Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "U"

 
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Uebler, Frederick W.P.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Sergeant Frederick W. P. Uebler (MCSN: 850427), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy near Paggok, Korea, on 8 September 1950. Sergeant Uebler while serving as Liaison Wire Team Chief, attached to Headquarters Battery, First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, Yongsan, Korea, was checking telephone lines under enemy mortar and artillery fire, approaching the town of Paggok, where he was to make junction with another wire team approaching from the opposite direction. Adjacent to the town, personnel of the wire teams were pinned down and friendly vehicles halted by automatic weapons fire. Sergeant Uebler, without hesitation, and without regard for his personal safety, entered the town, searched out and killed the enemy automatic rifleman by employing a captured enemy submachine gun. Sergeant Uebler then proceeded to carry out his assigned mission and to establish vitally important communication lines. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Uebler reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 151 (November 1, 1950). Entered Service From Illinois.

Umholtz, Willis E.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 395 - 17 August 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Willis E. Umholtz, United States Air Force, for First Lieutenant Willis E. Umholtz, United States Air Force. Lieutenant Umholtz distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an enemy on 12 April 1951 as pilot of a B-29, 30th Bombardment Squadron, 19th Bombardment Group (Medium) FIFTH Air Force. Twenty-five miles from the target over North Korea, the formation was attacked repeatedly and aggressively by enemy fighters. Despite these attacks, combined with heavy anti-aircraft fire, a normal bomb drop was accomplished. Immediately after the bomb drop, the cockpit was struck by an explosive projectile, which killed the bombardier, mortally wounded the aircraft commander and wounded Lieutenant Umholtz in the knee, shoulder and neck. In spite of his wounds, and the violent explosive decompression and loss of oxygen, he assumed immediate control of the aircraft. In order not to divert the crew from giving first aid to the aircraft commander, he did not inform them of his wounds, and still under heavy attack, he flew the formation cross-cockpit until the area of immediate danger was cleared. After landing the badly damaged aircraft at an emergency base and only after assuring himself of the safety of the remaining crew members did he report himself as wounded. Lieutenant Umholtz's quick thinking, courage and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Umpleby, James P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James P. Umpleby (MCSN: 1046277), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When a numerically superior hostile force attacked his sector with small arms, grenades, mortars and machine guns, Private First Class Umpleby fearlessly moved through the intense barrage to an exposed position where he could deliver accurate return fire against the attackers and, despite painful wounds sustained in both legs by grenade fragments, remained steadfast and continued to fire, inflicting heavy casualties among the onrushing enemy troops, refusing evacuation until the savage onslaught had been repulsed. Returning to his short-handed platoon after receiving treatment for his wounds, he persisted in h is efforts, fighting courageously despite his handicap until his company was relieved. By his daring initiative, dauntless perseverance and his indomitable fighting spirit, Private First Class Umpleby contributed materially to the success of his unit and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Panama City, Panama Home Town: Austin, Texas.

Underdown, William F. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 96 - 17 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class William F. Underdown (ASN: RA-13310371), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 11 July 1950, near Chonan, Korea. As radio operator for the Battalion Command Post, Private Underdown was at his post when an enemy attack started. He was slightly injured by a mortar burst. Moving to a higher position, he continued to operate his radio. Being subjected to heavy enemy machine gun fire, he jumped into a foxhole. From this position he alternately operated his radio and fired his weapon in order to hold his position. A mortar shell burst in his foxhole partially blinding Private Underdown. He still continued to operate his radio and kept communications flowing. A fellow soldier tried to have him withdraw for his own safety, but Private Underdown refused saying that he must maintain communications. When last seen Private Underdown was still in his foxhole alternately firing his weapon and operating his radio. This conspicuous act of gallantry on the part of Private Underdown reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: July 11, 1950.

Underwood, Bobbie L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 59 - 26 January 1952)

By the direction of the President, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to Corporal Bobbie L. Underwood, US54009348, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Kumsong, Korea, on 13 October 1951. His platoon was advancing on enemy-occupied Hill 500 when it was pinned down by intense defensive fire. There was very little cover and no chance to advance or withdraw. One squad attempted an assault but was stopped by a hail of grenades and heavy automatic weapons fire. Corporal Underwood, Machine Gunner, arose from his crouched position, picked up his weapon and tripod and, dragging a belt of ammunition, fearlessly charged up the hill through the murderous fire. The enemy fire became so concentrated that he was repeatedly forced to stop and seek cover. But with grim determination, he relentlessy continued on. Attacking the enemy's right flank, he poured devastating streams of fire into their positions and purposely used himself as a decoy to divert their attention. His comrades, taking advantage of the opportunity, advanced up the hill and overran the hostile positions, inflicting severe casualties upon the enemy. Corporal Underwood's courageous action, fearless initiative and selfless performance of duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

Upmeyer, Earnest Harold (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Earnest Harold Upmeyer (MCSN: 1189256), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 - 19 August 1952. While participating in the defense of a combat outpost on "Bunker Hill," Corporal Upmeyer constantly exposed himself to hostile small arms fire as he moved up and down the line of resistance, throwing grenades and firing his rifle at the enemy and encouraging the men around him throughout the night. When his unit's supply of grenades and ammunition became dangerously low, he carried out two daring trips to the rear in the face of an intense hostile artillery and mortar barrage in order to obtain supplies. Resuming his position on the defense line, he continued to engage the enemy until he was mortally wounded by a hostile mortar shell. By his outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Upmeyer upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 15, 1930 at Issaquah, Washington Home Town: Oakridge, Oregon. Death: KIA: August 19, 1952.

Urban, Joseph A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Joseph A. Urban (MCSN: 654598), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 February 1951. When an enemy force launched a savage attack against his fire team positioned on a low ridge, Corporal Urban repeatedly braved intense hostile small arms and grenade fire to personally engage the enemy and direct the fire of his men. As the numerically superior hostile force advanced to within a few yards of his position, he ordered his men to fix bayonets and led a vigorous charge to completely rout the enemy. By his outstanding courage and daring leadership, Corporal Urban was directly instrumental in killing fourteen hostile soldiers, and his zealous devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: North Tonawanda, New York. Home Town: North Tonawanda, New York.

Urquhart, Gordon K.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Gordon K. Urquhart (MCSN: 561638), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yudam-ni, Korea, on 3 December 1950. Refusing to be evacuated from his position which was under intense hostile attack although wounded twice in the leg, Sergeant Urquhart courageously led his men up a hill, organized a hasty defense and successfully repulsed the enemy assault. Staunchly remaining at his post, he continued to lead his squad until intense pain and loss of blood necessitated his evacuation from the lines. His bold leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty were contributing factors in the success of his unit and reflect great credit upon Sergeant Urquhart and the United States Naval Service. Born: Cooperstown, North Dakota. Home Town: Seattle, Washington.

Uskurait, Robert W.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to First Lieutenant Robert H. Uskurait (MCSN: 0-44486), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer, Mortar Company, 5th Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), FMF. First Lieutenant Uskurait distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Konmi-chi, Korea, on 12 June 1951. On that date his company was assigned the mission of rendering close support to an infantry battalion. When the enemy launched a fanatic night attack on the battalion's positions, Lieutenant Uskurait, without regard for his personal safety, moved to an exposed position to direct the fire of his mortars. Through his skillful observation of the enemy positions, the company was enabled to deliver accurate, effective mortar fire on the advancing enemy. The actions of Lieutenant Uskurait contributed immeasurably to the successful defense of the battalion's positions. His gallantry, initiative and devotion to duty on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 176 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Pennsylvania.


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