.  Upon receiving first aid and treatment at the aid station he regained consciousness.  Despite protests of Battalion corpsmen, Lieutenant Schryver voluntarily left the aid station and returned to his platoon to reassume command when the platoon situation was critical.  His return to duty despite his painful wounds and heavy loss of blood was an inspiration to his Platoon and to the whole Company.  Lieutenant Schryver bravely reassumed command of his platoon and his outstanding leadership and coolness under fire were highly instrumental in repelling the enemy counterattack and subsequently seizing the vital objective which broke the main defense of the enemy in the area.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Schryver reflects great credit on himself and the naval service.  Entered the naval service from Iowa.

Schuckman, Richard Fred (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Richard Fred Schuckman (MCSN: 1180348), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Machine gun Squad of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 May 1952. When the unit was subjected to a determined night assault by a numerically superior enemy force while defending a forward outpost, Corporal Schuckman immediately engaged the hostile troops with his rifle and hand grenades, ordered his machine gun into action and, directing effective counterfire on the enemy's base of fire, promptly gained fire superiority over the attackers. Quickly deploying the gun to a fresh position when the outpost was attacked from another direction, he skillfully utilized a white phosphorous grenade to silhouette the approaching hostile troops and aided immeasurably in repelling the assault. Pausing only long enough to hurl grenades, fire his rifle and shout orders to his gun crew, Corporal Schuckman continued to treat the casualties within his unit throughout a third enemy attack and, in the absence of a Corpsman, rendered timely medical aid to the stricken men. Returning to his squad, he instructed his men to remain in position while he placed the machine gun in preparation for an expected assault, and was mortally wounded while assisting his unit to repel the subsequent attack. By his outstanding courage, exemplary leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Schuckman served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the successful defense of the outpost, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 9, 1931 at Quincy, Illinois. Home Town: Quincy, Illinois. Death: KIA: May 13, 1952 - Buried at: Woodland Cemetery - Quincy, Illinois.

Schueller, Merlin H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Merlin H. Schueller (NSN: 3225292), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Serving as a Medical Corpsman, Hospitalman Schueller was moving with the company in the attack of a strongly fortified enemy position when the unit was subjected to intense and accurate enemy automatic weapons, mortar and small arms fire, causing numerous casualties, and he himself was seriously wounded in the leg and feet. Although he was unable to walk, he courageously crawled among his fallen comrades, skillfully rendering first aid. When the fighting had passed beyond that area, and all casualties had been evacuated, he then refused to be carried on a stretcher, because of a shortage, and instead hopped and crawled to the aid station over a tortuous route. His bravery and outstanding devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospitalman Schueller's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 2151 (January 27, 1951). Home Town: Waterloo, Iowa.

Schultz, Gerald D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Gerald D. Schultz (MCSN: 548278), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Section Leader of a Heavy Machine Gun Section of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 September 1951. When his platoon leader became a casualty during an attack by a numerically superior enemy force, Staff Sergeant Schultz reorganized his men and those of nearby friendly units and placed the troops at strategic points in a hasty defense maneuver, thereby preventing the enemy from overrunning the area. Although suffering a severe head wound, he skillfully directed his section in delivering counterfire on the attackers and remained at his position until the hostile force was decisively defeated. By his marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and gallant devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Schultz served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: White Fish, Montana. Home Town: Bellingham, Washington.

Schupbach, Ward (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Ward Schupbach (MCSN: 1088884), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner in Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. Although subjected to intense fire from an enemy 76-mm. gun during an attack against well-entrenched hostile troops, Private First Class Schupbach bravely maintained his exposed position and continued to deliver effective machine gun fire on the retreating enemy. Mortally wounded by hostile fire while relaying the position of the enemy weapon to a mortar forward observer, Private First Class Schupbach, by his marked courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, was greatly instrumental in destroying the hostile gun and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 12, 1929 at Ozark, Missouri Home Town: Highlandville, Missouri. Death: KIA: September 12, 1951 - Buried at: Schupbach Cemetery - Chestnut Ridge, Missouri.

Schupp, Donald L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Donald L. Schupp, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Headquarters Battery, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. Serving as a jeep driver, Corporal Schupp was driving a lead vehicle in a convoy of tractors and howitzers proceeding under continuous enemy attack from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri when the column was halted by road block manned by a numerically superior force. With the column forced to remain in its position because the tractor prime movers were in need of fuel, Corporal Schupp unhesitatingly volunteered to accompany an officer in an attempt to run the gauntlet of fire to obtain aid from the perimeter at Hagaru-ri. Although suffering from exhaustion and crippling frostbite, he skillfully maneuvered his vehicle across a blown-out bridge and over icy roads through fire-swept territory swarming with the enemy into Hagaru-ri. Through his courageous efforts, fuel and aid were dispatched to the beleaguered column. Corporal Schupp's daring initiative and inspiring efforts were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Louisville, Kentucky. Home Town: Louisville, Kentucky.

Schwab, Gerald J.

Citation not yet found.

"Capt. Gerald J. Schwab, a doctor with the Third Infantry Division of the Seventh Infantry in Korea, has been awarded the Silver Star medal, his parents have learned.  He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Casper Schwab of Harlan [Iowa].  The medal was awarded because of bravery in action December 3, 1950, when the Seventh Infantry was withdrawing down an icy mountain road under heavy enemy fire.  'Heedless of his own personal safety, Capt. Schwab repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire and moved up and down the road giving medical aid to all the wounded,' the official announcement of the citation read." - special to The Council Bluffs Nonpareil, March 16, 1951

Schwatka, Herbert Blake (posthumous)

Sgt. Herbert B. Schwatka, RA17314873, Armor, United States Army, while a member of Company B, 245 Tank Battalion, 45th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Sanjon, Korea.  The ridgeline in enemy territory on which Sergeant Schwatka's tank was situated on 21 March 1953 had been subjected to sporadic but extremely accurate mortar fire.  The bombardment by hostile firing became so intense and severe that it was necessary for Sergeant Schwatka and his crewmen to mount the vehicle through the escape, preparing to move into firing position.  Noticing that nearby infantry units were receiving constant shelling which had inflicted several casualties, Sergeant Schwatka moved his tank into an exposed position to observe enemy locations.  Acting as gunner as well as commander, he completed one devastating fire mission, then moved back to reload.  After finishing preparations for a second attack, Sergeant Schwatka maneuvered once again to an extremely exposed position in order to bring more accurate fire on enemy positions in support of the infantrymen.  During the execution of this hazardous task, Sergeant Schwatka was mortally wounded, but not before he had succeeded in destroying important Communist installations and supplying the riflemen with vitally needed support.  The display of decisive leadership, selfless devotion to duty and gallantry demonstrated by Sergeant Schwatka reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.

[KWE Note: Herbert Schwatka, from Pillager, Minnesota, enlisted in the US Army on January 30, 1951 at the age of 18. He trained at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina; Ft. Bragg, North Carolina; Ft. Hood, Texas; and Camp Atterbury, Indiana, in the 31st Dixie Division in tanks. He went to Korea on July 10, 1952. Sergeant Schwatka's widow, Elaine Mudgett Schwatka, received his posthumous Silver Star medal at a ceremony in Tuscola, Illinois, where she was living while he was in Korea. He was the father of children John Blake Schwatka, Ruth Elaine Schwatka, and Rachel Lynn Schwatka (who died as an infant). Mrs. Schwatka later married Tuscolian John Ross, who had been a medic in the Korean War.]

Schwindt, William A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William A. Schwindt (MCSN: 1171518), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 December 1951. Although wounded in the left hand when his fire team was subjected to heavy enemy automatic weapons fire while acting as rear guard during an ambush patrol, Private First Class Schwindt supported his weapon on his knee and continued to deliver effective fire on the hostile position. Paralyzed in the right hand when again hit by enemy fire, he refused to allow his comrades to expose themselves in order to assist him, crawled to a covered position before accepting first aid and, during a period of two and one-half hours, constantly remained on watch until relieved by the main group of the patrol. Throughout the return journey to friendly lines over rugged terrain in the face of persistent harassment by hostile forces, he bravely refused all offers of assistance in a selfless effort to render the trip as safe and expeditious as possible for the entire unit. By his outstanding courage, marked fortitude and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Schwindt served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by the patrol, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Gridley, Kansas. Home Town: Topeka, Kansas.

Sciutti, Roscoe J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Roscoe J. Sciuti (MCSN: 1178077), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 19 - 20 September 1952. While Private First Class Sciuti was moving forward with a combat patrol forward of the main line of resistance, the unit was ambushed by the enemy and sustained several casualties. During this action, when the patrol leader was hit and a while phosphorous grenade which he was carrying was set off by the enemy fire, covering his body with the burning material, Private First Class Sciuti rushed to the aid of his wounded comrade in the face of intense hostile small arms, mortar, hand grenade and automatic weapons fire and immediately covered his burning body with his own in an attempt to extinguish the flames. Unsuccessful in this attempt, he tore off the man's burning clothing, threw dirt on him and rolled him around on the ground. During the entire period, he picked up and threw back several enemy grenades that landed near the wounded Marine. By his indomitable courage, quick initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Private First Class Sciuti served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Los Angeles, California. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Scott, Dwain L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 111 - 30 August 1950

Captain (then First Lieutenant) Dwain L. Scott, 01540938, Field Artillery, United states Army, a member of Battery A, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 5 July 1950 at Osan, Korea. An enemy force of superior numbers had passed the forward infantry positions and were attacking the artillery position with observed tank, mortar and small arms fire. Captain Scott, refusing to withdraw his unit, ordered the howitzer section to employ direct fire against the tanks. He then joined a howitzer group to contribute to its firing. The initial enemy fire destroyed the battery fire direction center and the ammunition dump. Captain Scott, realizing his men were firing from exposed positions, furnished the necessary example to keep the battery firing by moving throughout the position giving instruction and encouragement to his men. His outstanding courage and calm leadership contributed greatly to the destruction of five enemy tanks. His devotion to duty and exemplary conduct reflect high credit on himself and the military service. Entered the service from Santa Ana, California.

Scott, James R.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Sergeant James R. Scott (MCSN: 995511), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against enemy aggressor forces on 17 August 1950 in the Naktong River Bulge, Korea. On 17 August 1950, Sergeant Scott, a Squad Leader, was assigned the mission of assaulting a hill defended by well-entrenched enemy forces. Without regard to his own personal safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to rifle and grenade fire in order to coordinate and direct the advance of his squad. During this action Sergeant Scott was wounded but, despite his wound, he refused to be evacuated but continued to lead his squad in an aggressive attack. His leadership and skill were an inspiration to his squad and contributed to the success of the mission. Sergeant Scott's gallantry displayed on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 68 (September 15, 1950). Entered Service From California.

Scott, John D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John D. Scott (MCSN: 1113730), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 April 1951. Leading his fire team as point of the platoon assault against a well-fortified enemy position, Private First Class Scott bravely moved forward in the face of withering automatic weapons and small arms fire and single-handedly assaulted a hostile bunker with hand grenades, causing a large number of the attackers to retreat down the reverse slope of the hill. Courageously pursuing the fleeing enemy, he killed two soldiers and captured another, using his prisoner in an attempt to entice the remaining soldiers to surrender. Private First Class Scott's exemplary leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and gallant devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Anthonies Mill, Missouri. Home Town: Sullivan, Missouri.

Scott, John L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John L. Scott (MCSN: 0-37313), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of an unarmed Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), during a rescue mission carried out in enemy-held territory in Korea on 5 February 1951. Notified that two Marines had been critically wounded in a forward area, First Lieutenant Scott unhesitatingly volunteered to attempt a rescue despite the possibility of guerrilla action and the extreme danger of flying his vulnerable craft in darkness without the proper equipment for night flight. With only a flashlight to illuminate his engine instruments, he effected two brilliantly executed take-offs and three landings to bring both casualties back to safety. By his superb airmanship, extraordinary courage and grave concern for others at great personal risk, First Lieutenant Scott was undoubtedly responsible for saving the lives of two men who otherwise might have perished. His heroic efforts throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Commerce, Texas.

Scott, Malcolm L.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 32 - 7 November 1960

Sergeant First Class Malcolm L. Scott, (then Sergeant), Infantry, a member of Company "E", 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in the vicinity of Haukae, Korea, on 20 and 21 February 1953.  As medical aid-man, Sergeant Scott was a member of a patrol relieving a platoon which had been attacked at night by two companies of Chinese Communists.  Upon arriving at the combat scene, he immediately began to treat the wounded and to direct their evacuation.  When it was determined that all of the wounded could not be evacuated, and the relief platoon was withdrawn, Sergeant Scott, voluntarily and despite the presence of enemy skirmishers and grenadiers in the immediate area, remained and risked his life to care for the wounded left behind.  At dawn, after a squad of tanks took the field, he was found wounded, with his nose, ears, and fingers partially frozen by the extreme cold, still guarding and caring for the last remnants of the battered patrol.  This brave and courageous action by Sergeant Scott was beyond the call of duty.  His conspicuous gallantry is in the most cherished tradition of the United States Army, and reflects distinct credit upon himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Providence, Rhode Island.

Scott, Miller W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Miller W. Scott (MCSN: 1172224), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 July 1953. When his platoon commander became a casualty during the defense of a vital outpost position far forward of the main line of resistance which was under murderous enemy mortar and artillery fire and vicious hostile infantry attacks, Sergeant Scott unhesitatingly assumed command and courageously exposed himself to the devastating hostile fire in order to reorganize the defensive positions, skillfully placing his men where they could repel the enemy probes. Although painfully wounded, he refused evacuation and continued to hurl numerous grenades at the enemy to assist in repulsing the numerically superior attacking force. During a lull in the action, he again refused evacuation and carried a wounded comrade to safety and medical aid, returning to the outpost through an intense hostile preparatory barrage to direct the defense of his sector of the vital position. By his skilled leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and unyielding devotion to duty, Sergeant Scott contributed in large measure to the successful defense of the outpost and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sumner County, Tennessee. Home Town: Mount Juliet, Tennessee.

Scott, Robert Frederick (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Robert Frederick Scott (MCSN: 0-32214), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane and Division Leader in Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three (VMF-323), attached to the U.S.S. Badoeng Strait (CVE-116), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chinju, Korea on 27 August 1950. Braving intense and accurate hostile fire, First Lieutenant Scott led his five-plane division in furnishing close support to friendly ground forces whose advance was obstructed by enemy tanks, heavy artillery and small arms fire. Reconnoitering the area to locate hostile positions and determine the most effective type of assault, he launched vigorous low- level bombing, rocket and strafing attacks and succeeded in personally accounting for the destruction of an artillery emplacement and one of the three tanks destroyed by his flight. A skilled airman and leader, First Lieutenant Scott, by his fighting spirit and strategic ability, contributed materially to the subsequent advance of our forces with a minimum of casualties, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: July 2, 1922 at Dallas, Texas. Home Town: Drumright, Oklahoma. Death: DNB: August 28, 1950.

Scranton, Sereno S. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Sereno S. Scranton, Jr. (MCSN: 0-41358), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 11 to 17 August 1952. Ordered to seize a strongly defended outpost, Captain Scranton skillfully maneuvered his company through the main line of resistance under cover of darkness and expertly directed his men in seizing the objective and in setting up a perimeter of defense. When the enemy attempted to retake the vital position early the next morning, he adroitly redeployed his platoons and directed friendly artillery and mortar fire on the enemy, successfully thwarting each counterattack. Although his company was depleted by severe casualties, he dauntlessly continued to defend the hill until reinforcements arrived. At the rear of the main line of resistance, he quickly reorganized his company, assigned replacements and readied them for further combat. Within forty-eight hours, he led his men back to the hill position and, vigorously engaging the enemy, succeeded in repelling a heavy counterattack, thereby reducing the strength of the enemy and temporarily neutralized any hostile attempt to regain the hill. By his indomitable fighting spirit, inspiring courage and unwavering devotion to duty, Captain Scranton contributed materially to the success achieved by the battalion and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York.

Scribner, Charles L.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Charles L. Scribner (NSN: 9545503), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Corpsman attached to the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea, on 18 August 1950. On this date Hospitalman Scribner was at the forward aid station of his Battalion which was attacking enemy positions on ridges east of Yongsan. Hearing that many wounded men were on a fire-swept ridge awaiting evacuation he organized a litter bearing team of volunteer Korean civilians, and with utter disregard for his own safety, fearlessly led them through heavy enemy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire. By his initiative and example, he encouraged the litter team to continue under the heavy enemy fire. By his aggressive efforts many seriously wounded men were evacuated to the aid station and several lives were saved. Hospitalman Scribner's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Scroggins, Walter J. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 244 - 26 October 1950

Second Lieutenant Walter J. Scroggins, 0965247, Infantry, Company A, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  While attacking along the road near Chongchon-ni, Korea on 2 August 1950 the company was subjected to intense small arms, machine gun, and anti-tank gun fire which effectively stopped the attack.  Lieutenant Scroggins led a squad up a nearby hill and established an observation post to adjust mortar fire into the enemy positions.  As Lieutenant Scroggins directed the barrage which effective trapped the enemy force he was mortally wounded by a sniper.  By his courageous leadership, Lieutenant Scroggins was largely responsible for the complete rout of the enemy with 200 casualties inflicted and successful completion of the company's mission.  His initiative and military skill reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Alabama.

Sealey, Armon J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Warrant Officer Armon J. Sealey (MCSN: 0-48629/214004), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Ordnance Officer of the First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 December 1950. Badly shaken from concussion when a hostile grenade exploded in his truck following a small arms and mortar fire attack on the leading elements of his convoy, Warrant Officer Sealey braved the hostile barrage to man a .50 caliber machine gun and directed effective fire until the weapon jammed. Successfully clearing the stoppage, he continued to deliver accurate fire, forcing the enemy to withdraw from their positions near the leading vehicles of the convoy and along the road. After helping a wounded officer to a covered position, he insisted on returning to re-enter the engagement, but was ordered to submit to medical attention and evacuation. His bold initiative, skilled marksmanship and indomitable fighting spirit reflect great credit upon Warrant Officer Sealey and the United States Naval Service. Born: Belpre, Kansas. Home Town: San Diego, California.

Sears, Carl D.

 Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, General Orders No. 87 5 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Carl D. Sears (ASN: RA-15422619), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 1 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea. During the early morning hours of this date he was attached to an infantry company as an Aid Man. When the enemy attacked with numerically superior forces, surrounding a platoon, Corporal Sears responded to the call for aid despite the direct fire of the enemy and went from position to position, helping the wounded. Later on that morning, a patrol was organized to evacuate the casualties to the battalion aid station and Corporal Sears was placed in charge of four litter cases. En route to the aid station he and his four wounded men were separated from the patrol and surrounded by the enemy, In the face of this apparently hopeless situation, he fought off the enemy long enough to gain the protection of a large draw on the side of the hill for his wounded men. Corporal Sears carried one of the wounded men on his back for a distance of approximately three miles, even though he was under constant enemy fire, and pinned down several times by close-in machine gun fire. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Sears on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Sears, Norman Walker

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Army Award) to Captain Normal Walker Sears (NSN: 0-59557), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Chief of Staff, Attack Force Seven, United Nations Command, in the Inchon-Seoul operations during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. His actions contributed to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Seatvet, Lloyd D.

First Lieutenant Lloyd D. Seatvet, 02028518, Infantry, United States Army, 160th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sat'ae-ri Korea on 3 December 1952. Lieutenant Seatvet led a ten man patrol into enemy territory charged with the mission of contacting and capturing the enemy. After the patrol had advanced 300 yards, it was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. In the ensuing fire fight, one of the members of Lieutenant Seatvet's patrol was seriously wounded. Lieutenant Seatvet immediately deployed the remainder of the patrol, and then exposing himself to the enemy fire courageously went to the wounded man to ascertain the extent of his injuries. Finding the man seriously wounded, Lieutenant Seatvet supervised the evacuation of the man to a more protected position. In the operation Lieutenant Seatvet was wounded in the head and leg by enemy fire. When a runner, who was sent to the main line of resistance to guide a support unit to the scene of the action was wounded, Lieutenant Seatvet, completely disregarding his painful wounds, and under heavy artillery and mortar fire, returned to the friendly lines to guide the support unit to the patrols position Lieutenant Seatvet's superior actions, outstanding qualities of leadership, and inspiring gallantry were instrumental in saving many lives and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army. Entered the Federal service from Ohio.

Seeler, Jack R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Jack R. Seeler (MCSN: 494515), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Platoon Sergeant of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 June 1951. Attacking across a large, open area to assist in seizing an enemy hill, Staff Sergeant Seeler led his platoon forward in the attack against a heavily entrenched hostile force until, in the center of the area, the unit was subjected to a heavy barrage of enemy mortar fire which inflicted fifteen casualties upon the group almost immediately, Although painfully wounded, Staff Sergeant Seeler received first aid on the scene and continued to lead the platoon in the assault, exhorting his men to exert their greatest efforts and steadfastly refusing evacuation until he was wounded a second time. By his valiant fighting spirit, fortitude and selfless devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds, Staff Sergeant Seeler served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the ultimate victory achieved by the company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Louis, Missouri. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri.

Seeley, Henry W. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Henry W. Seeley, Jr. (MCSN: 0-7315), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Motor Transport Officer of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1950. When his convoy was attacked and surrounded by numerically superior hostile forces while proceeding from Koto-ri to Hagaru-ri, Major Seeley boldly refused the enemy's demand to surrender and quickly reorganized friendly Marine and Army elements in a determined effort to fight a way out of the ambush. Although continually exposed to hostile fire throughout the ensuing action, he bravely led his men in inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy and, skillfully directing the tactical movement of the convoy, succeeded in leading his unit out of the trap. By his marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty, Major Seeley served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Washington, Connecticut. Home Town: Washington, Connecticut.

Segar, Thomas Robert (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Thomas Robert Segar (MCSN: 1158773), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Ammunition Carrier in Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 and 2 September 1951. When the enemy launched a vicious counterattack on the company and withering hostile fire from high ground inflicted heavy casualties among his section, Private First Class Segar coolly persisted with his duties as ammunition carrier as the attackers advanced to within forty yards of the machine guns. Seizing an automatic rifle from a fallen comrade, he boldly raised himself to an exposed position to obtain a more effective firing position, personally killed four of the enemy and skillfully directed the machine gun crews in inflicting heavy losses on the hostile force. Despite successive enemy attacks, he bravely maintained his position for over twenty-four hours until he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his marked courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Segar was greatly instrumental in preventing the enemy from overrunning the position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 8, 1930 at Kilmarnock, Virginia. Home Town: Kilmarnock, Virginia. Death: KIA: September 2, 1951 - Buried at: Richmond National Cemetery - Richmond, Virginia.

Segraves, Herbert H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Herbert H. Segraves (MCSN: 1095917), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1951. Assigned the mission of spearheading the platoon's attack against a series of heavily fortified and strongly defended hill positions along the enemy's main line of resistance, Corporal Segraves expertly led his men forward and, boldly exposing himself to vicious hostile fire, launched a fierce bayonet charge, overrunning the nearest bunkers and personally killing four of the enemy. Quickly reorganizing the squad, he moved from fire team to fire team, directing accurate and deadly fire against the adjacent emplacements, materially aiding the advance of the other squads. By his inspiring leadership, aggressive determination and staunch devotion to duty in the face of strong opposition, Corporal Segraves contributed directly to the success of his company and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Helton, North Carolina. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.

Seipp, Leroy A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Leroy A. Seipp (MCSN: 0-31459), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 November 1951. A daring and resourceful airman, Captain Seipp was directly instrumental in destroying a total of two enemy locomotives and five supply-laden boxcars within a period of twenty-four hours. Locating a damaged hostile train which had halted in a virtually inaccessible canyon near Singye while he was participating in an intruder mission during the early morning hours, he carried out a series of devastating attacks on his objective, scoring direct hits with cannon fire and napalm which completely destroyed the locomotive together with its tender and one boxcar. While engaged in a similar mission in the vicinity of Singosan after dusk on the same day, he pressed repeated bombing and strafing runs on another enemy train until his ordnance was expended and, although exposed to a hail of hostile automatic weapons fire during the action, scored direct hits on the locomotive and accompanying boxcars. By his exceptional courage, superb airmanship and unswerving devotion to the fulfillment of his missions in the face of grave danger, Captain Seipp upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fredericksburg, Texas. Home Town: San Antonio, Texas.

Sellers, Harold G. (posthumous)

Private First Class Harold G. Sellers, RA14425543, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 26 October 1952 in the vicinity of Chorwon, North Korea.  On that date, Private Sellers, a medical aidman attached to Company "I", 9th Infantry Regiment, was accompanying a rescue patrol into enemy territory to bring back wounded members of a friendly patrol.  The area in which the wounded men were lost was a mine field, and Private Sellers, with complete disregard for personal safety, moved into the hazardous area in an attempt to bring out the wounded men.  As he made his way through the area, he stepped upon a mine, detonating it and receiving mortal wounds.  Private Sellers exhibited extreme courage and bravery above and beyond the call of duty as he made the supreme sacrifice in an effort to accomplish his deeds of mercy in the rescue of the wounded.  The gallantry in action displayed by Private Sellers reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Tennessee.

Sellers, Thomas Milford (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Air Force Award) (Posthumously) to Major Thomas Milford Sellers (MCSN: 0-29118), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as Pilot of an F-86 aircraft, 4th Fighter Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 20 July 1953. On that date, Major Sellers and his wingman were on an armed reconnaissance mission deep in North Korea when they sighted eight MiG-15s at a low altitude preparing to attack a flight of friendly fighter-bombers. Although the nature of his mission did not require an attack on this numerically superior force, Major Sellers completely disregarded personal safety and immediately unleashed a furious assault o n the enemy formation. In the desperate battle that ensued, Major Sellers demonstrated outstanding airmanship and intrepidity in destroying two of the enemy MiGs. Major Sellers continued to divert the enemy attack on the friendly fighter-bombers until his aircraft was struck by enemy gunfire. The skill, daring, and accuracy of his attack insured the successful accomplishment of a vital United Nations bombing effort, and accounted for two enemy aircraft destroyed. By his extraordinary valor in action and unselfish devotion to duty, Major Sellers reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces and the United States Air Force. Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 13 (January 2, 1954). Born: August 29, 1924. Home Town: Dallas, Texas. Death: MIA: July 20, 1953.

Sells, Kenneth W.
Synopsis from Home of Heroes website

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 85 - 25 September 1951

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Kenneth W. Sells (ER19242255), Private, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company K, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action near Na'san, Korea, on 20 May 1951. Private Sells' company, pinned down by enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire, was launching a strong counterattack when the enemy showered the company's position with concussion and fragmentation grenades. Private Sells, providing flank security for a machine gun, observed a grenade thrown within destructible range of the emplacement and near his position. In picking up the grenade and (remainder of citation missing).

Sengewald, Richard H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Richard H. Sengewald (MCSN: 0-20190), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 October 1950. When the assault company was pinned down by murderous hostile fire from a numerically superior enemy force occupying a heavily fortified ridge line commanding the road, Captain Sengewald courageously exposed himself to intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire to move forward and reconnoiter approaches into the hostile position. Under cover of darkness, he launched a furious attack against the enemy-held stronghold and, while continually subjected to heavy hostile small arms, automatic weapons, mortar and anti-tank fire, directed the advanced elements of his company in the assault. By his skilled leadership and outstanding courage, he was greatly instrumental in the infliction of numerous casualties upon the enemy and in forcing the remainder of the hostile force to withdraw. His exceptional valor and resolute fighting spirit in the face of heavy odds were contributing factors in the success achieved by his unit and reflect great credit upon Captain Sengewald and the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Severns, James G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant James G. Severns (MCSN: 0-52171), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 - 22 February 1953. When the patrol which he was leading far forward of the main line of resistance was subjected to devastating hostile mortar and artillery fire and sustained several casualties, First Lieutenant Severns ordered the remaining men back to the front lines to guide a relief party to the scene and traversed the entire area to comfort and to administer medical treatment to the wounded. Although suffering intense pain from wounds sustained during the continuing bombardment, he crawled from one man to another to offer words of encouragement and, when one of his wounded comrades became exposed to the heavy enemy fire, covered the Marine with his own body in order to protect him. A short time later, when the rescue team arrived, he directed the expeditious evacuation of the casualties, refusing evacuation for himself until all the other wounded had been removed to safety. By his outstanding leadership, indomitable courage and gallant devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Severns served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Plymouth, Indiana. Home Town: East Chicago, Indiana.

Sessions, Beryl B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Beryl B. Sessions (MCSN: 0-35037), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three (VMF-323), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 December 1951. Observing that another aircraft was disabled by enemy flak while he was leading a division on a strike against hostile rail facilities near Sinchang-ni, Captain Sessions immediately joined flight with the stricken plane in the face of intense ground fire and assumed the responsibility of directing the damaged aircraft to a safe area. With the disabled plane rapidly losing altitude, he ordered the pilot to bail out, promptly directed survival aircraft to the scene and, throughout a period of ninety minutes, carried out repeated low-level passes over the downed airman in the face of heavy enemy fire. Although his plane sustained five hits by hostile ground fire, he bravely remained on station over the downed pilot. By his outstanding courage, superb airmanship and selfless efforts in behalf of a fellow aviator, Captain Sessions upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hitchita, Oklahoma. Home Town: Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Seydel, Karle Frederick (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Karle Frederick Seydel (MCSN: 0-43007), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Machine Gun Platoon Leader in Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 and 7 December 1950. When his company attacked a well-entrenched, numerically superior hostile force on a high snow-covered hill, First Lieutenant Seydel repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to lead the assault, direct the fire of his machine guns and distribute ammunition. During the attack, when one of his gunners was wounded, he personally carried the machine gun forward and delivered accurate and effective fire on the enemy until the objective was seized. Although seriously wounded by an enemy hand grenade the following morning during a strong hostile counterattack, he refused to be evacuated and continued to move among his men, lending words of encouragement and directing their fire until mortally wounded by a burst of enemy submachine gun fire. By his outstanding leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty throughout, First Lieutenant Seydel inspired all members of his company and contributed immeasurably to the successful seizure and defense of his assigned objective, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 16, 1924 at Denver, Colorado. Home Town: Denver, Colorado. Death: KIA: December 7, 1950.

Sgarlato, Anthony S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Anthony S. Sgarlato (NSN: 2357256), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 June 1952. Hospitalman Sgarlato with one Marine voluntarily left a combat outpost at Nung-Dong surrounded by enemy to treat three wounded Marines in a valley 700 yards away where the presence of an unknown number of enemy was realized. He found the wounded and directed the two able to walk to the combat outpost while he skillfully treated the third. As this Marine was unable to walk or crawl due to severe feet and leg wounds, he carried him on his back. On four occasions he was pinned down by enemy automatic weapons fire, each time placing the wounded Marine under cover until he believed it safe to move forward again. After one hour he reached the combat outpost. His exceptional heroism and devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospitalman Sgarlato's courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 25338 (August 26, 1952).

Shacter, Jacob

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Jacob Shacter (ASN: 0-22724), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 9 August 1950 near Thogean, Korea. When his vehicle was caught in a strong enemy road block that had successfully halted several friendly vehicles, Colonel Shacter realized the need for aggressive action to prevent a rout. Heedless of his own safety, he fearlessly organized all available personnel and, exposing himself to heavy enemy artillery, mortar and machine gun fire, set up positions and directed fire against the enemy strong point. Then, moving among the stalled vehicles, he ordered the remaining personnel to take cover along the road while he mounted a disabled vehicle to utilize the radio. Contacting a friendly unit, Colonel Shacter called for friendly tanks, medical service for the seriously wounded and requested that units along the road be informed to stop traffic. When the tanks arrived, he expertly directed their fire to eliminate the enemy positions in reduction of the road block. His courageous and cool leadership, coupled with a steadfast devotion to duty, made possible the reopening of the main supply route and were an inspiration to all men present. Colonel Shacter's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Shaffer, Wayne D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Wayne D. Shaffer (MCSN: 198624), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunnery Sergeant of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 September 1950. When a group of by-passed hostile troops opened fire on him while he was reconnoitering for advance mortar positions, Technical Sergeant Shaffer, together with the company executive officer, immediately engaged the enemy soldiers, killing four and capturing twelve and, despite hostile mortar and small arms fire, delivered the prisoners to the company area. Later, he assisted in organizing and leading a patrol back to the scene of action to engage the remainder of the enemy force, thereby materially aiding his company in successfully displacing forward and supporting the continuation of the attack. By his marked courage, daring initiative and devotion to duty, Technical Sergeant Shaffer upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Babylon, New York.

Shankle, Joseph Fay

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 458 - 23 July 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), [then Second Lieutenant] Joseph Fay Shankle (ASN: 0-62399), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery B, 64th Field Artillery Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. North of Seoul, Korea, on 21 May 1951, the unit with which Lieutenant Shankle was serving as artillery observer encountered heavy resistance from a strong hostile force entrenched on commanding ground. When the preparatory artillery barrage was.lifted, he voluntarily joined the infantry commander at the front of the company as it moved forward for the assault. Taking the place of a wounded platoon leader, he repeatedly exposed himself to devastating small arms and automatic weapons fire to rally his men and direct their movement toward the blazing crest. Although painfully wounded by a bursting grenade, he closed on a machine gun emplacement and eliminated the crew with small arms fire and a hand grenade. After the enemy had been driven to flight, he remained to reorganize a perimeter defense before he allowed himself to be evacuated for medical aid. Lieutenant Shankle's exemplary courage, aggressive leadership and inspirational devotion to duty are in keeping with the historic traditions of the United States Army. Entered the military service from Arizona.

Shanks, Harold W. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Harold W. Shanks (MCSN: 1179771), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Reconnaissance Patrol attached to Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 - 17 July 1953. Operating three thousand yards forward of the main line of resistance in strongly defended hostile territory when his patrol was ambushed at midnight by a numerically superior enemy force and sustained over fifty percent casualties, Corporal Shanks quickly reorganized his unit to resist enemy attempts to overrun the position, and skillfully directed small arms fire and mortar concentrations on the attackers. Following this action, he proceeded to move about the hill, continuously exposing himself to hostile fire in order to lend words of encouragement to his men and to aid the wounded. Mortally wounded, himself, while removing casualties to safety, Corporal Shanks, by his outstanding leadership, courage and determined efforts in behalf of his men, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: November 10, 1933 at Combes, Texas. Home Town: Combes, Texas. Death: KIA: July 17, 1953 - Buried at: Harlingen-Combes Memorial Cemetery - Cameron, Texas.

Shannon, Robert James (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Robert James Shannon (MCSN: 630194), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. When the squad leader left the cover of his position during an attack against hostile strongholds to go to the aid of wounded Marines who were in a jeep on the road, Corporal Shannon assumed command of the squad and conducted his men in covering the evacuation of the wounded from the jeep by building a base of fire against the enemy. Repeatedly exposing himself to hostile gunfire in order to expand his squad's base of fire, he succeeded in providing excellent cover for the wounded men before he himself received a fatal wound by an intense burst of enemy automatic fire. His courage, leadership and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Shannon and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 15, 1929 at Arlington, Massachusetts. Home Town: Cambridge, Massachusetts. Death: KIA: September 21, 1950.

Sharon, Donald W. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Donald W. Sharon (MCSN: 0-49870), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters and Service Battalion, First Provisional Marine Brigade, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 August 1950. When his unit was ambushed by a numerically superior hostile force during a company attack, Second Lieutenant Sharon, as advance guard point commander, bravely moved forward and launched a devastating counterattack against the enemy. Fearlessly exposing himself to intense hostile small arms fire, he skillfully pointed out targets and directed the fire of his men, inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy and destroying three machine gun emplacements. Later, Second Lieutenant Sharon directed the successful withdrawal of his troops under intense hostile mortar fire, allowing the main body to surge forward into the attack. By his outstanding courage, expert leadership and timely actions, he materially aided in preventing the enemy from inflicting heavy casualties on the main body and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Sharon, Donald W. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Donald W. Sharon (MCSN: 0-49870), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 November 1950. Suddenly confronted by four well-concealed enemy tanks while leading his unit at the point of a motorized patrol, Second Lieutenant Sharon bravely mounted the nearest hostile vehicle, together with two Marines, in an attempt to open the hatch and deposit a hand grenade within. Unable to open the cover, he assisted in knocking down the periscope and, calling for a grenade to be dropped into the aperture, succeeded in disabling the tank. While fully exposed to the fire of the remaining hostile vehicles, he directed accurate and effective fire from his anti-tank weapons, resulting in the destruction of the enemy tanks. By his marked courage, outstanding leadership and devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Sharon contributed materially to the security of his platoon and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Urbana, Missouri. Home Town: Urbana, Missouri.

Sharp, Allen R.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 79 - 8 August 1950

Sergeant Allen R. Sharp, RA38303864, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Battery, 13th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16-17 1950 near the Kum River, Korea. As Battalion Communications Sergeant, SGT Sharp volunteered to go forward between the Battalion switchboard and the switchboards used by forward liaison parties and forward observers when communications had been disrupted by enemy fire. He labored under heavy enemy fire in a vain attempt to maintain these communications. Fourteen communications soldiers were surrounded by enemy forces. SGT Sharp organized a road block which held off enemy forces while this maneuver was carried out. He then led a group of men through the hills until he was wounded in the legs and had to be evacuated. SGT Sharp was largely responsible for keeping communications intact as long as possible, enabling his Battalion to deliver effective fire on the enemy forces crossing the Kum River and in leading a large group of men to safety after a withdrawal became necessary. By his gallant and fearless actions, he brought great credit to himself and the military service. Entered service from Beckville, TX.

Sharpe, Walter Joseph (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Walter Joseph Sharpe (MCSN: 0-51370), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 September 1951. Assigned the mission of leading his platoon in an attack against strongly defended enemy positions near Ku-dong, Second Lieutenant Sharpe courageously led the assault on the well-fortified bunkers and skillfully directed the fire of his men. Although painfully wounded during the action, he steadfastly refused evacuation, resolutely continuing in the attack and inspiring his men to heroic efforts until he was struck by hostile fire a second time and fell, mortally wounded. By his outstanding leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Second Lieutenant Sharpe upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 13, 1926 at Washington, D.C. Home Town: San Antonio, Texas. Death: KIA: September 16, 1951.

Shaw, Virgil R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Virgil R. Shaw (MCSN: 643719), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tractor Commander in an Amphibian Tractor Section of Company A, First Amphibian Tractor Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 September 1950. Upon his arrival at the front lines after volunteering the services of his tractor for the evacuation of wounded Marines, Sergeant Shaw alighted from the tractor and carried out six trips by foot, returning each time with a seriously wounded Marine. Although pinned down by intense hostile fire, he fought his way through on each trip and contrived to destroy six of the enemy and capture two in the process. His courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon Sergeant Shaw and the United States Naval Service. Born: Stephenville, Texas. Home Town: Sunray, Texas.

Shaw, William Hamilton (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant William Hamilton Shaw (NSN: 257303), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Special Interpreter and Liaison Officer attached to the Fifth Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 September 1950. Lieutenant Shaw courageously volunteered to accompany a front line battalion in order to conduct on the spot interrogation of prisoners and civilians and to point out critical terrain features for the assault companies. Having been born and raised in Pyongyang, Korea, his services were of inestimable value and his knowledge of the terrain was of material aid in planning the attack. When he learned that a combat patrol was assigned the mission of entering and clearing a native village he voluntarily accompanied the patrol and while leading the patrol through the village he was mortally wounded and gallantly gave his life for his country. Lieutenant Shaw's display of initiative and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 18196 (December 9, 1950). Born: June 5, 1922 at at Pyongyang, Korea. Home Town: Delaware, Ohio. Death: KIA: September 22, 1950.

Shawe, Hamilton B.

General Orders No. 73 - 25 February 1951

Lieutenant Shawe distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States. On 1 October 1950, while serving as a pilot of the the 8th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, he displayed an exceptional degree of flying skill, courage and competence. Alone in an unarmed reconnaissance aircraft, he flew 425 miles to his target, the port of Wonsan in Korea. Upon reaching his objective he made repeated photographic runs at a dangerously low altitude over the strongly defended beach and port area. In spite of his aircraft being repeatedly hit by enemy ground fire, Lieutenant Shawe continued making passes until his mission of nine runs was completed. Information gained from the excellent photographs taken by Lieutenant Shawe proved invaluable to the United Nations forces in their subsequent planning for the landing at Wonsan. Lieutenant Shawe's conspicuous gallantry and outstanding skill were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces and the United States Air Force.

Sheahan, Patrick (posthumous)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 561 - 13 December 1951

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded posthumously to the following named enlisted man:  Corporal Patrick Sheahan, US51064448, Infantry, Company "A", 7th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 4 October 1951, Company "A", with the First Platoon serving as the assault unit, attacked Hill 281, near Chungse-ri, Korea.  Stiff enemy opposition prevailed and the sweeping fire of a hostile machine gun soon pinned down the platoon and halted its advance up the hill.  Corporal Sheahan, realizing the gravity of the situation and aware that the hail of fire and completely destroyed the emplacement with accurately thrown hand grenades.  Uncertain as to whether all the enemy soldiers had been killed by the explosions, he rose to his feet and, rushing forward, fired a long burst into the smashed entrenchment, eliminating all possible opposition.  It was while this revealed to the enemy, as he carried out his single-handedly brave action, that corporal Sheahan fell, mortally wounded by the savage fire of an adjacent automatic weapon.  Corporal Sheahan's aggressive gallantry and selfless devotion to duty were instrumental in the successful completion of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Shelley, Virgil Charles Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Virgil Charles Shelley, Jr. (MCSN: 1225016), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 July 1952. When his platoon was pinned down by intense hostile machine gun fire during a raid on concealed enemy emplacements well in advance of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Shelley bravely exposed himself to the hostile fire and engaged the enemy with his automatic weapon until friendly machine guns could be brought into position, personally silencing a sniper who was inflicting casualties on his unit. Mortally wounded by hostile machine gun fire while covering his platoon during its movement to fresh positions, Private First Class Shelley, by his outstanding courage, daring initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by his unit, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: May 6, 1933 at Champaign, Illinois. Home Town: LaSalle, Illinois. Death: KIA: July 3, 1952.

Shelton, Leslie Taylor Jr. (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Leslie Taylor Shelton, Jr. (MCSN: 0-51496), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Combat Patrol Commander of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 December 1952. Voluntarily leading a combat patrol on an extremely hazardous and difficult mission, First Lieutenant Shelton advanced far forward of the main line of resistance in an effort to recover the bodies of several Marines killed in action during a previous engagement with the enemy. When the patrol became engaged in close combat with a numerically superior hostile force, he spearheaded a determined assault against the fortified enemy positions. With murderous fire and superior numbers of hostile troops retarding the advance of his unit, he led a small group of his men in an aggressive attack on the main point of enemy resistance. Although suffering severe wounds which eventually proved to be fatal, he continued to lead the vicious assault until he collapsed. By his outstanding leadership, valiant fighting spirit and resolute determination in the face of overwhelming odds, First Lieutenant Shelton was instrumental in the success achieved by the mission and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: December 18, 1925 at Mobile, Alabama. Home Town: Mobile, Alabama. Death: MIA: December 27, 1952.

Sheehan, John B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal John B. Sheehan (MCSN: 653103), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Wireman of an Artillery Forward Observer Team of Battery A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 November 1950. With his artillery forward observer seriously wounded and unable to call fire missions during an attack by an estimated four hundred enemy soldiers against his reconnaissance patrol, Corporal Sheehan, although inexperienced in controlling fire missions, promptly moved forward through intense hostile small arms and machine gun fire to an exposed position where he could observe the enemy. Utilizing the patrol commander's radio when the fire direction radio was damaged by enemy fire, he succeeded in calling down and adjusting two fire missions, firing over two hundred rounds of artillery ammunition before the intensity of the attack necessitated his withdrawing to a covered positions where he could continue the fight with his carbine. By his daring initiative, prompt action and courageous efforts against tremendous odds, Corporal Sheehan was directly instrumental in obtaining and controlling the artillery support which permitted his patrol to disengage from the overwhelming force with a minimum of casualties, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 9978 (March 15, 1951). Born: Belleville, Illinois. Home Town: Belleville, Illinois.

Shelnutt, John Carlton (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain John Carlton Shelnutt (MCSN: 0-16535), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commander of the Defense Forces at Hagaru-ri, Korea, while attached to Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 and 29 November 1950. When his company was attacked by a determined, numerically superior hostile force employing automatic weapons, mortars and hand grenades, Captain Shelnutt repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire to move among his men, directing their fire and shouting words of encouragement. As the hostile attack increased in intensity, he remained in an unprotected position and continued to point out targets until he was fatally wounded by hostile mortar fire. By his courageous actions, he served to inspire his men to heroic endeavor toward repulsing the enemy attack and retaining possession of a vital defensive position. His outstanding leadership, cool courage and steadfast devotion to duty throughout reflect the highest credit upon Captain Shelnutt and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 22, 1917 at Athens, Georgia. Home Town: Bremerton, Washington. Death: KIA November 29, 1950 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Shenk, Henry Hess (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Henry Hess Shenk (MCSN: 404030), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Motor Dispatcher of Company D, First Motor Transport Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. Volunteering to man a light machine gun when his motor convoy was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force during the advance from Hagaru-ri to Hungnam, Staff Sergeant Shenk fearlessly exposed himself to the intense barrage to place his machine gun on top of a truck and deliver effective return fire on the attackers. When ordered to take his gun out of action so he could seek the limited available cover on the ground, he choose to remain at his station and, continuing to man his gun with deadly accuracy, accounted for many enemy dead and wounded while providing covering fire for other Marines as they moved their guns to more advantageous firing positions. By his daring initiative, heroic actions and grave concern for others at great risk to his own life, Staff Sergeant Shenk served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed immeasurably to the successful repulse of the enemy attack. His indomitable courage throughout the intensive engagement reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Born: July 4, 1922 at Manheim, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Newport, Rhode Island. Death: KIA: December 7, 1950 - Buried at: National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific - Honolulu, Hawaii.

Shepherd, Lemuel Cornick Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant General Lemuel Cornick Shepherd, Jr. (MCSN: 0-889), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Inchon-Seoul operation during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 50 (October 27, 1950). Born: February 10, 1896 at Norfolk, Virginia. Home Town: Norfolk, Virginia. Death: August 6, 1990 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Sheridan, Daniel J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Daniel J. Sheridan (MCSN: 438802), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 September 1950. Participating in a company attack against strong enemy positions in Seoul when his platoon suddenly came under a devastating hail of automatic weapons fire from well-concealed hostile gun emplacements, causing numerous casualties, including the platoon leader, Corporal Sheridan courageously assumed command of the disordered unit and, effecting a hasty reorganization of the squads, prepared for the evacuation of the wounded. When he discovered that the killing zone of hostile fire prohibited returning to the company over the only apparent route, he resolutely exposed himself to the withering fire to seek an alternate route and re-crossed the fire-swept area to lead his comrades back to rejoin the company. By his courageous leadership, initiative and indomitable devotion to duty, Corporal Sheridan served to inspire all who observed him and aided materially in the successful redeployment of the platoon, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Shewmaker, Robert E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Yeoman Third Class Robert E. Shewmaker (NSN: 3447036), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while attached to and serving on board the U.S.S. Partridge (AMS-31), on 2 February 1951. When that ship struck an enemy mine while engaged in minesweeping operations in the Korean combat zone, two men were seriously injured and pinned down in the wreckage. With the aid of another, he successfully rescued these two men. Not until the vessel began to sink rapidly did he abandon ship. By his aggressive initiative coupled with complete disregard for his own safety, Yeoman Third Class Shewmaker contributed greatly to the safety of his shipmates, and his zealous devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1221 (August 4, 1951).

Shiflett, Cpl. James O.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 311 - 28 June 1951

Corporal James O. Shiflett Jr., RA13386439, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 24 May and during the early morning hours of 25 May 1953, a friendly patrol of Company "K" was assigned the mission of ambushing the enemy in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea. They reached the predetermined location for the ambush and immediately set up their formation. When the enemy was sighted and a fire fight ensued, Corporal Shiflett demonstrated outstanding determination and courage. As he was moving under intense hostile small arms and grenade fire, the patrol leader pointed out to him six enemy soldiers who were advancing towards him. Stopping momentarily, he accurately fired his automatic rifle against them. After this action, he continued his route towards a new position. There he found one of his comrades seriously wounded. The enemy started advancing, as he aided the man. Operating both his and his comrade's weapons Corporal Shiflett's accurate fire was instrumental in stopping the movements of the enemy. Taking advantage of the momentary cessation of movement, he fire swept the area which the friendly unit had selected for their defensive perimeter and then covered the friendly maneuver to the area. His actions contributed materially to repulsing the enemy attack. Corporal Shiflett's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Virginia.

Shipley, Stafford D.

Corporal Stafford D. Shipley, Battery A, 15th AAA AW 8n. (SP), displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Hoengsong, Korea, an 12 February 1951. Corporal Shipley was in charge of an M-16 multiple machine gun half track which was protecting a road intersection to permit the passage of the vehicles of a task force to Woniu, Korea. While his M-16 was engaged in firing at the enemy, Corporal Shipley heard a call for assistance from his section chief who had discovered eight seriously wounded soldiers in a burning house. Corporal Shipley unhesitatingly made his way to the house through intense enemy fire to assist in carrying the wounded men to a place of comparative safety, after which he helped to load them onto passing vehicles for evacuation. Corporal Shipley's gallant actions resulted in saving the lives of eight men and reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the service from Texas.

Shortt, James E.

Private First Class James E. Shortt, RA 15288446, Infantry, US Army, a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action near Osan, Korea on 5 July 1950. GO 55, 24 Jul 1950. During an enemy tank attack on Company C positions, PFC Shortt had his Browning Automatic Rifle destroyed by enemy fire. Undaunted by this he picked up a bazooka and fired on the tanks. Due to his quick think and courage he knocked out two fo the enemy tanks and damaged three others. He kept firing the bazooka until it was destroyed by machine gun fire. During this time Company C’s positions were subjected to heavy artillery, mortar and small arms fire from the enemy tanks. After the bazooka had been destroyed he returned to his position secured another Browning Automatic Rifle and continued to fire it and helped in covering the withdrawal of his unit. The outstanding courage and fortitude displayed by PFC Shortt reflects great credit on himself and the United States military service. (Shortt was wounded in action on 12 July 1950.) GO 55, 24 Jul 1950.Home of record: Raleigh WV.

Shramek, Jack Howard (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Jack Howard Shramek (MCSN: 915701), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman in Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. While his platoon was attacking a strong enemy position, Private First Class Shramek moved forward in the face of intense hostile fire in order to gain a more favorable firing position. Boldly subjecting himself to the barrage of enemy fire, he accurately directed his fire against hostile positions, destroying several automatic weapons and annihilating many enemy troops before he received a fatal wound. By his courageous actions, he materially aided his platoon in successfully completing its assigned mission. His fortitude, initiative and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Shramek and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 17, 1925 at Omaha, Nebraska. Home Town: Omaha, Nebraska.

Shumate, John C.

On December 16, 1950, Capt. Shumate was awarded the Silver Star with the following citation:

Captain John C. Shumate, United States Air Force, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy on 10 October 1950, by rescuing an injured British fighter pilot from his downed aircraft, deep in enemy territory north of Seoul, Korea. Captain Shumate, in the capacity of para-doctor as part of a helicopter team, left the helicopter upon landing near the crashed aircraft, and rushed to the aid of the pilot. Enemy forces from a nearby farm house opened fire with small arms in an attempt to prevent any aid by Captain Shumate. At the risk of his life, Captain Shumate leaped to the wing of the aircraft and attempted to lift the pilot out of the cockpit. The pilot, paralyzed from the waist down and unable to help, was pinned to the wreckage by his flying suit. Still under enemy small arms fire, Captain Shumate lifted and held the pilot with one arm and with his free hand cut away the pilot's flight suit, freeing the pilot. Practically exhausted, Captain Shumate managed to carry and drag the pilot to safety from the small arms fire. Assisted by the helicopter pilot, the injured British fighter pilot was placed aboard the helicopter and flown to a hospital. The gallantry under enemy fire and devotion to duty displayed by Captain Shumate on this occasion are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

Sibley, Willard Jesse (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 31 - 15 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Willard Jesse Sibley (ASN: RA-6705048), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Service Battery, 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, near Osan, Korean, on 5 July 1950. His unit was attacked without warning by an overwhelming, numerically superior enemy force. After several hours of bitter fighting, the friendly troops were completely surrounded and all possible avenues of escape were cut off by enemy road blocks. Although he was in a relatively safe position outside the enemy encirclement, Private Sibley volunteered to go forward with a machine gun crew in an attempt to break up the road blocks, thereby providing a route of withdrawal for his unit. Although outnumbered twenty-to-one, he continuously exposed himself to the enemy and aggressively engaged them in fire fights which caused the hostile soldiers to disperse and opened a safe route of withdrawal for his surrounded unit. When last seen, he was still manning his machine gun fighting against harassing enemy snipers. Private Sibley's courageous action, indomitable spirit and selfless performance of a mission far beyond the call of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's withdrawal and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Born: May 5, 1912. Home Town: Bradford County, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: July 5, 1950 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Sice, Raymond E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Raymond E. Sice (MCSN: 1192917), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of the 75-mm. Recoilless Rifle Platoon of Anti-tank Company, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 October 1952. When a fourteen-man reconnaissance patrol of an infantry company inadvertently set off two land mines far forward of the main line of resistance and every Marine in the patrol was either killed or wounded, Corporal Sice unhesitatingly volunteered to accompany the rescue unit to the area and materially assisted in locating the stricken patrol, neutralizing several mines during the advance. Upon arriving at the scene, he rendered all possible aid and comfort to the wounded and aided in the evacuation of the casualties despite continuous hostile mortar barrages which were falling in the immediate area. When it was discovered that one man was still unaccounted for, he immediately left the group and searched the area, finally locating the man and carrying him to safety. By his outstanding courage, initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, Corporal Sice served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Parajioto, New Mexico. Home Town: Gallup, New Mexico.

Sidney, 1LT Wilbur A.

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 33 - 7 February 1953

The Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to First Lieutenant Wilbur A. Sidney, 019132?8, Infantry, Company L, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 8 August 1952, two platoons of Company L, of which Lieutenant Sidney was commanding officer, were assigned the mission of assaulting an enemy held position near Chokko-ri, Korea. As the elements of the first platoon approached their objective, they were subjected to enemy small arms and mortar fire, wounding the platoon leader and several other men. The assault platoon withdrew, leaving the casualties behind, exposed to the enemy fire. Lieutenant Sidney immediately reorganized the first platoon and combined it with the second platoon as he led the friendly forces to the front of the enemy positions in a second attack, enabling the friendly elements to evacuate their casualties and inflict numerous casualties among the enemy. Lieutenant Sidney’s gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from South Carolina.

Sierra, Pablo (KIA)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 536 - 24 November 1951

Sergeant Pablo Sierra, US51062889, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 30 September 1951, Company "I", engaged in an attack on a well-fortified hill near Chorwon, Korea, was subjected to intense fire from the entrenched enemy. Realizing that the hill could only be taken with bayonet and grenade as friendly mortar and artillery fire had failed to dislodge the hostile troops, Sergeant Sierra led his squad in an assault on the first pillbox. Although several of his men were felled by the hail of fire, he continued to fearlessly advance and destroy the occupants of the emplacement with hand grenades. Inspired by his example, the attack gained momentum and the hostile defense was broken. Fearlessly exposing himself, Sergeant Sierra mounted a machine gun on the crest of the hill and delivered a lethal fire into the retreating foe; however, while so engaged, he was mortally wounded by enemy small arms fire. The singular gallantry and courage displayed by Sergeant Sierra reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New York.

Siers, Howard L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Howard L. Siers (MCSN: 0-53391), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. When his platoon was attacking a numerically superior and well-entrenched enemy force, Second Lieutenant Siers repeatedly exposed himself to a withering hail of enemy small arms, mortar and artillery fire to lead and control his men. With a shower of grenades and mortar shells heavily falling around him during the final assault of the last enemy strong point, he aggressively led his men into the hostile positions, firing his carbine and hurling grenades. Engaging the opposition in hand-to-hand combat, he personally accounted for two enemy dead as his unit annihilated the position and killed fifteen of the opposition. Although painfully wounded, he skillfully reorganized his platoon and, despite a heavy enemy mortar barrage, searched the entire area to ensure that all his men were accounted for before withdrawing. By his inspiring leadership, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Siers was largely responsible for the successful destruction of the enemy strong point, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Akron, Ohio. Home Town: Jackson, Ohio.

Siewert, Orville R.

Headquarters, 24ID
General Orders No. 56 - 26 January 1952

By direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to First Lieutenant Orville R. Siewert, Artillery, U.S. Army, a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 26th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (self-propelled), 24th Infantry Division, (then a member of Battery D), distinguished himself by courageous action near Hudong-ni, Korea, on 10 October 1951. Lieutenant Siewert was given the mission of leading two sections of his self-propelled weapons carriers on a reconnaissance patrol into enemy territory with tank elements. In its advance to the destination, the patrol was suddenly attacked by approximately one enemy battalion, deploying intense small arms, automatic weapons, mortar and artillery fire. Lieutenant Siewert immediately led two of his carriers into a commanding position and directed the firing of both vehicles until they were put out of action by enemy mortar and artillery fire. Although painfully wounded by mortar fragments, he refused medical aid and directed his other vehicles into positions. While pointing out enemy positions to the newly arrived crewmen, he saw one of his men lying wounded in an exposed position. With complete disregard for his own safety, he moved out, under intense enemy fire, and carried the wounded man to a place of safety. He then administered first aid and evacuated him to a medical installation. Only then did he allow himself to be treated and evacuated. Lieutenant Siewert’s courageous action, outstanding performance of duty and selfless devotion to a wounded comrade reflect the highest credit on himself and the U.S. Artillery. Entered service from Worthington, Minn.

Siler, Jerry Eldon

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Jerry Eldon Siler (MCSN: 0-97889/1125371), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 12 to 15 August 1952. With his squad leader mortally wounded during the company's defense of a strategically important hill position, Private First Class Siler voluntarily assumed command and reorganized the squad, personally carrying the body of the squad leader to a foxhole while subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage. Later, he volunteered to crawl twenty yards down the forward slope under enemy mortar and artillery fire to search the enemy dead for intelligence information and to acquire hostile equipment for intelligence purposes. By his inspiring courage, initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Siler upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Woodline, Iowa. Home Town: Omaha, Nebraska.

Silver, Morton I.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade (DC) Morton I. Silver, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Dental Officer attached to the Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 27 November to 4 December 1950. On the night of 27 November 1950, when the Regimental Aid Station was under attack by a numerically superior enemy force employing small arms, machine guns and grenades, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Silver, serving as Regimental Dentist, with absolute disregard for his own personal safety, repeatedly and fearlessly exposed himself to heavy and direct enemy fire to assist the Regimental Surgeon administer aid and comfort to the regimental casualties. As the attack increased in intensity, he unhesitatingly reorganized a section of Corpsmen and integrated them into the receiving station, thereby insuring that orderly, rapid care of casualties could continue. On 3 December 1950, while the regiment was on the march to Hagaru-ri, Korea, enemy grenades were dropped from positions on mountain sides overlooking the road into a section of the main body he was assigned. Immediately he moved back to the area of the explosions and administered aid to two wounded Marines, then directed their evacuation to vehicles in the march. On another occasion, during the same day, although the area was subjected to grazing machine gun and a barrage of mortar fire, he fearlessly moved to an exposed area, picked up and carried two litter patients that had been previously cared for to passing vehicles, thereby undoubtedly preventing them from receiving further wounds. Between 0100 and 0400 on 4 December 1950, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Silver, at great risk to his person, assumed command of the confusion resulting from an overturned truck and trailer which pinned four Marines in the wreckage. The truck carrying patients, parachutes and primer cord had slid off the icy road and overturned down an embankment and patients, parachute rigging and explosive became a tangle. Within a period of twenty minutes, he had successfully extricated all Marines and began administering aid to the injured. Not having a splint available, he broke pieces of boards from the trailer with which to make adequate splints for the patient suffering from a compound fracture of both legs. For approximately three hours he administered aid and loaded on passing vehicles twenty patients that were in the wrecked vehicle and trailer. His gallant aggressive actions, constant efficient application of medical assistance and continued disregard for his own life were an inspiration to all who observed him, and directly contributed to the high state of morale within his regiment. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Silver's display of outstanding courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 9649 (March 7, 1951).

Simeona, David

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 208 - 28 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal David Simeona (ASN: RA-10735072), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Songju, Korea, on 21 September 1950. An enemy force estimated at 25 infiltrated his company's area and attacked with automatic weapons and grenades. When he observed an unattended machine gun, he unhesitatingly manned the gun and poured such a volume of accurate fire into the enemy that he was repulsed leaving nine dead and one wounded. In this heroic action Corporal Smith was wounded. His gallant example reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Army.

Simmons, Edwin H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Edwin H. Simmons (MCSN: 0-10642), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 and 26 September 1950. Occupying the observation post after completing his assigned mission of organizing the battalion's left sector defensive positions and of preparing a roadblock across the main route entering the battalion area, Major Simmons heard the sound of tracked vehicles approaching from his front and, after flashing an attack warning, directed and coordinated all possible fire on the enemy. When his observation post became a primary target and his radio operator was wounded, he repeatedly exposed himself to the intense hostile fire to call for artillery and mortar fire. Skillfully directing the friendly fire, he contributed materially to the destruction of virtually all of the hostile vehicles and weapons and of the killing or wounding of approximately five hundred of the enemy. By his inspiring leadership, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Major Simmons upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: August 25, 1921 at Paulsboro, New Jersey. Home Town: Paulsboro, New Jersey. Death: May 5, 2007.

Simonds, Frank H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Frank H. Simonds (MCSN: 0-13677), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane and Commanding Officer of Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 February 1952. Participating in a night intruder mission in the vicinity of Pyongyang, Major Simonds skillfully carried out a reconnaissance of the area without the aid of flare-dropping aircraft. Utilizing the scattered lights of a large enemy motor convoy to determine his altitude above the extremely rugged terrain, he launched a damaging attack against the convoy. With the resulting fires enabling him to locate a group of the supply-laden vehicles, which had dispersed beyond the fringes of firelight, he shifted his attacks to a cluster of buildings which appeared to be a supply or refueling point. Undaunted by automatic weapons and small arms fire during the initial approach, he fearlessly continued to attack the objective until his ordnance was expended and ten buildings were engulfed by flames. His alertness, expert airmanship and courageous devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Major Simonds and the United States Naval Service. Born: Sparta, Illinois. Home Town: Sparta, Illinois.

Simpson, Carl C.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 168 - 11 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Field Artillery) Carl C. Simpson (ASN: 0-1178625), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Osan, Korea, on 5 July 1950. Attacked by advancing enemy tanks penetrating the infantry positions, Captain Simpson unhesitatingly left the relative safety of his position at the Battalion's fire direction center to join a howitzer section then under fire. Assuming the duties of cannoneer, he directed effective fire onto the advancing tanks and destroyed two. Although the tanks had penetrated to within one hundred yards of his position, he continued to direct the howitzers' fire and successfully defended the battalion's positions. To establish communication with the forward partially out-flanked infantry battalion, he led a volunteer wire party through the hail of small arms, artillery, and machine gun fire to successfully contact the infantry command post. His courage, unselfish devotion to duty and complete disregard for his own safety were an inspiration to the gun crews and contributed greatly to the successful defense of the artillery positions. His gallantry reflects the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Lawton, Oklahoma.

Simpson, Wayman Elliott (POW)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 79 - 8 August 1950

Corporal Wayman Elliott Simpson, RA37103116, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 8 July 1950 near Chonan, Korea. Corporal Simpson’s observation post was under intense enemy artillery fire and the concussion from some shells that hit close by caused him to roll about fifty feet down the side of a hill. With disregard for his own safety he returned to the observation post and recovered his radio. On returning to his battery, Corporal Simpson observed an enemy machinegun crew firing into the battery positions, which was being rapidly evacuated. He crawled to a position close to the machinegun and destroyed it with hand grenades, then returned to his battery and mounted the last vehicle to leave the area. The gallant act displayed by Corporal Simpson reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered service from Mesa, Arkansas. (Corporal Simpson was captured 14 July 1950 and spent the duration of the war as a prisoner of war.)

Simpson, William Franklin Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain William Franklin Simpson, Jr. (MCSN: 0-26126), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot in Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Fourteen (VMF-214), attached to the U.S.S. SICILY (CVE-118), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Inchon, Korea, on 16 September 1950. Participating in a four-plane flight to seek out and attack hostile tanks and troops which were threatening the advance of friendly landing teams at Inchon, Captain Simpson pressed home bold attacks against a column of six hostile armed vehicles and, directing accurate and damaging fire, assisted in bringing the enemy group to a standstill. Fighting his plane skillfully, he made repeated low-level runs on the hostile line and personally accounted for the destruction of a tank and several enemy troops. When his aircraft was severely damaged by intense accurate anti-aircraft fire, he crashed among a concentration of hostile troops. A skilled airman, Captain Simpson, by his fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty, contributed materially to the success of our troops in securing all of Inchon in one day, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 8, 1920 at Norfolk, Virginia. Home Town: Portsmouth, Virginia. Death: KIA; September 16, 1950 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Sims, James M.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 276 - 26 July 1953

Sergeant James M. Sims, RA10104906, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 10 June 1953, Company "F" commenced to attack enemy held Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. An eleven man assault team was the first unit to leave the line of departure shortly afterwards, the support element, commanded by Sergeant SIMS, moved along the eastern ridge to a predetermined position where they set up in support of the assault group. When the platoon leader in charge of the initial assault unit was wounded, Sergeant Sims, without regard for his personal safety, armed himself with grenades and moved over the crest of the hill to locate the source of the enemy fire. Finding the enemy in entrenched positions a short distance down the reverse slope, he started the rush towards them. He reached a point within yards of the enemy before he threw his grenades. His courageous action resulted in neutralizing the position, mortally wounding many of the enemy and rendering others as casualties. With the enemy's fire reduced, he was then able to reorganize the assault squad in an orderly fashion. Sergeant Sim's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Hawaii.

Sims, Lewis M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Lewis M. Sims (MCSN: 1172900), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 March 1953. Participating in the initial assault on a strongly fortified hostile position when his unit was subjected to a deadly barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire which inflicted many casualties, Corporal Sims refused medical aid for his own painful wounds while assisting in administering treatment to his other severely wounded comrades and, moving from one man to another to lend words of encouragement to the casualties, directed the rescue teams to their positions. On one occasion, gallantly rising to his full height under the devastating hostile fire to aid a helpless Marine, Corporal Sims succeeded in carrying the wounded man to the comparative safety of the trench line, although shortly after, he, himself fell unconscious from loss of blood and was evacuated. By his outstanding courage, exceptional fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of others, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cedar Falls, Iowa. Home Town: Cedar Falls, Iowa.

Sinclair, Donald H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 31 - 15 January 1952

The Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to Private First Class Donald H. Sinclair, US52083794, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company D, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Kumsong, Korea, on 1 November 1951. Elements of his heavy weapons company were occupying defensive positions on a recently captured strategic hill. After making a fainting attack on an adjoining hill to divert the friendly troops’ attention, the enemy masses turned suddenly and assaulted the unit’s positions with the element of surprise in their favor. The hostile soldiers were within 75 yards of the first squad’s machine gun emplacement and [the enemy unit] began firing its four automatic weapons with concentrated intensity before they were discovered. Private Sinclair, Machine Gunner, immediately sized up the situation. He deliberately held his fire until he had determined the location of the automatic weapons and until the enemy was within grenade-throwing distance. With his weapon freed from its adjustment mechanism, he swept the enemy hordes with devastatingly accurate bursts. Finding himself unable to reach the entire group of attackers from his half-crouched position, he jumped to his feet and, heedless of the intense enemy small arms fire cutting branches and splattering dust around him, he proceeded to make a one-man stand. With his machine gun cradled in his arms, he advanced slowly, maintaining such a steady and highly effective volley of fire that the enemy suffered severe casualties and retreated in blind panic. Private Sinclair’s courageous action, exceptional presence of mind and selfless performance of duty contributed almost exclusively to the success of his unit’s defense and reflect the highest credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered military service from Youngstown, Ohio.

Sinclair, Elliott H.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Elliott H. Sinclair, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Aidman of Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action at Changnyong, Korea, on 7 September 1950. On that date, Corporal Sinclair's platoon was attacked from the rear and in the hand-to-hand fighting which ensued one of the U.S. soldiers was wounded and was lying in a position exposed to heavy enemy fire. Corporal Sinclair, with complete disregard for his personal safety, immediately advanced to give medical aid to the wounded soldier. He remained in a position exposed to direct enemy sniper fire from a distance of less than 30 yards and administered first aid to the wounded man, remaining with him until he could be evacuated. Corporal Sinclair's gallant actions and selfless devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army Medical Services. Home of record: Massachusetts

Sinclair, Robert B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Robert B. Sinclair (MCSN: 0-40326), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 May 1952. After leading a four-plane flight in repeated bombing and strafing attacks which destroyed a rail bridge, a road bridge and two railway cars in the vicinity of Chinnampo, Captain Sinclair conducted his flight on an armed reconnaissance along a heavily defended enemy supply route near Pyongyang. Discovering a camouflaged enemy tank, he led his planes through intense anti-aircraft fire and executed a second series of rocket and bombing assaults, destroying the armored vehicle. When one of the attacking aircraft was struck by hostile fire and crash-landed deep in enemy territory, Captain Sinclair immediately alerted rescue facilities and dispatched a member of the flight to guide a rescue helicopter to the scene. Although his own plane was damaged by the increasingly accurate ground fire, he led repeated strafing runs against an enemy force attempting to surround and capture the downed pilot. With his ammunition expended, he carried out repeated dummy runs and effectively suppressed the hostile fire during the recovery of the pilot and the withdrawal of the helicopter. By his superb airmanship, daring initiative and exceptional courage, Captain Sinclair was largely responsible for the success of the mission and the rescue of his fellow airman, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Elizabethtown, Kentucky. Home Town: Elizabethtown, Kentucky.

Sindlinger, Jack William

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Jack W. Sindlinger (MCSN: 919816), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Seoul, Korea, during the period 24 September 1950 to 2 October 1950. Corporal Sindlinger acting as a Rifle Squad Leader continuously displayed outstanding courage and leadership against enemy forces. On one occasion while participating in an attack on strong enemy emplacements on the crest of Hill 228 and as elements of the attacking forces reached the top of the hill, he led his squad through intense enemy machine gun fire to a position at the top of the hill within 25 yards of the enemy. Here Corporal Sindlinger reorganized many scattered elements of the attacking forces with his squad and deployed them to repel repeated close-in counterattacks. Without regard for his personal safety he fearlessly exposed himself continually to control the defense of his position and by example to inspire his unit until seriously wounded in the head by enemy fire. His initiative, courageous leadership and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: August 31, 1925 at Sheridan, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Conneaut, Pennsylvania. Death: July 15, 2007.

Sisson, Marlyn

Citation not yet found.

"A Silver Star will be awarded Sunday to the father of a Sioux Falls [South Dakota] soldier who is listed as a prisoner of the Chinese communists.  The medal will be presented at special ceremonies to the father of Marlyn Sisson.  The award will be made by Col. Gilbert Linkswiler, acting chief of the South Dakota Military District.  The citation states that Pvt. Sisson remained behind to blow up an ammunition dump when his platoon withdrew in the face of an enemy attack." - The Daily Republic, January 5, 1951

Article in a later issue -

"Christmas dinner in a Communist prisoner of war camp in Korea consisted of goat meat, beans, fruit and candy, a South Dakota POW said in a letter to his parents.  The letter from Pvt. Marlyn K. Sisson has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Walter R. Sisson who farm near here.  Sisson in whose name a Silver Star was presented to his parents last week, told of Christmas observance in the POW camp.  He fashioned a "home-made" Christmas card which accompanied the ltter.  He said he is living in a house in which three other South Dakotans are also being held as prisoners of war.  The other three were not identified.  The parents said the letter was written on a very poor grade of paper.  Sisson was employed by the Farmer's Market and the Sioux Transit Company here before entering service."

Six, Richard L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 199 - 23 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Richard L. Six (ASN: RA-35390968), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Yulgak, Korea, on 26 September 1950. During an advance a squad of his company was pinned down by heavy machine gun fire and suffered many casualties. With utter disregard for his own safety, he repeatedly moved through a hail of withering fire to the squad's exposed position, successfully evacuating the wounded to the relative safety of friendly lines. Sergeant Six's gallant actions and complete devotion to his comrades reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Sutton, West Virginia.

Skaggs, Edwin (posthumous)

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 276 - 31 May 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Edwin Skaggs (ASN: NG-23381498), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company F, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action near Sokkogae, Korea. On the night of 17 - 18 April 1953, while assisting in repulsing an enemy attack, Private Skaggs continually exposed himself to the enemy artillery and small arms fire. Although wounded by the enemy fire, Private Skaggs rendered first aid to the other wounded and tried to give them as much shelter as possible. With no regard for his personal safety, Private Skaggs, ignoring the devastating enemy fire, continued to treat the wounded while he inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy with his weapon. Although surrounded by the enemy and wounded for a second time, Private Skaggs did not give up his position. Private Skaggs proceeded to again treat the wounded when he was killed by an enemy artillery round. The gallantry displayed by Private Skaggs reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Skelt, Ernest P. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Ernest P. Skelt, Jr. (MCSN: 0-42317), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Officer in Charge of a Four-man Demolition Team of Company A, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. After all friendly forces had cleared the town of Hagaru-ri, First Lieutenant Skelt bravely led his men in the destruction of a large concrete bridge, many buildings and other facilities and, with the enemy entering the far end of the city, remained at his post until the rear elements of friendly forces had safely cleared to a point several hundred yards distant before he detonated the last of the explosive charges. Working far to the rear under enemy fire and, on occasion, out of sight of the friendly rear guard throughout a dangerous sixteen hours, he repeatedly disregarded enemy small arms and mortar fire and the possibility of contact with numerically superior hostile troops to carry out his mission and delay the advance of the aggressors. His inspiring leadership, courage and unrelenting devotion to duty in the face of grave peril reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Skelt and the United States Naval Service. Born: Ypsilanti, Michigan. Home Town: Ypsilanti, Michigan.

Slasor, Roy Emerson (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Roy Emerson Slasor (MCSN: 656169), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Ammunition Bearer in Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. Volunteering to replenish a critically short supply of hand grenades during an enemy counterattack, Corporal Slasor repeatedly exposed himself to heavy hostile fire in order to cross an open area and return with an ample supply of the vital ammunition. While distributing the grenades among members of his platoon, he was mortally wounded by hostile machine gun fire. By his courageous actions, he served to inspire others of his group to heroic endeavor toward repulsing the enemy attack. His fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Slasor and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 24, 1927 at Cambridge, Ohio. Home Town: Mansfield, Ohio. Death: KIA: September 24, 1950 - Buried at: Old Washington Cemetery - Old Washington, Ohio.

Slavey, James W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James W. Slavey (MCSN: 1176622), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1952. Although painfully wounded in the leg when his platoon was subjected to a merciless barrage of hostile mortar and artillery fire while participating in an attack against a heavily defended enemy hill position, Private First Class Slavey crawled to the aid of a wounded Marine lying out in the open. Fearlessly exposing himself to the intense hostile fire, Private First Class Slavey covered the Marine's body with his own to act as a shield for his comrade during the deadly and continuous enemy assault and, although wounded three times while engaged in this dangerous undertaking, remained to protect the wounded Marine until the firing ceased and they could be evacuated. By his undaunted bravery, daring initiative and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of his comrade while under vicious hostile fire, Private First Class Slavey contributed materially to saving the life of a fellow Marine and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Somerset, Kentucky. Home Town: Ruth, Kentucky.

Slay, Maurice S.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 136 - 19 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Field Artillery) Maurice S. Slay (ASN: 0-1823787), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 20 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. Leaving on the mission of bringing necessary supplies to the two firing batteries supporting the 34th Infantry Regiment, Captain Slay was informed that two heavily defended enemy road blocks had been encountered which were disrupting the main route of supply to the forward combat elements of the Regiment. Displaying complete disregard for his own personal safety, he manned a .30 caliber machine gun mounted on the hood of a 3/4 ton vehicle and led three vehicles in an attempt to penetrate the road block. Taken under heavy enemy automatic weapons fire, the vehicles were force to withdraw, but only after inflicting heavy casualties to the numerically superior enemy force. All communications being out, Captain Slay organized his Service Battery for movement to another position and then personally proceeded to reconnoiter the Yongdong road in an attempt to obtain infantry assistance in clearing the road block. Thee actions of Captain Slay instilled great confidence in the men and resulted in a successful withdrawal by the hard-pressed battery with a minimum loss of men and equipment. The courage and complete disregard for personal safety displayed by Captain Slay reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Palm Beach, Florida.

Slaysman, Edwin L.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 316 - 5 August 1953

Corporal Edwin L. Slaysman, RA13418700, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 10 June 1953, Company "F" began to attack enemy held Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. When the assault team attempted to rush positions on the reverse slope, they were momentarily halted by intense enemy artillery and mortar fire. Two squads from the support platoon, one of which was under command of Corporal Slaysman, were quickly ordered into the conflict. When the patrol leader called for volunteers heavily armed with grenades to lead a renewed assault, Corporal Slaysman immediately volunteered as a member. Forming a skirmish line, they began to advance towards the crest of the hill. Upon reaching the skyline, Corporal Slaysman started hurling grenades at the entrenched enemy, who were but a short distance away. He then proceeded to move down the reverse slope when suddenly a concussion shell exploded, enveloping part of the assault team. Although stunned by the air burst, he continued to move forward until he reached a point directly in front of an enemy position. There, he threw his remaining grenades, mortally wounding three of the enemy and rendering two others as casualties. His actions were instrumental in routing the enemy from their entrenched positions. Corporal Slaysman's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty-reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Delaware.

Sleppy, Jay

Sergeant First Class Jay Sleppy, US55061514, (then Sergeant), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company A, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 14 October 1951 in the vicinity of Mundung-ni, Korea.  On that date, Company A launched an attack on a strategic hill defended by a determined enemy force.  Sergeant Sleppy, platoon sergeant, completely disregarding his own safety, led his men in the assault.  Exposing himself to the heavy concentration of enemy fire he assaulted the hostile positions with his rifle and grenades, inflicting numerous enemy casualties.  With complete indifference to the fanatical hostile resistance he continued in this courageous manner until the objective had been secured.  The aggressive and spirited leadership of Sergeant Sleppy inspired his men and greatly aided his unit in the successful completion of its mission.  The gallantry in action and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Sleppy on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Indiana.

Sloan, Marshall

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Marshall Sloan, United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman with a Rifle Platoon attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division, in action at Korea, on 27 November 1952. When an outnumbering enemy force launched a fanatical attack against his platoon's position, Corpsman Sloan repeatedly exposed himself to direct enemy fire to search for and administer aid to wounded Marines. Although he himself was wounded and suffering severe pain, he steadfastly refused to be evacuated and continued administering aid and directing the rapid evacuation of casualties. Forced to submit to evacuation when struck by enemy fire a second time as the intensity of the attack increased, Corpsman Sloan, by his daring initiative, extraordinary heroism and grave concern for others at great risk to his own life, contributed to the saving of many lives and served as an inspiration to all who observed him. His staunch devotion to duty reflects the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.

Sloane, Charles R.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 361 - 27 August 1953

Sergeant First Class Charles R. Sloane, US52176316, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 6 July 1953, Company "K" commenced to attack enemy held Hill "250" in the vicinity of Honu-Chon, Korea. The attacking force moved over the first sector of the hill without incident, but as they entered the second sector. known as "Mak", the unit came under automatic weapons fire from an enemy listening post. Sergeant Sloane, assistant platoon sergeant, immediately directed rapid and effective carbine fire on the position. His accurate fire quickly neutralized the position. He then began moving among his men, directing their fire, deploying them to the most effective positions, and urging them on to the attack. Nearing the crest of "MAk", the assault squads were fired upon from a large machine gun bunker. Sergeant Sloane, with complete disregard for his personal safety, began to rush the enemy position. In the ensuing action, he succeeded, along with another member of the patrol, in climbing to the roof of the bunker. He then hurled two grenades into the aperture. As he threw his last grenade, an incoming enemy artillery round critically wounded him. His courageous actions resulted in the complete destruction of the enemy fortification. Sergeant Sloane's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Ohio.

Sludock, Joseph C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Joseph C. Sludock (MCSN: 1221079), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1952. When the platoon's outpost position well forward of the main line of resistance was attacked by a large hostile force during the hours of darkness, Private First Class Sludock immediately positioned his fire team and brought deadly fire to bear upon the enemy. With the unit sustaining several casualties when a sudden barrage of hostile mortar and artillery fire struck the outpost, he moved the casualties to a sheltered tunnel and, remaining at one of the entrances, delivered intense fire upon the enemy with his submachine gun. Aggressively firing his weapon, he was instrumental in killing five of the attackers and wounding at least five others. After the enemy withdrew, he moved through the trench line to ensure that all the wounded had been placed in covered positions. When the second enemy assault was launched, Private First Class Sludock and several other Marines engaged the attackers in hand-to-hand combat until it was impossible to repel the numerically superior hostile force, whereupon he again assumed a position to protect the casualties. Subsequently, when an artillery barrage forced the enemy to withdraw, he returned to the tunnel to offer words of encouragement to the wounded and to assist wherever possible. By his outstanding leadership, indomitable courage and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Sludock served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Massapequa, New York.

Small, Selden Clobridge

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Selden Clobridge Small (NSN: 0-71604), United States Navy, for meritorious service during the period 12 August to 25 August 1950, while Commander of the Naval Element of a Special Operations Group which conducted a series of night demolition raids and beach reconnaissance against the enemy on the coasts of Korea. Commander Small, together with Commander Troop Element, skillfully planned the operations and carefully coordinated and trained all elements for these raids and beach reconnaissances. Under his determined leadership the task element successfully completed their missions in three night demolition raids, thereby inflicting considerable damage to enemy lines of supply and communications. Again under his leadership the task element successfully conducted night beach reconnaissances and surveys of three beaches, thereby obtaining valuable intelligence information. His leadership, skill, and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 6342 (November 8, 1950). Death: October 28, 1969.

Smith, Alvin E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Alvin E. Smith (MCSN: 324089), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces during the assault of a strongly defended hill position overlooking the battalion command post in Korea on 28 November 1950. When his unit was subjected to intense hostile automatic weapons, grenade and small arms fire and both the platoon leader and platoon sergeant were wounded, Sergeant Smith, although painfully wounded himself bravely refused medical attention and, assuming command, led the men forward through the heavy fire in a daring assault against the enemy. By his skillful leadership and fortitude he served to inspire the platoon in completely routing the entrenched hostile force and in driving the enemy from the strategic ground. Persevering in his task, he refused to seek aid for his wound until he had directed the establishment of a defense line. His marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 36559 (November 7, 1951). Born: Starkville, Mississippi. Home Town: Starkville, Mississippi.

Smith, Bobbie L.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 558 - 27 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Bobbie L. Smith, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy on 31 May 1951 as Fighter Pilot, 335th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Fifth Air Force. Leading an element of two F-86 planes in a group formation on a bomber escort mission in the Sinanju area of North Korea, Lieutenant Smith broke escort with the rest of the Group when minimum fuel was reached. As the Group turned South to return to home base, Lieutenant Smith sighted an enemy force of 12 MIG-15 aircraft heading to intercept the bomber force. As the last to become airborne, Lieutenant Smith's element had more fuel remaining than the rest of the Group. Ordering "drop tanks", he and his wingman returned to the bomber formation. Arriving over the bombers just as the enemy formation initiated their first attack, Lieutenant Smith unhesitatingly turned into the enemy formation to engage them in a head-on pass, thereby diverting and disrupting the enemy attack. Although outnumbered six to one, and with the additional disadvantage of a drop tank which failed to release, Lieutenant Smith maintained his position over the bombers and time and again repulsed the enemy by making head-on attacks. Lieutenant Smith's gallant defense of the bomber formation during this 15-minute running battle, resulted in his destroying one enemy MIG-15 in a head-on pass and severely damaging another before running out of ammunition. Realizing that his departure from the bombers would leave them open to attack, and although he was out of ammunition and handicapped by the external tank, Lieutenant Smith instructed his wingman to take over the lead while he flew wing. Every attack made by the enemy was parried and all bombers were safely escorted from the target area. Lieutenant Smith's leadership and gallantry in action in the face of overwhelming odds, reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Smith, Bobby G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Bobby G. Smith (MCSN: 1166582), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Heavy Machine Gun Ammunition Carrier of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 September 1951. With his section occupying the extreme point of the battalion's ridgeline position during a night-long series of vicious hostile assaults, Private First Class Smith obtained an automatic rifle from a wounded comrade and, firing his weapon with deadly accuracy, continued to defend the position despite the apparent hopelessness of the situation. Although all friendly troops within one hundred yards of him had become casualties and enemy hand grenades had eliminated one friendly machine gun, he moved from one foxhole to another, deceiving the enemy in regard to the strength of the line and providing protective fire on both sides of the one machine gun remaining in operation. Continuing his fearless combat tactics until dawn, Private First Class Smith contributed materially to the infliction of heavy casualties upon the enemy and to the successful defense of the friendly position. His indomitable fighting spirit, exceptional courage and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Austin, Texas. Home Town: Manor, Texas.

Smith, Burneal E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Burneal E. Smith (MCSN: 0-37856), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Marine Aircraft Group Twelve (MAG 12), FIRST Marine Aircraft Wing, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 26 March 1953. Suddenly attacked by a flight of hostile jet interceptors while voluntarily escorting the tactical air coordinator of a massed aerial assault on a mission against enemy supply installations in the vicinity of Chinnampo, Captain Smith immediately countered the attack with aggressive firing runs on the vastly superior enemy and succeeded in disrupting their flight, skillfully maneuvering his aircraft to successively engage the swept-wing fighters as they conducted individual dives against the flight leader. As the last of the attackers dived past the nose of his aircraft, he gave momentary pursuit and shattered the nose of his aircraft, he gave momentary pursuit and shattered the right wing of the enemy plane with a burst of machine-gun fire, resulting in the immediate disengaging and retiring of the hostile flight from the area. By his exceptional courage, professional skill and unyielding devotion to duty in the face of extreme peril, Captain Smith successfully defended the tactical air coordinator, who subsequently directed the diverse elements of the striking force in a highly successful bombing strike against the primary objective, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, Serial 7158. Born: Springfield, Ohio. Home Town: Springfield, Ohio.

Smith, Charles A.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 59 - 3 February 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Charles A. Smith, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy as Pilot, Detachment 1, 3d Air Rescue Squadron on 3 July 1951. At the voluntary risk of his life, Lieutenant Smith flew a highly vulnerable H-5 helicopter ten miles into enemy held territory to rescue a Marine fighter pilot who parachuted from his stricken airplane near Sangyong, Korea. After reaching the scene, Lieutenant Smith, observing that the distressed pilot was waving frantically while in a prone position, decided to land immediately. When the defenseless helicopter alighted, bullets began to strike in the area, and the aero-medical crewman ran to the aid of the seriously injured pilot. Realizing the weight of the helpless pilot was too much for the crewman, Lieutenant Smith leaped from the aircraft and ran through concentrated small arms fire to offer assistance. After the pilot and crewman were aboard, Lieutenant Smith took off and returned safely to friendly territory. By his gallantry and courage in the face of the enemy, and his selfless devotion to duty in saving another pilot's life, Lieutenant Smith reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Smith, Charles F. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles F. Smith, Jr. (MCSN: 1137771), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 17 July 1953. When the patrol leader, assistant patrol leader and radioman were seriously wounded, temporarily leaving the patrol without a leader or communication, during an attack from the front and flanks by a numerically superior enemy force far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Smith quickly repaired the damaged radio aerial in order to inform the company commander of the situation and then accurately called in friendly mortar fire on the enemy, thereby permitting the patrol to reorganize. Observing that a proper defense was still needed, he skillfully organized the patrol in a perimeter defense and, assigning members of the squad to evacuation teams, led the patrol back to friendly lines. Upon returning, he discovered that four members of the unit were missing and unhesitatingly volunteered to take a detail back to the endangered area, succeeding in bringing the missing men back to the main line of resistance. By his aggressiveness, skilled leadership and courageous initiative, Private First Class Smith served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Canton, Massachusetts. Home Town: Medfield, Massachusetts.

Smith, Clyde E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Clyde E. Smith (MCSN: 1165484), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 March 1953. Although painfully wounded while leading his squad through intense enemy mortar and artillery fire in the initial assault on a vital enemy-held outpost located far forward of the main line of resistance, Corporal Smith fearlessly remained with his men and led them up the fire-swept hill into the hostile trenches, refusing medical aid in order to direct his men in the defense of the newly gained position. Weak from the loss of blood, he steadfastly continued to direct his men in the face of murderous hostile small arms fire until he collapsed from his wounds. By his exceptional courage, fortitude and indomitable spirit, Corporal Smith served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Alexandria, Louisiana. Home Town: Boyce, Louisiana.

Smith, Darrell Otto (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Darrell Otto Smith (MCSN: 0-55018), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 - 7 October 1952. Second Lieutenant Smith displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty during the defense of a vitally important hill position forward of the main line of resistance. When the enemy commenced a devastating barrage of artillery and mortar fire and followed by a savage attack by an overwhelming number of enemy troops, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and remained in the exposed trench. Throughout the action, he called effective fire missions for friendly mortars and artillery and directed the efforts of his men. When, in spite of his determined efforts, the enemy overran the outpost and the defenders were locked in hand-to-hand combat, he stood shouting encouragement to his comrades and throwing hand grenades. During the close fighting, he was critically wounded but even as he was being carried to a bunker, he continued to concern himself about the welfare of his men. As a result of his wounds, he died, gallantly giving his life for his country. Second Lieutenant Smith's gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: July 17, 1925. Home Town: Clovis, New Mexico. Death: KIA: October 7, 1952.

Smith, Denford R. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Denford R. Smith (MCSN: 1350597), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 July 1953. Serving as pointman for a patrol moving forward from an outpost which was under heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire, Private First Class Smith discovered an enemy ambush and immediately delivered a heavy volume of fire, exposing and breaking up the ambush position. Although knocked to the ground by the explosion of an enemy hand grenade, he quickly regained his feet and continued to fire his weapon with deadly accuracy. Realizing the dangerous plight of the patrol, he directed his men to return to friendly lines and, fearlessly remaining in position, held back the overwhelming enemy force with accurate covering fire until the patrol reached safety. Mortally wounded while carrying out this heroic action, Private First Class Smith, by his intrepid fighting spirit, marked courage and selfless efforts in behalf of others, was directly responsible for the safe withdrawal of his comrades and aided materially in the success of the mission. His unwavering devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 29, 1935 at Red Boiling Springs, Tennessee. Home Town: Red Boiling Springs, Tennessee. Death: KIA: July 25, 1953.

Smith, Edwin P. Jr. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Edwin P. Smith, Jr. (NSN: 0-412097), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Underwater Demolition Team One and serving with Special Operations Group, Amphibious Group ONE, Pacific Fleet, in night demolition raids against targets 200 to 300 miles behind enemy lines on the east coast of North Korea during the period 12 to 16 August 1950. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Smith particularly distinguished himself. Serving as a scout and swimmer for the Special Operations Group, he swam ashore from a rubber boat in the face of unknown enemy opposition, reconnoitered each objective area and then signaled the balance of the raiding group to land their rubber boats. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Smith then supervised the rigging of each objective for demolition and remained ashore after the raider group had left the beach to pull fuses and initiate each explosion. As a result of his conspicuous and outstanding bravery during three demolition raids, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Smith materially assisted in the destruction of three railroad tunnels and two railroad bridges along the enemy main coastal line of supply and communications. His bravery, gallantry, and outstanding devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 6500 (November 17, 1950).

Smith, Edwin P. Jr. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Edwin P. Smith, Jr. (NSN: 0-412097), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Wave Guide while attached to Underwater Demolition Team One during the amphibious assault against Inchon, Korea, on 15 September 1950. As LVT Wave Guido for the first assault wave on the Blue Beach area, he contributed greatly to the precise timing and coordination with which these operations were stages. When it was found necessary to divert waves scheduled for Blue Beach One, he remained in the immediate vicinity of the beach under enemy fire and personally guided successive waves to Blue Beach Three. When a hospital boat making an attempt to evacuate a casualty from the left flank of Beach One was driven off by hostile fire Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Smith directed the beaching of his assault boat to remove the casualty and transferred him to the hospital boat off shore. Upon completion of the assault phase, he led rescue boats and evacuated a detachment of the landing force from the seawall of the Inchon Tidal Basin, while under enemy fire. His inspiring leadership, courage, and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 362 (May 16, 1951).

Smith, Eugene

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Sergeant Eugene Smith (MCSN: 816922), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Saemol, Korea, on 3 June 1951. On that date, during an attack on a heavily fortified enemy position, the squad of which Sergeant Smith was a member was cut off from the remainder of the platoon by an intense barrage of enemy fire. Carefully selecting his route of advance, he courageously led his squad in a charge against the enemy bunker, throwing grenades and firing directly into the emplacements. So effective was hid direction of the attack that the objective was quickly secured, and the remainder of the platoon contacted and regrouped. The gallantry and initiative displayed by Sergeant Smith on this occasion contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission, and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 177 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Utah.

Smith, Francis M.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 482 - 6 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Francis M. Smith (ASN: 0-23634), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Hudong-ni, Korea. On 11 September 1951, Colonel Smith ordered Company K, 31st Infantry Regiment, on a combat patrol with the mission of attacking and capturing two strategic enemy-held hills. As the assault began, Colonel Smith moved from the battalion observation post under heavy enemy automatic weapons and artillery fire to an exposed position to advise the commander of the attacking unit. After the first hill was captured, he again moved forward with the company commander toward the next objective. Remaining exposed to the concentrated enemy fire, Colonel Smith called for and adjusted artillery fire on the enemy position. As the assaulting forces moved forward to the final objective, they were met with withering enemy fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Colonel Smith once again moved through the heavy enemy fire and directed the company to a covered route of approach to the enemy emplacements. Through the superior coordination of artillery fire and supporting weapons by Colonel Smith, the mission was successfully completed with negligible casualties. The gallantry displayed by Colonel Smith reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Infantry. Entered Service from Tennessee.

Smith, Gerald Jay (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Gerald Jay Smith (MCSN: 354042), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Fire Team Leader in an Infantry Platoon of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 and 29 November 1950. When a numerically superior hostile force launched an aggressive attack against his sector, Private First Class Smith, fearlessly exposed himself to the intense, accurate fire to direct his team in repelling the onslaught. Later, when the enemy launched a second attack, he refused to be evacuated despite a severe arm wound and, staunchly remaining with his men, led them over treacherous, ice- covered terrain in a maneuver to seize a heavily fortified hostile entrenchment. Submitting to evacuation, he insisted on returning to his platoon immediately after his wounds were dressed and, assuming command of a squad, led his men against the enemy until his company was relieved. His bold and inspiring actions, courageous leadership and unrelenting devotion to duty against heavy odds were contributing factors in the success achieved by his company, and reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Smith and the United States Naval Service. Born: November 5, 1923 at Canandaigua, New York. Home Town: Fort Worth, Texas. Death: KIA: December 6, 1950.

Smith, Halsey W. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Halsey W. Smith, Jr. (MCSN: 1106123), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 and 9 April 1952. When his combat patrol was subjected to heavy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire from a well-entrenched enemy force, Sergeant Smith immediately deployed his men and, leading his unit in a vigorous assault against the hostile troops, repeatedly attacked the entrenchments, skillfully firing his rifle and hurling hand grenades into the enemy positions. Effectively reorganizing his group when the patrol leader became a casualty, he bravely led them forward to reinforce the base of fire. Although painfully wounded, he carried out three trips under intense enemy fire to search for the wounded patrol leader and, as the unit moved to more favorable positions, assisted in carrying casualties across flooded rice paddies under enemy fire to a forward aid station. By his inspiring courage, outstanding leadership and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Smith contributed materially to the successful evacuation of the wounded and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Washington, D.C. Home Town: Arlington, Virginia.

Smith, Harrison E.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 80 - 28 August 1950

Private First Class Harrison E. Smith, RA16316091, Field Artillery, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 90th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  Private First Class Smith, assistant gunner on a 50 caliber machine gun, was in position near Pongam-ni, Korea, when the enemy launched an attack against the battery position on 12 August 1950.  Exposed to continuous artillery, mortar and small arms fire, he continued to direct devastating fire into the attacking forces, although his position was a special target of the enemy.  When his supply of ammunition dwindled he moved through the heavy fire, replenished the stock and, reopening fire on the enemy, destroyed an assault gun and its crew.  Despite the danger from the explosion of an ammunition truck which had been hit by enemy fire, and although twice thrown from his machine gun by the concussion of bursting artillery shells, Private First Class Smith returned and refused to quit his post until ordered to do so.  Private First Class Smith's dauntless courage and outstanding devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Smith, Jack E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Jack E. Smith (MCSN: 109440), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Machine Gunner of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 December 1950. With his platoon assigned to furnish a base of fire for the assaulting rifle platoon engaged in attacking a ridge defended by a hostile force, consisting of an estimated three to four hundred of the enemy, Private First Class Smith fought gallantly throughout the intense action and, when his gunner was wounded, immediately took over the duties as gunner. Although painfully wounded during the battle, he staunchly refused to be evacuated, remaining steadfastly at his gun to deliver accurate and effective fire and inflict heavy casualties on the enemy. By his daring initiative, heroic fighting spirit and cool courage at great risk to his own life, Private First Class Smith served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the rifle company in seizing the objective. His aggressive and determined actions throughout reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Akron, Ohio. Home Town: Youngstown, Ohio.

Smith, Jack Edwin (1st award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 67 - 5 August 1950

Captain Jack Edwin Smith, O60347, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company M, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 8 July 1950 near Chonan, Korea. The 3d Battalion, 34th Infantry had the mission of defending the town of Chonan. The Battalion became disorganized due to an encirclement by the enemy. Captain Smith, the Heavy Weapons Company Commander, became aware of the situations and made a reconnaissance of the area to locate positions to set up heavy machine guns and 81 millimeter mortars. After locating positions for his weapons he personally directed the setting up of the weapons. The area was under heavy enemy artillery, mortar and automatic weapons fire. This act of courage and leadership on the part of Captain Smith inspired the men and kept the flank position from being overrun by the enemy. The fire from the machineguns and mortars inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy. After he had succeeded in halting the advance of the enemy, he made another reconnaissance, again under heavy enemy artillery and tank fire, for a safe withdrawal for the unit. During the withdrawal, he remained with the machineguns and mortars to see that all the men had withdrawn from their positions. This gallant act on the part of Captain Smith reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered service from Newton, KS.

Smith, Jack Edwin (2nd award)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 123 - 9 September 1950
Amended by General Orders No. 167 - 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Jack Edwin Smith (ASN: 0-60347), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 3d Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division in action on 20 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. The forward elements of the Division were surrounded by numerically superior enemy forces in Taejon and a withdrawal had been ordered. Before the withdrawal was completed the enemy established a series of roadblocks on the roads leading out of the city. Captain Smith seeing that the troops were disorganized, went to them and appointed temporary leaders. In order to prevent further disorganization he ordered a covering force set up to cover the withdrawal. When friendly forces had left the main part of town Captain Smith went to the area of the enemy roadblocks and under extremely heavy enemy fire took command of the troops there, causing them to effectively direct their fire on the enemy thus enabling them to withdraw through the roadblock. Only when all the troops had withdrawn did Captain Smith leave. Arriving at a second roadblock he again took command, organizing the troops into a fighting unit and knocking out the roadblock. He organized a party of approximately one hundred and fifty men approximately fifty of whom were wounded and led them to safety. Arriving at a friendly area Captain Smith contacted the local authorities and had his men billeted and wounded taken care of. Allowing himself no rest he contacted military authorities and had a hospital train dispatched to him to remove the wounded. Due to Captain Smith's self-sacrifice and devotion to duty many American troops were able to reach friendly lines. The gallant act displayed by Captain Smith reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Newton, Kansas.

Smith, J.B.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 417 - 2 September 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain J. B. Smith, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States on 21 January 1951 as pilot of an unarmed jet photo reconnaissance aircraft. Captain Smith displayed great courage in volunteering to go on a special mission, his second in two days, to obtain low altitude oblique photographs of the heavily defended city of Pyongyang, Korea. Realizing the importance of these photographs to the United Nations efforts, he undertook this mission although he knew he would be subjected to intense anti-aircraft and small arms fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, he entered the strongly defended target area and was last heard from when he radioed that he was beginning the first of his two planned photographic runs. Captain Smith's gallantry and devotion to duty in volunteering for this extremely hazardous mission were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Smith, Jessie Alvin (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Jessie Alvin Smith (MCSN: 1211413), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Wireman attached to Company E, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 October 1952. When an intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage damaged vital communications lines, killing the forward observer, Private First Class Smith unhesitatingly advanced into the open area to repair the lines. Although painfully wounded about the face by the intense hostile fire while he was re-establishing communications, he refused medical assistance and remained alone in his forward position to call and direct accurate artillery supporting fire until he was struck down by enemy mortar fire and fell, mortally wounded. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and zealous devotion to duty, Private First Class Smith served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 13, 1930 at Knoxville, Kentucky. Home Town: Sebree, Kentucky. Death: KIA: October 26, 1952.

Smith, John D. (Army)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 192 - 26 September 1950

Private First Class John D. Smith, RA15280643, Infantry, Company D, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 26 July 195 Private First Class Smith was serving as a machine gunner in the vicinity of Tabu-dong, Korea when the company position was subjected to a barrage of mortar fire followed by an attack in force.  Although he suffered a serious head wound early in the action, Private First Class Smith remained in position and continued to deliver effective fire on the hostile forces.  Despite profuse bleeding from his wound, Private First Class Smith declined evacuation until the company was ordered to displace to prepared positions.  The gallant stand of Private First Class Smith enabled his company to inflict severe casualties on the enemy and provided a lasting inspiration for his comrades.  Entered the military service from Ohio.

Smith, John D. (Navy)

Headquarters, United States Naval Service
28 December 1952

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman John D. Smith (NSN: 3036105), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 - 30 November 1952. Serving as Company Corpsman, Hospitalman Smith displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. Although struck down by concussion, he ignored his own condition in an effort to continue administering aid to the numerous casualties in the company throughout the night. Disregarding the intense enemy mortar and artillery fire, he fearlessly moved across open ground to the side of his comrades in need. Exhibiting indomitable spirit, under the most adverse conditions, he continued to work for almost twelve hours until a latent blindness occurred and only when it became total, did he unwillingly abandon his treatment of the wounded. Even then he stayed by their side and continued to raise their spirits with his words of encouragement. His untiring efforts during the twelve hours of impending blindness were instrumental in saving the lives of many Marines. Hospitalman Smith's gallant and intrepid actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 39628

Smith, John H. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 69 - 5 August 1950

Sergeant John H. Smith, RA6228711, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery A, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star posthumously for gallantry in action on 19 July 1950 at Taejon, Korea. A superior number of enemy were surrounding and overrunning American positions at Taejon. The switch board which was keeping communication for the battery was knocked out by enemy shelling. Sergeant Smith voluntarily left his foxhole and reinstalled the switchboard, enabling his unit to fire counter-fire. In spite of heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire falling in his area, SGT Smith remained at the switchboard until killed in action by enemy mortar fire. Sergeant Smith’s superior devotion to duty and courage in face of great danger reflects the highest credit on himself and the Military Service. Entered service from Fort Sill, OK.

Smith, Joseph T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Joseph T. Smith (MCSN: 1195271), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radioman of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 August 1952. Painfully wounded in the arm by enemy mortar fire when his unit was subjected to a barrage of hostile fire while defending a key position against a fanatical enemy force, Corporal Smith proceeded to set up his radio and, after receiving treatment for his wounds, refused evacuation and volunteered to lay communications wire from the command post to one of the outlying platoons. Using his one good arm, he moved forward alone and, despite a virtual hail of hostile artillery and mortar fire which fell all around him, succeeded in installing the vitally needed wire. Although suffering intense pain from the shrapnel wounds in his arm, he continued his hazardous undertaking, consenting to evacuation only after completing the communications system by laying a new wire back to the main line of resistance. By his valiant determination, fortitude and selfless devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire, Corporal Smith served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Denver, Colorado. Home Town: Denver, Colorado.

Smith, Laverne N. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 46 - 20 July 1950

The Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Private Laverne Smith, RA17270103, Infantry, Army of the United States.  On the morning of 16 July 1950, the Second Platoon, Heavy Mortar Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, was in support of Company C which was subjected to a number of attacks by enemy infantry.  After a number of such attacks had been repulsed, the enemy succeeded in flanking the position of Company C and attacked between the rear of that organization and the heavy mortar position.  Since the enemy was inside heavy mortar range, the platoon defended its perimeter position with small arms fire.  When the position became untenable, the Platoon Leader gave the order to withdraw.  Private Smith, and three other soldiers, although unwounded and perfectly able to withdraw, volunteered to remain in the platoon position and hold off the enemy while the rest of the platoon withdrew.  During the time the platoon was withdrawing, Private Smith and his companions repulsed two assaults, killing at least nineteen of the enemy.  Defying odds of about thirty to one these soldiers enabled the main body of the platoon to withdraw and to take their wounded with them.  On the final enemy assault their position was overrun and all were killed.  Home Town: Shell Rock, Iowa.

Smith, Myron James (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Myron James Smith (MCSN: 1084719), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radio Operator attached to the Air and Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 and 30 November 1950. When his vitally needed radio became inoperative during a fierce assault by a numerically superior hostile force, Corporal Smith took charge of a detail and proceeded over open ground in the face of intense enemy fire to salvage parts from an abandoned radio. Despite sub-zero temperatures, he worked without gloves to perform a successful major overhaul on his radio which was essential to maintain contact with the command post. Early the following morning, during an intense enemy attack on his unit, he manned a machine gun and remained exposed to the withering hostile fire to cover the displacement of the regimental command post until his ammunition was exhausted. Obtaining a hand-packed radio from a wounded comrade, he took position with the assault company in the attack and, although suffering intense pain from frozen fingers and feet, remained all day to direct accurate fire upon the enemy until seriously wounded during an assault against a strong hostile roadblock that evening. Corporal Smith's gallant and inspiring actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: November 24, 1929 at Omaha, Nebraska. Home Town: Omaha, Nebraska. Death: MIA: November 30, 1950.

Smith, Nathan R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Nathan R. Smith (MCSN: 0-18753), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. When his assaulting platoons were subjected to devastating enemy small arms, mortar and automatic weapons fire, and temporarily unable to advance during the company attack against a well-fortified hostile position, Major Smith exposed himself to the deadly hostile barrage to move among his men, shouting words of encouragement and directing the continuation of the attack. After gaining fire superiority over the enemy, he led his men forward in a vicious assault upon the last hostile strong point. Although sustaining a severe chest wound during the assault, he refused medical attention and continued forward to rout the entrenched enemy, submitting to evacuation only after the position had been completely secured and a defense line established. By his outstanding courage, exemplary leadership and resolute determination, Major Smith served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: White Haven, Pennsylvania. Home Town: White Haven, Pennsylvania.

Smith, Ralph Arthur (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant Ralph Arthur Smith (NSN: 0-320896), United States Naval Reserve, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy as Pilot of a night attack plane attached to Composite Squadron Thirty-five (VC-35), on board the U.S.S. Boxer (CV-21), on 7 July 1953. While flying a night interdiction mission over Communist-held North Korea against enemy transportation facilities in the Anbyon area, Lieutenant Smith discovered a long string of truck traffic on a highway running through the heavily-defended valley south of Anbyon. Disregarding the extreme hazards concerned, he commenced bombing attacks by flare-light through extremely accurate anti-aircraft fire, and though hit in one wing by an explosive 20-mm. shell, succeeded in blowing up and destroying fifteen trucks loaded with vital supplies for attacking front-line troops. Running the gamut of well over one hundred anti-aircraft guns situated along the valley, Lieutenant Smith, knowing full-well that the element of surprise would be gone, and that by then every gun would be manned and firing, reversed his course and flew backup the valley through his own flare-light, and though his plane was hit again by an explosive shell, succeeded in destroying at least ten more loaded trucks with accurate bombing and strafing attacks. By his outstanding airmanship and extraordinary courage in the face of overwhelming opposition, Lieutenant Smith incalculably assisted the combat efforts of the United Nations Forces then under attack all along the front lines. His daring initiative and steadfast devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Board Serial 1086 (December 4, 1953). Born: March 16, 1921. Home Town: Salina, Kansas. Death: Missing in Action/Presumed KIA.

Smith, Oliver P.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Major General Oliver P. Smith (MCSN: 0-920), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commanding General, First Marine Division (Reinforced), United Nations Command, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Inchon-Seoul operation during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 50 (October 27, 1950). Born: October 26, 1893 at Menard, Texas. Entered Service From North Carolina. Death: December 25, 1977.

Smith, Robert E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert E. Smith (MCSN: 1097436), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 September 1951. When a machine gunner became a casualty during an early morning attack by a strong enemy force, Corporal Smith bravely moved through a hail of devastating hostile fire to reach the position and unhesitatingly placed the gun in action, centering deadly fire on advancing enemy units. As the attackers approached to within a few yards of his weapon, he leaped up, cradled the gun in his arms and, despite intense hostile small arms and grenade fire, delivered effective point-blank fire on the enemy. Painfully wounded by burns form a hostile signal pistol, Corporal Smith, by his inspiring courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty aided materially in repelling the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chattanooga, Tennessee. Home Town: Hixson, Tennessee.

Smith, Russell Joseph

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Russell Joseph Smith (MCSN: 1190228), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 27 March 1953. Serving as a Platoon Guide, Sergeant Smith displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty in the absence of his superiors. While engaged in combat with the enemy on an outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, he skillfully maneuvered the platoon through intense hostile mortar and artillery fire. Although painfully wounded, he refused evacuation and courageously led the assault on an enemy objective. Upon reaching the strategic position, the platoon was pinned down by devastating small arms fire. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he dauntlessly advanced and found a position from which he delivered deadly fire on an enemy machine gun bunker, putting it out of action and enabling the unit to move forward. Again refusing medical attention, he directed tank fire on another hostile installation. He reached the objective with the unit and moved about, caring for his injured comrades and directing the evacuation. Only after the hostile position had been fully secured would he allow himself to be evacuated. Sergeant Smith's gallant and courageous actions combined with his determination and indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Smith, Troy R. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Troy R. Smith, Jr. (MCSN: 348193), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Battery F, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 December 1950. When the infantry company to which he was attached as a scout observer sustained many casualties after encountering two heavily defended strong points manned by an estimated enemy battalion during its attack on a strategic hill position, Private First Class Smith, although exhausted from carrying wounded Marines down steep, snow-covered slopes on the preceding night, returned to his team and volunteered to move to the forward elements of the fire fight to aid in further evacuation of the wounded. Despite intense hostile small arms fire, he made three separate trips, carrying ammunition and grenades to the infantry and bringing back wounded Marines for medical treatment. By his outstanding courage, initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Private First Class Smith contributed materially to the saving of many lives and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: El Reno, Oklahoma. Home Town: Dallas, Texas.

Smith, Walter G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Walter G. Smith (MCSN: 379867), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. Assigned the mission of attacking along a narrow ridge line leading to a well-fortified enemy hill position that was the company's objective, Sergeant Smith led his squad through devastating hostile automatic weapons and hand grenade fire and launched a vicious bayonet charge which completely routed the entrenched enemy, killing seven and capturing several others. By his outstanding courage, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Sergeant Smith contributed materially to the success of his company and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Riverhead, New York. Home Town: Riverhead, New York.

Smith, William Y.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 232 - 15 May 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain William Y. Smith, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as Element Leader of a flight of four (4) F-84 type aircraft, 49th Fighter Bomber Wing, on an interdiction mission at Chongju, Korea, on 2 February 1952. As Captain Smith led his element on a dive bomb attack through intense anti-aircraft fire on an important rail line, a large anti-aircraft shell ripped through the fuselage of his aircraft, severing his right foot at the ankle. Despite shock and loss of blood, Captain Smith successfully completed his attack and made a wheels-up, deadstick landing behind enemy lines. Although intense pain from his injury made all movements extremely difficult, he crawled thirty yards to a boulder and evaded enemy troops for approximately one hour until he was rescued and returned to enemy territory. Captain Smith's outstanding airmanship and coolness during this hazardous incident reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Smithson, Robert W.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

Captain Robert W. Smithson, 01184153, Artillery, Army of the United Stated, Commanding Officer, Headquarters Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 28 January 1951 in the Wonju-Hoengsong, Korea, area.  Captain Smithson's battery was among the armor-infantry-artillery patrols dispatched from the vicinity of Wonju with the mission of entering Hoengsong, moving as far north into enemy territory as time would permit, seeking out the enemy forces, and striking deep into enemy-held territory with artillery fire.  The route from Wonju north was infested with guerillas and mine fields, and was subjected to enemy attacks in force.  Captain Smithson wisely stripped his battery or everything except those tactical elements absolutely required to move, communicate, and shoot with the least possible delay.  About three miles north of Wonju, the Battery came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire.  Captain Smithson immediately dispersed his vehicles and men for direct support of the infantry elements ahead.  Thee leadership and initiative displayed by Captain Smithson was primarily responsible for the minimum of casualties sustained by his troops.  The gallant conduct displayed by Captain Smithson reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from California.

Smyk, Walter Joseph Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Walter Joseph Smyk, Jr. (MCSN: 658168), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Gunner of a 3.5-in Rocket Launcher while attached to Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1950. Assigned the mission of engaging hostile positions with his rocket launcher when his company was subjected to heavy hostile small arms, machine gun and mortar fire, Corporal Smyk moved through the intense fire and located a position from which he succeeded in destroying several enemy mortar emplacements. When a hostile machine gun opened fire on his company and inflicted numerous casualties, he voluntarily crawled forward through intense fire to a position where he could observe and bring his fire to bear upon the machine gun. After firing four rounds and temporarily silencing the hostile gun, he was preparing to fire another round when he was mortally wounded by enemy small arms fire. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and steadfast devotion to duty throughout, Corporal Smyk contributed materially to the successful defense of his company's position, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 9872 (March 12, 1951). Born: March 19, 1931 at Baltimore, Maryland. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland. Death: KIA: November 30, 1950 - Buried at: National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific - Honolulu, Hawaii.

Smythe, Jack M.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 157 - 3 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Jack M. Smythe (ASN: RA-13276026), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy on 30 July 1950 near Kwonbin-ni, Korea. To eliminate the possibilities of valuable ammunition and equipment from falling into the hands of a hard pressing enemy during his battalion's withdrawal to new positions, Private Smythe volunteered to make a lone stand against the enemy. Arming himself with a 3.5 inch rocket launcher and three cases of ammunition he remained in the exposed position, effectively firing upon the enemy until all rockets had been expended. Returning, he loaded a 1/4 ton vehicle with weapons and a maximum of ammunition. The remainder he destroyed, thereby preventing its capture by the enemy. Only then did he leave the area for a position of greater safety. The gallantry displayed by Private Smythe reflects the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Bowie, Maryland.

Snee, James W.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 168 - 11 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Armor) James W. Snee (ASN: 0-19516), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy during the Waegwan-Taejon Offensive, 18 to 29 September 1950. As Acting Chief of Staff, G-3, Lieutenant Colonel Snee staffed and coordinated the Division Commander's attack plans against a tenacious enemy. Not content with merely writing operations instructions he personally visited the scene of action whenever difficulties appeared. The assault across the Naktong River was accomplished against great odds and bitter enemy opposition. Being present at the scene of fighting, he was able to advise the Division Commander of alternate plans of action which were adopted and successfully executed. Once beyond this obstacle, he visited the spearhead units on many occasions traveling over mine-infested roads; whenever a delay occurred he promptly ascertained the cause and often was instrumental in overcoming such obstructions. On many occasions he flew behind the enemy lines to determine what their next course of action would be and often succeeded in destroying enemy positions with supporting arms prior to the arrival of our spearhead ground units. In all instances he acted fearlessly and with utter disregard for his own life. Such gallantry reflects great credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Snee and the military service. Home Town: Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania.

Snell, James W. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 244 - 26 October 1950

Private First Class James W. Snell, RA12315161, Infantry, Company E, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  The light machine gun of which Private First Class Snell was assistant gunner was prominently engaged in driving off a determined attack on the company position near Hwanggan, Korea on 27 July 1950 when the booster cap and bipod blew off the weapon and rolled down the hill.  Despite the large volume of fire directed at him, Private First Class Snell crawled down the hill, retrieved the missing parts, returned to his position and held them in place on the weapon from an exposed position until he was mortally wounded.  Private First Class Snell's personal courage and devotion to duty were responsible for the continued operation of his machine gun in a critical situation and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from New Jersey.

Snelling, Nolan Harry (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Nolan Harry Snelling (MCSN: 544147), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. As a member of an eight-man patrol whose mission was to silence guns within an enemy cave, Corporal Snelling daringly crawled forward to a position where, in spite of intense hostile fire, he was able to direct heavy fire from his weapon upon the target. Succeeding in silencing one enemy gun, he was later mortally wounded by hostile gunfire. By his courage, initiative and loyal devotion to duty, Corporal Snelling materially aided his patrol in successfully completing its assigned mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 7814 (November 18, 1950). Born: June 5, 1926 at Pontiac, Michigan. Home Town: Bakersfield, California. Death: KIA: September 21, 1950 - Buried at: Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery - San Diego, California.

Snodgrass, Elmer

Sgt. 1C Elmer Snodgrass, Battery A, 15th AAA AW Bn. [SP], displayed gallantry in action against on armed enemy at Hoengsong, Korea, on 12 February 1951. Sergeant Snodgrass was protecting a road intersection with the two M-16 multiple machine gun half tracks of his section to permit the passage of a withdrawing task force. While his weapons were firing against the numerically superior enemy, Sergeant Snodgrass saw a wounded soldier crawl out of a burning house. Making his way through intense enemy mortar I automatic weapons and small arms fire, he rendered first aid to the wounded man and subsequently discovered seven other seriously wounded men in the house, all of whom were on litters and unarmed. While Sergeant Snodgrass was rendering first aid to them, the house was hit by enemy mortar fire. With the assistance of three members of his section, he carried the wounded men to a place of comparative safety. The gallant actions of Sergeant Snodgrass resulted in saving the lives of eight comrades and reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the service from Virginia.

Snyder, Elwood M. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 9;1 - 15 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Elwood M. Snyder (ASN: RA-13309654), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 10 July 1950 near Cho Chi Won, Korea. Company K had successfully launched an attack and had driven the enemy from their positions. Upon reaching their final objective, Private First Class Snyder was seriously wounded in the chest. Before he could be evacuated, the enemy launched a strong counter-attack against their positions. Although seriously wounded he secured his Browning Automatic Rifle and started firing on the enemy attacking forces. The accurate fire from his BAR and the small arms fire from the other men of his platoon halted the enemy attack and forced them to withdraw. He was evacuated to the battalion aid station which was under heavy artillery and automatic weapons fire and while lying on a stretcher waiting to be given medical care he was again seriously wounded. The act of gallantry displayed by Private First Class Snyder reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Born: 1931. Home Town: Reynoldsville, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: July 11, 1950 - Buried at: Emerickville Cemetery - Emerickville, Pennsylvania.

Snyder, Harold N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Harold N. Snyder (MCSN: 1212840), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Wireman of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 3 to 5 April 1953. While operating with his unit far forward of the main line of resistance during the defense of a vital combat outpost which was subjected to deadly hostile mortar and artillery fire throughout this period, Private First Class Snyder bravely traversed the area in the face of the murderous enemy fire to ensure the maintenance of the communication system between the outpost and the main line of resistance. On five separate occasions, he led patrols forward of the outpost in an attempt to recover the bodies of Marines killed in a previous action. On one occasion, he advanced forward under a deadly hail of enemy machine gun, mortar and artillery fire in an attempt to reach the isolated bodies. Although painfully wounded by the hostile fire, he successfully accomplished his mission and subsequently aided in the evacuation of the wounded. By his indomitable courage, initiative and steadfast devotion to duty, Private First Class Snyder served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Jackson, Mississippi. Home Town: Jackson, Mississippi.

Soderquist, Harold H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Harold H. Soderquist (MCSN: 585562), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 March 1951. When a fellow Marine was seriously wounded by enemy mortar fire during an engagement with numerically superior hostile forces, Corporal Soderquist fearlessly moved to the stricken man's side and shielded him with his own body to protect him from further harm as the attackers continued to lay down heavy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire. Although painfully wounded himself, he calmly remained in his exposed position under the intense barrage until friendly mortars had silenced the enemy's fire and a safe withdrawal could be effected. By his daring initiative, extraordinary courage and grave concern for another at great risk to his own life, Corporal Soderquist undoubtedly saved the life of one who otherwise might have perished. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Leamington, Utah. Home Town: Salt Lake City, Utah.

Solheim, Howard W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Howard W. Solheim (MCSN: 278218), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant in Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 September 1950. Unaware that the boat with his platoon leader and one squad aboard had crashed and had not come ashore as scheduled during the initial Inchon landing, Technical Sergeant Solheim quickly organized the rest of the platoon and commenced to carry out the platoon's assigned mission. Directing the capture and evacuation to the rear of approximately fifty prisoners taken by his platoon, he then skillfully directed a flanking assault upon his platoon's objective which was secured with no casualties among his own men and approximately twenty of the enemy destroyed. His outstanding leadership, courage and initiative reflect the highest credit upon Technical Sergeant Solheim and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Minot, North Dakota. Home Town: Fessenden, North Dakota.

Sollom, Almond H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Almond H. Sollom (MCSN: 0-24382), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 September 1950. When a group of by-passed hostile troops opened fire in him while he was reconnoitering for advance mortar positions, Captain Sollom, together with the company gunnery sergeant, immediately engaged the enemy soldiers, killing four and capturing twelve and, despite hostile mortar and small arms fire, delivered the prisoners to the company area. Later, he organized and led a patrol back to the scene of action to engage the remainder of the enemy force, thereby materially aiding his company in successfully displacing forward and supporting the continuation of the attack. By his marked courage, brilliant leadership and devotion to duty, Captain Sollom upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Thief River Falls, Minnesota. Home Town: Bagley, Minnesota.

Sonnentag, Anthony A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 136 - 18 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Anthony A. Sonnentag (ASN: US-55035859), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Yongon-ni, Korea, on 20 October 1951. His unit had the mission of defending a hill from attack by the enemy. Under the cover of darkness the fanatical foe began their assault and they were aided by such an intense, murderous concentration of mortar and small arms fire that the friendly troops decided to withdraw for tactical reasons. Realizing the danger of the enemy overrunning the friendly troops Corporal Sonnentag, remained behind to act as a rear guard. He delivered a devastating hail of bullets and held back the hostile troops until his unit was able to complete an orderly withdrawal. Corporal Sonnentag's gallant action, outstanding initiative and selfless performance of duty were a great inspiration to his comrades and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered Service From Wisconsin.

Sorick, John Oscar

By direction of the President of the United States, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul. 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following named enlisted man: Sergeant First Class John Oscar Sorick, a member of Medical Company, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Infantry), displayed gallantry in action near Kumchon, Korea, on 31 July 1950. The enemy was attempting to capture the city of Kumchon, Korea where Sergeant Sorick’s unit was engaged in the treatment and evacuation of the wounded. While under fire from enemy mortar and small arms fire, Sergeant Sorick repeatedly exposed himself in order to move from one wounded man to another, administering plasma and otherwise treating the wounded. Sergeant Sorick, after treating and evacuating many patients was wounded himself in the face, arm and leg by enemy mortar shell fragments. Sergeant Sorick’s gallant conduct reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.  General Orders: General Orders number 65, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division (Infantry), 21 August 1950. Home of Record: California.

Sosa, Cayetano (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 74 - 7 August 1950

Private First Class Cayetano Sosa, RA18320021, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star posthumously for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950 near Yongdong, Korea. During an enemy attack on the battery’s position, PFC Sosa volunteered to operate a .50 caliber machinegun which was located some distance from the battery as an outpost. This position was under heavy small arms and mortar fire. He continued to operate the machinegun until he was mortally wounded by small arms fire. This courageous act inspired the other men of the battery to continue to defend their positions. The act of gallantry displayed by PFC Sosa reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. Entered service from Laredo, TX.

Soucie, Francis Philip (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Francis Philip Soucie (MCSN: 1169438), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader attached to Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 August 1952. When his sector was subjected to a furious enemy mortar and artillery bombardment while his platoon was defending a strategic position on "Bunker Hill," Private First Class Soucie repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy small arms and machine gun fire, moving from one position to another to encourage his men and assisting in carrying the casualties over a ridge line to positions of comparative safety. While skillfully directing the fire of his teammates and continuing to shout words of encouragement, he was hit by a fragment from a bursting enemy artillery shell and fell, mortally wounded. By his courage, daring initiative and zealous devotion to duty, Private First Class Soucie served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: July 20, 1933 at Cambridge, Massachusetts. Home Town: Cambridge, Massachusetts. Death: KIA: August 18, 1952 - Buried at: Cambridge Cemetery - Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Southerland, Lyndell Manuel (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 69 - 5 August 1950

Captain Lyndell Manuel Southerland, O1175588, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery A, 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star posthumously for gallantry in action on 14 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. Battery A was supporting the 34th Infantry Regiment when wire communications were destroyed by enemy artillery fire. Captain Southerland was acting as liaison officer and personally hand carried a fire mission to the battery he commanded. The route he had to traverse was under heavy artillery fire. His vehicle barely missed being hit on several occasions, and as a result of this fire mission the battalion expended several hundred rounds of ammunition inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and knocking out two enemy tanks. Later during the day the battery was surprised by an enemy infantry attack from both flanks and the rear. With disregard for his own safety, Captain Southerland continued to direct the firing of his battery until he was seriously wounded by enemy fire. Although seriously wounded, Captain Southerland continued to direct the destruction of equipment and the withdrawal of the personnel. During this time he received another wound in the neck and died instantly. This gallant and courageous act on the part of Captain Southerland reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service. Entered service from Tyler, TX.

Souza, Melvin

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 372 - 29 July 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Melvin Souza, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 67th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 18th Fighter-Bomber Group, FIFTH Air Force, on 21 April 1952. Leading a flight of four F-51 type aircraft, Lieutenant Souza displayed outstanding airmanship and courage when he affected the safe escape of a battle damaged helicopter which had picked up a downed F-80 pilot near Sonchon, Korea. Without regard for enemy ground fire, Lieutenant Souza positioned himself under the helicopter and, as the enemy opened fire, led his flight in numerous devastating attacks which silenced several of their guns. Lieutenant Souza continued his attacks along the rescue course and effectively prevented the enemy from directing fire against the damaged helicopter. As a result of Lieutenant Souza's high personal courage and superior airmanship, the helicopter and its rescued cargo were able to proceed safely to a friendly base. Through his outstanding gallantry in action against determined enemy opposition, Lieutenant Souza reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Sozzoni, Peter

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 277 - 21 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Pete Sozzoni (ASN: RA-19295898), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company C, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Sozzoni distinguished himself by courageous action near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. As his crew started across the open beach and reached the water's edge during the assault crossing of the Naktong River the enemy opened fire with mortars and automatic weapons. In spite of the intense fire he led his men in the crossing of the river time and again. On one occasion the enemy scored direct hits on h is boat, but undaunted he retrieved another and continued the flow of men and arms to the far shore. Sergeant Sozzoni's courageous action, devotion to duty and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Engineer Corps. Home Town: Ukiah, California.

Spafford, Richard L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Richard L. Spafford (MCSN: 1160036), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 July 1952. Returning from a combat patrol, Private First Class Spafford volunteered to join a rescue party attempting to locate a missing man. When the searching patrol dispersed at the foot of an enemy-held hill upon the advice of a friendly outpost, he immediately proceeded up the hill in company with another Marine and fearlessly exposed himself to hostile small arms, grenade and mortar fire as he advanced to within a few yards of the enemy. After finding the body of the missing Marine, he carried it down the hill in the face of the heavy fire and, although painfully wounded, persisted in his efforts until the intensity of the enemy fire forced him to leave the deceased man near the foot of the hill, where a later patrol subsequently returned to the casualty to friendly lines. By his resolute determination, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Spafford served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Vista, California. Home Town: Redondo Beach, California.

Spangenberg, Leo M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Leo M. Spangenberg (MCSN: 664306), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rocket Gunner of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 March 1951. When the company's advance was temporarily halted by intense and accurate hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire during an attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Private First Class Spangenberg unhesitatingly moved through the devastating fire to an exposed area in order to place heavy rocket fire on the hostile emplacements and, when his rocket ammunition was expended, continued with the company as a rifleman. While administering first aid to a comrade who had been wounded by shrapnel when the unit was subjected to a fierce enemy grenade barrage, he observed a hostile grenade rolling directly toward the casualty and, bravely leaping forward to shield the fallen man from the explosion with his own body, succeeded in saving him from more serious wounds or possible death, although he, himself, sustained severe leg wounds. By his outstanding courage, valiant fighting spirit and self-sacrificing devotion to duty, Private First Class Spangenberg served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Jersey City, New Jersey. Home Town: Jersey City, New Jersey.

Spear, Thomas J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Thomas J. Spear (MCSN: 562119), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of an Artillery Forward Observer Team of Battery I, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. After two infantrymen had been hit and seriously wounded by hostile fire and on two attempts to evacuate the casualties, the rescuers had been wounded and failed to reach the helpless Marines, Corporal Spear fearlessly braved heavy enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire, succeeded in reaching the two wounded men and, after evacuating one, returned through the hostile barrage to rescue the other. His courageous initiative, unselfish consideration for others and inspiring devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk reflect great credit upon Corporal Spear and the United States Naval Service. Born: New Orleans, Louisiana. Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana.

Speed, Jack P.

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 19 - 28 May 1965

Master Sergeant Jack P. Speed, United States Army, while serving with the 28th Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed enemy on 4 November 1951, in the vicinity of Kumwha, Korea.  When the unit commander was seriously wounded during the infiltration of the enemy's first line of defense at an outpost, Sergeant Speed immediately assumed command.  With fortitude and determination, he rallied the raiders of his unit and led them in charge after charge through intense enemy gun fire, and into the enemy's second line of defense.  In one bold charge, he succeeded in knocking out the machine gun at the enemy's key strong point and personally annihilated a great number of the enemy troops.  Although he was wounded in the stomach during this action, he refused evacuation and continued with the mission of mopping up the enemy positions, directing the raiders' gun fire, and assisting his fellow soldiers in reaching the objective.  Sergeant Speed's conspicuous gallantry is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Speedy, George Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class George Speedy, Jr. (MCSN: 1048304), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. When the enemy penetrated to his position and surrounded him during a vicious night attack, Private First Class Speedy defiantly refused an enemy demand to surrender and, opening fire with his rifle, threw his would-be captors into confusion and forced them to withdraw, although he himself fell mortally wounded during the action. By his daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of almost insurmountable odds, Private First Class Speedy served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the successful maintenance of his platoon's position, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 7, 1923 at Stoneville, Ohio. Home Town: Hartville, Ohio. Death: KIA: May 29, 1951 - Buried at: East Akron Cemetery - Akron, Ohio.

Spies, Harry R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Harry R. Spies (MCSN: 351305), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Guide of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 December 1950. When leading elements of the platoon were subjected to devastating hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire during the attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position, Sergeant Spies skillfully directed the attached machinegun section in delivering accurate fire on the enemy positions. Observing that the gunner of one weapon was wounded, he rushed forward and, removing the stricken Marine to a safe position, quickly manned the machine gun. As the platoon moved forward in the assault, he accompanied the leading elements and accurately fired rifle grenades into enemy bunkers. When his supply of rifle grenades was exhausted, he obtained hand grenades and, despite the withering hostile fire, continued to neutralize enemy entrenchments. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Spies contributed materially to the success of his unit in seizing the strategic ground and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Lyndhurst, New Jersey.

Spofford, James R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 660 - 31 December 1952

Lieutenant Colonel James R. Spofford, 13371A, United States Air Force.  Colonel Spofford distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot of an F-80G aircraft, 8th Fighter-Bomber Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 13 July 1952.  As Flight Leader of a flight of four F-80 type aircraft, Colonel Spofford displayed outstanding airmanship and navigational skill in leading his flight through intense and accurate automatic weapons fire to dive bomb enemy artillery, supply caves and bunkers.  Upon entering his dive-bombing run, Colonel Spofford's aircraft received a direct hit in the right main wing tank, exploding it, causing a large hole in the main spar and major damage to the horizontal stabilizer.  Disregarding personal safety, Colonel Spofford continued his run, assisting in the destruction of six bunkers and one artillery piece.  After the bomb run it was discovered that his wingman was also hit.  Although Colonel Spofford's aircraft was hard to control, he maintained his usual high caliber of leadership and directed from the area the flight of his wingman, whose cockpit was filled with smoke.  As a result of this highly successful mission the enemy was substantially hindered in pressing any further attack in that sector.  By his high personal courage, flying skill and exemplary devotion to duty, Colonel Spofford reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Sporrer, Otto E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Commander (CC) Otto E. Sporrer (NSN: 0-215778), United States Navy, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving as Chaplain, First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action in the Yongsan area of the Naktong River, Korea, on 18 August 1950. On this date, Lieutenant Commander Sporrer, in his capacity as Catholic Chaplain visited the forward aid station of the Fifth Marines, then in attack on enemy positions of the ridges west of the Naktong River. Learning that a number of wounded were on the ridges awaiting evacuation, Lieutenant Commander Sporrer organized a litter bearing team of Korean Civilians, and, showing a high degree of courage and skill, led them through heavy small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. By his leadership and example, Lieutenant Commander Sporrer encouraged the litter team to continue even after they had been pinned down by enemy fire. He then succeeded in evacuating a number of seriously wounded to the aid station. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Commander Sporrer reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 162 (November 8, 1950).

Springfield, William B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant William B. Springfield (MCSN: 0-52274), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Artillery Forward Observer of Battery I, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 May 1952. When the patrol to which he was attached was attacked by fifty of the enemy employing accurate small arms and grenade fire, inflicting several casualties on the unit while it was engaged in a mission to bring defensive fires on the enemy, Second Lieutenant Springfield immediately brought down previously planned artillery fire to break up the attack. Forced to assume a position in the open due to terrain conditions, he courageously exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire to observe the hostile force and to adjust artillery fire. Although painfully wounded by enemy fire, he continued to direct fire on the opposition, accounting for an estimated twenty-five enemy dead and approximately twenty others wounded. By his professional skill, exceptional leadership and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Springfield served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Corsicona, Texas. Home Town: Ennis, Texas.

Spuhler, Raymond H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Raymond H. Spuhler (MCSN: 0-15628), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 June 1951. Although painfully wounded when his company was subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage while he was leading the unit in the attack on a strongly fortified enemy hill position, Major Spuhler refused to be evacuated and fearlessly continued to expose himself to heavy enemy fire to direct the final seizure of the objective. Despite the severe pain from his wounds, he expertly established a defense line and remained with his company throughout the night to assure the integrity of the position. By his aggressive fighting spirit, outstanding leadership and courageous initiative, Major Spuhler served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Johnstown, Pennsylvania.

St. Amand, Gilbert E.J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Gilbert E. J. St. Amand (NSN: 2097610), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 12 June 1951. Observing an enemy hand grenade fall on the chest of a wounded man when the company was subjected to devastating hostile small-arms, automatic weapons and hand grenade fire during an attack against a bitterly defended enemy hill position, Corpsman St. Amand quickly leaped forward, seized the deadly missile and hurled it back at the enemy. Although sustaining serious wounds in the arm and leg when the grenade exploded a few feet from his hand, he refused to be evacuated in order to assist in carrying other wounded Marines to safety and to direct the rendering of first aid, accepting treatment for his own wounds only after all other casualties had been cared for. By his outstanding courage, quick initiative and gallant devotion to duty, Hospital Corpsman Third Class St. Amand served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division, SERIAL 60174 (November 30, 1951).

St. Clair, Albert J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Albert J. St. Clair (MCSN: 1276848), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving s a Machine Gunner of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 July 1953. During the initial assault by enemy troops on his sector of the main line of resistance, Private First Class St. Clair delivered accurate machine gun fire which inflicted many casualties on the hostile troops and forced them to halt the attack. With the main enemy force withdrawing to continue its attack from defensive positions while a hostile unit of approximately squad size moved to the rear area of his position, he quickly removed the machine gun from its mount, rushed from the bunker into the trench line in order to meet the onrushing troops and gallantly fired the machine gun from his arms, causing numerous casualties among the enemy and again forcing their withdrawal. When assured that the attackers had completely withdrawn from the rear position, he placed his weapon in the exposed trench line and remained in the endangered position throughout the night to fire on the enemy. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and steadfast devotion to duty, Private First Class St. Clair served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Newton Township, Ohio. Home Town: Newton Falls, Ohio.

St. Clair, Howard B. (1st citation)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 16 - 24 January 1951

Lieutenant Colonel Howard B. St. Clair 022017, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, First Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 21 November 1950, in the vicinity of Halmjong, Korea, Company "B" was probing the enemy when attacked by two to three hundred enemy troops. During the attack many difficulties accrued, and Lieutenant Colonel St. Clair personally proceeded to the isolated company in order to determine the extent of the difficulties. With utter disregard for his own safety, he placed himself in a forward position under intense small arms fire and observed the surrounding conditions. Then he quickly reorganized the company which enabled another attack by the enemy to be repulsed. Lieutenant Colonel St. Clair's outstanding devotion to duty, leadership, and courage were inspiring to his command. His gallantry under fire exemplifies the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from the State of West Virginia.

St. Clair, Howard B. (2nd citation)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 512 - 14 November 1951

Lieutenant Colonel Howard B. St. Clair, 022017, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 25 April 1951, the first of a 3-day enemy counteroffensive, the 1st Battalion was attacked from the rear by a large hostile force, near Uijonbu, Korea, which had infiltrated the reserve company's position under cover of a dense fog and then attempted to crash through the battalion perimeter. Personally organizing the support company, Colonel St. Clair crossed bullet-swept terrain many times to do so and then, aware that the continuing enemy pressure made a withdrawal expedient, he directed effective covering fire, under the protection of which the battalion fell back to a previously designated blocking position. In this location, the unit was again struck by the pursuing enemy forces and in order to direct a successful defense, Colonel St. Clair repeatedly moved about on an exposed ridge, kept under fire by 5 hostile machineguns, to observe the action and control the counter fire. After fighting a fierce engagement, the battalion, skillfully led by Colonel St. Clair, once more necessarily withdrew to a new line of defense. Here again sustaining a hostile attack of regimental strength, the unit held off and threw back the assault with staggering losses as Colonel St. Clair moved fearlessly about the embattled perimeter urging his battle weary troops to stand firm. The personal gallantry and brilliant application of fire and maneuver reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of West Virginia.

St. John, Roscoe R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Roscoe R. St. John (MCSN: 0-29619), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirty-Three (VMF(AW)-533), FIRST Marine Aircraft Wing, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 October 1951. When the Navy Rescue Helicopter he was escorting was taken under intense enemy anti-aircraft fire, Captain St. John immediately maneuvered his plane to an altitude approximately 2,000 feet below the harassed craft and, flying back and forth across the hostile fire batteries, succeeded in drawing the fire away from the helicopter, permitting it to proceed safely to the successful completion of its mission. By his expert airmanship, daring tactics and outstanding courage in the face of tremendous odds, Captain St. John contributed materially to the success of an extremely difficult rescue assignment, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Los Angeles, California. Home Town: Grants Pass, Oregon.

Stafford, Dorin S. (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Dorin S. Stafford (NSN: 3935209), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1950. Hospitalman Stafford was serving as a Corpsman in a rifle platoon on an independent outpost mission when the platoon was subjected to heavy enemy small arms, machine gun fire, and suffered numerous casualties. Without regard for his own personal safety, he exposed himself to the enemy fire to administer aid and evacuate the wounded Marines. One group of enemy succeeded in overrunning the forward elements of the platoon's rear. The platoon was ordered to withdraw to more favorable positions when Hospitalman Stafford voluntarily rushed into the enemy hordes to aid a wounded Marine who was calling for help. His outstanding display of devotion to duty and aggressive actions were an inspiration for all members of his platoon and undoubtedly saved the lives of many wounded Marines. As a result of this action, he is missing in action. Hospitalman Stafford's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 9896 (March 13, 1951). Born: January 27, 1924. Home Town: Portland, Oregon. Death: Missing in Action/Presumed KIA.

Stahelski, Anthony F.

Captain Anthony F. Stahelski, O1167648, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 14 July 1950 near Samgye-ri, Korea. Captain Stahelski’s battery was surrounded by enemy infantry and subjected to heavy mortar fire from a nearby hill. Displaying complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain Stahelski directed the action of the firing battery. With the entire battery being overrun by enemy infantry, Captain Stahelski maneuvered two howitzer sections into a position for withdrawal, but in the interim all the battery’s trucks were destroyed by enemy action. In the face of heavy sniper fire Captain Stahelski started a withdrawal action, destroying all equipment. Fighting a delaying action, Captain Stahelski took with him 150 enlisted men and 6 officers into the hill on the right flank, and after an all night march through enemy territory brought them to the safety of our lines. This conspicuous act of gallantry on the part of Captain Stahelski reflects great credit on himself and the military service. GO 78, 8 Aug 1950. Entered service from Westfield, Massachusetts.

Stainbrook, Theodore A. Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Theodore A. Stainbrook, Jr. (ASN: RA-15278663), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company H, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 28 November 1950 near Samao-ri, Korea. While Corporal Stainbrook's battalion was moving along the main supply route they were ambushed by a strong enemy force that threatened to overrun the convoy. During the ensuing action, Corporal Stainbrook's machine gun section was committed to eliminate the road block. In a short time many casualties were suffered. At great risk to his own life, Corporal Stainbrook voluntarily moved about, in the heavy enemy mortar, automatic weapons and rifle fire, to reach and carry wounded comrades to a covered position. As the enemy pressure increased, he organized available troops and formed a defense line between the casualties and the enemy. Courageously continuing to direct fire against the onrushing hordes, Corporal Stainbrook staunchly remained at his self appointed post until he was overrun by overwhelming enemy troops. His completely selfless and inspiring example of supreme devotion to duty saved the lives of several men. Corporal Stainbrook's gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Stallard, Walter E. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 277 - 21 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Walter E. Stallard (ASN: RA-13303071), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as a member of Company C, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Stallard distinguished himself by courageous action near Waegwam, Korea, on 19 September 1950. During the assault crossing of the Naktong River he was one of the first to reach the water's edge and to make the perilous crossing. Continuously exposed to a hail of withering fire he urged his boat crew on to greater efforts. Returning to the friendly shore the boat was subjected to intense mortar fire. Rallying his men he succeeded in loading the boat with men and arms and setting forth across the fire-swept stream. Enemy mortar fire struck the boat causing momentary confusion. By his outstanding leadership and cool conduct he was able to bring the boat safely to the shore where enemy fire raked the area and Sergeant Stallard was seriously wounded. His courageous actions, devotion to duty and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Engineer Corps. Born: 1929. Home Town: Pound, Virginia. Death: KIA: September 30, 1950.

Stamford, Edward P.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Captain Edward P. Stamford (MCSN: 0-30251), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with the 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division (U.S. Army) in the Chosin Reservoir area on 27 November 1950, and again on 1 December 1950. On 27 November 1950, Company A was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force which overran the company Command Post and the third platoon, killing the company commander, the platoon leader and seriously wounding the platoon sergeant. Captain Stamford, sensing the immediate danger, voluntarily and without regard for his own personal safety, exposed himself to withering enemy fire in order to rally the platoon and lead a successful counter attack against the enemy. He then ordered the second platoon to move to a better position so as to bolster the defense of the perimeter. On 30 November 1950, while with the leading elements of the regiment, Captain Stamford directed air strikes against the enemy on the perimeter. When his radio operator was hit and seriously wounded, he placed the radio on his back and continued to direct the air attack, while exposed to small arms and automatic weapons fire. Captain Stamford's courageous leadership, tactical ability and high devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 157 (July 22, 1951). Entered Service From Florida.

Stampley, Roy

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 252 - 28 October 1950

Sergeant Roy Stampley, RA14031624, Artillery, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 64th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  On 1 September 1950 near Masan, Korea, Sergeant Stampley was serving as forward observer with a front line infantry company.  When intense hostile fire damaged his equipment he continued to adjust fire from an exposed position until communications were completed disrupted and his attempts to repair them were without effect.  He then adjusted mortar fire for the infantry, maintaining his highly vulnerable post in order more accurately to accomplish the mission.  By his initiative and indomitable devotion to duty Sergeant Stamply contributed materially in repelling the fanatical attack.  Entered the military service from Mississippi.

Standa, Edward J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Edward J. Standa (MCSN: 658650), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 March 1953. When his unit became engaged in combat an outpost well forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Standa ran seventy-five yards through devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire to reach two wounded Marines and render aid to them. Realizing the danger to the stricken men who were lying exposed to the hostile fire, he exerted tremendous physical stamina and resourcefulness to carry both men to safety. Again braving the intense hostile fire, he returned to the site where the men had been wounded, retrieved their automatic weapons and brought them back to be utilized by the other members of the platoon. By his outstanding courage under fire, quick initiative and gallant devotion to duty, Sergeant Standa served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: East Taylor Township, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Conemaugh, Pennsylvania.

Stanley, George D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class George D. Stanley (MCSN: 1092621), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 October 1950. Serving as a member of the point quad during a night attack against a strongly defended enemy position when his unit was temporarily pinned down by intense, close-range hostile automatic weapons, rifle and grenade fire, Private First Class Stanley unhesitatingly moved through the withering enemy fire to render aid to several wounded comrades lying in the exposed fire-swept area. Although painfully wounded while administering emergency treatment and assisting the casualties to safety, he continued to aid the stricken Marines, seeking treatment for his own wounds only after all other casualties had been removed from the danger area. By his outstanding courage, fortitude and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of others in the face of enemy fire, Private First Class Stanley served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Norristown, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Norristown, Pennsylvania.

Stanley, Lee R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 569 - 4 December 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Lee R. Stanley, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy in Korea on 30 August 1951, while participating in a voluntary experimental rocket mission near Sunchon, Korea with the 49th Fighter-Bomber Group, FIFTH Air Force. Captain Stanley, as flight leader of a unit of four F-84E type aircraft, demonstrated exceptional airmanship and heroism while attacking enemy rail transportation and supplies with experimental rockets and machine guns. Sighting a heavily-loaded supply train heading towards the front lines, Captain Stanley, disregarding heavy enemy ground fire, pressed the attack, completely destroying the locomotive and numerous tank cars. Before he could pull off the target, Captain Stanley's badly damaged aircraft disintegrated. As a result of this highly successful mission, valuable data were obtained on the experimental rocket. The heroism and devotion to duty displayed by Captain Stanley were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Staples, Carl Willis (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Carl Willis Staples (MCSN: 0-55033), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Platoon Commander of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1952. While participating in an assault to regain a vital sector of the main line of resistance which had been overrun by the enemy, Second Lieutenant Staples skillfully led his unit through an intense hostile mortar and artillery barrage to a strategic position where the final attack could be launched. Although suffering from a concussion, he continued to direct the fire of his men in an effort to destroy enemy snipers pinning down his platoon and, refusing to seek cover, personally killed two of the snipers and wounded several others before he was struck down, mortally wounded. By his inspiring courage, outstanding leadership and selfless devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Staples was greatly responsible for the success of the final assault, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 8, 1929 at Everett, Washington. Home Town: South Braintree, Massachusetts. Death: KIA: October 27, 1952.

Stebner, Arthur Robert (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Arthur Robert Stebner (MCSN: 666935), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Jeep Driver and Radio Operator in Headquarters Company, First Signal Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1950. When the Division convoy was subjected to a vicious hail of enemy fire which wounded him and damaged his jeep, Sergeant Stebner courageously refused evacuation to remain in the jeep and work on his radio in an attempt to re-establish communications with the convoy commander. Although wounded a second time by small arms fire from hostile troops who had advanced to within a few yards of the column, he resolutely persisted in the repair work until he fell, mortally wounded. By his unflagging determination and steadfast devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Stebner served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 23, 1929 at Cleveland, Ohio. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio. Death: KIA: December 6, 1950 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Steel, Clyde J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Clyde J. Steel (MCSN: 1226992), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 October 1952. Undaunted by the severe pain of his own wounds when he and his comrades were wounded s enemy infantry troops, firing automatic weapons and hurling hand grenades, attacked under a devastating artillery and mortar barrage while the combat patrol was advancing toward an outpost, Private First Class Steel quickly pulled his companions out of the wire in which they had become entangled and removed them to the trail. Fearlessly advancing through the intensified hostile fire to the outpost position, he obtained several men and stretchers to assist in rescuing the patrol members. After the successful completion of the evacuation, he unhesitatingly returned to the fire-swept trail to recover a radio to call supporting fires for the defense of the outpost and assisted the Corpsman in administering aid to the wounded Marines, refusing evacuation until the enemy had been repulsed. By his marked fortitude, outstanding bravery and courageous initiative, Private First Class Steel served to inspire all who observed him and was directly instrumental in saving the lives of his comrades, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Toledo, Ohio. Home Town: Toledo, Ohio.

Steel, John A.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class John A. Steel (MCSN: 636163), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea by firing on the enemy from an exposed position in order to prevent the evacuation of an enemy ammunition truck in September 1950. Private First Class Steel fearlessly continued firing. This display of gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and the Naval Service of the United States. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 5 (September 27, 1950). Home Town: Jacksonville, Florida.

Steele, John W. (posthumous)

General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

Sergeant First Class John W. Steele, RA 34100759, Infantry, a member of Company "K", 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy the morning of 11 July 1950 near Chochiwon, Korea.  Sergeant Steele was the weapons platoon sergeant of Company "K" and as such was inspecting platoon positions when the enemy attacked from the left flank.  The position was held until the enemy further flanked and set up four machineguns and began inflicting heavy casualties on Company "K".  The order to withdraw came and even though Sergeant Steele realized it meant death he calmly walked through his platoon positions while under automatic weapons, rifle and mortar fire encouraging, directing and assisting his men in the withdrawal.  In this effort Sergeant Steele was killed.  His actions reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.

Steele, Leon W.

General Orders No. 481 - 16 November 1953
Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division

Sergeant First Class (then Sergeant) Leon W. Steele, RA12290526, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 16 July 1953, in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, Sergeant Steele was platoon sergeant of a combat patrol advancing to Hill "326", a contested position near enemy lines. Reaching the crest of the hill, Sergeant Steele immediately deployed his men in an effective defense perimeter. He soon observed an enemy force approaching the position and, alerting his men, aggressively led the patrol in the ensuing fire fight. After repelling the attack, the unit moved back approximately thirty yards to more advantageous positions. Learning that two comrades were missing, Sergeant Steele courageously ran back to the previous location through heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire to evacuate them. Ring with the men, he was informed that the platoon leader had been mortally wounded and, after receiving the order to return, he safely guided the patrol back to the main line of resistance. Sergeant Steele's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from New York.

Steele, William H.

General Orders No. 120 - 5 September 1950
Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division

First Lieutenant William H. Steele, 01182263, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 15 July 1950, at Tuman-Ni, Korea.  Lieutenant Steele was battery executive and in the battery position at the time of an enemy attack.  The battery commander was killed in the initial enemy fire and five of the six chiefs of section were wounded.  Lieutenant Steele promptly assumed command of the battery and directed the defense of the position.  The attack lasted for four hours and in addition to directing the fire of the battery, he had the wounded collected and carried to an area safe from enemy fire.  His coolness under fire and his able leadership inspired the members of his battery to such an extent that the enemy attack was repulsed and the battery position was saved from capture by the enemy.  This act of conspicuous gallantry in action on the part of Lieutenant Steele reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the service from Glen Garden, New Jersey.

Steigerwald, Robert S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Robert S. Steigerwald (MCSN: 1003996), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 March 1953. When the platoon was subjected to devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire while he was advancing with the unit in an assault on a strongly fortified hostile position, Staff Sergeant Steigerwald courageously exposed himself to the hostile fire to distribute ammunition to his comrades and lend words of encouragement. With the ammunition supply replenished, the assault continued and the unit succeeded in reaching the objective and in routing the entrenched enemy. Upon discovering that the platoon commander was missing, Staff Sergeant Steigerwald skillfully assumed command and organized his men for an orderly withdrawal. After an unrelenting search, he found the platoon commander, and together they delivered deadly accurate covering fire as the unit withdrew. By his outstanding courage, initiative and indomitable spirit, Staff Sergeant Steigerwald served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Oceanside, New York.

Stein, Max (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Max Stein (MCSN: 286660), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Leader of a Machine Gun Section of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 September 1950. When his section and a rifle squad were pinned down under intense hostile fire, Technical Sergeant Stein courageously advanced over open, enemy fire-swept terrain to assault an enemy strong point housing a machine gun. Accurately placing his grenades, he put the gun out of action, destroyed its crew and, although painfully wounded during the action, called his section and rifle squad to come forward. Hastily reorganizing the units, he skillfully led them to the successful completion of their assigned mission. By his inspiring leadership, daring initiative and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Technical Sergeant Stein upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Stein, Max (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Max Stein (MCSN: 286660), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 6 and 7 December 1950. With his company assigned to defend the right half of the battalion's defense sector when a hostile force of estimated regimental strength attacked his area during the night, and subsequently effected a gradual penetration of the company's left flank, Technical Sergeant Stein, despite serious wounds sustained in the back and shoulders from hostile mortar fragments during the initial stages of the action, staunchly refused to be evacuated and persisted in the fight. Voluntarily advancing forward of his own lines, he assumed an exposed position to observe the strength and disposition of the attackers and, upon returning to his own lines, moved among his men, shouting words of encouragement and directing and controlling their accurate and effective fire. Again wounded by enemy fire and suffering intense pain, Technical Sergeant Stein continued to lead his units in the bitter sub-zero temperatures, inspiring them to heroic efforts in repelling the onslaught and contributing materially to the success achieved by his company. His daring leadership, fortitude and extraordinary courage throughout the furious action reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York.

Steinberg, William A.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

First Lieutenant William A. Steinberg, 062641, (then Second Lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters, 1st Battalion, (then Company A), 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 14 September 1950 in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea.  Elements of Company A, with supporting anti-aircraft firing vehicles, was attempting to clear out a bypassed enemy pocket.  The patrol cautiously searched the area where the enemy was supposed to be but could make no contact with him.  While the patrol was advancing to a village nearby, it was ambushed by a well-concealed and well-armed enemy.  The initial volley of fire from the enemy confused the patrol and caused heavy casualties within it.  Lieutenant Steinberg immediately reorganized the platoon, designated targets, and ordered counter-fire upon the enemy positions.  As his platoon was predominately South Korean soldiers, it was necessary for him to go from man to man, giving instructions by the use of hand signals.  When the platoon was forced to withdraw, he again instructed each man as to the route of withdrawal.  Noticing that a wounded man had been left behind, Lieutenant Steinberg moved without hesitation into the direct line of enemy fire and carried the wounded man to safety.  Only after the platoon had reached safety did Lieutenant Steinberg reveal that he had received a serious wound.  The gallant conduct and inspiring leadership displayed by Lieutenant Steinberg reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Stemple, James W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant James W. Stemple (MCSN: 0-49931), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Although suffering from severe frostbit when the company was assigned the mission of going to the aid of another company surrounded by a large hostile force, Second Lieutenant Stemple insisted on leading his platoon and, when contact was made with the enemy, skillfully guided his men forward through intense hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire to a position overlooking the besieged company. Upon discovering an enemy strong point adjacent to his position, he led his men in a fierce bayonet charge of the hostile position, killing seven of the enemy and routing the remainder in complete disorder. By his outstanding courage, determined leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Stemple contributed materially to the success of the company and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Thomas, West Virginia. Home Town: Thomas, West Virginia.

Stenger, John Clinton (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal John Clinton Stenger (MCSN: 469572), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as an 81-mm. Mortar Forward Observer of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, from 21 September to 30 September 1950. Observing a squad leader who had been wounded during a vicious counterattack against his company's position by a numerically superior hostile force on 26 September, Corporal Stenger unhesitatingly assumed control of the unit and directed effective action against the attackers. With his company again under heavy attack on 30 September, he constantly exposed himself to the intense fire to direct an accurate mortar barrage, remaining in an open position and continuing his heroic efforts until he fell, mortally wounded. By his fearless initiative, heroic actions and exceptional skill in the performance of his duties, Corporal Stenger served as a constant inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: April 14, 1924 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: September 30, 1950.

Stepanek, John Godfrey

Sergeant First Class John Godfrey Stepanek, RA37418423, Infantry, United States Army, a member of the 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 19 July 1950 near Taejon, Korea. The scout section under the command of Sergeant First Class Stepanek was protecting the left flank of the company during its withdrawal when the order was given for scout section to withdraw. He ordered the section to withdraw and he remained with four men who had been wounded. With disregard for his own safety, and under heavy artillery and automatic weapons fire, he obtained a Jeep to evacuate them. After the company had withdrawn, and the wounded evacuated, he remained in the area searching for the wounded until a tank was sent out to bring him back to the unit. The act of gallantry displayed by Sergeant First Class Stepanek reflects great credit on himself and the military service. GO 95, Aug 19 1950. He entered the service from Cedar Rapids, IA.

Stephan, Richard E.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 245 - 11 July 1953

Sergeant Richard E. Stephan,US52175421, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 11 June 1953, Company "B" was assaulted by a reinforced hostile company under the blanketing support of enemy mortar and artillery fire in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea. Although the Company "B" recoilless rifle section, of which Sergeant Stephan was loader, was not engaged in the action, he volunteered his assistance in the intense hand to hand combat raging in the trenches. Granted permission, he immediately left the command post and situated himself in an advantageous firing position, while under continual enemy fire, and returned effective, accurate automatic rifle fire, accounting for numerous enemy casualties. Whit the slackening of the enemy attack and remnants of the opposition withdrawing, Sergeant Stephan promptly aided in the evacuation of friendly wounded to the nearby aid stations. A check of personnel after the fire fight revealed the absence of a wounded platoon leader who had been seized by the retreating enemy force. With complete disregard of his personal safety, he again volunteered to move out into the shell torn area forward of friendly lines, encountering heavy enemy small arms and automatic weapon fire. Upon arriving at a barbed wire entanglement, he discovered the body of the platoon leader. A litter was dispatched and he closed the friendly line assisting his comrades in returning their mortally wounded leader. Sergeant Stephan's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Ohio.

Stephens, Pascal E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Pascal E. Stephens, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 September 1951. Leading the assault fire team of his platoon up a steep, bare, strongly defended hill, Corporal Stephens continually exposed himself to intense hostile small arms, mortar, and automatic weapons fire in an attempt to dislodge the enemy forces from their well-entrenched positions on the crest of the vitally strategic ridge. Boldly charging the enemy positions, he inflicted numerous casualties by delivering accurate rifle fire and well-thrown hand grenades. Corporal Stephens skillfully directed and coordinated effective rifle and automatic rifle fire on the hostile positions until his unit, inspired by his daring leadership, joined in the platoon assault and charged the last 100 yards, seized the objective and dislodged the defending enemy troops. Although severely wounded in the right ear, he refused to be evacuated and, remaining with his men, organized a hasty defense of the area, aiding his men throughout the night in repelling several hostile counterattacks. By his bold courage and unswerving devotion to duty, Corporal Stephens upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.

Stephens, Richard Warburton (1st citation)

Headquarters 24ID
General Orders No. 48 - 21 July 1950

The Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to Colonel Richard W. Stephens, 015569, Infantry, United States Army, who displayed gallantry in action at Chochiwon, Korea on 9 and 10 July 1950.  As Commanding Officer, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, his coolness under fire and personal leadership inspired the inexperienced officers and troops of elements of his command to effectively delay a determined attack conducted by numerically superior infantry and armored force.  Despite enemy artillery fire, he remained at front line positions during operations and personally directed the improvement of positions, placement of automatic weapons and the coordination of artillery and infantry fires.  Leaning that an enemy armored and infantry attack was imminent, he returned to the positions and skillfully directed the conduct of the defense from an observation post in advance of the main defensive position.  After his position had been surrounded on three sides by the numerically superior forces of the enemy, he organized and conducted an orderly withdrawal to new defensive positions.  He was the last man to leave the exposed and overrun position.  Colonel Stephens' gallant leadership is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Stephens, Richard Warburton (2nd citation)

Headquarters 24ID
General Orders No. 179 - 13 October 1950

Colonel Richard W. Stephens, 015569, Infantry, United States Army, Commanding Officer, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the First Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy near Waegwan, Korea, on 18 and 19 September 1950.  When instructions were received for his regiment to cross the Naktong River and break through the Pusan perimeter, colonel Stephens personally led the reconnaissance party to the vicinity of the proposed river crossing site.  Continuously exposed to concentrated enemy fire and observation, he voluntarily went forward alone to a vantage point from which he could better observe the proposed river crossing area.  From his visual observation the attack was planned and launched during the early morning hours.  Again with complete disregard for his own safety he established his command post at the river crossing.  Although under heavy enemy artillery, machine gun and small arms fire, he moved among his men giving last minute instructions and encouragement where necessary.  His courage and superior leadership influenced materially the success of the river crossing by his command.  His gallant actions and unhesitant devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered the service from Pierre, South Dakota.

Stephens, Richard Warburton (3rd Award)

Headquarters IX Corps
General Orders No. 19 - 7 February 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Colonel Richard W. Stephens, Infantry, United States Army, a member of the 21st Infantry Regiment for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Kyongju, Korea, during the period 28 August 1950 to 7 September 1950. When Colonel Stephens was assigned the mission of halting the North Korean Army’s drive down Korea’s east coast, which threatened Pusan, the United Nations’ last remaining seaport in Korea, he immediately made a personal reconnaissance of the front line area, braving enemy mortar and sniper fire, to confer with the Republic of Korea front line Commanders. After making an estimate of the situation, Colonel Stephens made a decision to commit battalion sized combat teams to strengthen the weak United Nations line and to contain any enemy breakthrough which might develop by aggressive counter-attacks. Throughout this period, Colonel Stephens, exhibiting unsurpassed professional knowledge and ability, made accurate, rapid estimates of each situation confronted, and moved his troops rapidly from area to area, wherever the enemy pressure was the greatest. By his great knowledge of the enemy’s tactics and his maneuvering of troops, he succeeded in blunting and then hurling back the vastly numerically superior enemy’s advance, through a series of successful aggressive counter-attacks. A battalion sized combat team engaged the enemy force and hurled them back in a disorganized retreat at Angang-ni, Pohang-dong, and Kyongju. Throughout the period he went long hours without sleep or food, moving from area to area, always where the fighting was the most fierce. On one occasion, when a strong enemy force struck at the United Nations lines, he moved forward and with complete disregard for personal safety, moved up and down the front line, completely exposed to the enemy fire, directing his troops’ fire on enemy targets, and by personal example, encouraged his overwhelmingly outnumbered troops to continue to place an extremely heavy volume of fire on the attacking enemy. His extreme calmness under enemy fire served as an outstanding example to the men of his command and inspired them to the highest possible degree of determination and efficiency. His superb leadership, during this critical period, was directly responsible for halting the enemy’s advance and establishing a firm United Nation’s Defense line in the sector. Colonel Stephens’ heroic action, above and beyond the call of duty, reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army. Entered service from Pierre, SD.

Sternburg, Harry J.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 67 - 12 March 1951

First Lieutenant Harry J. Sternburg, 057209, Heavy Mortar Company, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 19 February 1951, near Kodong-ni, Korea, Lieutenant Sternburg was forward observer in support of a company which was attacking Hill 88. The leading platoon was pinned down by a murderous hail of fire from a pillbox. Being unable to direct mortar fire on the pillbox because of the proximity of friendly troops, Lieutenant Sternburg, with complete disregard for his own personal safety and while under intense small arms, mortar, and artillery fire, crawled to a point within thirty yards of the pillbox and threw hand grenades into the enemy positions. Having failed to knock out the pillbox, Lieutenant Sternburg crawled to the rear, re-supplied himself with grenades, and again returned to hurl them into the pillbox until it had been completely neutralized. The inspiring actions of Lieutenant Sternburg resulted in the success of the assault on the hill, and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of South Dakota.

Stetler, Charles H.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

Private First Class Charles H. Stetler, RA13329388, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery C, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea.  The enemy forces had completely surrounded the position of the 15th Field Artillery Battalion and was delivering intense small arms and mortar fire within the area.  In spite of the severe wound suffered by Private Stetler in earlier action he refused to be evacuated and returned to his gun section where he operated the piece with one arm.  His actions contributed materially to the combat efficiency of the battalion and were an inspiration to his comrades.  The gallant conduct displayed by Private Statler reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Maryland.

Stewart, Bruce E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 135 - 18 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Bruce E. Stewart (ASN: 0-1327774), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 10 December 1951. His unit had the mission of attacking and securing strongly defended enemy positions. As they began their assault, the friendly troops were met by an intense, murderous concentration of hostile machine gun fire from three sides. Lieutenant Stewart, nevertheless, carried on the fight and led his men forward. He became seriously wounded by hand grenade fragments, but with utter disregard for his own safety he refused to stop. He personally directed the evacuation of the other wounded men, and only after the last man had been taken to the rear did he return to relative safety for treatment of his own wounds. Lieutenant Stewart's gallant action, exemplary leadership and selfless performance of duty were a great inspiration to his men and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: New York, New York.

Stewart, Doyle J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 29 - 14 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Doyle J. Stewart (ASN: US-55055247), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Hudong-ni, Korea, on 20 October 1951. His platoon had the mission of taking and securing Objective KING, a steep rocky terrain feature defended by a well dug-in enemy force. As the friendly troops advanced on the objective, they were subjected to intense automatic weapons, small arms and mortar fire. The enemy, having excellent observation, pinned the platoon down and inflicted several casualties. Corporal Stewart, Machine Gunner, immediately recognizing the need for immediate action, picked up his weapon and made his way to the platoon's front. He set up his machine gun in an advantageous but completely exposed position and unleashed withering fire on the enemy. His unceasing fire silenced key enemy positions and enabled his platoon to start evacuation of the wounded. As he continued to operate his weapons with devastating accuracy, he was seriously wounded, but realizing that if his fire ceased the enemy would again pin his platoon down and halt evacuation of the wounded members, he disregarded the pain and remained at his weapon to provide valuable covering fire. His comrades discovered his condition and tried to persuade him to submit to medical aid, but he refused and continued to operate his weapon until he collapsed from loss of blood. However, his covering fire had by this time enabled the platoon to evacuate the wounded, regroup, and renew the attack. Corporal Stewart's courageous action, tenacious determination and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Springfield, Missouri. Death: January 26, 2004.

Stewart, James Malcolm

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Commander James Malcolm Stewart (NSN: 0-160995), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. LSMR-409 in combat against an armed enemy of the United Nations in the Korean conflict. During the engagement with the enemy in Wonsan Harbor, North Korea, on 17 July 1951, Lieutenant Commander Stewart distinguished himself by his gallantry and intrepidity in maneuvering his ship among the plumes of the enemy's fire from shore batteries, all the while delivering rocket and continuous and effective counter battery fire against these enemy batteries at a time when the enemy was making his most determined effort to drive United Nations Naval forces from Wonsan Harbor. In total disregard of his own safety and for a period of about forty minutes, while his ship was exposed to a type of enemy plunging fire which made the ships unprotected conn station extremely dangerous, and while his ship was being hit by shell fragments from near misses, he conned his ship skillfully and delivered counter-battery fire accurately and assisted greatly in silencing the enemy's guns. His gallantry and intrepidity throughout this engagement reflect outstanding credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1797 (November 5, 1951).

Stewart, Joseph L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Joseph L. Stewart (MCSN: 0-5644), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of the Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. With his regiment attacking from Yudam-ni toward Hagaru-ri against strong elements of three hostile division occupying commanding terrain and employing mortars and automatic weapons, Lieutenant Colonel Stewart acted immediately when the accompanying vehicle train was halted under intense small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire emanating from well dug-in positions on either side of the road. Although the column suffered heavy casualties, he unhesitatingly moved forward against the blistering fire and, walking upright back and forth along the train, expertly directed men to cover and supervised the removal of wounded to comparative safety. Deploying his troops forward, he boldly pointed out targets and directed a brilliantly executed counterattack to neutralize the opposing automatic weapons, silence the supporting mortars, and enable his units to regain fire superiority to cover the continued advance. By his superb leadership, daring combat tactics and extraordinary courage in the face of tremendous odds, Lieutenant Colonel Stewart was in large measure responsible for the successful culmination of his regiment's attack. His heroic efforts throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: May 31, 1915 at Newton, Alabama. Home Town: Montgomery, Alabama. Death: Deceased.

Stewart, Samuel C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Samuel C. Stewart (MCSN: 1053275), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When the enemy overran a fire team and his heavy machine gun position, and approximately ten of them penetrated further into the defense perimeter and began to deliver heavy and accurate fire against his company, Corporal Stewart immediately reorganized the three remaining members of his squad and directed their effective fire against the infiltrating enemy. Repulsed by heavy return fire in two consecutive assaults against a heavy machine gun position, he made a third daring attempt which resulted in the destruction of the emplacement and the annihilation of fifteen of the enemy. Continuing his daring efforts to hold the enemy at bay until his company's flank was secured, Corporal Stewart, by his fearless initiative, determined fighting spirit and cool courage against heavy odds, served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Norman, Oklahoma. Home Town: Los Angeles, California.

Stewart, William Sidney

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander William Sidney Stewart (NSN: 0-78823), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Henderson (DD-785), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 13 to 15 September 1950. An officer of outstanding professional ability and resourcefulness, Commander Stewart skillfully navigated his ship through a hazardous enemy mine field and, entering the strongly fortified harbor of Inchon, conducted an effective close-in bombardment against hostile shore installations and gun emplacements. Defying the deadly and ever increasing fire from hidden enemy batteries scattered along the coastline, he boldly continued to direct furious counterfire on the hostile fortifications until the defenses were sufficiently neutralized to permit the successful amphibious landings of friendly forces at Inchon. By his marked courage, expert seamanship and loyal devotion to the fulfillment of vital operations, Commander Stewart upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 918 (October 14, 1950). Born: May 18, 1913. Death: January 16, 1993. Virginia.

Stickler, Bernard R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Bernard R. Stickler (MCSN: 1205513), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 July 1952. When his unit was subjected to intense enemy small arms, grenade and mortar fire, Corporal Stickler, although painfully wounded himself, courageously assisted in evacuating other casualties. After the unit had regrouped for a withdrawal and it was learned that the body of a Marine who was killed in action was unaccounted for, he guided a detail of men to recover the body and led them back through an enemy mine field. By his exceptional courage, initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Stickler served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: North Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: North Chicago, Illinois.

Stiff, Houston

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Houston Stiff (MCSN: 0-7848), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 September 1951. When his battalion was assigned the mission of seizing a strategic hill position, consisting of a series of formidable and heavily defended enemy strong points, Lieutenant Colonel Stiff bravely exposed himself to intense hostile mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire and moved with the assault elements, directing his attack from a completely exposed forward position. Expertly employing his supporting arms and maneuvering his companies, he materially aided his men in seizing the objective. Despite the numerous casualties suffered by his units, Lieutenant Colonel Stiff quickly organized the defense and successfully defended the newly won positions against a series of sharp enemy counterattacks. By his outstanding professional ability, marked courage and exemplary leadership, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Waco, Texas. Home Town: Denton, Texas.

Stith, Benjamin F. Jr.

[KWE Note: The following news release was sent to the KWE by Ben Stith, son of Captain Benjamin F. Stith Jr.]

Silver Star is Awarded to Leisenring Captain

Captain Benjamin F. Stith, Jr., of Leisenring, has been awarded for gallantry in action the Silver Star Medal, the nation's third highest decoration.  Captain Stith, whose wife lives in Leisenring, serves with Headquarters and Headquarters Company of the Third Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division.  The Fayette County serviceman was cited for action which occurred on May 20, 1951, near Pungam-ni, Korea, where Captain Stith, located in the battalion observation post, saw that a heavy volume of enemy automatic weapons fire was halting the Third Battalion's advance and forcing the troops to desperately seek cover.  He unhesitatingly dashed forward through the enemy fire and urged the troops to continue the assault.  The men vigorously renewed the advance and proceeded slowly and unfalteringly to close in on the enemy, inflicting many casualties.  Captain Stith noticed that a steady and vicious stream of fire from a number of concealed hostile automatic weapons was seriously hampering the drive.  He moved forward in an effort to locate these emplacements.  He was wounded and knocked down, but recovered from the initial shock and rose from the ground.  He located the source of fire and returned to the observation post to report his findings, which enabled an effective artillery barrage to be placed on these emplacements.  The barrage completely neutralized their effectiveness.  Captain Stith walked a considerable distance still without medical attention to obtain litter jeeps and guide them in their evacuation of the wounded.  He discovered a wounded officer and waded through waist-deep water to evacuate him but the man had died.  He then returned to the scene of battle and supervised the evacuation of all the wounded before receiving any personal medical attention.

The citation states, "Captain Stith's extreme gallantry and superb physical stamina reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service."

Stockler, Von E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Von E. Stockler (MCSN: 1072969), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Service Battery, First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yudam-ni, Korea, on 3 December 1950. Voluntarily manning a machine gun after two gunners had been wounded, Sergeant Stockler skillfully directed effective fire against an enemy roadblock and succeeded in silencing one hostile mortar weapon and inflicting numerous casualties. When his defending group was pinned down by intense fire from enemy reinforcements during at attempt to withdraw, he fearlessly moved into the open and, while advancing toward the enemy, fired his weapon from a carrying position. By his bold initiative and personal courage in the face of great risk, he delivered accurate fire which permitted the remainder of his group to withdraw safely. His indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Sergeant Stockler and the United States Naval Service. Born: Dayton, Ohio. Home Town: Dayton, Ohio.

Stokley, William J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William J. Stokley (MCSN: 612389), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces south of Yudam-ni, Korea, on 1 December 1950. When the point platoon and its attached tank were subjected to heavy automatic weapons and small arms fire from positions on high ground while proceeding along the battalion's main supply routed, Private First Class Stokley supervised his team in delivering fire against the enemy emplacements. While other units of the company moved forward during the ensuing action to combat the continued intense hostile barrage which killed three men and wounded nine, he fearlessly climbed onto the heavy tank, voluntarily manned the .50 caliber machine gun and registered accurate fire on the enemy positions approximately 800 yards east of the supply route, thereby furnishing cover for the evacuation of casualties. Staunchly maintaining a vigorous defense, he remained at his post until a severe leg wound forced him to submit to evacuation. His bold initiative, indomitable courage and inspiring devotion to duty were contributing factors in the success of the company in achieving its objective, and reflect great credit upon Private First Class Stokley and the United States Naval Service. Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Camden, New Jersey.

Stone, Earnest H. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Earnest H. Stone, Jr. (MCSN: 0-45147), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Communications Officer of the Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. En route with his battalion in convoy when a numerically superior hostile force attacked and separated the column into two sections, First Lieutenant Stone immediately organized the elements of two rifle companies and attacked in an attempt to drive the enemy back. While subjected to intense hostile fire from small arms, machine guns and mortars, he skillfully established a base of fire and directed an air strike to neutralize the roadblock and permit the convoy to consolidate and advance. By his daring and aggressive leadership, superb tactics and cool courage in the face of grave peril, First Lieutenant Stone served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lingle, Wyoming. Home Town: Bridgeport, Nebraska.

Story, Anthony F.

General Headquarters, Far East Command
General Orders No. 41 - 17 October 1950

Lieutenant Colonel Anthony F. Story, A0523446, United States Air Forces, Aide-de-Camp and pilot to General of the Army Douglas MacArthur, Commander-in-Chief, United Nations Command, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry in action in Korea during the period 27 June to 30 September 1950.  His actions in flying successfully and safely many missions in an unarmed plane over enemy-held territory or into areas subject to enemy attack contributed materially to the success of the campaign, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered Federal service from Missouri.

Stovall, John R. (posthumous)

Private John R. Stovall, RA16235431, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 8 July 1950 near Chonan, Korea. Company K was in a defensive position north of Chonan, when it was ordered to withdraw to the city of Chonan due to the numerically superior attacking forces of the enemy. A light machine gun which was protecting the withdrawal of the Company was knocked out by enemy fire. Private Stovall volunteered to take up a position with his carbine and furnish protection for the withdrawal. Private Stovall’s position was under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire. The fire from his carbine was so accurate and effective that it held up the enemy attacking forces and gave the Company enough time to complete their withdrawal and set up in new positions. He was last seen as the enemy overran his position. The gallant act displayed by Private Stovall reflects great credit on himself and the military service. GO 67, 5 Aug 1950. Entered service from Scott Field, IL. (Private Stovall is missing in action, declared dead 13 Dec 1953. Family DNA needed.)

Stowell, Patrick J.

Headquarters 24th Division
General Orders No. 195 - 22 October 1950

Second Lieutenant (then Master Sergeant) Patrick J. Stowell, 02262122, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against the enemy near Chon-do, Korea, on 17 August 1950.  During an advance by his company on enemy hillside positions, his platoon was held up by intense mortar and machine gun fire.  Seeing that this fire threatened to disorganize the company's advance he determined to attack.  Organizing the platoon, he led the assault, and the men, inspired by his example, overran the position.  When strengthened enemy forces counter-attacked, Lieutenant Stowell led the defense of the position and through his effective use of hand grenades, the enemy was repulsed with heavy losses.  His gallant example reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.  Entered military service from Stanley, North Dakota.

Stowers, Rufus Arnold

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Rufus Arnold Stowers (MCSN: 238782), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Armorer in Charge of four Light Machine Guns of Headquarters and Service Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 and 3 November 1950. With his machine guns employed in defense of the battalion command post when the enemy launched a strong attack on the defense lines, and the 4.2" mortar company on his flank was forced to fall back, Master Sergeant Stowers, observing that a new line of defense had to be established, fearlessly exposed himself to the blistering barrage to re-deploy his men and weapons. When one of the machine guns jammed, he boldly moved forward and repaired it under direct enemy fire and, although painfully wounded, refused evacuation and continued to direct and encourage his men until he was ordered to the aid station. While undergoing treatment, he worked tirelessly and with exceptional skill in total darkness and succeeded in repairing another machine gun that was brought to him when it became inoperable. By his daring and aggressive leadership, fortitude and cool courage in the face of tremendous odds, Master Sergeant Stowers contributed materially to the successful defense of the battalion command post and served as an inspiration to all who observed him. His heroic efforts throughout reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 10643 (April 7, 1951). Born: Milton, Florida. Home Town: Milton, Florida.

Stoyanow, Victor R.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Victor R. Stoyanow (MCSN: 0-40939), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a member of Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Moraekogae, Korea on 17 May 1951. During the early morning hours on that date, his company was subjected to a fanatical attack by an estimated enemy regiment. Early in the engagement, Lieutenant Stoyanow was painfully wounded in the upper arm and in both legs. Refusing medical attention, he continued to deploy his company to the greatest advantage, displaying outstanding courage and professional skill. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he continually exposed himself to the withering small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire in order to maneuver elements of his company into positions to contain the enemy attack. After approximately three and one half hours of fierce fighting, the attack was repulsed, and the enemy forced to retreat in disorder, abandoning numerous wounded personnel. The outstanding leadership, gallantry, and high devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Stoyanow on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 226 (October 7, 1951). Born: Helsingfors, Finland. Entered Service From Arizona. Death: October 19, 1970.

Strahley, Charles Glasgow (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade Charles Glasgow Strahley (NSN: 0-513261), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Fighter Squadron Fifty-two (VF-52), embarked in U.S.S. Valley Forge (CV-45), in action against hostile North Korean and Chinese Communist forces. On 21 March 1952, Lieutenant, Junior Grade Strahley led a section of jet fighters on a strike against the vital enemy rail network in the vicinity of Hamhung, North Korea, With the highest skill and precision, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Strahley destroyed sections of the track in four separate locations on four attacks. On the fourth attack, made through a hail of crossfire from automatic weapons, his aircraft was struck in several vital locations, and immediately began trailing smoke indicating an engine fire. However, the smoke dissipated shortly afterward and Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Strahley unhesitatingly returned to the target to make four more attacks, severing the enemy rail track in two more vital sections. As he recovered from his last attack, Lieutenant, Junior Grade,. Strahley's aircraft was again critically struck by a barrage of automatic weapons fire causing a dense fire in the engine compartment and the plane to erupt volumes of heavy smoke, whereupon he immediately flew a direct course to the coastline. By the time he was safely clear of enemy territory, however, his cockpit was enveloped in flames and he was forced to bail out. His body was seen to strike the horizontal stabilizer and though his parachute opened normally his body was not recovered. The gallant fighting spirit demonstrated by Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Strahley in the face of grave peril, coupled with the hazard of making several attacks in a flak-damaged aircraft is most evident of unbounded courage and bravery. His actions reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1602 (July 1, 1952). Born: April 8, 1926. Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: March 21, 1952.

Strasser, Buster W.

Sergeant First Class Buster W. Strasser, 21st AAA AW Bn. (SP). On 4 April 1951, Sergeant First Class Strasser's half-track platoon was supporting an attack on strong hostile positions near Kunia-dang, Korea. When the communications system within his unit failed to function, he repeatedly exposed himself to heavy small arms and automatic weapons and mortar fire to direct the counterfire of the crews on the main strong points of the foe. Despite the increasing intensity of the devastating barrage, he continued his efforts until the enemy had been driven from the objective. Sergeant First Class Strasser's courageous and determined actions reflect the highest credit on himself, his unit and the Armed Forces.  Entered the military from North Dakota.

Stratton, Ralph Burgess (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Ralph Burgess Stratton (ASN: RA-33529851), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 2 September 1950 near Taegu, Korea. When his company had been surrounded by the enemy and was attempting to withdraw to more tenable positions, they suddenly encountered a hostile road block consisting of four machine guns along the possible route of escape. Private Stratton, with another automatic rifleman, quickly moved 75 yards forward of the friendly lines before the enemy opened fire upon them. After several minutes of returning the enemy's fire, Private Stratton realized his automatic rifle fire was ineffective. Picking out a more advantageous position, he quickly moved to the new post and directed such effective fire into the enemy emplacements that one machine gun crew was destroyed and the other three were forced to withdraw. Private Stratton's gallantry and aggressiveness reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Streetman, Roy L.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Roy L. Streetman (MCSN: 667796), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, near Taebong-ni, Korea, on 17 August 1950. During an attack against the enemy main line of resistance the platoon, of which Corporal Streetman was a member, came under intense enemy fire and during the fire fight which followed Corporal Streetman was seriously wounded. Upon being evacuated and despite three serious wounds, Corporal Streetman realizing the need for corpsmen in his platoon's sector voluntarily organized and led a group of Corpsmen to the aid of his unit. His actions in guiding Corpsmen to his platoon materially aided in saving the lives of many Marines who were in need of medical aid. His initiative and courage were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 104 (October 7, 1950). Entered Service From Texas.

Stricker, Jerry L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Jerry L. Stricker (MCSN: 1137069), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of the Anti-tank Platoon, Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 May 1951. When a numerically superior enemy force attacked the platoon, overran its positions and gained control of the two key areas from which automatic weapons fire was poured on the platoon's flanks, Private First Class Stricker, in company with another Marine, moved forward in the face of intense hostile fire in an attempt to regain one of the vital gun positions. Twice repelled by grenades, which wounded his comrade, Private First Class Stricker moved forward a third time under the covering fire of his squad and managed to get close enough to hurl a grenade into the hostile position and thereby neutralize it. Despite the hail of fire around him, he skillfully employed the enemy's own weapon to knock out the other position, enabling his squad to regain fire superiority and to hold its sector of the line. By his marked courage, initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, Private First Class Stricker contributed in large measure to the repelling of the strong enemy force. His actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Columbus, Ohio. Home Town: Laguna Beach, California.

Strickland, Charles M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Charles M. Strickland (MCSN: 613514), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader in a Rifle Platoon of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. When his company was ordered to seize and occupy an enemy-held hill during the movement of his battalion from Hamhung to Hagaru-ri, Corporal Strickland promptly moved his squad into the foremost position on Hill 698 and, constantly exposing himself to the enemy's intense fire, succeeded in maneuvering his men into covered and concealed positions. Although twice painfully wounded during the action, he staunchly refused to be evacuated and, remaining in position under concentrated hostile machine gun fire, calmly directed the fire of his squad against the counterattacking force, at the same time firing his rifle and throwing hand grenades. By his daring and aggressive leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and courageously determination in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Strickland served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed to the successful accomplishment of the assigned mission. His heroic efforts were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Nash County, North Carolina. Home Town: Middlesex, North Carolina.

Strickland, Leval

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 131 - 17 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Leval Strickland (ASN: US-53085629), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 10 December 1951. His unit had the mission of attacking and securing several strongly defended enemy positions. His platoon became pinned down by a murderous concentration of hostile machine gun fire. Realizing that the foe's emplacement must be obliterated, Private Strickland, with utter disregard for his own personal safety advanced to a point within a few yards of the bunker and delivered a deadly accurate hail of bullets into it, killing two occupants and wounding the third. He was seriously wounded while clearing out the position but continued fighting until he had finished the job. As a direct result of his accomplishment, his unit was able to complete its mission. Private Strickland's gallant action, unswerving determination and selfless performance of duty were an inspiration to his comrades and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered Service From Mississippi.

Strommen, Ronald Duane (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Ronald Duane Strommen, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radio Operator of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 28 November 1950. Assigned the mission of establishing radio contact with the battalion, Private First Class Strommen moved out of his company's defensive perimeter and proceeded through the snow in sub-zero temperatures to a listening post on high ground manned by eight Marines. Shortly after his arrival, and before he could establish radio contact with the battalion, the enemy attacked in overwhelming numbers under cover of darkness, completely overrunning the listening post and subjecting the entire rifle company to fierce grenade, rifle and mortar fire. Although severely wounded, Private First Class Strommen continued his efforts to establish contact until he was no longer able to do so. At this time he entrusted his radio set to his comrades so that it might not fall into enemy hands. By his outstanding courage, resolute determination and inspiring devotion to duty, Private First Class Strommen upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: July 22, 1930 at Madison, Wisconsin. Home Town: Janesville, Wisconsin. Death: MIA: November 28, 1950.

Strong, Gordon Malin (posthumous)


Gordon Malin Strong
(Click picture for a larger view)

First Lieutenant Gordon M. Strong, 050835, Infantry, Company E, 5th Infantry, United States Army. When on 7 August 1950 near Chindong-ni, Korea, his platoon was overrun by a numerically superior hostile force, Lieutenant Strong quickly gathered a depleted squad and moved to the flank of the hard pressed unit. Despite intense small arms, automatic weapons fire and hand grenades, he led a direct assault into the enemy forces, thereby creating a diversion which permitted his platoon time to reorganize and defend its position. In the bold, determined attack, Lieutenant Strong was mortally wounded. Lieutenant Strong's gallant leadership and tactical ingenuity are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army. Entered the Military service from Pennsylvania.

[KWE Note: "Gordo was born on 26 March 1925 at the Station Hospital, Fort Riley, Kansas, and spent the first two years of his life at that old Cavalry post.  From then on through his childhood he found himself living wherever his father, a U.S. Cavalry officer, happened to be stationed.  Such places as Fort Leavenworth, Kansas; Saumur, France; Ft. Bliss, Texas; Ft. Oglethorpe, Georgia; Ft. Knox, Kentucky; and Washington, D.C. were all included in the memories of his childhood.  The facilities for his early education were similarly varied: until at the age of fourteen years he entered Northwood School at Lake Placid, New York, where, after four years of creditable performance in academics and athletics, he received his high school diploma.  Concurrent with his senior year, his mother, after untiring effort and masterful negotiations, secured for him a third alternate appointment to the military academy.  This appeared at the time to be a very uncertain road to his father's and brother's Alma Mater, but, his principal and two senior alternates either failed their examinations or decided on other careers, and young Strong was duly admitted and sworn in, much to his and his family's delight.  Almost immediately after academics had started, Gordo developed a mental allergy to mathematics, which, unfortunately, was not overcome in time to prevent his being found deficient at Christmas.  However, after three months with "Doc" Silverman, he was readmitted the following September in the Class of 1947.  He was graduated accordingly and bore the mark of the Academy as one who had applied himself with equal enthusiasm to academics, athletics and good fellowship.  There are many young men in the Service today who, in addition to the normal qualities of a true soldier and officer, have an additional intangible aura of leadership which is reflected by their sincerity and by the confidence they inspire.  Without noticeable effort they stand out and their leadership and guidance are sought by those around them.  Not knowing that he was such a young man--and probably not much concerned about it anyway--Gordo went into the Infantry.  After a year of basic and branch schools in the United States, he found himself aboard a ship bound for Korea.  He remained there, evidently quite happy and occupied, for eighteen months.  Finally, in January 1950, he wrote that he had been transferred permanently to Hawaii, where he could 'buy a car, some Waikiki beach shorts, and perhaps even become engaged for a while.'  He returned to Korea with the 5th Infantry Regimental Combat Team in July 1950, after the war there had started, and in the role of a platoon leader in combat, was mortally wounded in action on 7 August while his unit was on the perimeter of the Pusan beachhead at its smallest." - Source: U.S. Military Academy]

Stropes, Dale Lemoine (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Dale Lemoine Stropes (MCSN: 338703), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 20 September 1950. During the attack on the Han River Bridgehead west of Seoul, Korea, Technical Sergeant Stropes, serving as Company Gunnery Sergeant, observed that the 60-mm. mortar section was pinned down and receiving heavy enemy small arms and machine gun fire from an estimated enemy battalion. Unhesitatingly he fearlessly and courageously left his covered position and with complete disregard for his own personal safety repeatedly exposed himself to evacuate three wounded Marines to a position of cover. This courageous action materially aided the wounded in receiving medical attention much earlier than would otherwise have been possible. Technical Sergeant Stropes then moved from position to position and personally encouraged and urged the remaining men of the 60-mm. mortar section to reorganize. On completion of the reorganization he personally observed the adjusting of the fires in order to effectively support the attack. This action materially aided his company in the successful continuance of the attack. Technical Sergeant Stropes' display of initiative and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: September 14, 1921 at Andelusia, Illinois. Home Town: Andelusia, Illinois. Death: KIA: December 2, 1950.

Stuffelbeam, Myron

Headquarters 25th Division
General Orders No. 286 - 3 November 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Private First class Myron Stuffelbeam, Infantry, Company B, 5th Infantry Regiment, United States Army.  During an intense hostile attack on the company position near Taejon, Korea, on 13 August 1950, Private First Class Stuffelbeam was seriously wounded in the face.  Despite his painful wound, he continued to fire his rifle on the fanatic attackers until he was wounded in both hands and unable to hold his weapon. By his selfless devotion to duty, he assisted materially in repelling the hostile forces and contributed greatly to the esprit of his unit.  Private First Class Stuffelbeam's courageous action reflects great credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Iowa.

Sturgeon, Willie B.

Headquarters 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 55 - July 5, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Willie B. Sturgeon (ASN: RA-14338277), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Osan, Korea on 5 July 1950. The 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry, was in a defensive positions which was being attacked by thirty-two enemy tanks, artillery, mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire. Private First Class Sturgeon distinguished himself by volunteering to fire a bazooka singled handed with which he destroyed one enemy tank and damaged five others while annihilating their crews. It was necessary for Private First Class Sturgeon to leave his position and expose himself to enemy fire in order to secure additional ammunition and a new bazooka. He immediately returned to a firing position and was pinned down by fire from other thanks. Being unable to join his unit he remained behind the enemy lines one day before he could rejoin. The outstanding courage and determination to destroy the enemy shown by Private First Class Willie B. Sturgeon reflects the highest credit on himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.

Sturman, Kenneth

Citation not found yet.

"Major Kenneth Sturman of Lusk, former Wyoming university football player, has been given two medals for heroic action during the fight for Heartbreak Ridge in Korea.  Major Sturman has been given the Silver Star and the French Croix de Guerre.  He is an executive officer of a battalion of the 23rd Infantry Regiment.  During World War II he took part in several major Pacific invasions." - Billings Gazette, November 27, 1951

Sullivan, Daniel J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Daniel J. Sullivan (MCSN: 564253), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 September 1950. Unhesitatingly assuming command of his squad after all noncommissioned officers had become casualties, Private First Class Sullivan courageously led the assault on a well defended enemy-held ridge. Although suffering extreme pain and loss of blood from a wound sustained in action, he resolutely continued to direct and control the squad's fire against three hostile machine guns until, wounded a second time, his evacuation was necessitated. By his daring initiative, aggressive determination and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy enemy opposition, Private First Class Sullivan upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Brooklyn, New York.

Sullivan, Daniel Patrick (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 69 - 5 August 1950

Sergeant First Class Daniel Patrick Sullivan, RA38013701, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Battery, 13th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star posthumously for gallantry in action on 16 and 17 July 1950 north of Taejon, Korea, on the Kum River. The 13th Field Artillery Battalion was in support of the 19th Infantry Regiment defending the Kum River line. The enemy had been able to penetrate the defensive positions of the 19th and attack their left flank. The enemy set up a road block in the rear of the 13th Field Artillery’s position. SFC Sullivan, on his own initiative and with disregard for his own personal safety, organized a group of men and set them up in a defensive position establishing a base of fire which resulted in the reduction of the enemy road block and the elimination of a large part of the sniper activity which was encountered upon the withdrawal of the battalion. He personally wounded and killed several of the snipers. His group of men later laid down a base of fire permitting a group of 200 men who were withdrawing from their forward position to withdraw past other enemy roadblocks. He also acted as rear guard fur this group of men. As the group of 200 men withdrew some of the wounded fell out. SFC Sullivan or one of his men stayed with them until such time as they could be evacuated to safety. The gallant action displayed by SFC Sullivan reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered service from Artesia, NM.

Sullivan, Edward M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Edward M. Sullivan (NSN: 3613568), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 September 1950. During the attack by his company, Hospitalman Sullivan serving as a Company Corpsman, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, advanced under the intense enemy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire to reach two wounded Marines. While advancing forward he was knocked unconscious by concussion of an enemy mortar shell explosion. Regaining consciousness soon he continued forward and moved the two wounded back into a covered position and proceeded to administer first aid. By his courageous actions medical attention was given the wounded men much earlier than would otherwise have been possible. Hospitalman Sullivan's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 17630 (November 2, 1950).

Sun, Herbert C.Y.

Master Sergeant Herbert C.Y. Sun, RA29040109, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 19 September 1951 in the vicinity of Suim-nyon, Korea.  On this date his platoon was defending its newly-won positions against a numerically superior hostile force.  Sergeant Sun repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire in a valiant attempt to set up an adequate defense line. Circulating among his men he shouted words of encouragement and directed them in delivering accurate and effective fire on the onrushing hostile forces.  On numerous occasions he advanced over the fire-swept area to administer aid to his wounded comrades and assisted in their evacuation.  during the entire battle Sergeant Sun remained with the most forward elements of his unit and by his example of bravery under fire inspired his men to turn the enemy attack into a complete rout.  The gallantry in action and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Sun on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the Territory of Hawaii.

Surber, Ralph Edmonds (1st citation) (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Ralph Edmonds Surber (MCSN: 326338), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 13 to 15 August 1952. With the company engaged in defending a vitally important hill position far forward of the main line of resistance, Staff Sergeant Surber skillfully moved his platoon into position under extremely heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire and expertly deployed his men over the platoon's assigned sector of the hill. Constantly exposing himself to the intense fire, he personally supervised his platoon in setting up positions and encouraged his men who were suffering from exhaustion and intense heat. When the enemy attacked, he picked up an automatic rifle and delivered devastating fire into the oncoming force, inflicting heavy losses upon the enemy and forcing their withdrawal. Although painfully wounded, he continued to aid his platoon and repeatedly rushed through the heavy enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire to carry urgently needed ammunition and water to his men. By his aggressive fighting spirit, cool courage and unwavering devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Surber served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Surber, Ralph Edmonds (2nd citation) (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Ralph Edmonds Surber (MCSN: 326338), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 - 7 October 1952. When a bunker collapsed and buried a fellow Marine while the unit was defending a vital outpost during an intense hostile mortar and artillery bombardment on the position, Staff Sergeant Surber rushed to the scene in a brave attempt to aid his comrade. Undeterred by the devastating enemy fire falling all around him, he continued to clear away the debris until the wounded man had been rescued, and evacuated the casualty to the command post for medical treatment. Later, when hostile forces overran the outpost during a savage attack, he boldly led his men in hand-to-hand combat and, although his weapon was destroyed, continued to fight barehanded until he fell, mortally wounded. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Surber served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: September 22, 1924 at Charleston, West Virginia. Home Town: Charleston, West Virginia. Death: MIA: October 7, 1952.

Sussel, Malcolm A.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 51 - 29 November 1956

Captain Malcolm A. Sussel, Infantry (then First Lieutenant) United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Osu-ri, Korea, on 6 February 1951.  While making a reconnaissance on a hilly and wooded area Captain Sussel found an enemy force on the battalion's exposed flank.  With only two squads at his disposal Captain Sussel deployed one along high ground and exposed himself to enemy small arms fire in order to more effectively direct fire from beyond the village.  With the other squad he set up a road block and for 8 hours successfully held the position and captured one prisoner.  Through Captain Sussel's direction while continually exposed to the enemy, the fire became so accurate that the enemy withdrew from the forward slope and surrounding area.  Captain Sussel then remained exposed to mortar fire personally directing the withdrawal of all men and vehicles.  Captain Sussel's courage, and prompt and aggressive employment of his small force against numerically superior enemy forces permitted his battalion to form a defensive line, and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Pottstown, PA.

Suszko, August

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman Third Class August Suszko (NSN: 2784859), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 July 1953. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Suszko displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. While serving with a Company operating far forward of the main line of resistance, he was critically wounded when the company was subjected to intense enemy mortar and artillery fire and as a result of his wounds was unable to walk. Expressing complete disregard for his own personal safety, he courageously crawled to a seriously wounded Marine officer and with a remarkable display of courage administered first aid to the stricken man. Despite the intense enemy mortar and artillery barrage, he dauntlessly continued to give first aid treatment and directed the safe evacuation of several comrades. He gallantly remained at his post in order to assure the evacuation of all the wounded and only then did he let himself be removed from the extremely dangerous area. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Suszko's gallant and courageous actions combined with his selfless devotion to duty served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 26124 (November 1, 1953).

Sutherland, John P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain John P. Sutherland (MCSN: 0-42278), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Attack Squadron Two Hundred Twelve (VMA-212), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 June 1952. Leading a flight of four fighter planes while engaged with friendly surface units in destroying enemy coastal defense installations, Captain Sutherland quickly directed one of his aircraft onto an enemy target when the plane developed mechanical trouble and instructed the pilot to return with a passing flight that was proceeding to its base. After being directed to an enemy gun position by the surface controller, he led his remaining planes in an aggressive attack on the hostile weapons and, when one aircraft was shot down by enemy anti-aircraft fire, skillfully directed rescue operations from the air, resulting in the safe rescue of the downed pilot. Returning to the target area, he again led his flight in devastating attacks and destroyed three hostile boats and one coastal gun position. Redirected by the surface controller, he carried out additional attacks with his wingman and succeeded in destroying four bunkers and in damaging one gun position. When his wingman developed an electrical fire in the cockpit, Captain Sutherland led him on the final attack and destroyed four buildings and one gun position. By his superb airmanship, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of intense enemy fire, Captain Sutherland contributed materially to the success of his unit and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Beaumont, Texas. Home Town: Hot Springs, Arkansas.

Suzuki, Norman S.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 56 - 26 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Norman S. Suzuki (ASN: RA-10104245), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company L, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Nunan-san, Korea, on 18 May 1951. His company attacked enemy forces firmly entrenched on a strategic mountain objective. Due to the nature of the terrain, the assault was made in a column of platoons, with the Third Platoon as the leading element. As the forward troops fought their way up the objective, they were subjected to intensely concentrated machine gun fire and suddenly counterattacked by a strong enemy force on the right flank. The friendly unit's ammunition supply was dangerously low and the enemy hordes in front of them and to their right were preparing to join, making the situation doubly perilous. Sergeant Suzuki, Platoon Sergeant, realized that if his men withdrew the entire attack would collapse. If they remained, they would suffer heavy casualties. He immediately ran to a foremost position, shouting encouragement to his comrades and, with complete disregard for his own safety, charged headlong toward the machine gun position confronting the platoon. So furious was his assault that the hostile soldiers were completely demoralized. As the gun crew attempted to flee, Sergeant Suzuki killed them with bursts from his automatic rifle. His men, inspired by his fearless aggressiveness, immediately followed him and secured an intermediate objective. Enemy automatic weapons fire from higher ground suddenly swept their position. Deploying his men to give him covering fire, he again advanced, dashing across the open terrain under devastating enemy fire toward the emplacement. His men took up the charge, some with empty weapons, and as the panicky enemy troops scrambled out of their positions, they were killed or wounded by the assault fire. As a result of his outstanding valor, his platoon took both its objectives with a minimum of casualties and turned what might have been disaster into a decisive victory. Sergeant Suzuki's courageous action, magnificent fighting spirit and indomitable determination reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the United States Infantry. Home Town: Kahului, Maui, Hawaii.

Swafford, Jesse B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Jesse B. Swafford (MCSN: 980245), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader in Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces during a dangerous patrol mission in Korea on 26 November 1950. When the enemy attacked the leading assault platoon with automatic weapons fire at point-blank range, Sergeant Swafford immediately put his machine gun into action and delivered accurate fire which forced the hostile troops to withdraw from their positions. Voluntarily assuming charge after the enemy subsequently launched a fierce counterattack in force form the front and left flank, killing the rifle platoon leader and platoon sergeant and wounding four other Marines, he reorganized the platoon and moved it to a favorable position where he gained fire superiority and then evacuated the wounded who were lying in the hostile lines. His courageous initiative, aggressive leadership and indomitable fighting spirit reflect great credit upon Sergeant Swafford and the United States Naval Service. Born: Petros, Tennessee. Home Town: Nashville, Tennessee.

Swartz, Richard Paul

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Richard Paul Swartz (MCSN: 398821), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Serving as Company First Sergeant, Technical Sergeant Swartz displayed outstanding courage and initiative during a company attack of a strongly defended enemy hill position. When the assaulting platoon neared the crest of the objective, they were subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage, followed by an enemy counterattack. Beating of the enemy attack, they were preparing to continue the advance when they were caught in a vicious crossfire of enemy automatic weapons, causing numerous casualties. Unhesitatingly moving forward through heavy enemy fire, he fearlessly and with complete disregard for his personal safety remained exposed in order to direct and assist in the evacuation of the many casualties. Refusing to seek cover for himself, he discovered that the platoon's radioman had also been wounded, whereupon he took over operation of the radio, enabling the company commander to transmit vital messages in maneuvering the platoon to safety. His great personal bravery, resourcefulness, and unswerving devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him, and aided materially in the success achieved by the company. Technical Sergeant Swartz's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana.

Sweere, Richard T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Richard T. Sweere (NSN: 3182394), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 February 1951. Hospitalman Sweere, serving as a Corpsman in an infantry platoon, displayed outstanding skill, courage and confidence in the performance of his duties. While advancing along a narrow trail on an independent mission, his platoon was attacked by numerically superior enemy forces, and he, though subjected to direct enemy small arms, mortar and machine gun fire, continually moved through the platoon administering first aid to the wounded Marines. Although painfully wounded in the initial attack, he refused to be evacuated and continued to fearlessly expose himself to the heavy enemy fire in order to treat the increasing number of casualties. After the enemy attack had been repulsed, he remained at his post, still refusing evacuation and organized and directed stretcher parties to carry the wounded to the nearest aid station. His aggressive actions, devotion to duty and complete disregard for his own personal safety set an example for all who served with him and were directly instrumental in saving the lives of numerous wounded Marines. Hospitalman Sweere's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 11310 (May 15, 1951).

Sweet, Granville G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Granville G. Sweet, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander in Company A, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 February 1951. Assigned the mission of supporting an infantry battalion in the attack on a strongly defended enemy hill position, Second Lieutenant Sweet fearlessly and with complete disregard for his own safety exposed himself to devastating enemy fire, skillfully leading his platoon forward over the tortuous terrain seeking routes of advance which would enable the platoon to move in close support of the infantry. Repeatedly moving on foot to better direct the fire and movement of his tanks, he was able to keep his platoon with the assault elements, rendering effective close-in machine gun fire, and destroying bunkers at point-blank range. His aggressive leadership and outstanding devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him, and aided immeasurably in the successful seizure of the objective. Second Lieutenant Sweet's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: July 16, 1918 at Glenwood, Illinois. Home Town: Glenwood, Illinois.

Swenson, David H. Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant, Junior Grade David "H" Swenson, Jr. (NSN: 0-498457), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving in U.S.S. Lyman K. Swenson (DD-729), in the Korean area on 13 September 1950. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Swenson, while assigned the duties of Gunnery Liaison Officer, was charged with ascertaining from available information on hand the correct and specific targets on which his ship should fire during its bombardment of Inchon, Korea, on 13 September 1950, and to keep the ship's gunner control officer informed accordingly. While carrying out his assigned duties of observing the effect of his ship's gunfire on the enemy shore batteries and applying that information to the ship's gunfire charts in order that the guns could receive accurate revised target data, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Swenson was struck by enemy counter-battery fire and instantly killed. By his courageous action and devotion to duty in refusing to leave his unprotected post in the face of heavy enemy fire, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Swenson was responsible for obtaining and furnishing such valuable information to the gunnery control officer that he definitely assisted his ship to escape damage from enemy gunfire, thereby providing a material contribution to the war effort of the Korean Campaign. His conduct served as an inspiration to the members of the ship's company and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1090 (November 20, 1950). Born: August 26, 1926. Home Town: Taylor, Texas. Death: KIA: September 13, 1950.

Swingle, Ivan Earl (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 29 - 14 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Ivan Earl Swingle (ASN: US-52058360), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Korisil, Korea, on 14 October 1951. His platoon had the mission of attacking and securing an enemy-occupied objective. As the friendly troops approached the top of the hill, they were pinned down by intensely concentrated fire form enemy mortars located on the reverse slope. Immediately perceiving the situation, Corporal Swingle, armed with grenades and rifle, fearlessly moved forward over the top. With complete disregard for his own safety, he charged the mortar position exposing himself to the intense automatic weapons fire and grenades that were blasting around him as he ran. Deliberately using himself as a decoy, he drew all firepower upon himself, thereby enabling the remainder of the platoon to advance. Coming into full view of the emplacement, he threw a grenade into it, completely destroying the position and killing the mortar crew. Seconds later, he was mortally wounded by small arms fire. Corporal Swingle's courageous action, aggressive initiative and self-sacrificing performance of a task far beyond the call of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission, reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the United States Infantry. Born: August 18, 1928. Home Town: Blue Rock, Ohio. Death: KIA: October 14, 1951.

Swords, John J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant John J. Swords (MCSN: 0-49727), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 April 1951. While participating in a company attack against a strongly defended hostile position, the platoon was subjected to an intense barrage of enemy mortar fire which caused numerous casualties and forced the company to halt temporarily in order to reorganize. Realizing that many of the casualties required immediate medical attention, First Lieutenant Swords bravely moved across 500 yards of open, fire-swept terrain to reach a friendly tank platoon and guide them to his company position. Continuing to expose himself to the intense hostile fire while directing the placing of the wounded on the tanks and the evacuation of the casualties to the aid station, he contributed materially to the saving of many lives which would have been lost without prompt medical attention. By his outstanding courage, skill and selfless efforts in behalf of others, First Lieutenant Swords served to inspire all who observed his heroic actions and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: Jeffersonville, New York.

Syms, George L.

This was my grandfather, George L. Syms, whom I loved and respected very much. I went into the Army because of him and his love for this country. My Grandfather was a hero. Just before he died of cancer this year, I asked him how he earned the Silver Star with "V" device. My Grandfather told me the story. I obviously don't remember all of it but here it goes.

He was in the Artillery.  After being overrun by the North Koreans, a retreat order was given.   My Grandfather evacuated with some of the first to leave.  When his unit realized that they had left wounded and others behind, he went back for them. He had to steal a jeep from an officer.  While saving his fellow soldiers' lives, he was engaged by enemy and was shot at numerous times, he said, sometimes coming within yards of the North Koreans.   He said he turned a corner and there was a young North Korean soldier scared to death.  My Grandfather sped away from him quickly before he could shot at my grandfather.  After getting to the front line and saving his fellow soldiers, my Grandfather ended up driving along a creek bed, following it until he reached a unit that could help them.  When he returned he had been shot, "grazed" as he put it, three times.  He went back for men that his command left behind.  He was the only one who would go and get those men.  My Grandfather lived by the words, "No man left behind." Also, my Grandfather went to the medics with his wounds from being shot.  They patched him up and told him to come back later and fill out the paperwork for his Purple Heart.  My Grandfather never went back and he never received a Purple Heart for being wounded in action. He did get the Silver Star.  I guess that was enough for him. He treasured that award until the day he died. A few years ago I got together with my family and we bought an awards display for him for Christmas for his medal and awards.  This was the only time I ever saw my Grandfather cry. - Submitted by Det. Richard Campbell

Sypniewski, Stanley Leonard (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Stanley Leonard Sypniewski (NSN: 3034019), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company G, 3d Battalion, 7th Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 August 1952. With his company defending a strategic sector of "Bunker Hill" in the face of a heavy enemy bombardment, Hospitalman Sypniewski bravely exposed himself to hostile mortar and artillery fire to treat the wounded and to ensure their prompt evacuation. Refusing to seek cover, he constantly moved across the fire-swept terrain to administer aid to the casualties in other areas. Mortally wounded by enemy shell fragments while attempting to reach a stricken Marine, Hospitalman Sypniewski, by his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 3, 1931. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois. Death: Killed in Action.

Syverson, Douglas Wayne (2nd citation)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 9 - 4 January 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant] Douglas W. Syverson, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as Commanding Officer, Company G, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Angang-ni, Korea, on 4 September 1950. His company was attacked by an enemy force estimated at over 400 troops. One of his platoons had been subjected to a particularly fierce assault and was being disorganized by the fury of the fire sweeping its positions. One of three tanks, supporting the platoon, was disabled in this action. Utterly disregarding the enemy's intense fire, Captain Syverson moved among the men encouraging them on to greater efforts and placing them in defensive positions. Dispatching a small group of his men, to the rear, with instructions for setting up a defense of the town, he remained in his exposed position. He personally placed explosive charges to destroy the disabled tank and directed the evacuation of the wounded on the remaining tanks. After the disabled tank had been destroyed and assured of the safe removal of the wounded Captain Syverson led the platoon, through the encircling enemy to the company's position in the town. Here he quickly organized an effective defense and in spite of overwhelming odds the enemy was repulsed withy heavy losses. Captain Syverson's gallant actions, exemplary leadership and complete devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry.

Syverson, Douglas Wayne (3rd citation)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 223 - 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Douglas W. Syverson, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as Commanding Officer, Company G, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Kwaksen, Korea, on 31 October 1950. When his company was spearheading the regiment's drive toward the Yalu River, its advance was temporarily halted when it encountered severe fire from seven enemy tanks and an estimated battalion of enemy troops. When the enemy opened fire on his company's lead platoon, Captain Syverson, displaying outstanding leadership ability, courage and devotion to duty, moved forward into the severe enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire to his lead platoon's position where, with utter disregard for personal safety, he personally directed establishment of a base of fire by the platoon. Then, although under intense enemy fire, he moved to the rear and in the extreme darkness, contacted his support platoon. Captain Syverson, again displaying utter disregard for personal safety led his support platoon back into the face of the enemy fire to a position from where it placed heavy fire on the enemy position and neutralized the enemy fire. Captain Syverson's courageous actions and outstanding leadership ability reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

Syvertsen, Alfred

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Alfred Syvertsen (MCSN: 1152296), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 June 1951. Although he sustained serious leg and hand injuries when the rifle company to which he was attached as a member of a machine gun squad was attacked by a large hostile force employing automatic weapons, hand grenades and small arms, Private First Class Syvertsen bravely refused to be evacuated and remained in position to deliver heavy fire on the enemy. When he observed a wounded Marine lying in an exposed area swept by hostile fire, he moved forward to attempt his rescue and, despite the intense pain of his own wounds, succeeded in carrying the man to safety. By his aggressive fighting spirit and selfless efforts in behalf of a comrade, he served to inspire all who observed him. His marked courage and steadfast devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Syvertsen and the United States Naval Service. Born: Klickitat, Washington. Home Town: Alturas, California.

Szczepanski, Sylvester

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Sylvester Szczepanski (MCSN: 653896), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner of Company B, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Seoul, Korea, on 28 September 1950. With his tank disabled by intense hostile anti-tank, small arms and automatic weapons fire, Corporal Szczepanski, upon observing that his loader had collapsed from dangerous fumes within the vehicle, continued to engage the enemy forces withy his gun. Alternately loading and firing both his 90-mm. and coaxial machine gun, he delivered accurate and effective fire to inflict heavy casualties among the attackers and put several anti-tank guns out of action, continuing his defense of his own tank until it could be withdrawn to a position of comparative safety. By his daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty, Corporal Szczepanski contributed materially to the success achieved by his unit. His heroic efforts throughout reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

 

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