Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "T"

 
Close this window
 

Tabor, Stanley Eugene (posthumous) (POW)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 26 - 3 April 1954

First Lieutenant Stanley E. Tabor, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Taejon, Korea, from 22 July to 26 July 1950.  Surrounded by a numerically superior foe with routes of escape cut by the enemy, small elements of the division were making a determined attempt in the face of relentless enemy pressure to withdraw toward friendly lines.  Alone and attempting to evade capture ad reach friendly fire, he met his Division Commander suffering from injuries, disease and hunger and attempting to make contact with friendly forces.  Although in good health and physically capable of making a long march over rugged terrain, Lieutenant Tabor, with complete disregard for his own safety and despite repeated urgings of his Division Commander to abandon him, elected to remain and assist his disabled commander.  On July 26, 1950, they were discovered by the enemy who attempted to capture them.  Lieutenant Tabor immediately covered the escape of his commander by pouring devastating rifle fire into the ranks of the foe.  When last seen, he was crawling through a paddy and attempting to evade capture and later died of wounds while in the hands of the enemy.  Lieutenant Tabor's selfless devotion and act of gallantry is in keeping with the highest tradition of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself.


Stanley E. Tabor
(Click picture for a larger view)

Stanley E. Tabor Citation
(Click picture for a larger view)

Taggart, Edward John (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Edward John Taggart (MCSN: 1183788), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 21 July 1952. When the enemy laid down a heavy mortar barrage on his outpost and a fellow Marine was wounded, Private First Class Taggart unhesitatingly left the safety of a heavily constructed bunker to go to the aid of the stricken man. Instantly killed by hostile mortar fire while attempting to save his wounded comrade, Private First Class Taggart, by his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of another, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 22, 1933 at Hannibal, New York. Home Town: Bozeman, Montana. Death: KIA: July 21, 1952 - Buried at: Sunset Hills Cemetery - Bozeman, Montana.

Talarico, John C. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class John C. Talarico (MCSN: 1313463), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 July 1953. When his platoon was subjected to murderous hostile mortar and artillery fire during an attack against an enemy-held outpost well forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Talarico volunteered to obtain additional machine gun ammunition desperately needed for the securing of the hostile position. In order to reach the supply point, he was forced to expose himself to enemy observation and the direct hostile fire which was continuously being delivered upon the area. Braving the intense barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire while en route to and from the ammunition supply point, he returned to the platoon's position with an exhausting load of the urgently needed ordnance. Although exhausted upon reaching the area, he again requested permission to go after more ammunition. Mortally wounded when an incoming hostile shell suddenly landed nearby, Private First Class Talarico, by his indomitable courage, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: December 19, 1934 at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: July 26, 1953 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Tall Bear, Alvin

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Alvin Tall Bear (MCSN: 666298), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 28 January to 15 March 1951. With his platoon leader seriously wounded and evacuated to the rear during his company's assault against the regimental objective, a series of cleverly camouflaged enemy positions deeply entrenched on a high hill, Sergeant Tall Bear immediately assumed command and effected a skillful reorganization under blistering small arms and automatic weapons fire. Painfully wounded in the arm as he spearheaded the drive up the steep and treacherous slope, he refused to leave his men and continued to lead them forward until severe pain and loss of blood forced him to submit to evacuation. By his daring initiative, forceful and determined leadership and dauntless fighting spirit in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Tall Bear served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed materially to the successful seizure of the objective. His heroic efforts throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Pawnee, Oklahoma. Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Talotta, Joseph A.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 154 - June 15, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Joseph A. Talotta (ASN: RA-33786851), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company L, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 6 February 1951, near Chipyong-ni, Korea. On that date he was a platoon sergeant in an infantry unit which was assigned the mission of locating a reported enemy command post near Chipyong-ni. As the platoon approached Hill 506, it was subjected to heavy enemy machine gun, small arms and mortar fire, which pinned it down. When the platoon leader was mortally wounded in a bayonet charge Sergeant Talotta immediately took command and led the platoon toward its objective in spite of the intense enemy small arms fire. His courageous actions contributed materially to the success of his unit in accomplishing its mission. The gallant conduct of Sergeant Talotta reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Tamborini, Joseph L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Joseph L. Tamborini (MCSN: 859844), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. With his company under attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Corporal Tamborini fearlessly braved enemy small arms, machine gun, grenade and mortar fire to direct and control the effective fire of his team. Observing hostile forces overrunning a machine gun position on his right flank, he immediately adjusted his team's fire and successfully annihilated the enemy who had penetrated the position. Although suffering from head and leg wounds sustained during the initial stages of the action, he courageously remained at his post, repeatedly refusing to be evacuated until he was assured that the hostile attack had been repulsed. His gallant leadership, courage and staunch devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Corporal Tamborini and the United States Naval Service. Born: Wainwright, Ohio. Home Town: Oakland, California.

Tanner, James K.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders #231 - 6 July 195_

Private James K. Tanner, RA14459432, Army Medical Service, Medical Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 10 June and during the early morning hours of 11 June 1953, private Tanner, a medical aid man, was with Company "F" in an attack on Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. While under constant enemy fire, he administered aid aid to the wounded and Prepared them for evacuation. During the battle, he went to the aid of a friendly Korean soldier lying wounded in a cave subjected to intense sniper fire. Still under enemy fire, he carried the wounded man to a relatively sheltered position and with the aid of a litter bearer prepared to evacuate him. When the litter bearer was wounded, Private Tanner remained with both men to administer first aid until further assistance could be brought from the line. With the coming of darkness, the area became the target of friendly and enemy fire. Throughout the night, fire raked the position in increasing intensity and his position was under the observation of a hostile machine gun crew which had set up its weapon directly above him on the ridge. Prior to dawn, the Korean soldier died despite Private Tanner's efforts. With the coming of dawn, he dragged the wounded man toward friendly lines for approximately 1000 yards until, completely exhausted, he had to go on alone to secure aid. He then returned and directed the evacuation for the remaining distance, resting only when assured the wounded man was readied for removal to the hospital. Private Tanner's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Georgia.

Taplett, Robert Donald (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Colonel Robert Donald Taplett (MCSN: 0-6678), United States Marine Corps, for gallantry in action while Commanding Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), United Nations Command. Lieutenant Colonel Taplett distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry in action in the amphibious landing resulting in the capture of Wolmi-Do, Korea, on 15 September 1950 in the Inchon-Seoul operation. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Military Services. Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 50 (October 27, 1950).

Taplett, Robert Donald (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Robert Donald Taplett (MCSN: 0-6678), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 21 September 1950. Assigned the mission of seizing and occupying two hills overlooking the regimental objective, Lieutenant Colonel Taplett skillfully carried out this hazardous task and, upon its completion, coolly remained in an exposed area to personally direct the placing of supporting fire on strong enemy positions which were bringing intense small-arms, machine-gun, mortar and artillery fire to bear on the entire battalion front and causing many casualties. By his inspiring leadership, gallant fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty in the face of heavy enemy fire, Lieutenant Colonel Taplett contributed materially to the success of the regiment in carrying out its assigned mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tyndall, South Dakota. Home Town: Tyndall, South Dakota.

Tassey, George

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 60 - September 30, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) George Tassey (ASN: 0-38346), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as Commanding Officer of Company D, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 1 September 1950, near Changyong, Korea. Between midnight on 31 August 1950 and 0600 hours 1 September 1950, the 1st Battalion of the 23d Infantry Regiment was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force, and due to their overwhelming numbers, the battalion was forced to withdraw. During this withdrawal, the defensive perimeter between Companies A and B, was pierced by a regiment of the enemy, creating a threat to the entire battalion. Captain Tassey, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, and in the face of murderous enemy fire, displayed great courage and traits of leadership by piecing together the struggling elements of four companies into a defensive perimeter which held until reinforcements could reach the position. After the reinforcements had arrived, he remained in a position exposed to the withering fire of the enemy, and supported the battalion until it could be withdrawn. That his composite unit of his was able to withdraw intact and with a minimum loss of life and equipment is due almost solely to Captain Tassey's valorous actions on this occasion. His heroic and inspiring action on this occasion exemplify the highest traditions of the military service, and provide a lasting tribute to himself and to the Infantry.

Tate, Roy A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 724 - 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Coast Artillery Corps) Roy A. Tate, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer, 52d Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 24th Infantry Division, in action near Pamsong-gol, Korea, on 15 October 1951. On that date, one battery of Colonel Tate's Battalion was assigned the mission of supporting infantry units attacking Objective Dog. As four half-tracks opened up on the enemy positions, they were immediately subjected to concentrated enemy mortar and artillery fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, Colonel Tate moved forward through the murderous hail of enemy fire to join the unit and direct the fire and maneuvering of the vehicles. During this action, he was hit by shrapnel, but resolutely he continued to supervise the destruction of enemy bunkers and heavy weapons positions, inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy and proving of great benefit to the Infantry. On one occasion, despite the extreme pain of his wounds, he fearlessly advanced on foot to personally reconnoiter a safe route through a heavily mined area and to select advantageous positions from which the half-tracks could deliver more effective fire. Colonel Tate's courageous action, selfless devotion to duty and exemplary leadership contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission. His gallant actions and selfless devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Tator, Marshall B.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 261 - 8 July 1951

First Lieutenant Marshall B. Tator, 01290333, Infantry, Company "I", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 23 March 1951, the 3d Platoon of Company "I", under Lieutenant Tator's command, attacked the left flank of a ridge overlooking the town of Uijongbu, Korea. Placing himself within range of the enemy fire, Lieutenant Tator pointed out targets and assisted in directing automatic weapons fire on the foe's entrenched positions. During the final phase of the attack, he aggressively rallied his troops and supporting weapons into such an overwhelming force that the enemy was severely beaten and withdrew in disorder. Lieutenant Tator's exceptional gallantry and outstanding leadership reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Minnesota.

Taylor, Charles R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Charles R. Taylor (MCSN: 1117560), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 - 26 August 1952. With his unit engaged in an assault to re-establish and reinforce the company's right flank, Corporal Taylor courageously led his squad through intense enemy mortar fire to their objective where they immediately took cover. Upon observing that his platoon leader was lying helpless in front of the position, ten yards from an enemy machine gun emplacement, he bravely rushed to his leader's aid and dragged him to the relative safety of a friendly bunker where he rendered first aid and emergency care. By his outstanding heroism and selfless devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire, Corporal Taylor served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: East Point, Georgia. Home Town: East Point, Georgia.

Taylor, David Scott (posthumous)

Headquarters, Eighth United States Army Korea (EUSAK)
General Orders No. 160 - 13 November 1950

First Lieutenant David S. Taylor, 046493, United States Marine Corps, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy in Southern Korea on 17 August 1950.  On this date, the 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, attacked elements of the 4th North Korean Army Division, located on Obangi Ridge, four and one-half miles west of Yongsan, Korea.  At approximately 1630 hours, B Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, was halfway up the slope of the ridge.  The 2nd Platoon, B Company, in the assault, was pinned down by heavy machinegun, automatic, and small arms fire and was suffering heavy casualties.  It was at this time that Lieutenant Taylor, Platoon Leader of the Second Platoon, personally lead a portion of his Platoon in a flanking maneuver to the top of the ridge to build up a base of fire on his Platoon's right flank in order that the remainder of his Platoon could advance.  At this time Lieutenant Taylor received a gunshot wound in his left thigh, but continued to supervise and direct the fire of his Platoon until the majority of the remainder of his Platoon had reached the crest of the ridge.  Due to the pain and the great loss of blood, Lieutenant Taylor finally allowed himself to be evacuated.  His actions materially contributed to his Platoon's success and final attainment of the objective.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Taylor reflects great credit on himself and the naval service.  Entered the naval service from Washington.

Taylor, George E.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 80 - 1 November 1950

Second Lieutenant (then sergeant first class), George E. Taylor, )-2262201, Armor, United States Army, Company B, 73d Heavy Tank Battalion, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on the night of 21 September 1950, at Suwon, Korea.  Lieutenant Taylor was traveling in the middle of a task force column when he intercepted a message that his Company Commander's tank had been hit.  Without regard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Taylor voluntarily proceeded through the cross fire to the knocked out tank.  After rapidly making an estimate of the situation and calling for tanks to shield the aid men, Lieutenant Taylor then mounted the tank in an exposed position and supervised the evacuation of the crew.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Taylor on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Georgia.

Taylor, Gus

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 72 - 17 January 1951

By direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action, is awarded to Corporal Gus Taylor, RA18332411, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company E, 19th Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Anju, Korea, on 5 November 1950. His company was attacked by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength and was ordered to withdraw. As the company withdrew, he voluntarily remained in position along with a comrade to cover the movement. Observing three of the enemy , armed with automatic weapons, approaching his position, he rushed forward and killed one and wounded the second with a blow from his rifle as his comrade dispatched the third. He then continued to fight off the remainder of the advancing enemy as he withdrew to rejoin his company. Corporal Taylor’s fearless actions reflect great credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered service from Jacksonville, Arkansas.

Taylor, John E. Jr.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 575 - 7 December 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain [then First Lieutenant] John E. Taylor, Jr., United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy as Pilot, 39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, Fifth Air Force, on 3 September 1951. While leading his flight on a close support mission over United Nations ground troops, Captain Taylor's right napalm tank was hit and set on fire by enemy anti-aircraft fire. With disregard for his personal safety, Captain Taylor refused to drop the flaming napalm tank over friendly troops and positioned himself for an assault on enemy troops nearby, scoring a direct hit. Even though his aircraft's wing was severely burned, Captain Taylor pressed successive attacks on the Communist enemy with rockets and machine guns. Captain Taylor, by his gallant deed, saved the lives of many United Nations Forces. By his courage and bravery, Captain Taylor reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Taylor, Lester R. Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Lester R. Taylor, Jr. (MCSN: 634600), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 March 1951. While serving in an assault squad and assigned to assist in gaining and maintaining fire superiority over well-emplaced hostile forces in mountainous terrain, Private First Class Taylor bravely persevered in his task although continually exposed to intense and accurate enemy small arms and mortar fire. During the final assault, he immediately responded to an urgent call for additional ammunition and was mortally wounded while carrying out his hazardous mission. By his daring initiative, he served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of his company. His marked courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Taylor and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 13, 1929 at Columbus, Ohio. Home Town: Canal Winchester, Ohio. Death: KIA: March 27, 1951 - Buried at: Fernwood Cemetery - Lockbourne, Ohio.

Taylor, Ray

Headquarters 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 118 - 31 December 1950

Sergeant Ray Taylor, RA20654411, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company D, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 22 September 1950 in the vicinity of Sinban-ni, Korea.  On that date Sergeant Taylor was in command of a heavy machine gun section attached to a rifle company.  The company was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force and was subjected to severe mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire.  During the attack all members of Sergeant Taylor's section became casualties and the rifle company was forced to withdraw.  Although he had been wounded three times Sergeant Taylor remained alone at a machine gun and, amid a hail of hostile fire, directed his devastating fire against the advancing enemy.  Fearlessly he remained at his weapon, disregarding his personal safety, until he had covered the withdrawal of the rifle company to new defensive positions.  His intrepidity in the face of overwhelming odds enabled the company to withdraw with a minimum of casualties, reorganize in its new positions and repel the enemy attack.  The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Taylor on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the fine traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Wisconsin.

Taylor, Richard M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Richard M. Taylor (MCSN: 0-27073), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Receiving word that an infantry company had been cut off, pinned down and thereby prevented from communicating with adjacent or parent units in order to tie in the defensive sectors for the night, Captain Taylor immediately organized a tank platoon and hurried to the scene of action. Although the infantrymen were subjected to an intense attack by hostile forces employing automatic weapons, mortars and small arms from ranges as close as two hundred yards, he bravely exposed himself to the enemy fire to leave his tank and deliver radio batteries to the company commander. Returning to his vehicle, he skillfully directed his platoon in neutralizing the hostile fire which enabled the infantry company to move to more advantageous terrain under the covering fire of his tanks. By his marked courage, expert tactical ability and unswerving devotion to duty, Captain Taylor served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Albany, Texas. Home Town: Albany, Texas.

Taylor, Robert W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert W. Taylor (MCSN: 0-37866), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), during an observation flight carried out over enemy-held territory in Korea on 1 March 1951. A daring and aggressive airman, First Lieutenant Taylor observed two well-entrenched hostile positions located on a ridge controlling the route of march of friendly forces while flying his unarmed aircraft and, fully realizing the extreme dangers confronting the advancing units, contacted and briefed close support aircraft, then executed several low altitude dives over the area to pinpoint and mark the emplacements by dropping smoke grenades. Subjected to close range small arms and automatic weapons fire, he remained over the positions, directing and coordinating the air strikes with superb skill until the emplacements were neutralized. By his vigilance, dauntless perseverance and heroic devotion to duty throughout the intensive action, First Lieutenant Taylor contributed materially to the successful forward movement of the ground forces and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: June 18, 1924 at Quanah, Texas. Home Town: Quanah, Texas.

Taylor, T.J.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 109 - September 27, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal T. J. Taylor (ASN: RA-38644677), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company G, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 13 August 1950 near Yongpo, Korea. Corporal Taylor was a member of an outpost near a blown out bridge across the Naktong River approximately 1,000 yards in front of friendly troops. A large enemy force crossed the river and overran a position on the flank of Company G. As soon as the enemy crossing was discovered, the outpost was ordered to withdraw, but when the men attempted to do so, they found themselves cut off by the enemy. Corporal Taylor immediately delivered a heavy volume of fire with his weapon and advanced upon the enemy, knocking out several machine guns with his fire. Although wounded in the shoulder he continued to deliver protective fire enabling the other members of the outpost to reach safety. Corporal Taylor remained in position protecting several men who had been wounded until aid arrived and they were evacuated from the area. By his gallant actions, Corporal Taylor reflected great credit upon himself and his actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Taylor, Wardell J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Wardell J. Taylor, Jr. (MCSN: 113607), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with the First Service Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 30 November 1950. At approximately 0200, during a fanatical enemy attack on the northern sector of the Hagaru-ri perimeter, an enemy white phosphorus mortar shell hit a stack of gasoline drums containing eighty octane gasoline and set fire to approximately seventy-five drums. The explosion and resulting fire threatened other drums of gasoline and diesel fuel stacked on all sides of the burning drums. Despite heavy snow on the ground, flaming gasoline was rolling along the ground in close proximity to other drums. Corporal Taylor, realizing the critical shortage of Class III supplies, voluntarily and with absolute disregard for his own personal safety, ran to the burning drums and attempted to confine the fire to just one stack of drums. Although he drew heavy enemy small arms and machine gun fire and he was silhouetted in the bright light , he not only fearlessly exposed himself to enemy fire but to intense heat and flames from exploding drums. By his gallant initiative, unhesitant actions and utter disregard for his life, he successfully extinguished the spreading flames and was able to confine the fire to one stack of Class III drums, thereby saving the remaining critical supplies in the dump. Corporal Taylor's display of outstanding courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Taylor, Warren Herbert (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Warren Herbert Taylor (MCSN: 0-49872), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Section Leader of a Mortar Section in Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. When the Company Commander and the Executive Officers became casualties, Second Lieutenant Taylor unhesitatingly assumed command of the company and moved fro position to position while exposed to enemy fire in order to insure the successful completion of the company's assigned mission. Immediately upon seizure of the objective, he personally reorganized his company and installed a hasty defense which made possible the repelling of three separate hostile counterattacks. Repeatedly risking his life under heavy enemy fire in order to consolidate the defensive positions, Second Lieutenant Taylor served to inspire and encourage all members of his company. His initiative, courageous leadership and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: December 10, 1924 at Dallas, Texas. Home Town: Arlington, Texas. Death: KIA: September 25, 1950 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Taylor, William W. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William W. Taylor (MCSN: 0-43023), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader and subsequently as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 1 to 10 December 1950. With his company commander fatally struck down and the enemy inflicting heavy casualties among his units during an attack against a numerically superior hostile force in a blinding snow storm, which rendered the use of supporting arms ineffective, First Lieutenant Taylor immediately assumed command and effected a skillful reorganization while under direct hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire. Personally leading the assault, he moved among his men along the line, shouting words of encouragement and directing their fire until the objective had been seized with heavy losses to the enemy. When the enemy fiercely counterattacked in a blistering night engagement, First Lieutenant Taylor again maneuvered from one sector to another around the defense perimeter, repeatedly placing himself in an exposed position and personally engaging in the bitter fight against the fanatical attackers throughout the night. By his daring and courageous leadership, fearless tactics and indomitable fighting spirit, First Lieutenant Taylor served as a constant inspiration to all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by his unit. His heroic actions throughout this period of intensive combat were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Taylor, William W. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William W. Taylor (MCSN: 0-43023), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. Painfully wounded by grenade shrapnel as he bravely moved to the focal point of a night attack by a numerically superior enemy force, First Lieutenant Taylor steadfastly refused medical aid and courageously moved from one position to another along the defense line, shouting words of encouragement to his men and directing the fire of his unit. With the hostile force launching repeated assaults, he skillfully deployed automatic weapons to outmaneuver the attackers and, at dawn, resolutely led a counterattack which completely routed the enemy, submitting to medical treatment only after the integrity of the position was assured. By his aggressive leadership, inspiring courage and unwavering devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Taylor contributed materially to the successful defense of the strategic ground and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Randolph County, Alabama. Home Town: Waverly, Alabama.

Tedesco, Joseph E.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 852 - 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Joseph E. Tedesco, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company A, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action on 14 October 1951 in the vicinity of Mundung-ni, Korea. On that date, during an attack on a well-fortified and strategic enemy-held hill, Corporal Tedesco displayed dauntless courage and cool behavior before the enemy. Despite the intense hostile small arms, automatic weapons and grenade fire, he led his men through the heavily wooded terrain and skillfully maneuvered them toward the enemy positions. In the course of this action, he was knocked down by an enemy grenade burst but immediately rose and continued in the assault, personally inflicting numerous casualties upon the enemy. His actions were an inspiration to the men of his unit and aided immeasurably in the success of the attack.

Teener, David R.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 55 - August 13, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) David R. Teener (ASN: 0-60871), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company H, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division in Korea. On 26 July 1950 near Yongdong, Korea, enemy infantry supported by heavy concentrations of artillery and mortars, launched an attack against the left flank of the 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry. Exposing himself to the intense enemy fire, Lieutenant Teener moved forward to select positions for 75-mm. rifles. Despite severe burns about the face and arms by white phosphorous, he continued to establish defensive positions which enable the company to withstand the enemy onslaught and protect the battalion flank. Lieutenant Teener's courage and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Terrio, Donald

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Donald Terrio (MCSN: 1084626), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against an armed enemy on 8 August 1950 near Chindong-ni, Korea. On 8 August 1950 Private Terrio was advancing with his company in an attack on a steep and strongly held enemy position, when the company came under intense enemy machine gun fire from the flank. The advance of the company was restricted and the heavy fire caused many casualties. Without regard for his own personal safety, Private Terrio advanced under the intense fire to a position in the rear of the enemy lines, where he attacked and destroyed one of the machine guns with grenades. This action reduced the volume of fire and enabled the company to continue its advance. After this act, Private Terrio volunteered to rescue and return to safety a wounded man, who lay in the direct path of fire of a machine gun. The gallantry displayed by Private Terrio on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 72 (September 16, 1950). Entered Service From Wisconsin.

Terwilliger, William B.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 160 - 16 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant William B. Terwilliger, RA17277688, (then Corporal), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 20 May 1951 in the vicinity of Senchon, Korea. On that day the 1st Battalion of the 9th Infantry Regiment counterattacked an enemy force far superior in number to its own. During the fiercest portion of the attack Sergeant Terwilliger sighted an abandoned machine gun position. Disregarding the intense enemy fire, he dashed across a mine field and lunged into the emplacement, placing the weapon in correct position. He then manned the machinegun throughout the attack, killing forty of the enemy. Sergeant Terwilliger’s undaunted courage and devotion to duty reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Colton, South Dakota.

---

News Clipping:

"Sgt. William B. Terwilliger has been awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action in Korea, according to a notification sent his mother, Mrs. Bulah Hoyl.  Terwilliger's citation came during the fighting near Senschon in May.  He was assigned to the 9th Infantry Regiment.  The citation reads in part: "During a fierce portion of an attack, Sergeant Terwilliger sighted an abandoned machine gun position.  Disregarding the intense fire, he dashed across a mine field and lunged into the emplacement.  Sergeant Terwilliger placed the weapon in correct position and his fire was so effective that 40 of the enemy were killed." - The Daily Republic, Mitchell, SD, July 11, 1951

Teverbaugh, Jesse W. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Jesse W. Teverbaugh, Jr. (MCSN: 1125999), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the Support Company, First Service Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 6 and 7 December 1950. Driving a weapons carrier in a vehicle convoy proceeding from Yudam-ni to Koto-ri when a strong hostile force ambushed the column during the hours of darkness, Corporal Teverbaugh observed an unidentified man crawl under a truck as members of the convoy took firing positions along the side of the road and, crawling under the enemy's intense fire to the vehicle, found a hostile soldier and promptly killed him with his knife. With the convoy again halted by accurate machine gun fire in a later action, he obtained three hand grenades and, while exposed to the heavy fire, hurled them directly into the emplacement, destroying the position and enabling the convoy to proceed. By his daring and aggressive action, indomitable fighting spirit and cool courage in the face of grave peril, Corporal Teverbaugh contributed to the success of the vehicle train in reaching its destination and his heroic efforts throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Therkelsen, Donald A. (posthumous) (KIA July 17, 1953)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 1 - 1 January 1954

Private First Class Donald A. Therkelsen, US55238398, Infantry, Medical Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the morning and afternoon of 17 July 1953, in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, Company "B" assaulted enemy held Hill "433" and, in the ensuing firefight, sustained many casualties. Observing the wounded attackers lying exposed to the enemy fire, Private Therkelsen, an aidman, courageously moved from casualty to casualty, administering medical aid and removing them to sheltered positions. He repeatedly returned to aid the wounded men, despite the intense enemy fire, and was greatly responsible for saving the lives of several United Nations personnel. Private Therkelsen was last seen valiantly advancing into an area under heavy enemy bombardment in an attempt to assist a wounded comrade. Private Therkelsen's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Illinois.

Thomas, Alfred I. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Alfred I. Thomas (MCSN: 0-45440/405931), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 1 to 18 March 1951. On one occasion, during a mission to seize a hill west of Hoengsong that had been taken and subsequently lost by friendly forces four different times, First Lieutenant Thomas promptly initiated his plans and gave his four platoon commanders a thorough briefing on the tactics to be employed in the attack against the heavily defended position. Accompanying the leading elements of his company in the assault, he continually exposed himself to heavy fire from small arms, automatic weapons and mortars to direct his men in the onslaught, inspiring them to heroic efforts throughout a furious battle which culminated with a bayonet charge to annihilate the enemy and capture numerous rifles, machine guns, grenades and other materiel. By his broad knowledge of infantry tactics, daring and forceful leadership and inspiring devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Thomas was in large measure responsible for the successful conduct of all missions assigned his company. His dauntless perseverance throughout this period of intensive combat was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Thomas, Alfred I. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Alfred I. Thomas (MCSN: 0-45440/405931), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Commanding Officer of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 December 1950. Pinned down by heavy and intense hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire while leading his depleted company of approximately forty-five men against a numerically superior enemy force estimated at three hundred, First Lieutenant Thomas repeatedly exposed himself to the continuous hail of hostile fire in order to accurately and effectively direct the fire of his group and to shout words of encouragement and inspiration to his men. Although enemy fire pierced his clothing in four different places, he boldly continued to move forward at the head of his unit across open and unprotected terrain against a determined and fanatical enemy force well-entrenched and cleverly concealed in a series of high ice-covered ridges running parallel to the road. Maintaining his forward position and continuing to bolster the morale of his weary men, he gallantly led a final attack which resulted in the seizing of his objective and the destruction of a large number of the enemy with a minimum of loss to his command. By his exceptional leadership, cool courage while under heavy enemy fire, and unflinching devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Thomas upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tampa, Florida. Home Town: Tampa, Florida.

Thomas, Gene F. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Gene F. Thomas (MCSN: 1302413), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 16 December 1952. When his fire team was assigned the mission of covering the operations of a flame thrower in the assault of an enemy trench line, Private First Class Thomas fearlessly advanced to the hostile position in the face of devastating machine gun, grenade, automatic weapons and small arms fire. With all of his comrades severely wounded by the enemy fire, he unhesitatingly moved forward alone and delivered killing fire into the hostile positions, permitting the flame thrower to pour its deadly fire on the entrenched enemy. Observing that the flame thrower operator was seriously wounded and unable to move during the withdrawal, Private First Class Thomas crawled through a heavy volume of grenade fire to the aid of his comrade and succeeded in removing him to a safe position. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Thomas served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Thomas, Gene F. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Private First Class Gene F. Thomas (MCSN: 1302413), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 29 - 30 March 1953. Occupying a vital outpost far forward of the main line of resistance when the enemy launched a vicious assault on the position, Private First Class Thomas continually moved through the fire-swept trenches, shouting words of encouragement to his comrades and supplying them with ammunition and grenades. Although painfully burned when a white phosphorous grenade exploded near him, he continued to direct and inspire his men. While administering medical aid to a stricken comrade, he was thrown to the ground by the explosion of enemy concussion grenades, but stubbornly regained his footing and assisted the wounded man until a Corpsman arrived to relieve him. Only after he was assured that all the other casualties had been cared for would he accept medical treatment for his own wounds. By his outstanding leadership, indomitable courage and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Thomas served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Ordervill, Utah. Home Town: Cottonwood, Arizona.

Thomas, Gordon William (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Hospitalman Gordon William Thomas (NSN: 3039545), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 August 1952. Although painfully wounded when the forward elements of the patrol were subjected to an intense barrage of enemy mortar fire, Hospitalman Thomas unhesitatingly rushed to the aid of his more seriously wounded comrades. Mortally wounded himself while moving forward under a hail of fire and in an attempt to reach the stricken men, Hospitalman Thomas, by his outstanding courage, daring initiative and zealous devotion to duty upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Authority: Board of Awards: Serial 117 (February 18, 1953). Born: June 22, 1930. Home Town: Batavia, Illinois. Death: Killed in Action.

Thomas, Marvin F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Marvin F. Thomas (MCSN: 1210979), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Loader of Battery G, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 February 1953. While the battery was firing air bursts directly over friendly tanks which were being overrun by the enemy infantry, Corporal Thomas, approaching the howitzer with a fused round, accidentally slipped and jammed the fuse into the breach of the howitzer, endangering the lives of his comrades. Quick to act in the face of grave danger, he wrapped his arms around the projectile, faced away from the six other Marines at the gun, and dived into the personnel bunker which he knew to be unoccupied. Once inside the bunker where an exploding round would have wounded no one but himself, he defused the projectile and returned to his duties. By his indomitable courage, quick initiative and gallant devotion to duty, Corporal Thomas served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Liberty, North Carolina. Home Town: Stokesdale, North Carolina.

Thomas, Melvin H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Melvin H. Thomas (MCSN: 820698), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Battery B, First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), and serving with an infantry company as a scout sergeant of an artillery forward observer team, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. During the attack against a well-fortified enemy hill position, the assault elements were subjected to devastating automatic weapons and small arms fire from cleverly concealed hostile gun emplacements, and suffered heavy casualties. When the infantry withdrew to reorganize, Sergeant Thomas remained in a completely exposed position to relay fire commands from the forward observer to the radio operator, materially aiding in bringing down heavy artillery fire upon the enemy emplacements. Realizing that the unit was seriously depleted by casualties when the infantry elements prepared to resume the attack, he unhesitatingly joined the assault squad and led a vicious bayonet charge which completely routed the entrenched hostile troops and secured the strategic position. By his exemplary leadership, outstanding courage and gallant devotion to duty, Sergeant Thomas served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: McGregor, Texas. Home Town: Dallas, Texas.

Thomason, Lynden E.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Lynden E. Thomason, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action on 20 March 1951. Captain Thomason displayed a very high degree of heroism by accomplishing the rescue of a United Nations pilot forced down behind enemy lines. Although he was aware of the risk involved -- the first helicopter to attempt the rescue suffered severe battle damages -- Captain Thomason was undaunted and flew to the area, thirty miles behind enemy lines. On reaching the location he attempted an immediate landing, but was forced to pass it over because of intense small arms fire from enemy troops surrounding the distressed pilot. With complete disregard for personal safety, Captain Thomason made repeated attempts to land, but was driven off by the effective small arms fire. When escorting fighters beat down the enemy fire slightly, Captain Thomason landed his helicopter and successfully rescued the pilot, still under enemy fire. Captain Thomason's exceptional courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Thompson, Billy B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Billy B. Thompson (MCSN: 599421), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. With his squad leader killed and another comrade seriously wounded during a night attack on his sector when a large hostile force, supported by withering automatic-weapons, mortar and small-arms fire, advanced to within a few feet of his position, Corporal Thompson bravely carried the wounded man to safety in the face of heavy fire and immediately returned to his post. Finding the squad badly depleted, disorganized and short of ammunition, he promptly assumed command, established a new firing line and, personally obtaining ammunition from an adjacent unit, directed a devastating volume of fire upon the attackers which completely halted the assault and inflicted heavy casualties on the hostile troops. By his outstanding courage, exceptional leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Thompson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kingston, Oklahoma. Home Town: Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Thompson, Carl Browning Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Carl Browning Thompson, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49958), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a Platoon Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 September 1950. Courageously leading his men through intense hostile rifle, machine gun and anti-tank fire in a daring assault on well-defended street barricades, Second Lieutenant Thompson resolutely continued his efforts although his platoon had been reduced to eight men. When friendly tanks came through to support him and reinforcements arrived, he voluntarily assumed an exposed position in the middle of the street in order to point out targets and to lead the attack on the last three enemy barricades. By his inspiring leadership and aggressive determination, he contributed materially to the destruction of approximately twenty-five hostile machine gun emplacements. Second Lieutenant Thompson's unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Owatonna, Minnesota. Home Town: Ashland, Kentucky.

Thompson, Edgar

Headquarters 2d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 167 - 16 June 1951

Master Sergeant Edgar Thompson Jr., RA43013424, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 14 February 1951 in the vicinity of Yoju, Korea.  On that date his company was under intense attack and completely surrounded by the enemy.  Sergeant Thompson, although bleeding profusely from shrapnel wounds in the right hand and arm, took charge of the company and led a number of comrades through the enemy encirclement toward friendly lines.  Disregarding his painful wounds, he aggressively engaged the enemy, firing his individual weapon with deadly accuracy and encouraging and urging his comrades to inflict casualties upon the enemy.  In spite of heavy enemy mortar concentrations and point blank enemy small arms fire he continued to urge his men on until they broke through the enemy and reached the safety of friendly lines.  Gallant conduct displayed by Sergeant Thompson reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Washington.

Thompson, Frederick Benjamin (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Frederick Benjamin Thompson (MCSN: 1111936), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1951. Assigned to lead his unit against a key enemy strong point atop a fortified hill, Sergeant Thompson courageously charged forward and spearheaded a vicious assault on numerous hostile emplacements. Although painfully wounded, he succeeded in overrunning the positions and in reaching the top of the hill and, while reorganizing his squad and directing effective fire on the enemy, was struck by hostile fire and fell mortally wounded. His cool leadership, personal courage and indomitable fighting spirit were contributing factors in the success of his company and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby reflecting great credit upon Sergeant Thompson and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 7, 1931 at Syracuse, New York. Home Town: Syracuse, New York. Death: KIA: September 17, 1951 - Buried at: Saint Agnes Cemetery - Syracuse, New York.

Thompson, Glenn O.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Hospitalman Glenn O. Thompson (NSN: 5713772), United States Navy, for gallantry in action while serving as a Corpsman attached to the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Tong-myon, Korea, on 19 June 1951. On that date, Company G was attacking a numerically superior enemy force, well entrenched on Hill 872. During the attack, an intense barrage of enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire forced the company to seek cover, inflicting numerous casualties. Hospitalman Thompson, serving as Medical Corpsman with the company, moved swiftly through exposed, fire-swept terrain to treat and evacuate wounded personnel. While moving to assist a severely wounded comrade, Hospitalman Thompson was painfully wounded, but refused to be evacuated and continued to minister to the wounded. When loss of blood ultimately forced his evacuation, Hospitalman Thompson assisted other casualties to the aid station, where he was treated for his wounds. The gallantry, courage and outstanding devotion to duty displayed by Hospitalman Thompson on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 182 (August 16, 1951).

Thompson, James E. (posthumous)

Citation not yet found.

"Pfc. James E. Thompson, Groveport, Ohio, of the 35th Infantry Regiment, received the Silver Star medal posthumously.  Thompson refused to yield his position which had been cut off by the enemy and continued firing and throwing hand grenades to slow the enemy attacking all about him until he was finally killed." - Morning Avalanche, September 12, 1950, Lubbock, Texas

Thompson, Jim Harvey (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Jim Harvey Thompson (MCSN: 559946), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as Leader of a Machine Gun Section of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 December 1950. With his company suddenly pinned down by intense hostile fire from three directions during an assault against a numerically superior enemy force south of Koto-ri, Sergeant Thompson fearlessly led his section forward through the heavy barrage and, quickly setting up his machine guns in an exposed area, delivered accurate and effective fire to neutralize the opposition sufficiently to enable his company to advance. Despite several wounds sustained during the bitter action, he bravely continued to direct the fire of his section against the enemy, offering words of encouragement to his men and inspiring them to greater efforts until he fell, mortally wounded. By his aggressive leadership, courageous fighting spirit and unrelenting devotion to duty in the face of grave peril, Sergeant Thompson contributed materially to the successful seizure of the assigned objective and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: February 24, 1927 at Nevada, Missouri. Home Town: Nevada, Missouri. Death: KIA: December 8, 1950.

Thompson, John R. Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 105 - 21 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Field Artillery) John R. Thompson, Jr. (ASN: 0-1171394), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as a member of Battery B, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 16 July 1950 along the Kum River, north of Taejon, Korea. The entire position area commanded by Captain Thompson was receiving intense mortar and small arms fire from the enemy. Realizing that the position was becoming untenable but having received no order from higher headquarters to withdraw, Captain Thompson without regard for personal safety moved throughout his area encouraging, calming, and keeping his men at their firing positions. When it became apparent that friendly infantry positions wee no longer in front of his battery he received the order to withdraw. Even though the enemy had begun to penetrate his position, Captain Thompson personally supervised an orderly evacuation of personnel and equipment, refusing to leave until every piece of equipment had cleared the area. His courage and gallantry under fire, his disregard for personal safety and his devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on Captain Thompson and the military service. Home Town: Norton, Kansas.

Thompson, CPL Joseph E.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 38 - 12 February 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal Joseph E. Thompson, RA34096204, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company H, 38 Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 7 January 1951 in the vicinity of Wonju, Korea. Early in the morning of that date, enemy troops had successfully infiltrated through the front lines and had attacked Corporal Thompson’s 80mm mortar platoon. As he was defending his position against the attack of numerically superior enemy forces, he observed an enemy hand grenade fall near a group of his comrades. Without hesitation and with complete indifference for his personal safety, he left the comparative security of his position, dashed across terrain swept by hostile fire, and kicked the grenade from the proximity of the men just before it exploded. He then returned to his position and continued to engage the enemy in the firefight. His intrepid action in risking his life to save the lives of his comrades reflects great credit upon himself and fully upholds the finest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Nebraska (amended from South Dakota).

Thompson, Kenneth L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Kenneth L. Thompson (MCSN: 1219325), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1952. When an overwhelming enemy force attacked a friendly outpost while his platoon was establishing a defense perimeter on an important terrain feature in order to protect the outpost, Private First Class Thompson participated in the ensuing fire fight which caught the enemy in deadly cross fire between the outpost and his position. With the hostile force diverting a large number of its troops to attack the perimeter defense, he single-handedly charged the enemy in a vicious hand-to-hand battle in the trench line as the foe overran the area. When an intense hostile mortar and artillery barrage landed on the position and caused many casualties, he rushed to the aid of a stricken comrade and removed him to a covered sector. During the withdrawal of the friendly assault element, he skillfully delivered deadly fire to cover the disengagement. Although his weapon was blown from his hand, he quickly recovered another one and raced from one position to another, shouting words of encouragement to his comrades and assisting in the evacuation of the wounded. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Thompson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Shawano, Wisconsin. Home Town: New London, Wisconsin.

Thompson, Melvin L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Melvin L. Thompson (MCSN: 1103167), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. With his platoon under attack by a hostile force of estimated company strength, Private First Class Thompson unhesitatingly risked his life under direct enemy fire to run to the supply dump and obtain critically needed ammunition for his squad. On two occasions while carrying out his voluntary mission, he assisted in evacuating wounded Marines across fire-swept terrain to the company aid station. When the enemy penetrated an adjacent unit, he boldly moved to the area to check the positions and make certain that they were in friendly hands. By his daring initiative, coolness under fire and grave concern for others at great risk to his own life, Private First Class Thompson served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hamilton, Kansas. Home Town: Central Point, Oregon.

Thompson, Robert I.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 265 - 17 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Robert I. Thompson (ASN: 0-27750), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, Company F, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Angang-ni, Korea, on 5 September 1950. During a withdrawal the 2d Battalion was attacked by a large enemy force which had established a strong road block along the route of withdrawal. The battalion subjected to intense artillery mortar and automatic weapons fire was terribly disorganized. Ordered to attack and destroy the enemy, Lieutenant Thompson rallied his company and led the assault. Immediately subjected to the full fury of the enemy's automatic and small arms fire the attack was slowed. Totally disregarding his own safety, he exposed himself to the withering fire encouraging his own company to press the attack. Leading his troops, he engaged the enemy in close range fire, inflicting numerous casualties and the men, inspired by his fearless example overran the position. Lieutenant Thompson's gallant actions and devotion to duty resulted in the destruction of the enemy force and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Washington, D.C.

Thompson, Weston H. Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 275 - August 21, 1952

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded posthumously to the following named enlisted man:  Private First Class Weston H. Thompson, Jr., RA11218087, Infantry, Company "L", 1 5th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 30 January 1952, Company "L" dispatched a patrol to make a reconnaissance of enemy-held Hill 317, near Chuggo-jan, Korea.  As the patrol neared its objective it was subjected to an intense hail of hostile automatic weapons, small arms and grenade fire from well-concealed positions only a few yards away, on higher ground.  The fierce, accurate enemy fire immediately inflicted three casualties on the friendly patrol, forcing it to seek cover.  Realizing that the patrol could neither advance nor withdraw from its precarious position, Private Thompson completely disregarded his personal safety as he left his position of cover and fearlessly dashed through the withering enemy fire to a position directly in front of the hostile bunker that had the patrol pinned down.  In order to draw the enemy's fire upon himself and allow his comrades to withdraw with the wounded, Private Thompson courageously rose to an upright position, knowing fully the dangers involved, and commenced firing accurately and rapidly directly into the hostile position, inflicting several enemy casualties and forcing the balance to seek cover.  This heroic act enabled the patrol to withdraw and evacuate its casualties to a relatively safe position.  During the vicious conflict Private Thompson was hit and mortally wounded by the enemy fire but his willing sacrifice of his life assured the evacuation of his wounded comrades and the prevention of further casualties.  Private Thompson's outstanding gallantry and untiring devotion to his fellow soldiers reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Connecticut.

Thorin, Duane Wilbur (POW)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic Duane Wilbur Thorin (NSN: 3165995), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Helicopter in Helicopter Squadron ONE, Unit Thirteen, attached to U.S.S. Rochester (CA-124) during an attempted rescue of a downed pilot in enemy territory near Kojo, Korea, on 8 February 1952. When information was received that an injured and critically ill pilot was down behind enemy lines, Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic Thorin unhesitatingly volunteered to attempt the rescue. Piloting his helicopter over known enemy anti-aircraft positions, small arms fire, and mountainous terrain with turbulent winds, he reached the pre-arranged pick-up location, and after landing the helicopter, it overturned, due to turbulent wind. It is assumed that he was captured by enemy patrols that were searching for the downed pilot. The outstanding courage, initiative, and gallantry he displayed in attempting to save the life of another at such great risk to himself, contributed immensely toward maintaining the high morale of airmen participating in action against the enemy, and reflects the highest credit upon Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic Thorin and the United States Naval Service. Board Serial 09 (May 11, 1953).

Thornton, William Hurt

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 435 - 27 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal William Hurt Thornton (ASN: RA-14275100), United States Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations in the Republic of Korea while serving with Company B, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Thornton, on 19 October 1950 when the Regiment was moving up the main road in Korea in the attack, with 1st Battalion in front, B Company was lead company, they engaged with the enemy and was held up for several hours by two light machine guns and several riflemen were receiving mortar fire when Corporal Thornton crawled around in a ditch beyond hit with shrapnel using an automatic carbine knocked out one light machinegun and four riflemen from the flank, causing the enemy to withdraw. Then the Company continued on permission. Born: Coving, Tennessee. Home Town: Tipton, Tennessee. Death: Deceased.

Thrash, William G. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel William G. Thrash (MCSN: 0-6141), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane and Tactical Officer of Marine Aircraft Group Twelve in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 October 1951. Encountering twenty-four hostile MiG-15 jet aircraft while leading his flight of eleven Corsair planes on a strike against a strategic enemy railroad marshalling yard, Lieutenant Colonel Thrash coolly closed his flight and led it in an aggressive attack on the hostile jets, forcing them to break off the engagement and retire. Upon reaching the target area, he skillfully directed and coordinated repeated attacks on the enemy strong point and, despite the intense hostile anti-aircraft fire encountered at all altitudes, pressed his own assaults at extremely low levels in order to obtain greater accuracy. By his daring leadership and gallant fighting spirit, he served to inspire his flight in scoring direct hits on a locomotive, freight cards and railroad tracks, thereby seriously damaging a vital link in the enemy's supply system. His marked courage and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Thrash and the United States Naval Service. Born: September 17, 1916 at Tifton, Georgia. Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia.

Thurston, Robert D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Robert D. Thurston (MCSN: 0-20231), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Operations and Training Officer of the Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 and 26 July 1953. Assigned the extremely hazardous mission of commanding a vital outpost position far forward of the main line of resistance which had been subjected to vicious hostile attacks during the night and had suffered heavy casualties and material losses, Major Thurston gallantly exposed himself to murderous enemy small arms, mortar and artillery fire in order to rally the remaining Marines and to lead them in counterattacking and destroying enemy troops in the vital position. During the fierce encounter, he personally engaged and killed two hostile soldiers in bitter hand-to-hand fighting and wounded several others, inspiring his men to successfully clear the outpost. Expeditiously reorganizing his men in the defense of the position, he re-established channels for evacuation of casualties and supply of vitally needed ammunition in order to prepare his unit for repelling further hostile attacks. By his professional skill and meticulous attention to detail, he accomplished a quick and efficient relief of the position by fresh units. Throughout the night, he repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile artillery and mortar fire to observe and direct friendly supporting fire, resulting in heavy enemy casualties and in dispersing three company-size attacks. Critically wounded by the heavy enemy fire, Major Thurston, by his courageous leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, contributed in large measure to the successful defense of the extremely vital position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lumberton, New Jersey. Home Town: Merchantville, New Jersey.

Thyng, Harrison R. (3rd Silver Star, 1st in Korea)

For gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations while leading a squadron of F-86 type aircraft from the 4th Fighter Interceptor Wing, Fifth Air Force, on 28 November 1951.  On a counter air mission in the area of Naechongjong, North Korea, Colonel Thyng spotted ten enemy MiG-15s flying toward friendly fighter bombers attacking rail supply lines in the area.  Colonel Thyng, displaying a high degree of courage, leadership and tactical skill, immediately initiated an aggressive attack on the formation.  His wingman called that his aircraft had been hit and that he was still being fired upon.  Although outnumbered, Colonel Thyng disregarded personal safety and remained to fight aggressively until he could bring his guns to bear upon the MiG that had downed his wingman.  Firing a short burst from close range and obtaining strikes on the enemy fuselage, Colonel Thyng continued to press his attack in such a manner at low altitude as to cause the enemy aircraft to crash.  Immediately, Colonel Thyng opened fire on another MiG-15 observing several strikes on the left wing.  Although extremely low on fuel, alone, and with approximately fifty MiG-15s still in the area, Colonel Thyng remained for several minutes attempting to locate his wingman.  The high personal courage, superior flying ability and leadership displayed by Colonel Thyng reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Tibbetts, Oscar N.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 149 - 26 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Oscar N. Tibbetts, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 23 November 1950, by rescuing an American fighter pilot deep in enemy territory five miles south of Kanggye, Korea. Captain Tibbetts, as pilot of a helicopter, departed from Sinanju, Korea, and flew over eighty miles of enemy occupied territory to attempt the pick-up of a downed F-51 fighter pilot. Prior to departing, Captain Tibbetts was fully aware that enemy troops would be in the immediate area of the downed pilot and that the return to friendly territory would require the maximum range of the helicopter and involve night flying, for which the aircraft was not equipped. Upon reaching the area, the downed pilot fired a flare and began to run to the spot where he assumed Captain Tibbetts would land. With complete disregard for his own life, Captain Tibbetts landed, in spite of enemy automatic small arms fire which was directed at the helicopter and the escaping fighter pilot. With the aid of the medical crew member the injured pilot was loaded into the helicopter. During takeoff, the helicopter was hit in the forward section of the tail cone by small arms fire. Captain Tibbetts flew the last forty-five minutes of the return trip in darkness, without night flying instruments, and landed at Sinanju with his gas supply practically exhausted. Captain Tibbetts' gallantry under enemy fire reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Tibbs, Clarence E.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 61 - October 09, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Clarence E. Tibbs (ASN: RA-17233512), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 4 September 1950 at Yusan-Dong, Korea. On 4 September 1950, Corporal Tibbs' company was engaged in supplying direct support to Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, in the attack against Hill 208. The enemy had direct observation of our attacking troops and mortar positions. Corporal Tibbs volunteered to advance in front of the attacking infantry elements and establish an Observation Post to direct fire. Disregarding the intense enemy artillery and mortar fire directed against him, he continued to direct heavy mortar fire against enemy emplacements on Hill 208 until he received a direct hot on his position and fell mortally wounded. His undaunted courage in remaining exposed to the intense hostile fire in order to direct the fire of his mortars was instrumental in pinning down the enemy and enabled Company L to attack and seize Hill 208. The intrepid gallantry displayed by Corporal Tibbs is in keeping with the highest standards and traditions of the military service.

Tief, Francis W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Francis W. Tief (MCSN: 0-49935), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of the Anti-tank Company, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 October 1950. While directing the fire of his two leading tanks to cover the withdrawal of a company which was pinned down by a hostile barrage, Second Lieutenant Tief braved heavy enemy small-arms fire to dismount from his tank and go to the aid of some wounded Marines who could not be rescued by the infantry. Completing four separate trips, he carried the casualties one-by-one to the safety of the tank, thereby undoubtedly saving their lives. By his courageous initiative, skilled leadership and gallant devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, he contributed materially to the success of the regiment in completing its assigned mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: June 28, 1928 at Port Chester, New York. Home Town: Port Chester, New York.

Tighe, Thomas Benton

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Thomas Benton Tighe (MCSN: 0-8973), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as S-3, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 November 1950. With his battalion engaged in supporting an advancing friendly battalion when elements were pinned down by grazing fire from enemy machine guns and small arms, Major Tighe personally took charge of and positioned a section of heavy machine guns, a section of 75-mm. rifles and an 81-mm. mortar forward observation team in front of his own lines to provide maximum fire support for the advancing forces. Moving among the positions under direct hostile fire, he expertly controlled and coordinated a brilliantly executed attack to rout the enemy from his positions and leave many killed or wounded. By his daring and aggressive leadership, superb tactics and inspiring courage in the face of heavy odds, Major Tighe contributed to the successful advance of the convoy and to the completion of the assigned mission. His heroic efforts were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Washington, D.C. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio.

Tillman, Gerald D.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Staff Sergeant Gerald D. Tillman (MCSN: 575719), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with First Platoon, Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Staff Sergeant Tillman as platoon sergeant of the first platoon, at the risk of his own life, fearlessly exposed himself at the head of the assault platoon and forcefully directed the disposition of his squads in the destruction of the entrenched enemy high on a dike. The company front consisted of an area one hundred yards wide and flanked by concrete buildings. His outstanding leadership and continuous exposure to enemy fire in directing his men inspired the highest confidence and materially assisted in successfully destroying all enemies in the line of advance. The gallantry displayed by Staff Sergeant Tillman reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 5 (September 27, 1950). Home Town: Memphis, Tennessee.

Timmons, Patrick M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Patrick M. Timmons (MCSN: 660228), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 20 to 25 January 1951. With his company's right flank taken under heavy fire and pinned down on one occasion during an attack against a strong enemy force near Chiso-dong, Corporal Timmons crawled forward of his own lines under intense fire from small arms and machine guns to determine the exact location of the hostile machine gun. Although painfully wounded during his daring mission, he succeeded in making his way back to his own lines and in pointing out the exact location of the emplacement to his platoon commander, thereby contributing to the subsequent destruction of the hostile weapon by friendly artillery fire. By his fearless and timely actions, dauntless perseverance and heroic efforts, Corporal Timmons was in large measure responsible for the success of his company in attaining its assigned objective. His inspiring conduct throughout this period of intensive combat reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. Born: Los Angeles, California. Home Town: New York, New York.

Tincher, Harry R.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 123 - 9 September 1950

Second Lieutenant Harry R. Tincher, 01688727, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 31 July 1950 near Chinju, Korea.  Attached to Company C, 19th Infantry Regiment as a forward observer for his artillery unit, Lieutenant Tincher, with utter disregard for his own personal safety materially assisted the organization and deployment of new replacements received by the infantry company while under severe enemy attack.  All during the enemy attack he continued to deploy the new replacements effectively and assisted in their efforts against a numerically superior enemy.  His gallant actions continued until he was wounded by enemy small arms fire and was forced to crawl to the rear for medical assistance.  Due to Lieutenant Tincher's self-sacrifice and actions beyond the call of normal duty, the infantry company was able to rally and hold its positions.  The gallant act displayed by Lieutenant Tincher reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered service from Omaha, Nebraska.

Tipton, James G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James G. Tipton (MCSN: 1217006), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 February 1953. Although he was seriously wounded and his automatic rifle was put out of action when his unit contacted a numerically superior enemy force forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Tipton quickly secured an abandoned weapon from a nearby wounded comrade and, delivering a deadly hail of accurate and steady fire, forced the enemy to deploy, thereby allowing friendly casualties to be moved to safety. Acting as a covering force during the patrol's withdrawal, he accounted for at least six enemy dead and submitted to medical treatment only after he was assured that the flank was secure and all other wounded had been treated. By his indomitable fighting spirit, marked fortitude and courageous actions in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Tipton served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Greenwood Springs, Mississippi. Home Town: Quincy, Mississippi.

Tipton, Willie R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Willie R. Tipton (MCSN: 668058), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 November 1950. Painfully wounded when the motorized reconnaissance patrol in which he was participating was subjected to vicious enemy small arms and mortar fire, Private First Class Tipton repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire in order to cover the withdrawal of the remainder of the patrol, all but one of whom were wounded. Resolutely persisting in his gallant efforts to safeguard the casualties, he steadfastly continued to fire upon the enemy until a second wound necessitated his evacuation. By his aggressive determination, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave danger, Private First Class Tipton upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: North Carolina. Entered Service From North Carolina.

Titlow, William E.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 192 - 26 September 1950

Corporal (then Private First Class William E. Titlow, RA34281741, Infantry, Company B, 27th Infantry Regiment, United States Army.  On 25 July 1950 near Hwaaggan, Korea, Corporal Titlow observed the enemy emplacing a machine gun some 300 yards to his front.  Immediately he obtained a rocket launcher and started to move into a better firing position when the enemy opened fire on him.  He then crawled 75 yards to a vantage point from which with one round he neutralizing the enemy gun.  Although fire from other hostile weapons continued directly on his position, he fired two more rounds and completely silenced the enemy position. Corporal Titlow's gallant initiative and determination to overcome the enemy reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from South Carolina.

Titterson, Richard F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Richard F. Titterson (MCSN: 654544), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Runner of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 February 1953. Participating in a raid against a strongly fortified hostile position, Private First Class Titterson volunteered to act as pointman and, upon nearing the objective, again volunteered to lead a two-man team to seize a known enemy listening post located inside a burned out tank. Although realizing that the tank was undoubtedly mined and covered by enemy fire, he unhesitatingly crawled to within a few yards of the hulk and threw grenades into the open hatch. Later, he led the assault element over 700 yards of open terrain to reach the hostile position and, although sustaining painful wounds, delivered devastating small arms fire at point blank range upon the enemy, thereby covering the advance of flame throwers and supporting units while they seized the objective. By his indomitable courage, outstanding initiative and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Titterson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Rochester, New York. Home Town: Rochester, New York.

Tittle, James I.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 142 - 24 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant [then Second Lieutenant] James I. Tittle (ASN: 0-2204078), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery B, 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near the Kum River, Korea, on 16 July 1950. During an attack by a numerically superior enemy force his battery's position was subjected to intense artillery, mortar and machine gun fire. Fearlessly exposing himself to the withering fire he went among the troops personally directing howitzer and small arms fire on enemy infantry and machine gun positions, inflicting heavy casualties and halting the advance. The enemy, however, after seven hours of furious frontal assault, abandoned his attempt to overrun the position and diverted his efforts to the battery's rear. In spite of the heroic stand against overwhelming odds, Lieutenant Tittle was forced by this maneuver to withdraw. His path blocked by an enemy strong point he personally succeeded in breaking through with several tanks. This success, however, was short-lived as the enemy, continuing to pour more men and arms into the fight, prevented further evacuation . This avenue of escape blocked, he directed the battery through enemy lines over mountainous terrain to the safety of friendly positions. His gallant actions in the defense of his positions, and his heroic example were an inspiration to his men and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Tobin, Robert Gibson Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Robert Gibson Tobin, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49643), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Battery F, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Rein.), during operations against enemy aggressor forces near Kojo, Korea, on 28 October 1950. When the forward elements of the infantry company to which he was attached as an artillery forward observer were temporarily overwhelmed during a vicious enemy night attack, Second Lieutenant Tobin skillfully rallied the remaining men of the beleaguered units into a firm defensive position despite heavy and accurate enemy small-arms, grenade and automatic-weapons fire. Realizing that some casualties had been left in the fire-swept area in front of the position, he called for covering fire and, in the company of another man, unhesitatingly moved forward into the intense enemy fire to locate and evacuate the wounded to safety. After determining that there were no additional casualties in the forward area, he immediately moved to the rear through intense fire to obtain and guide needed medical aid to the casualties and arrange for their evacuation. By his daring initiative, cool leadership and grave concern for others at great risk to his own life, Second Lieutenant Tobin contributed to the saving of many lives and served as an inspiration to all who observed him. His forceful and determined leadership and heroic efforts throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: March 7, 1926 at Manila, Philippine Islands. Home Town: Port Washington, New York. Death: October 2, 1998.

Tolar, William L.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class William L. Tolar (MCSN: 1100267), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade, in action against an armed enemy on 10 August 1950 near Kosang, Korea. On 10 August 1950 Private Tolar was a member of an artillery forward observer team when he noted the forward elements of a reconnaissance company come under heavy enemy surprise fire, which caused many casualties. Without regard for his own personal safety, Private Tolar voluntarily made five trips across open terrain, through intense enemy fire, and assisted in bringing six wounded men to an aid station. The gallantry displayed by Private Tolar on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 72 (September 16, 1950). Entered Service From California.

Toman, Frank (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 88 - 13 February 1952

First Lieutenant Frank S. Toman, 01181169, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery A, 37th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 26 September 1951 in the vicinity of Pia-ri, Korea.  On this date Lieutenant Toman, forward observer, was attached to the French Battalion during its assault on Hill 931.  His position was under close observation by enemy observers, and was subjected to heavy and accurate mortar fire.  In analyzing the situation, he realized that the successful outcome of the assault was in doubt, as long as this devastating hostile mortar concentration persisted.  Lieutenant Toman advanced several times in an attempt to reach a position at which he could locate the enemy mortar positions, but each time was subjected to mortar fire and had to seek cover before reaching an advantageous observation post.  At this time, the Air Force instigated an air strike on the hostile mortar position.  Lieutenant Toman suspected that these positions would be either neutralized or diverted by this action.  Taking advantage of the diversion, he advanced to an exposed position of the ridge held by friendly troops.  At this point while attempting to direct friendly fire on hostile emplacements, Lieutenant Tolan was fatally wounded by enemy mortar fire.  His dauntless courage and self-sacrificing spirit were an inspiration to all who observed him.  The gallantry in action displayed by Lieutenant Toman was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Michigan.

Tomash, William R.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 89 - October 03, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant [then Corporal] William R. Tomashek (ASN: US-55037758), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in the area of Hill 461, in the vicinity of Ch'u-dong, Korea, on 27 August 1951. When the enemy launched a fanatical attack against company B, Sergeant Tomashek unhesitatingly moved ahead through intense enemy fire and provided effective covering fire as his unit made the attack. Sergeant Tomashek remained in an advanced position, inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy, and delayed their action. Realizing the enemy's superior number could overrun the position, he stubbornly resisted the hostile forces with withering machine gun fire and covered the withdrawal of his comrades until he exhausted his ammunition supply. Sergeant Tomashek's courage and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Tomashek, William R.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 89 - 4 October 1952

Sergeant William R. Tomashek, (then corporal), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in the area of Hill 461 in the vicinity of Ch'u-dong, Korea, on 27 August 1951.  When the enemy launched a fanatical attack against his company, he unhesitatingly moved ahead through intense enemy fire and provided effective covering support as his unit made the attack.  Sergeant Tomashek remained in an advanced position, inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy, and delayed their action.  Realizing the enemy's superior number could overrun the position, he stubbornly resisted the hostile forces with withering machine-gun fire and covered the withdrawal of his comrades until he exhausted his ammunition supply.  Sergeant Tomashek's courage and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Home of Record: Winona, Minnesota.

Tooks, A.T.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 579 - September 05, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class A. T. Tooks (ASN: RA-14372 878), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in Korea while serving in Company L, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy on 11 July 1953, near Sokkogae, Korea. On that date, Sergeant Tooks was wounded early in an engagement with the enemy but refused to be evacuated. Sergeant Tooks personally supervised the evacuation of several members of his platoon who had been wounded by enemy artillery fire. Seeing that his battalion commander was trapped in collapsed bunker, Sergeant Tooks fought his way up the slope of the hill. After meeting the enemy in hand-to-hand combat Sergeant Tooks and his comrades finally reached the bunker and succeeded in evacuating the casualties. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Tooks reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Toolen, Thomas M. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Thomas M. Toolen, Jr. (MCSN: 635019), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 March 1951. When leading elements of the company were pinned down by intense and accurate hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire, Sergeant Toolen led his men over precipitous terrain to a vantage point where fire could be brought to bear on the enemy and, after emplacing his machine gun, moved forward with only a pistol and hand grenades to initiate an assault on a hostile bunker. Returning to his squad after killing three and wounding two of the enemy, he directed effective supporting fire to aid in the routing of the entrenched enemy. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty, Sergeant Toolen served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: St. Louis, Missouri. Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri.

Toothill, William K.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 110 - September 27, 1859

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Armor), [then Second Lieutenant] William K. Toothill (ASN: 0-1688493), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 31 July 1950 at Kusuno, Korea. With complete disregard for their own safety, First Lieutenant Toothill and two companions ran forward 200 yards under heavy enemy automatic weapons fire to pick up and carry a wounded soldier back to friendly lines. First Lieutenant Toothill's voluntary act of gallantry contributed to the saving of the wounded man's life and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.

Torres, Angel L.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 277 - 26 July 1953

Captain Angel L. Torres, 0968116, Infantry, Company "B", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 11 June 1953, Company "B" was subjected to a heavy barrage of enemy artillery and mortar fire prior to a reinforced company raid on friendly positions in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea. With word of enemy contact with the forward elements of the second platoon, Captain TORRES, company commander, immediately proceeded to the entrenched positions where he could better direct and observe defensive operations. Upon arriving, he assumed complete command of the situation, effecting intense and successful counter fire measures. Moving among the widely dispersed fortifications, he instilled a high degree of confidence in the men with his words of encouragement, tactical directions and notably active participation in the fierce fire fight. Never once seeking the safety of shelter, he organized a searching patrol to recover and assist friendly casualties in their removal to rear areas. Captain Torres, with complete disregard for his personal safety, led his small band of volunteers into the rain of enemy artillery and mortar fire and successfully evacuated friendly casualties in addition to collecting valuable intelligence data. Captain Torres' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Puerto Rico.

Torres, Lawrence R.

Headquarters, 25ID
General Orders No. 68 - 20 August 1950

Private First Class Lawrence R. Torres, RA10103667, Field Artillery, Battery A, 8th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army.  On 3 August 1950, near Masan, Korea when Private First Class Torres was serving with a forward observer party as a radio operator, his position was subjected to intense enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire.  Although wounded by mortar fire, Private First Class Torres refused to leave his post and continued to relay firing data to the artillery.  His gallantry and devotion to duty were instrumental in repulsing the enemy attack and are in keeping with the highest tradition of the military service.  Entered the military service from Honolulu, Hawaii, Territory of Hawaii.

Information submitted by Lou Pritchett.

Torres, Pablo R.

Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division
General Orders #128 - 6 March 1952

Sergeant Pablo R. Torres, RA13367148 (then Private), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company H, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 27 August 1951 in the vicinity of Tumil-li, Korea.  On that date the heavy machine-gun section of Company H assisted rifle troops in securing vital positions on Hill 983.  The hostile force immediately launched a furious counterattack, supported by intense mortar and small arms fire.  Disregarding the enemy fire, Sergeant Torres manned his machine gun and delivered such effective fire that the enemy's advance was delayed, enabling friendly troops to withdraw and set up new lines of defense.  During the ensuing action, Sergeant Torres sighted a wounded comrade lying helplessly in the path of the enemy.  Without regard for his personal safety, he advanced through the withering hail of enemy fire to his fallen comrade and carried him to safety.  His dauntless courage and selfless devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him and undoubtedly saved the life of the wounded man.  The gallantry in action demonstrated by Sergeant Torres will live forever in the hearts of his comrades.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Toth, Louis L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 150 - 15 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Major Louis L. Toth, 01288468, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, (then Commanding Officer, Company K), 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Saemal, Korea. On that day Company K was surrounded by a superior enemy force and forced to withdraw into a perimeter defense by incessant enemy attacks. All during the daylight hours, Major Toth, with complete disregard for the intense hail of enemy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire, fearlessly moved about the perimeter deploying his platoons to meet each new threat by the enemy and inspiring his men by his calmness and lack of fear. After dark the company was ordered to attempt a withdrawal through the hostile encirclement. Major Toth led this men in the withdrawal, and the company, encouraged by his inspiring leadership and seemingly endless energy and patience, forced its way through more than two miles of enemy positions, successfully accomplishing the withdrawal. Major Toth was wounded during this action. The gallantry in action and tenacious leadership demonstrated by Major Toth on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from South Carolina.

Totus, Raymond

General Orders No. 363 - August 28, 1953
Headquarters 3rd Infantry Division

Corporal Raymond Totus, US56118384, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the early morning of 6 July 1953, Company "K" commenced to attack enemy held Hill "250" in the vicinity of Honu-Chon, Korea. Corporal Totus quickly set up his machine gun in support of the assault team which was a few yards away from his position. In the ensuing action, he was wounded by grenade fragments. Despite his wounds, he directed his assistant gunner to move the gun to where its fire could cover the advance of the assault force most effectively. Again, he was wounded by the explosion of a nearby concussion grenade, but he continued to fire his weapon. When the order was given to return to friendly lines, Corporal Totus supported a wounded comrade to the evacuation point. He then helped carry a litter into the aid station. Upon arriving at the station, Corporal Totus collapsed from the loss of blood. His courageous actions resulted in saving the live of a critically wounded comrade and furnishing the close support for the assault force. Corporal Totus' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Oregon.

Townsend, James B. Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major James B. Townsend, Jr. (AFSN: 0-16831A), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot of an unarmed RB-26 aircraft, 12th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, Night Photo, Fifth Air Force, on 10 May 1952. On that date Major Townsend was assigned the photographic coverage of rail cuts on the heavily fortified Sinanju-Sinuiju rail line in North Korea. Encountering intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire, Major Townsend fearlessly continued on his target run until enemy searchlights caught his plane and began cycling his cameras, nullifying his attempts to photograph the target. Exposing himself to the enemy ground barrage as well as the night fighters from the Sinuiju area, Major Townsend dived on the searchlights, glide bombed them with flash bombs and then intrepidly offered himself as a decoy to enable night intruders to suppress the defenses operating against him. The resulting photographic coverage gave vital intelligence to the United Nations Command. The skill and daring of Major Townsend, his great courage and devotion to duty reflected the highest credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Townsend, Murray L. Jr.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 37 - 17 August 1956

Captain Murray L. Townsend, Jr., (then first lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, while Executive Officer, Company B, 24th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Kumwha, Korea, on 8 September 1951.  Company B was committed to attack and occupy high ground controlling the withdrawal route of beleaguered friendly forces.  As the leading elements gained the base of the strategic hill objective, they were pinned down by a heavy concentration of enemy mortar, artillery, and small arms fire.  Rallying his men, Captain Townsend spearheaded a daring charge up the steep, barren slope through a merciless hail of fire.  Responding to the challenge of their valiant leader, the troops stormed forward with great determination but, in the ensuring action, Captain Townsend received a wound which necessitated evacuation.  Inspired by Captain Townsend's incredible valor, his unit pressed the assault with such intrepidity and skill the enemy was out-maneuvered and routed from the key terrain and the mission accomplished.  Captain Townsend's unflinching courage under fire and exemplary devotion to duty reflect utmost credit on himself and are in keeping with the esteemed traditions of the military service.  Home of Record: Suffolk County, MA.

Tracy, Donald

Corporal Donald Tracy, a member of Battery D, 82nd AAA AW Bn. (SP), 2nd Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Haengsong, Korea. On that date he was a squad leader and gunner of an antiaircraft firing vehicle which was supporting a convoy in an attempt to break through an enemy roadblock. Although he had been wounded, he continued to direct the fire of his crew, and succeeded in silencing several enemy automatic weapons. When his gunners had almost exhausted their ammunition, he assumed an exposed position outside the armored turret in order to clip ammunition for the gunners and enable them to continue firing. When the road was blocked by burning and abandoned vehicles, he dismounted under heavy enemy fire to direct his driver in pushing the vehicles from the road, thus making it possible for the column to proceed. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Tracy reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Missouri.

Tracy, Loren E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Loren E. Tracy (MCSN: 1098322), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 September 1951. Although sustaining a serious and painful chest wound when his fire team was subjected to an intense mortar barrage during a bitter fire fight with the enemy, Private First Class Tracy refused to be evacuated and rallied his men into position to act as a base of fire. A courageous and daring leader, he unhesitatingly charged forward in the face of intense hostile fire and personally knocked out two enemy bunkers with grenades, permitting the rest of the battalion to advance. Bravely refusing evacuation until the final objective was seized, Private First Class Tracy, by his inspiring leadership, aggressive fighting spirit and gallant devotion to duty, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Wichita, Kansas. Home Town: Wichita, Kansas.

Trader, Jack Dale (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Jack Dale Trader (MCSN: 1045932), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader in Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Pinned down in a vulnerable position on open terrain, Private First Class Trader boldly stood upright and risked his life in the face of concentrated and intense small arms fire from well-concealed hostile positions to point out targets and direct his machine gun squad in delivering accurate fire on the enemy. Fatally wounded during this action, he was responsible for neutralizing the hostile positions, thereby contributing materially to the advance of our forces. By his initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty despite great personal danger, Private First Class Trader upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 13, 1930 at Salina, Kansas. Home Town: Tulsa, Oklahoma. Death: KIA: September 21, 1950.

Trapnell, Nicholas M. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Nicholas M. Trapnell, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49663), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 December 1950. When an estimated enemy battalion attacked and attempted to overrun his position during hours of darkness, Second Lieutenant Trapnell fearlessly moved along the line in the sub-zero weather throughout the lengthy and bitter engagement, shouting words of encouragement to his men and directing their fires. With a number of the enemy gaining positions within yards of his line, he skillfully directed his men in a bayonet charge and succeeded in destroying the hostile troops. By his aggressive leadership and courageous initiative, Second Lieutenant Trapnell inspired his men to resist all attempts to breach the perimeter. When the attackers were finally routed, over 250 enemy dead were counted in front of his line. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Washington, D.C. Home Town: Richmond, Virginia.

Travis, John T. (posthumous)

Corporal John T. Travis, Battery B, 21st AAA AW Battalion (SP). On 16 February 1951, near
Naegong-ni, Korea, Corporal Travis was serving as a gunner on a multiple mount machine gun during a sharp fire fight. After the vehicle had been moved to an exposed vantage point, he delivered a steady stream of effective covering fire as the infantry maneuvered for an assault. Although subjected to an intense concentration of small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire, he remained at his post to direct over 3000 rounds at the surrounding foe before he was mortally wounded. Corporal Travis' exemplary courage, aggressive spirit and unremitting devotion to duty were an inspiration to his comrades and enhance the high traditions of the service. Entered the military service from California.

Treadwell, Marvin T.

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Fire Team Leader, Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division in action against enemy forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. While moving to cover the flank of the 2nd platoon which was advancing on enemy positions on a hill mass south of Yang Gu, Corporal Treadwell's fire team observed an enemy force preparing to attack the column. Realizing the threat, he moved quickly to reinforce the lead element of the threatened platoon by skillfully maneuvering his team while under hostile fire to a position 30 feet in front of two enemy positions. The enemy intensified its fire with grenades and automatic weapons, wounding several Marines. Corporal Treadwell moved fearlessly into the open and initiated a flanking movement through a breach in the enemy defensive line. Without regard for his personal safety, he took an exposed position to cover his team as they entered an enemy bunker and trench complex. Noticing an enemy bunker located at the top of the objective, he charged the enemy position, jumping on the roof of the bunker and firing into it. His actions allowed his team to engage and kill the enemy soldiers. By his extraordinary heroism in the face of extreme danger, unrelenting perseverance, and steadfast devotion to duty, Corporal Treadwell reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Trent, William S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospital Corpsman First Class William S. Trent (NSN: 6372926), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Artillery Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. Hospital Corpsman First Class Trent, serving as a Corpsman, was with his battalion in convoy, during the displacement from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri. On two occasions his convoy was attacked by numerically superior enemy forces, employing small arms, machine gun, mortar and grenade fire. Heedless of his own personal safety he fearlessly exposed himself to enemy fire and in company with another Corpsman moved among the casualties to administer first aid and assistance. Upon reaching the more seriously wounded, he assisted in carrying them to covered positions and after administering aid, making them as comfortable as could be under such adverse conditions. Working his way back and forth over approximately 200 yards of enemy fire-swept area on three different occasions, he supplied first aid and assistance to almost all of the casualties. His actions were an inspiration to all members of his battalion and undoubtedly saved many wounded Marines from receiving further wounds. Hospital Corpsman First Class Trent's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 2736 (January 25, 1951).

Trexler, Tommy P. (POW)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 202 - 25 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Tommy P. Trexler (ASN: 0-2014531), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Waegwan, Korea, on 23 September 1950. While leading his platoon against strong enemy hillside positions. Lieutenant Trexler was wounded. Disregarding his wound, he remained in command of the platoon in its successful assault. The enemy made repeated attempts to dislodge the platoon, but for five hours, Lieutenant Trexler successfully led the defense, inflicting many causalities and was evacuated only after being ordered by his superior. His outstanding leadership and gallant actions reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Salisbury, North Carolina.

Triantafel, Steve G.

General Orders No. 27 - 13 January 1952
24th Infantry Division

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Steve G. Triantafel (US55062314), Corporal, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Triantafel distinguished himself by courageous action near Chipsil-li, Korea, on 14 October 1951. His company had the mission of taking and securing part of Objective D, a very steep and rough mountainous terrain feature. The leading element had begun the assault when the support platoon was committed and started to cross a waist-deep river at the base of the objective. The enemy suddenly placed the wading troops under murderous machine gun, small arms and mortar fire. One man was wounded while crossing, but continued to advance until he was again wounded and fell helplessly in the water. With complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Triantafel made his way through the intense enemy fire to the soldier, and after a struggle with the swift current, saved the man from drowning and pulled him to safety. Later the company moved from one part of the objective to another to prepare positions for the night, but left the wounded to be evacuated and needed someone to go down and bring up the medical aidmen and litter bearers. Corporal Triantafel volunteered and returned with the aidmen, remaining to assist in evacuating the wounded over the rough terrain. A group of enemy troops in an unobserved bunker unexpectedly placed the men under concentrated small arms and automatic weapons fire. Instructing his comrades to take cover, Corporal Triantafel charged a key enemy emplacement and, killing four hostile soldiers with grenades and rifle fire, provided covering fire while his comrades withdrew and then rejoined them. Corporal Triantafel's courageous action, aggressive initiative and selfless devotion to his comrades reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

Trojanowski, Richard S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Richard S. Trojanowski (MCSN: 287641), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Battery C, First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1950. Voluntarily leaving his position in the face of fierce hostile grenade, mortar and small arms fire, Staff Sergeant Trojanowski advanced to evacuate a wounded Marine and, although severely wounded in the leg while placing the casualty in a poncho, gallantly continued to attend the wounded man. Painfully wounded a second time as he was carrying the casualty to a place of safety, he refused medical assistance and evacuation for himself until the wounded Marine he had recovered had been evacuated. His gallant initiative, courage and unselfishness in risking his life to save another reflect great credit upon Staff Sergeant Trojanowski and the United States Naval Service. Born: Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Trompeter, Joseph D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Joseph D. Trompeter (MCSN: 0-8177), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as S-3, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Assuming command of the battalion when its commander was wounded and its executive officer stationed with the reserve element, Major Trompeter fearlessly established his observation post on the highest terrain in the area in order to gain complete control and conduct the attack more effectively. Remaining in this position despite intense hostile fire, he successfully maneuvered the assault companies into strategic locations from which they could overrun the enemy-held ridge line and, after gaining the line, directed the assault companies to continue the attack. Repeatedly re-establishing and manning his observation posts in positions from which he could best control and direct the assault despite hostile fire, he succeeded in keeping the enemy moving rapidly, thereby permitting them no opportunity to employ an effective delaying action. His strategic ability, skilled leadership and indomitable courage were contributing factors in the success of the assigned mission and reflect great credit upon Major Trompeter and the United States Naval Service. Born: Edgemont, South Dakota. Home Town: Rapid City, South Dakota.

Troutman, Billie R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Billie R. Troutman (MCSN: 1216147), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 October 1952. Serving as an automatic rifleman, on a combat outpost, Private First Class Troutman displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the enemy launched a determined infantry assault, accompanied by a devastating barrage of mortar and artillery fire, he found that only he and one other Marine were left to defend the left flank of the position. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved forward to an exposed position where he delivered deadly fire on the advancing enemy force. As the attackers entered the trenchline and attempted to overrun the position, he unhesitatingly moved to more advantageous positions and continued to sweep the enemy with killing fire until they were forced to abandon their attack. Private First Class Troutman's stamina and aggressiveness served as an inspiration to all who observed him and his gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.

Trujillo, Enrique C.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Enrique C. Trujillo (MCSN: 1076142), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chaun-ni, Korea, on 23 March 1951. Private First Class Trujillo was acting s a fire team leader in a rifle squad assigned the mission of assaulting a steep hill where the enemy had well dug in, cleverly concealed positions. As the attack progressed it became apparent that this one particular enemy position must be neutralized before the remainder of the objective could be secured. Private First Class Trujillo, displaying outstanding skill and courage, moved forward alone with complete disregard for his own personal safety and heedless of the withering fire of the enemy's automatic weapons, to grenade the position. As he assaulted the enemy position, he was wounded by an enemy grenade. Undaunted, he regained his feet and despite the increasingly heavy small arms, automatic weapons, and grenade fire of the enemy, moved forward again and succeeded in grenading the position killing three of the enemy. His display of courage and his fine example were instrumental in the success of his platoon. Private First Class Trujillo's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, IX Corps, General Orders No. 45 (April 10, 1951). Entered Service From Arizona.

Trupiano, Anthony

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Anthony Trupiano (MCSN: 816825), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Koto-ri, Korea, on 28 November 1950. While leading his squad over a hilltop, Sergeant Trupiano encountered four hostile soldiers who ceased firing on his company flanks to fire upon him and his group. Finding that his weapon would not function, he instantly charged the enemy with two hand grenades, fatally wounding three of them and, although wounded in the face, boldly charged with his bayonet and killed the surviving enemy soldier as he attempted to throw a grenade. His gallant initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty were contributing factors in wiping out a hostile strong point and in aiding his company in driving back a numerically superior enemy force, thereby reflecting great credit upon Sergeant Trupiano and the United States Naval Service. Born: Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Detroit, Michigan.

Truscott, Lucian K. III

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 1 57 - June 15, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Lucian K. Truscott, III (ASN: 0-27519), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company E, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 15 May 1951, in the vicinity of Tagol, Korea. On that day Captain Truscott was leading his company on a patrol to probe the enemy lines and locate the enemy strongpoints. As the company was crossing an open valley that offered no natural concealment, it was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. Instantly the company became subjected to intense enemy automatic weapons, small arms and mortar fire. The volume of fire laid down by the enemy was murderous and the wicked cross fire of the enemy's automatic weapons and machine guns kept the entire company pinned down. Aware of this situation Captain Truscott and two of his men moved out in an attempt to knock out one of the enemy machine guns in order to halt the enemy cross fire. By running across open ground they finally reached an advantageous point from which their weapons could destroy one of the enemy machine guns. With this enemy gun disabled the company had more freedom of movement thus enabling them to knock out one enemy mortar and another machine gun nest. Captain Truscott continuously exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to care for the wounded and direct the men to the spots where they were most needed. Captain Truscott's gallantry in action, devotion to duty, courage and heroism reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Truszkowski, Chester V.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Chester V. Truszkowski (MCSN: 883623), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. With both guns of his section knocked out of action during a savage night attack by a numerically superior enemy force, Corporal Truszkowski unhesitatingly moved through intense hostile fire and succeeded in retrieving the weapons. Working rapidly in the complete darkness, he salvaged parts from the more seriously damaged gun and skillfully repaired the other weapon, quickly returning it into action. When four additional guns were rushed into bolster the line, he repeatedly braved heavy fire to effectively place the weapons in strategic positions along the front. With two weapons again damaged by close-range enemy grenade fire, he expertly repaired the guns and returned them to action in a minimum of time without impairing the efficiency of his unit. By his outstanding technical skill, marked courage and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Truszkowski contributed materially to the success of his company in repulsing repeated enemy attacks and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Trynoski, Emil (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Emil Trynoski (MCSN: 1111914), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner in Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. When he observed two enemy soldiers setting up a machine gun behind friendly lines after an attack by a numerically superior hostile force which resulted in the over-running of several of his platoon's positions, Corporal Trynoski immediately charged the enemy soldiers, who had turned the fire of their machine gun directly upon him, and succeeded in killing both of them and in destroying their gun. Proceeding to his own machine gun, which was exposed to hostile fire, he delivered accurate and effective fire upon the onrushing enemy troops until they overran his position and left him mortally wounded. By his courageous actions, Corporal Trynoski inspired all who observed with him and contributed materially to the successful repulse of the hostile attack. His outstanding fortitude, aggressive fighting spirit and daring initiative were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: August 15, 1926 at Fulton, New York. Home Town: Fulton, New York. Death: KIA: November 29, 1950.

Tucek, Joseph F.

Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 89 - 12 September 1950

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority in AP600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded the following named officers and enlisted men:

Sergeant Joseph F. Tucek Junior (then Private First Class) RA16298156, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division for gallantry in action against the enemy 15 August 1950 at Waegwan, Korea.  Sergeant Tucek's platoon was surrounded by an enemy attacking in force.  Realizing the seriousness of the situation, he voluntarily risked his life by opening fire upon the enemy at a range of 100 yards with a 4.2 mortar, using a number one propellant charge.  Although constantly subjected to machine gun and sniper fire and endangering his life with each mortar round fired, he continued to deliver effective fire.  His actions stopped the enemy advance and enabled his platoon to withdraw to safety.  Sergeant Tucek's heroic actions reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the traditions of the Armed Forces.  Entered the military service from Illinois.

Tucker, Chester E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Chester E. Tucker (MCSN: 0-48645), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Regimental Anti-tank Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 September 1950. First Lieutenant Tucker, serving as a tank platoon commander, observing friendly infantry that were unable to advance because of heavy enemy fire, personally led two tanks under his command into the enemy positions and engaged a large concentration of enemy infantry and anti-tank guns. In the ensuing action his tank became disabled. Despite this he continued to fire into enemy positions successfully destroying numerous enemy crew- swerved weapons and wounding many personnel. This action contributed materially to the advance of friendly units. In order to conduct the safe withdrawal of his tank, First Lieutenant Tucker opened the hatch under heavy fire and directed the withdrawal being seriously wounded as a result of his fearlessly exposing himself to effectively withdraw the tank. First Lieutenant Tucker's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 17646 (November 3, 1950).

Turnbell, Charles W.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 149 - 25 April 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Field Artillery) Charles W. Turnbell (ASN: 0-954326), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery A, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 1 November 1951. He was attached to an infantry line company that was being subjected to a savage assault by the enemy. Acting as a Forward Observer, he was trying to eliminate a hostile mortar which was delivering murderous fire on his comrades. As Lieutenant Turnbell performed his duties, he was attacked by a squad of fanatical enemy soldiers who were heavily armed with rifles, automatic weapons and grenades. He continued to relay the important directions to the artillery positions as he held off the foe by throwing hand grenades into their midst. Unhesitatingly and with utter disregard for his own safety, he remained at his post and fought the enemy hordes until he was relieved by troops from the friendly unit. His driving aggressiveness against the numerically superior enemy enabled his unit to carry on its activities with the greatly needed support of artillery fire. Lieutenant Turnbell's gallant action, tenacious determination and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Clinton, Tennessee.

Turner, Cooper T. (posthumous)

By direction of the President under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 9 July 1918, and pursuant to authority in AR-00-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded posthumously to the following named enlisted man:

Master Sergeant Cooper T. Turner, RA35733013, Infantry, United States Army, a member of C Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by courageous action near Sesim-ni, Korea, on 3-4 February 1951.  His company was defending in preparation for continuing the attack to the Han River.  About 2300 hours, the enemy launched the first of a series of attacks in tremendous force mass.  These attacks were covered and supported by the most intense small arms, machine gun and mortar fire.  About 0400 hours the final attack came and it was an all out effort by the enemy to shatter the battalion line.  They came in wave upon wave and the full fury of their supporting weapons was unleashed.  Under this savage attack, the unit on the right flank of Company C began to bend and was finally driven back.  Realizing the gravity of the situation, Sergeant Turner immediately took his support squad and put them in position on the now open flank.  When the enemy put great pressure there in an effort to overrun the company, he was met by withering fire from Sergeant Turner's group.  This battle continued for almost an hour and he continually ignored both safety and the hail of enemy fire falling about him to move up and down the line encouraging his men and directing their fire.  Finally the order came for the company to withdraw.  Realizing that some covering fire must be given or his small group would be overwhelmed by the mass of pursuing enemy, he ordered his men to leave while he remained behind to give fire cover.  He did this in the face of the most staggering odds with no weapon but his M-1 rifle.  However, he fired with such accuracy that the pursuit was actually stopped long enough for his men to move away safely and in tact.  In carrying out this covering action, he was mortally wounded.  A count of enemy dead after the position was retaken showed that he killed over 25 of the enemy in his single handed stand.  Sergeant Turner's courageous actions and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States infantry.  Entered military service from Hickman, Kentucky.

Turner, Henry George

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Henry George Turner (MCSN: 1018623), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. When a dangerous gap was created in the squad's defense line after his squad leader was killed and two other men were wounded during a strong enemy attack on the unit's sector under cover of darkness, Private First Class Turner unhesitatingly left his position of comparative safety and rushed across an area swept by murderous hostile fire to reach the gap in the line and block an enemy penetration. Although the attackers immediately concentrated heavy fire on his position in an attempt to force a penetration, he fearlessly held his ground and poured accurate fire on the numerically superior hostile troops, killing one of the enemy within a yard of his position. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked courage and steadfast devotion to duty, Private First Class Turner aided materially in the successful defense of the sector and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fairbury, Nebraska. Home Town: Point Richmond, California.

Turner, James H. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 45th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 7 - 3 January 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Infantry) James H. Turner (ASN: 0-2003389), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy near Sintan-ni, Korea. On the night of 29 October 1952, a patrol from Company G crossed the main line of resistance with the mission of contacting the enemy and engaging them in battle. As Lieutenant Turner, the patrol leader, guided his men across rough terrain to a point at the base of two small knolls, point-blank enemy fire cut into the patrol from both flanks. Although seriously wounded in the chest by this cross fire, Lieutenant Turner refused to seek cover or medical aid. Realizing the impossibility of his patrol's position, he ordered the withdrawal of his men. As the patrol maneuvered toward the security of friendly lines, Lieutenant Turner raised to his knees and directed rapid covering fire for the unit until fatally wounded. Lieutenant Turner's effective fire was responsible for the survival of many members of the patrol, and his devotion to his men and his gallant leadership reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.

Turner, Larry Denis (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Larry Denis Turner (MCSN: 1193357), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 September 1952. Although painfully wounded during a fire fight with a numerically superior hostile force on a vitally important hill position forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Turner refused medical aid and, in the face of heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire, proceeded to check the position of his men, directing their fire and shouting words of encouragement. When his squad was pinned down by enemy machine gun fire, he single-handedly advanced on the hostile emplacement and destroyed it with hand grenades. Struck down and mortally wounded by an enemy mortar barrage, Sergeant Turner, by his aggressive fighting spirit, skilled leadership and resolute determination in the face of heavy odds, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 11, 1933 at Tacoma, Washington. Home Town: Tacoma, Washington. Death: KIA: September 5, 1952.

Turner, Robert C.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 151 - May 4, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert C. Turner (ASN: RA-19332694), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Battery A, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion (Self Propelled), 7th Infantry Division, in action near Sumjumak, Korea, on 10 January 1951. On that date, Sergeant Turner's M-19 tracked vehicle, along with four other self-propelled automatic weapons of Battery A, was in support of a reinforced patrol of the 7th Reconnaissance Company. As the patrol entered a defile, Sergeant Turner's vehicle, in the leading element, encountered intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire from the steep hills on both sides of the road. The left cannoneer of Sergeant Turner's M-19 was mortally wounded and his body, in falling, wedged between the left 40-mm. gun and the tracking and aiming controls, making the weapon inoperative. When the driver of the vehicle behind him fell wounded, Sergeant Turner left the comparative safety of his M-19 turret and, under intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, ran to the aid of his wounded comrade. He removed the wounded man from the line of fire to the shelter of a stone wall and returned to his exposed vehicle. Sergeant Turner's gallant actions and selfless devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Turning Bear, James

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 38 - 12 February 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal James Turning Bear, RA19071307, (then Private First Class), Army Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 16 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea. On that date he was attached as medical aid man to a rifle platoon which was assaulting enemy positions long the Naktong River. During the advance, the platoon sergeant was seriously wounded by enemy grenade fire. Corporal Bear immediately dashed to the fallen soldier’s aid and although under intense hostile fire, administered first aid. After the platoon had cleared the area, a bypassed squad of ten enemy riflemen attacked the two men from a hidden position. Fearlessly holding his ground, Corporal Bear held off the attacking enemy with rifle fire and forced them to withdraw. His heroic action and devotion to a wounded comrade displayed on this occasion by Corporal Bear reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the high traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from Ft. Peck, Montana.

Turnipseed, Roy B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Roy B. Turnipseed (MCSN: 430174), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. When hostile troops, located on a rocky crag overlooking his position, cut off his company from friendly units and inflicted heavy casualties on his platoon, Private First Class Turnipseed volunteered to accompany another Marine in an attempt to drive off the enemy. Working his way forward about 200 yards under continuous intense hostile fire, he delivered accurate counterfire which diverted the enemy's aim, enabling him to reach a strategic position within grenade range where he assisted in assaulting the hostile emplacements and in killing fifteen of the enemy before returning to his unit. By his courageous initiative and skilled marksmanship, he contributed materially in eliminating the threat to his platoon and to the success of his company in holding the position against overwhelming odds for a period of five days in sub-zero weather. His indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Private First Class Turnipseed and the United States Naval Service. Born: Atlanta, Georgia. Home Town: Smyrna, Georgia.

Tussey, Frank Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 28 - 14 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant [then Private First Class] Frank Tussey, Jr. (ASN: RA-35996829), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Chu-Dong, Korea, on 28 June 1951. His company had the mission of attacking and securing a high steep terrain feature that was defended by a numerically superior enemy force entrenched in strongly reinforced bunkers. During the attack the friendly troops were subjected to intense enemy fire and sustained several casualties. When his platoon leader was wounded, Sergeant Tussey immediately assumed command and fearlessly led his comrades in the assault against the enemy. Advancing ahead of the others, he encountered a bunker containing six enemy soldiers who were slowing the friendly advance with continuous machine gun fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, he crawled to within a short distance of the enemy position and destroyed it with well-placed hand grenades, killing its occupants. He then continued his advance, blazing a trail for his comrades with devastatingly accurate rifle fire. Sergeant Tussey's courageous action, fearless initiative and selfless performance of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Franklin, Ohio.

Tuttle, Raymond Lee (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) (Posthumously) to Private First Class Raymond Lee Tuttle (MCSN: 1091349), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near the Naktong River, Korea, on 17 August 1950. On this date, at about 1200, while his company was in the attack, Private Tuttle, a Machine Gunner, succeeded in setting up his gun in a position swept by heavy enemy fire so that he might cover the advance of the assault units of his company. The intense, accurate fire he delivered enabled these units to advance toward their objective. Disregarding the heavy enemy fire he was drawing Private Tuttle continued firing his gun until he was killed by enemy fire. The heroic actions and devotion to duty displayed by Private Tuttle reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 151 (November 1950). Born: September 23, 1931. Home Town: Oakland, California. Death: KIA: August 17, 1950 - Buried at: San Francisco National Cemetery - San Francisco, California.

Twoney, Richard B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Richard B. Twohey (MCSN: 577327), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 November 1950. Suddenly confronted by four enemy tanks while leading a machine-gun section at the point of a motorized patrol, Staff Sergeant Twohey bravely mounted one of the tanks in company with his platoon commander and another Marine in an attempt to open the hatch and drop a grenade within. Unable to open the cover, he knocked down the periscope and deposited the grenade inside the aperture. When the tank moved a few yards and stopped, he again climbed upon it and dropped another grenade inside before being thrown from the vehicle during its final lurch. By his marked courage, daring initiative and devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Twohey contributed materially to the successful completion of the patrol's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. SPOT AWARD, 1st Marine Division, Serial 44173. Born: New Rochelle, New York. Home Town: New York, New York.

Tye, Hiram S. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster) (1st SS received in WWII)

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 215 - 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) Hiram S. Tye (ASN: 0-436949/0-60692), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, on 22 May 1951, near Pungam-ni. While located at the forward battalion observation post, Captain Tye, an intelligence officer, was observing the action of Company E in its assault on Hill 440, the battalion objective. Aware of the importance of the attack being launched, he voluntarily advanced to the lead elements of Company E and, repeatedly exposing himself to the intense enemy machine gun and hand grenade fire, moved among the men shouting encouragement and assisting in directing their fire. Having materially aided Company E in securing Hill 440, Captain Tye unhesitatingly volunteered to accompany a rifle platoon an unknown distance to contact the friendly unit on the exposed left flank. For two hours Captain Tye led the platoon along a dark mountain trail until contact was made with elements of the 9th Infantry. Upon returning to Company E, his sound recommendations greatly assisted the company commander in deploying his troops in such a manner as to maintain friendly contact on both flanks. The gallant leadership, initiative, and professional skill displayed by Captain Tye reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Tye, Leonard Elwood (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 243 - 6 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Leonard Elwood Tye (ASN: RA-19318817), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Chakchong, Korea, on 1 November 1950. His platoon was on a road reconnaissance when it was fired upon by a well-concealed enemy force. He immediately manned his mounted machine gun and opened fire with deadly effect. Although he was wounded in this action and thrown from his vehicle, he returned to the fight and maintained a steady stream of fire until he was killed by a burst of enemy fire. His gallant action, with total disregard for his own safety reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Armor. Home Town: Everett, Washington.

Tyler, Alan R. Jr.

Headquarters, 3ID
General Orders No. 107 - 31 December 1950

Private First Class Alan R. Tyler Jr., RA16309843, Infantry, Company "C", 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 29 November 1950, near Majon-Ni, Korea. Private First Class Tyler was an assistant squad leader of the 3d Platoon which was pinned down by heavy enemy rifle and automatic weapons fire.  During initial contact with the enemy, the gunner for the squad .50 caliber machine guns mounted on a half track was wounded and unable to man his weapons.  Private First class Tyler, acting on his own initiative, and heedless of the heavy enemy fire, ran to and mounted the half track.  Having no knowledge of the gun's operation he received instructions from the wounded gunner, and although exposing himself to intense enemy fire being placed at this position in an effort to render the guns useless, he calmly placed fire on the enemy's source of automatic fire.  By his actions he greatly assisted the efforts of Company "C" to reorganize and collect the wounded and dead.  Private First Class Tyler's courage and heroism reflects great credit upon himself and upon the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Illinois.

Tyler, Russell P.

General Orders No. 51 - 22 July 1950
Headquarters 24th Infantry Division

Sergeant Russell P. Tyler, RA 20152744, Infantry, a member of Company "K", 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action.  On 10 July 1950, north of Taejon, Korea, Sergeant Tyler was acting as Platoon Leader of the Second Platoon.  The Platoon was engaged in a counterattack which, largely due to Sergeant Tyler's outstanding leadership, was successful in attaining its objective.  Upon reaching the objective, Sergeant Tyler was wounded in the knee.  Ignoring his own injuries, he rescued a fellow soldier who was wounded and lying in front of the position by going to his aid in the face of sniper and machinegun fire.  Sergeant Tyler also directed accurate mortar fire on the enemy positions.  He refused to be evacuated until the position had been consolidated and darkness had fallen.  The next day, hearing that his Company was being overrun, Sergeant Tyler left a hospital and, gathering up a group of stragglers, organized a road block with a view to stopping the enemy advance.  He continued to direct the activities of the men comprising the road block until ordered to withdraw when the enemy overran the position.  By this display of gallantry, Sergeant Tyler brought credit to himself and lived up to the high standards of the military service.

Tyler, Russell R.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 373 - 30 July 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Russell R. Tyler, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 3d Air Rescue Squadron, Fifth Air Force, on 8 February 1952. Piloting a helicopter, Captain Tyler flew into enemy territory through strong winds to rescue three United Nations Airmen near Wonsan, Korea. Although another helicopter was lost on this mission, captain Tyler, disregarding personal wounds and damage to his aircraft, landed near the downed men until enemy fire and diminished fuel forced him to fly to a friendly Island for refueling and emergency repairs. leaving the Island against strong head winds and approaching darkness, Captain Tyler again attempted to reach the men by two different routes until anti-aircraft fire so damaged his aircraft that rescue was impossible. By his extraordinary heroism, skillful airmanship, and devotion to duty, Captain Tyler reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Tyree, Robey J.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robey J. Tyree (ASN:), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 16 September 1950 near Shindo, Korea. Corporal Tyree and two comrades were attached to an infantry company in connection with mine laying activities. Being given the extremely dangerous mission of laying an anti-personnel minefield on a knoll approximately 75 yards in front of friendly lines and 50 yards in front of the enemy positions, he immediately set out on his assignment. A few minutes after arriving at the objective, while preparing his equipment, the enemy laid an extremely heavy barrage of mortar and small arms fire in his area. One of his comrades was lightly wounded, forcing him to return to the company for evacuation. After rendering first aid to the wounded man, Corporal Tyree fearlessly continued to lay the minefield. On several occasions he was forced to take what little cover the terrain afforded while the infantry repelled enemy bonsai attacks. When his remaining companion was wounded, he administered medical treatment and carried the wounded man through the heavy fire back to the company area for evacuation. Through courageous and selfless behavior, he was an inspiration to the men of the company and enabled them to strengthen their defense. Corporal Tyree's gallant actions and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

 

Close this window
 

2002-2016 Korean War Educator. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use of material is prohibited.

- Contact Webmaster with questions or comments related to web site layout.
- Contact Lynnita for Korean War questions or similar informational issues.
- Website address: www.koreanwar-educator.org
 

Hit Counter
 

preferences-hl=en