Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "V"

 
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Vahlsing, William Frederick (1st award)

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 108 - 16 March 1953

First Lieutenant William F. Vahlsing, 02028642, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 32d Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Unhaeng, Korea.  On 30 December 1952, after a vicious encounter with the enemy, Lieutenant Vahlsing was given the mission of recovering the friendly dead and wounded from the contested area.  Upon reaching the area Lieutenant Vahlsing organized litter teams to carry the men back to the line.  Fearlessly he remained to search the area for more comrades and, amid blazing enemy fire, he located more dead and wounded.  As the unit was escorting these men back to friendly lines, it was set upon by a fanatical enemy force.  The patrol was forced to leave several wounded under guard and hasten to the Main Line of Resistance for assistance.  Upon reaching the line, Lieutenant Vahlsing, fearlessly and with complete disregard for his personal safety, formed another group and returned to the area to retrieve the remaining men.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Vahlsing reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Pennsylvania.

Vahlsing, William Frederick (1st Oak Leaf Cluster) (posthumous)

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 279 - 1 June 1953

First Lieutenant William F. Vahlsing, 02028642, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 32d Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Chorwon, Korea.  On 25 March 1953, Lieutenant Vahlsing's unit was committed in an attack to retake strategic positions recently occupied by the enemy.  During this action, Lieutenant Vahlsing, with complete disregard for his personal safety, moved forward with a 57mm recoilless rifle section in the lead elements of the company and placed the weapons where he could direct accurate fire upon the enemy. At this time, Lieutenant Vahlsing was seriously wounded by enemy mortar fire, but, refusing first aid, he joined the company commander in supervising the evacuation of the wounded.  Lieutenant Vahlsing continually exposed himself to the deadly enemy fire while searching for safe shelter to place the wounded until they could be evacuated. It was during the reconnaissance that Lieutenant Vahlsing was hit by direct fire weapon from the enemy and mortally wounded. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Vahlsing reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Pennsylvania.,

Valdez, Isidro S. Jr.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 85 - 3 November 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Captain Isidro S. Valdez Jr., 01997748, (then First Lieutenant), Artillery, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 24 August 1950 in the vicinity of the Naktong River, Korea. While piloting an L-16 aircraft, Captain Valdez observed approximately 200 enemy troops preparing to attack friendly troops in the Naktong River salient. Although darkness was close at hand and a severe thunder and rain storm was approaching, he chose to remain in the target area to observe artillery fire upon the enemy despite the fact that his plane was not equipped for night or heavy weather flying. As a result of this observation, the advance of the enemy troops was halted and the attack broken up. In returning to the landing strip, Captain Valdez was unable to fly around the storm and was forced to fly over dangerous mountain terrain without the aid of navigation lights or adequate instrument. Due to the heavy rain he was unable to identify his air strip from the normal approach pattern and was forced to circle the area at a critically low altitude until the landing strip was disclosed by a lightning flash. Without the aid of instruments, landing lights, or field lights, Captain Valdez successfully landed the aircraft during a subsequent lightning flash. The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed by Captain Valdez on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Oklahoma.

Valdez, Salomon Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress , 9 July 1918 has awarded the Silver Star to Private Salomon Valdez Jr., United States Army, for gallantry in action near Kumsong, Korea on 1 February, 1952, while serving with Company F, 2nd Battalion, 223d Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division. Private Valdez’s platoon was preparing an ambush patrol area when attacked by approximately fifty enemy soldiers. One element of the attackers began advancing up the draw that was covered by Private Valdez’s machine gun bringing him under direct fire. Private Valdez continued firing upon the enemy; dispersing them, thus allowing friendly forces time enough to withdraw to a more compact perimeter of defense. Though Private Valdez was fully aware that the enemy knew his exact position, he continued firing his machine gun until evacuation of the friendly wounded was complete. Only when sure that his platoon had established new positions, did Private Valdez withdraw; but in doing so Private Valdez was shot in the back by an enemy waiting in ambush. Private Valdez’s supreme sacrifice was directly responsible for the removal of wounded and for the safety of the rest of his unit, thereby reflecting credit on himself, the 40th Infantry Division and the Army of the United States.” Home State: Montana.

[KWE Note: This award was presented to Private Valdez's brother, Valdemar Valdez, on 8 November 3024 in Montana.]

Vallaster, John J. Jr.

From The Daily Oklahoman, 9 June 1951

Capt. John J. Vallaster Jr., Shattuck, Oklahoma, has been awarded the Silver Star medal for heroism on the Korean battlefront. Details of the act of heroism on the part of the West Point graduate were released this week by the First Cavalry Division in Korea. Capt. Vallaster, a member of Company A, Seventh Cavalry Regiment, "On Feb. 4, 1951, near Ochon-ni, Korea, the lead elements of the company . . . were forced back by an intense concentration of enemy small arms, machine gun and hand grenade fire. . . . Although wounded by a grenade, he refused to be evacuated . . . remained in front of his men, directing their fire." the citation read. Capt. Vallaster’s wife and two children are making their home in Shattuck.

Valentine, Paul V.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 154 - June 15, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Paul V. Valentine (ASN: RA-6668369), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company D, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against an armed enemy on 29 November 1950, in the vicinity of Yongduchan, Korea. On that date he was in charge of an outpost protecting the command post of his battalion, when the enemy made an overwhelming attack on his position. Sergeant Valentine ran forward and found his outnumbered men disorganized and withdrawing. With complete disregard for his own safety he advanced to the forward positions shouting orders to hold the positions and encouraging his men. When the outpost was forced to withdraw and a check of personnel indicated that a wounded man was left behind, Sergeant Valentine courageously rushed back to the former outpost, disregarding the enemy fire raking the area and safely led the wounded man back to safety. The gallantry, inspiring leadership and devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Valentine reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Valvo, Frank A.

Citation not yet found.

In his obituary - "Mr. Valvo was an Army Veteran of the Korean War and received the Silver Star for gallantry and Purple Heart for his actions September 16, 1950, while serving with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th RCT. In the vicinity of Waegwan and Hill 154, Corporal Frank Valvo, seeing many of his friends killed and wounded, charged a North Korean anti-tank nest, shouting and swearing in Italian as he fired his machine gun from the hip, standing in full view of the enemy. He continued the assault until hit in the chest. Ordered to the rear, he assisted in the evacuation of other wounded soldiers to the aid station. Refusing to stay out of action, he rejoined his Company, jumped onto a tank, and began to fire the turret mounted .50 cal at N. Korean positions a few yards to his front. Attracting intense fire he was hit again either by mortar or anti-tank shrapnel, receiving a head wound. He spent the next two years recovering from his wounds. Valvo was also awarded the Combat Infantryman's Badge, Army of Occupation Medal (Japan), Korean Service Medal, UN Korean Service Medal, Republic of Korea War Service Medal, New York State Conspicuous Service Cross, and the Cold War Recognition Certificate."

Vanas, Robert

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert Vanas (MCSN: 1303769), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Machine Gunner of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 March 1953. When the bunker which he was occupying well forward of the main line of resistance received a direct hit, wounding the gunner, during an intense enemy mortar and artillery barrage accompanied by onrushing hostile troops, Private First Class Vanas removed his wounded comrade from the position and returned to man the weapon alone, maintaining a constant hail of fire until knocked down by an enemy concussion grenade. Although painfully wounded, he again returned to the weapon and killed three of the enemy at point-blank range. When another direct hit rendered his position useless, he carried the machine gun to the main trench where he observed more of the hostile troops attempting to gain the trench line to his rear. With the extremely hot barrel of the weapon painfully burning his hands, he fired into the enemy until they withdrew, thereby allowing his comrades to reoccupy the position. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, Private First Class Vanas served to inspire all who observed him and was largely responsible for the successful defense of the outpost, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Holdon, New Jersey. Home Town: Fair Lawn, New Jersey.

Van Boven, Paul W.

Headquarters Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 129 - 29 March 1951

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul. 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority contained in Air Force Regulation 30-14, 22 August 1950 and Section VII, General Order Number 63, Department of the Air Force, 19 September 1950, the Silver Star for gallantry in action on the date indicated is awarded to First Lieutenant Paul W. Van Boven, United States Air Force.

Lieutenant Paul W. Van Boven distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy on 4 September 1950 while he was performing duty in Korea as a member of the Third Rescue Squadron. Although fully aware of the dangers involved, Lieutenant Van Boven departed in an unarmed helicopter to rescue a pilot who had bailed out of a damaged aircraft in enemy territory. Demonstrating remarkable courage, Lieutenant Van Boven flew his helicopter several miles behind enemy lines and exposed himself to intense ground fire to accomplish his mission. He located the downed officer in an open rice paddy surrounded by attacking enemy forces, but unfavorable ground conditions did not permit a landing. Despite continuous enemy fire, Lieutenant Van Boven maneuvered the helicopter close to the ground until the rescue was completed. In performing this heroic deed, Lieutenant Van Boven voluntarily risked his life to save an American pilot. His valorous action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

VanBrunt, Fred

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Fred Van Brunt (MCSN: 0-24978), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the period 29 November 1950 to 4 December 1950. His actions contributed materially to the successful break-through of United Nations forces in the Chosin Reservoir area and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 66 (December 15, 1950). Entered Service From California.

Vance, Billy B.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Diision
General Orders No. 126 - 12 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Billy B. Vance (ASN: RA-14299897), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 15 August 1950, near Kuel, Korea. The platoon of which Private Vance was a member had attacked and taken a hill. During an intense counterattack by overwhelming numbers of the enemy, the platoon was forced to withdraw. Heavy fire from the flank and rear threatened to prevent the withdrawal of the platoon and the wounded. Private Vance established himself in a commanding position on high ground and with grenade and rifle fire held off the enemy while his comrades completed their withdrawal. By his gallantry, Private Vance enabled his platoon to extricate itself from certain encirclement and to take the wounded members back to safety. This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of Private Vance reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service.

VandeLinde, Bobby L.

Department of the Army
Permanent Orders No. 118-02 - 28 April 2011

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, 9 July 1918 (amended by act of 25 July 1963), has awarded the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Bobby L. VandeLinde, 187th Infantry Regiment (Airborne) for gallantry in action on 22 October 1950, while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment (Airborne), near Sukchon, Korea while leading an eight-man forward outpost and protecting his company from a surprise attack.  As Sergeant VandeLinde moved from protected cover to silence a wounded enemy soldier who was attempting to guide an attack in his direction, he was confronted by a large attacking force, estimated at over two-hundred strong.  Despite enemy small arms fire and grenade explosions, he engaged the enemy, killing several and disrupting their fierce assault.  Wounded and knocked to the ground, he continued to resist, killing another enemy soldier who had stabbed him.  As his unit was being overrun he moved back to warn his commanding officer of the impending attack, allowing his company to regroup and prepare for the enemy assault.  With the warning from Sergeant VandeLinde, the unit was able to successfully meet and repel the enemy attack.  Sergeant VandeLinde's actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 187th Infantry Regiment (Airborne) and the United States Army.


Col. Sherman Weisinger presenting Silver Star to Bob VandeLinde July 22, 2011 in a ceremony at the National D-Day Memorial.
(Click picture for a larger view)


Image for the General Store, Non-fiction book, "Respect Forgotten Heroes" by VandeLinde.
(Click picture for a larger view)

[KWE note: Bob VandeLinde received the Silver Star in 2011 during a ceremony at the National D-Day Memorial, stating, "I accept this medal humbly and with a sense of pride.  I merely acted and reacted to circumstances for which I was trained.  I will accept the Silver Star on behalf of the seven other guys who fended off an enemy attack by North Koreans."  VandeLinde is the only one of the eight who is still living.]

Vander Heide, Herbert John

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 695 - 24 October 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Colonel (Infantry) Herbert John Vander Heide (ASN: 0-17754), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as Commanding Officer of the 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Lsil Gol, Korea, on 21 September 1951. Company G was fighting deep in enemy territory with the objective of establishing a blocking position. After intensive fighting, the friendly troops accomplished their mission, but were in danger of being overrun by numerically superior, counterattacking enemy forces who had them surrounded on three sides and were deploying devastating mortar, machine gun, automatic weapons and small arms fire. Ammunition was running low and the enemy threatened to cut the group off from other friendly units. The men, realizing the dire position they were in, were bordering on panic. In the midst of this confusion, Colonel Vander Heide appeared among them. With utter disregard for his personal safety, he calmly moved throughout the company, unhesitatingly exposing himself to the murderous enemy fire to shout words of encouragement and to instill in his men the aggressive will to win. Seizing a rifle, he shouted to the soldiers to follow him and then rushed toward the enemy lines, firing with deadly accuracy into their positions. The men, inspired by his fearless leadership, reorganized with renewed determination and attacked the surrounding enemy, fighting more fiercely than ever until the enemy was cleared from his advantageous positions. Colonel Vander Heide's courageous action, inspirational leadership and deep devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of the unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

VanderVeen, Maurice J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Maurice J. Vander Veen (MCSN: 990753), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. Participating in an attack against a strongly defended enemy hill position when the leading elements were subjected to devastating hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire which temporarily halted their advance, Corporal Vander Veen charged forward though the heavy enemy fire, inspiring his team to follow him in a vicious assault on the hostile position. Although painfully wounded during the attack, he refused medical aid and continued to lead his men forward, neutralizing all enemy positions in his sector. Consenting to evacuation only after the hostile troops had been routed and a defense line established, Corporal Vander Veen, by his aggressive fighting spirit, outstanding leadership and selfless devotion to duty, greatly aided in the success of the mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Detroit, Michigan. Home Town: Grand Rapids, Michigan.

VanderVliet, Anthony

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 190 - 25 September 1950

Master Sergeant Anthony VanderVliet, RA6901285, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 28 July 1950 near Hwanggan, Korea, Master Sergeant VanderVliet was serving with a team which was repairing communication lines to Company C.  While working on the mountainside the crew was met by the company which was withdrawing under heavy enemy attack.  With the aid of one man, Master Sergeant VanderVliet, armed with an automatic rifle, fought a rear guard action for the company, neutralized at least one hostile machine gun and so effectively harassed and delayed the attackers that the company was able to complete its movement in an orderly manner.  At a river crossing he assisted in carrying wounded through the shoulder-deep water to safety.  Master Sergeant VanderVliet's gallant and unflagging devotion to duty reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from New Jersey.

VanDorin, Clell E.

The Silver Star medal for gallantry in Korean action was presented to Clell VanDorin at his home, 15 East Washington, Albia, by officials of the Iowa military district. The citation which accompanied the award says:

"Private First Class Clell E. Van Dorin of the Infantry Army of the United States, a member of Company F, Twenty-Third Infantry Regiment, Second Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 15 February 1951 in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea. On that date Private Van Dorin's platoon was attached to Company G, which was staging a counter-attack to regain its position in the regimental perimeter. The unit met with such stiff resistance that it was again forced to withdraw. Private Van Dorin voluntarily remained in exposed position to cover the withdrawal. He continued to bring accurate and devastating fire to bear upon the enemy until he was positive that his unit had reached safety. During this action he was wounded several times. The gallant conduct displayed by Private Van Dorin reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.”

VanMeter, Clarence N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Clarence N. Van Meter (MCSN: 538816), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When the unit was pinned down by intense and accurate hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire emanating from the objective and adjacent ridge lines, Corporal Van Meter moved forward with his platoon in an assault on the enemy and skillfully maneuvered his squad toward the objective in the face of heavy hostile fire. With only seven of his comrades remaining as the platoon neared the top of the strongly defended hill, he charged forward in a vigorous assault, inspiring his men to follow him into the position and, although seriously wounded in the face by fragments of a hostile grenade, succeeded in killing an estimated forty of the enemy and securing the vital ground. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Van Meter contributed in a large measure to the success achieved by his company. His selfless devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Drumright, Oklahoma. Home Town: Stroud, Oklahoma.

VanNice, Richard L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Richard L. Van Nice (MCSN: 507400), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Section Leader of Company H, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 September 1950. When his platoon became pinned down by intense hostile machine gun and small arms fire while advancing toward its objective, Sergeant Van Nice skillfully maneuvered his machine gun section into position where his men could bring fire to bear upon the enemy despite a lack of covered positions. To adjust the fire of his section more effectively upon well-entrenched and camouflaged enemy positions, he repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile fire. Although wounded in the wrist while observing his section's fire, he steadfastly continued to direct the fire attack against enemy positions until he was wounded a second time in the chin and shoulder and allowed himself to be evacuated. By his courageous actions, he contributed materially to the subsequent capture of the hostile positions. His outstanding leadership, initiative and fighting spirit reflect great credit upon Sergeant Van Nice and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Des Moines, Iowa. Home Town: Mankato, Minnesota.

Vanture, Paul S.

First Lieutenant Paul S. Vanture, 21st AAA AW Bn. (SP).  On the night of 23-24 April 1951 near Unsan-ni, Korea, friendly positions along the Han Tan River were under strong attack by a numerically superior hostile force. Despite constant exposure to devastating small arms fire and bursting grenades, he placed his radio on the top of a personnel carrier to direct the fire of his half-track platoon. As the infantry withdrew to more tenable positions, he held his men in place to conduct a spirited close-in defense that held off the hostile horde until the displacement had been completed. He then supervised an orderly withdrawal to the newly established line of resistance. Lieutenant Vanture's calm demeanor, resolute leadership and inspirational devotion to duty are in keeping with the high traditions of the United States Army. Entered the military service from Maryland.

Varela, Joe R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Joe R. Varela (MCSN: 625211), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 March 1951. Participating in the attack against a well-fortified enemy hill position, Corporal Varela moved forward in the face of withering enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, and skillfully maneuvered his fire team as the leading element, overrunning successive hostile bunkers. As the assault progressed, his unit was suddenly subjected to an accurate barrage of enemy hand grenades thrown from a strategically located bunker on commanding ground. Realizing that the success of the attack depended on the rapid neutralization of the bunker, he quickly charged forward through the deadly barrage in a single-handed assault, accurately throwing hand grenades into the apertures. By his indomitable courage, determination and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Varela was greatly instrumental in the neutralization of the strategic ground and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Rupert, Idaho. Home Town: Burley, Idaho.

Vazquez, Noel

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 229 - 6 July 1953

Master Sergeant Noel Vazquez, RA29160297, Company "E", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 9 June 1953, a daylight combat patrol left the main line of resistance assigned the mission of assaulting Hill "412" in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea. Sergeant Vazquez was assistant patrol leader of the forward assault element that closed with the enemy, inflicting numerous casualties on the foe. When the patrol entered the trenches of the enemy stronghold, he exposed himself to intense fire to reach the mouth of a cave and destroy it with hand grenades. On one occasion, he saw two of the enemy approaching his patrol leader and immediately he mortally wounded the foe. Firing his weapon, although wounded by fragments from a hand grenade, Sergeant Vazquez continued firing his weapon until his ammunition was expended. He then directed the effective fire of other members of the patrol. Sergeant Vazquez' outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from Puerto Rico.

Veach, Joe N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Joe N. Veach (MCSN: 668272), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. When the platoon's advance was halted by intense and accurate hostile fire while the unit was attacking up an extremely steep hill infested with fortified enemy emplacements, Corporal Veach, spotting a bunker which concealed a group of hostile troops and automatic weapons, charged across the fire-swept area to deliver effective fire into the position. Although painfully wounded during the action, he continued to fire his rifle with deadly accuracy until the emplacement was neutralized, thereby enabling the remainder of his unit to advance and overrun the enemy positions prior to his evacuation. By his valiant fighting spirit, indomitable fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Veach contributed materially to the success achieved by his company and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Dallas, Texas. Home Town: Dallas, Texas.

Veer, Harry G.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 37 - February 10, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Harry G. Veer (ASN: RA-18323236), United States Army, for Gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company G, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy in Korea, in 1950. Sergeant Veer was a member of a patrol which was making a reconnaissance when it was ambushed by approximately one hundred enemy riflemen using small arms, automatic weapons and machine guns. Sergeant Veer began to withdraw with other members of the patrol when the Battalion Intelligence Officer, who was on a ground reconnaissance at the time, was seriously wounded. Realizing that the officer would not be able to withdraw due to his injury, Sergeant Veer and two comrades jumped into a ditch with the wounded officer and voluntarily elected to remain to protect him. Sergeant Veer and the two men remained in this position returning the enemy fire for seven hours before they were rescued by a tank section. Sergeant Veer then removed the officer to the tank deck, where he was returned to safety. The calm courage and fortitude displayed by Sergeant Veer in voluntarily remaining with the wounded officer, in the face of almost certain death, reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Vega-Vega, Monserrate

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders Nos. 21 - 11 January 1952

Private First Class Monserrate Vega-Vega, ER30430717, Infantry, Company "C", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 3 June 1951, near Sunbong-ni, Korea, Company "C" was given the mission of attacking Hill 466, the approaches to which were commanded by a group of enemy entrenched on high, rocky peaks. As the Third Platoon, moved in to assault one of these strong points after another platoon had been repulsed with casualties, Private Vega-Vega, a scout of the Third Platoon, accompanied by a comrade, climbed up the face of the sheer cliffs as hand grenades were showered down by the enemy from above. Pausing only to throw the grenades back over the peak, Private Vega-Vega proceeded forward, destroying two enemy machine gun positions and their four operators with grenades. After he had removed the foe from their vital positions, the company succeeded in seizing its objective. Private Vega-Vega's courageous gallantry reflects high credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Vera, Jose Jr.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No.288 - 17 July 1951

First Lieutenant Jose Vera, Jr., 01684927, Infantry, Company "M", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 6 December 1950, at Majon-dong, Korea, while Lieutenant Vera was in command of a machine gun and recoilless rifle section covering the withdrawal of the 1st Marine Division from the Chosin Reservoir area, numerically superior enemy forces infiltrated to within a few yards of his machine gun positions during the hours of darkness and attacked at dawn. Heedless of the intense fire, noise and confusion, Lieutenant Vera abandoned the shelter of his command post to direct and personally coordinate the defense of his positions, moving quickly and continuously among his men, encouraging and directing their actions. When one of his machine guns ceased to fire, Lieutenant Vera, realizing that he had to prevent the gun from being captured, moved fearlessly through heavy enemy fire to the machine gun emplacement, where he found that the gunner had been wounded and the machine gun had jammed. Despite the fact that the enemy was only about 15 yards from the emplacement, he remained in the exposed position until he had the machine gun in action. From this position he forced the enemy troops to withdraw in haste, abandoning their equipment. By repulsing their attack, he prevented an encirclement of the rifle platoon. During the attack, when one of his men was mortally wounded, Lieutenant Vera's left the machine gun emplacement and brought the wounded man back to safety, where he administered first aid treatment. Lieutenant Vera's gallantry and aggressive leadership were an inspiring example to his men, and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Puerto Rico.

Velez, Alfred M.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 74 - August 27, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Alfred M. Velez (ASN: RA-39729168), United States Army, for gallantry in action while a member of Service Company, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Infantry), in action against the enemy near Kumi-Ni, Korea, on 2 August 1950. A composite platoon was organized of which Sergeant First Class Velez was a member and was assigned the mission of blocking a river bed down which the enemy was advancing. The platoon went into position and at the break of day were attacked by numerically superior enemy forces. Under heavy enemy fire the platoon's position became untenable thus forcing a withdrawal. The route of withdrawal led through an exposed area of approximately fifty yards. Sergeant First Class Velez was covering the withdrawal with rifle fire and was one of the last to leave. As he passed through the exposed area he came upon a comrade whose legs were temporarily paralyzed from a head wound. With total disregard for personal safety and under direct small arms fire from the enemy, Sergeant First Class Velez picked up the wounded comrade and carried him to a position of safety. After administering first aid he carried the wounded man another 3,000 yards out to the road from which point he was evacuated. Sergeant First Class Velez's heroic action reflects great credit upon himself and the traditions of the military service.

Verdugo, Bruce M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Bruce M. Verdugo, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Tank Commander in Company D, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 29 November to 12 December 1950. During this period Sergeant Verdugo displayed outstanding courage and leadership in the face of fanatical attacks by numerically superior enemy forces. On one occasion, while under heavy hostile fire which penetrated his tank in several places, he continued to man his vehicle, contributing materially to the success of his unit's mission. Sergeant Verdugo's skill, fortitude, and inspiring devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: April 1, 1924 at Pomona, California. Home Town: Pomona, California.

Verner, William C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William C. Verner (MCSN: 1139013), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Radioman of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 April 1953. Although painfully wounded during the height of the intense fighting on the objective when his squad was engaged in a night assault against a strongly fortified hostile position, Private First Class Verner fearlessly remained in position where he could effectively protect two wounded comrades and, continuing to maintain communications with his unit, courageously fought off the enemy with an automatic rifle. When help arrived, he remained until all the casualties had been evacuated and then dauntlessly proceeded to the hostile trench line alone to ascertain that none of his wounded comrades had been left there. While looking for the wounded, he killed or wounded several of the enemy who were attempting to follow the stretcher bearers. By his indomitable fighting spirit, fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Verner served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Long Beach, California. Home Town: Compton, California.

Vernon, George E.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 70 - August 25, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private George E. Vernon (ASN: RA-17196930), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a member of Company H, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Infantry), at Ichon, Korea, on 30 July 1950. Private Vernon was a member of a heavy machine gun section given the mission to fight a delaying action to keep the enemy out of Ichon as long as possible. He held his machine gun position as the first two waves of enemy Infantry came on, and was responsible for many of their casualties. The first two waves of enemy having been driven off, a third wave started in. Private Vernon continued his fire on the oncoming enemy until all his machine gun ammunition had been expended. He grabbed his individual weapon and began to fire again. He soon realized that he was running low on small arms ammunition. He fixed his bayonet and with total disregard for his own safety, charged the enemy line until all the remainder of his ammunition had been exhausted. He then fired several rifles which the enemy had discarded, and also threw grenades which resulted in the enemy being thrown into a state of fear and confusion, forcing them to retreat. The heroism displayed by Private Vernon on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Vick, William L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant William L. Vick (MCSN: 561237), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Section Leader in a 75-mm. Recoilless Rifle Platoon of the Anti-tank Company, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1950. Voluntarily leading a squad forward as a reinforcing unit to assist two rifle companies acting as rear guard for a Marine force advancing in the vicinity of Yudam-ni, Staff Sergeant Vick moved up the hill during the night and, failing in his attempts to establish contact because of enemy infiltration, directed his men to establish a perimeter defense until daylight. When a numerically superior hostile force attacked the two companies at dawn, he maintained his position and, employing his weapons to maximum advantage, delivered accurate covering fire to neutralize the enemy's fire and permit the friendly riflemen to maneuver to more advantageous positions. The last man to leave his post after insuring that all casualties had been evacuated and all members of his section properly employed, Staff Sergeant Vick, by his inspiring leadership, dauntless perseverance and indomitable fighting spirit, contributed materially to the successful advance of friendly units to their destination and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Paducah, Kentucky. Home Town: Paducah, Kentucky.

Vinson, Richard Priestly

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Engineman Fireman Richard Priestly Vinson (NSN: 2765671), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy during the amphibious assault landings at Inchon, Korea, on 15 September 1950. While a member of a landing craft during assault operations on enemy beaches, Enginemen Fireman Vinson returned with the coxswain of the boat to the beach, assisted in rescuing from a group undergoing sniper fire, a wounded Marine and returned him to safety. His daring initiative and courage were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 974 (October 26, 1950).

Vinterella, John

Private First Class John Vinterella, RA18276091, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery B, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 16 July 1950 near Yongdong, Korea. The enemy had penetrated front line units and were attacking the battery’s positions. PFC Vinterella, a battery cook, joined a 105 howitzer section which was firing on the enemy from the battery’s exposed flank. While serving this howitzer in direct fire he was wounded twice by small arms fire. At one time the howitzer received a direct hit and wounded three men serving the howitzer. With utter disregard of his own personal safety, PFC Vinterella continued loading and firing the howitzer by himself until the enemy infantry was finally driven from the battery’s exposed flank. The act of gallantry displayed by PFC Vinterella reflects great credit on himself and the military service. GO 82, 10 Aug 1950. Entered service from New Orleans, LA.

Vintila, John N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Third Class John N. Vintila (NSN: 9544361), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 5 May 1952. When the patrol he was accompanying was subjected to a devastating hail of automatic-weapons and mortar fire, Hospitalman Third Class Vintila observed nine seriously wounded Marines lying on the trail and immediately ran from the rear of the column in the face of the shattering barrage to assist the stricken men. Constantly under fire, he succeeded in rendering first aid to each of the nine casualties and in carrying the less seriously wounded to safety. Although narrowly escaping direct hits from the bursting shells many times, he calmly persisted in his efforts until all the wounded had been evacuated. By his courageous initiative, resolute determination, and unyielding devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Hospitalman Third Class Vintila was directly instrumental in saving the lives of several wounded Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Violette, Joseph C.D. (posthumous)

Corporal Joseph C.D. Violette, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 31st Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Mundung-ni, Korea, on 6 November 1951. On this date, Corporal Violette was a medical aid man for Tank Company which was on a patrol. Early in the patrol, the lead tank was struck and disabled by enemy anti-tank fire. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Corporal Violette immediately came forward through an enemy mine field in a light vehicle (M-39 Personnel Carrier). Upon his arrival at the burning tank, Corporal Violette dismounted and under a hail of enemy anti-tank, mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire, personally supervised and aided in the removing of an unconscious man from the turret of the enflamed tank. Without thought for his own safety, he remained exposed to the intense enemy fire until he had loaded the wounded on the M-39. As the M-39 was returning to friendly lines, the vehicle hit an enemy mine and over-turned. Corporal Violette had saved the lives of the men trapped in the burning tank, but sacrificed his own, as he was mortally injured in the overturning of the evacuation vehicle. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Violette reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service. Entered the Federal Service from the State of Maine. General Orders No. 532, 18 December 1951, HQ, 7th Infantry Division Home of Record: Main

Viscuso, Joseph J.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 280 - 26 July 1953

Corporal Joseph J. Viscuso, US51135707, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the afternoon of 10 June 1953, in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, Company "F", of which Corporal Viscuso was a member, had been assigned the mission of attacking enemy positions on Hill "412". When the company made contact with the enemy, Corporal Viscuso, as squad leader, led his men in an assault against the hostile force which were entrenched on the reverse slope of the hill. As they advanced, they were subjected to a hail of fire from the enemy and the order was given to return to friendly lines. Corporal Viscuso, however, observing on of his comrades fall wounded, with complete disregard for his personal well-being, braved intense automatic small arms and grenade fire to return his wounded comrade to comparative safety. As he approached the wounded soldier, he came under the fire of an enemy machine gun which was spraying the immediate area. Nevertheless, he successfully accomplished his mission. Corporal Viscuso's outstanding heroism and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from New Jersey.

Voermans, Jake (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Jake Neil Voermans (MCSN: 632720), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 September 1950. Observing a member of his fire team wounded and lying in an open fire-swept area, Corporal Voermans unhesitatingly left the protection of his own position and ran to the aid of the wounded Marine. While attempting to bring the casualty to a position of cover, Corporal Voermans was himself fatally wounded. His courageous initiative and heroic action were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: January 29, 1931 at Whitefish, Montana. Home Town: Helena, Montana. Death: KIA: September 24, 1950.

Vogt, Chancey H.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Seaman Chancey H. Vogt (NSN: 3879631), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy during the amphibious assault landings at Inchon, Korea, on 15 September 1950. Despite a serious wound received from enemy sniper fire, Seaman Vogt carried out his assigned mission of landing troops ashore under heavy enemy fire and by his courage and perseverance contributed materially to the success of the landing operation. His daring initiative and courage were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 974 (October 26, 1950).

Volcansek, Max J. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Max J. Volcansek, Jr. (MCSN: 0-5435), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot and Commanding Officer of Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Forty-Two (VMF(AW)-542), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. Assigned the mission of reducing an enemy strong point opposing friendly ground forces in the center of Seoul, Lieutenant Colonel Volcansek led his four-plane flight in a determined attack against the objective through heavy smoke in the face of intense hostile anti-aircraft fire. Although his aircraft was damaged on the first run, which later necessitated his abandoning it by parachute, and despite shrapnel wounds in his leg, he steadfastly refused to discontinue his attacks until his ammunition was expended and the target was destroyed. By his superb airmanship, outstanding courage and inspiring devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel Volcansek upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Eveleth, Minnesota. Home Town: Eveleth, Minnesota.

Volker, Carl G. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Carl G. Volker, Jr. (MCSN: 650061), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 October 1950. While his company was pinned down by intense enemy fire Private First Class Volker, acting as an ammunition carrier for the mortar section, courageously volunteered to carry litter cases through heavy enemy small arms, machine gun, and mortar fire to the aid station. During a trip to the wounded Private First Class Volker was seriously and painfully wounded. By his actions he materially aided the wounded to receive aid and be evacuated much earlier than would otherwise have been possible and thereby saved the lives of several of the more seriously wounded. Private First Class Volker's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Vollo, Andrew Emil (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Andrew Emil Vollo (MCSN: 658342), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a 80-mm. Mortar Squad Leader in Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. When the rifle platoon to which he was attached was pinned down by heavy enemy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire while crossing an open, flat area in an attack against a well-entrenched enemy force holding the high ground near Hagaru-ri, Corporal Vollo voluntarily exposed himself to the heavy hostile fire to direct and control effective mortar fire on enemy positions, thereby greatly aiding the platoon in advancing across the open terrain. Observing that the Platoon Corpsman was injured, he made numerous trips across the fire-swept area and carried wounded Marines back to the injured Corpsman for medical attention. During a nighttime penetration of some of his company's positions by hostile elements, he directed and controlled accurate and effective fire upon the enemy until his supply of ammunition was exhausted. Ignoring the precariousness of his position, he immediately manned a machine gun and, from an unprotected area, inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy until fatally wounded. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and steadfast devotion to duty, Corporal Vollo contributed materially to the success of his platoon's mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

Vom Orde, Ewald A. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Ewald A. Vom Orde, Jr. (MCSN: 0-48829), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company D, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 6 to 10 December 1950. With his platoon attached to an infantry regiment and disposed with the point of the attack during the assault of the regiment from Hagaru-ri to Hungnam, First Lieutenant Vom Orde fearlessly braved heavy enemy fire to supervise the construction of bridges and by-passes along the route of march, a the same time assisting in the destruction of several enemy roadblocks. Continuously hampered by fanatical enemy attacks, butter sub-zero temperatures and ice- covered roads along rugged, precipitous terrain, he persistently drove forward, carrying out each mission with superb skill and courage and contributing materially to the successful passage of the entire division. His daring and forceful leadership, fortitude and unrelenting determination served as an inspiration to all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Vom Orde and the United States Naval Service. Born: Hattingen, Germany. Home Town: New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Voss, Eugene Frederick (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Eugene Frederick Voss (MCSN: 1338688), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 March 1953. Although severely wounded while moving through an intense enemy mortar and artillery barrage during an assault on a vital outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Voss fearlessly exposed himself to the devastating fire in a valiant attempt to repulse a bitter hostile counterattack. Courageously remaining in the open to cover the evacuation of wounded Marines in the forward element of the unit, he delivered deadly accurate fire on the enemy, momentarily halting the savage attack and permitting the friendly troops to withdraw. Steadfastly maintaining his position, he continued to bring a withering hail of fire upon the hostile troops in an effort to protect the evacuation of all his comrades and to halt the second heavy enemy counterattack. Mortally wounded while engaging the onrushing enemy, Private First Class Voss, by his aggressive fighting spirit, marked fortitude and unyielding devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: December 1, 1932 at Brooklyn, New York. Home Town: Valley Stream, New York. Death: KIA: March 28, 1953.

Vottero, Richard R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Richard R. Vottero (MCSN: 647734), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Pilot in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three (VMA-323), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 August 1952. Participating in the rescue of a downed Marine aviator deep in hostile territory, Master Sergeant Vottero escorted the rescue helicopter by the most direct route possible because of the proximity of enemy troop-s to the helpless pilot and oncoming darkness, although it meant exposing himself to intense fire from hostile anti-aircraft positions. After the rescue had been completed, the pilot of the helicopter stated that his plane's fuel supply was low and requested a direct outbound course over which he could fly at low altitude. Although his own plane was low on fuel and flying ahead of and below the helicopter, Master Sergeant Vottero immediately set a minimum altitude course, subjecting himself to intense barrages of enemy fire that rocked his aircraft. By his outstanding courage, skill and steadfast devotion to duty, Master Sergeant Vottero was largely responsible for the success of the mission and the rescue of a fellow pilot from certain capture by the enemy, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Kellogg, Idaho. Home Town: Kellogg, Idaho.

Vrbosky, Steve

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 112 - September 29, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant [then Sergeant First Class] Steve Vrbosky (ASN: RA-16000290), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 31 July 1950, near Kunuse, Korea. With complete disregard for their own safety, Master Sergeant Vrbosky and two companions ran forward 200 yards under heavy enemy automatic weapons fire to pick up and carry a wounded soldier back to friendly lines. His voluntary act of gallantry contributed to the saving of the wounded man's life and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.

Vreeland, James C. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 33 - 28 January 1953

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to Private First Class James C. Vreeland, US55145697, Army Medical Service, Medical Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by outstanding gallantry in action on 20 and 21 September 1952 in the vicinity of Sadmak, North Korea. On those dates, Private Vreeland was servicing as a Medical Aid Man with Company G, 38th Infantry Regiment, engaged in the assault upon a strategic hill held by a strong enemy force. During the initial conflict, Private Vreeland, displaying outstanding courage and untiring effort, continually exposed himself as he moved from position to position administering first aid that undoubtedly saved many lives. As the savage battle neared its peak, the enemy began saturating the area with grenades. One of these barrages was directed upon a machine gun emplacement, and as a result of the close proximity of the explosions, the machine gun crew suffered heavy casualties. Upon hearing their cries for help, Private Vreeland, with complete disregard for personal safety, crossed the hazardous terrain to the gun position and began administering first aid to the wounded. Before he could begin their evacuation, however, another hail of enemy grenades landed in the position, mortally wounding al of its occupants. Private Vreeland met danger without fear while performing his mission of mercy and unhesitatingly sacrificed his life in a valorous attempt to save the lives of others. His consummate devotion to duty and outstanding gallantry in action reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from St. Paul, Minnesota.

Vuley, Ernest A. Jr.

Headquarters, 45th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 471 - August 13, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Ernest A. Vuley, Jr. (ASN: 0-67476), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with the 45th Infantry Division near Pau-gol, Korea. On the morning of 15 July 1953, Lieutenant Vuley was leading a patrol through an unoccupied area. His mission was to make contact with an Allied company in order to estimate the situation for his battalion commander. The patrol proceeded from the safety of its own lines, but before it could reach the point of contact the unit was pinned down by mortar and machine gun fire. Pressed for time and realizing the hazards to the other members of the patrol, Lieutenant Vuley, without regard for his personal safety, crossed several yards of exposed terrain to make contact with friendly forces and to complete his mission. The gallantry exhibited by Lieutenant Vuley on this occasion reflects the highest credit upon himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the United States Army.

 

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