Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "W"

 
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Wadlington, Robert L.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 116 - 3 September 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Robert L. Wadlington (ASN: 0-170222), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 20 July 1950, at Taejon, Korea. During the withdrawal from the city of Taejon, Lieutenant Colonel Wadlington was commander of a convoy leaving the city limits. The convoy was stopped by enemy small arms fire. Colonel Wadlington with utter disregard for his own safety leaped from his vehicle and taking a few men from other vehicles proceeded under intense enemy fire to remove the road block and start the convoy moving. He then formed his group into a firing line to cover the passage of the convoy. This conspicuous act of gallantry on the part of Colonel Wadlington reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Home Town: Martinsville, Louisiana.

Waggoner, Russell J.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Commissioned Warrant Officer Russell J. Waggoner (MCSN: 0-15932), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the period 29 November 1950 to 4 December 1950. His action contributed materially to the successful break-through of United Nations troops in the Chosin Reservoir area and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 66 (December 15, 1950). Entered Service From California.

Wagner, Arthur (POW)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Arthur Wagner (MCSN: 0-32680), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 May 1951. Diverting to support a forward element of the 25th Infantry Division which was under attack by enemy forces northeast of Seoul while flying a pre-briefed night intruder mission, Captain Wagner, operating under the direction of the Forward Air Controller, carried out brilliantly executed attacks without illumination and over hazardous terrain, making his runs at extremely low altitudes to inflict maximum damage on the enemy. Pressing the attack until his fuel was almost expended, he subsequently flew to Suwon, refueled in fifteen minutes and promptly returned to continue the assault. By his superb airmanship, daring tactics and zealous devotion to duty at great personal risk, Captain Wagner was in large measure responsible for the disruption of the hostile onslaught and his heroic actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chino, California. Home Town: Chino, California.

Wagner, Philip J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal [then Private First Class] Philip J. Wagner (MCSN: 1266002), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 19 September 1952. Participating as a member of a rescue party to assist a patrol that had been ambushed, Private First Class Wagner moved forward with the unit until the enemy, situated on a ridge, detected members of the party and directed intense small arms fire on them. As the rescue party maneuvered to the base of the ridge to escape the devastating fire, the enemy began to throw grenades in their direction. When a hostile grenade landed in the midst of the group with the time fuse ignited, Private First Class Wagner, not knowing the exact location of the men around him and unwilling to risk their lives by throwing the grenade, courageously seized the missile and covered it with his body. Although the grenade was defective and failed to explode, his willingness to sacrifice his own life to protect his comrades served as an inspiration to all who observed him. His exceptional courage and daring initiative reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Wagner and the United States Naval Service. Born: Elmira, New York. Home Town: Toledo, Ohio.

Wagner, Thomas J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Thomas J. Wagner (MCSN: 662622), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of a Provisional Infantry Platoon of Battery K, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. With his platoon assigned to reinforce a Marine infantry company in assaulting and securing Hill 1449 near Hagaru-ri, Private First Class Wagner fought gallantly throughout the intensive action. When a captured machine gun on the hostile side of the crest of the hill, which was being employed against the enemy, developed a stoppage and seven of the nine Marines protecting the gun were wounded, he voluntarily exposed himself to heavy hostile small arms, machine gun and mortar fire to assume the duties as assistant gunner. After assisting in clearing the stoppage, he remained in the exposed position and placed accurate and effective fire on the outnumbering force throughout four coordinated attacks, inflicting heavy casualties and denying the enemy the highest portion of the hill, thereby preventing a penetration of the defense perimeter. By his daring initiative, heroic fighting spirit and courageous efforts in the face of tremendous odds, Private First Class Wagner served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Buffalo, New York. Home Town: Buffalo, New York.

Wagoner, Dale E.

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 37 - February 10, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Dale E. Wagoner (ASN: RA-16145920), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, in action near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, during the period 26 November 1950 to 5 December 1950. During this period, Sergeant Wagoner's encouragement of men and insistence on remaining with the wounded was an inspiration to all. He volunteered to remain and care for over sixty wounded men who were placed in houses outside the defense perimeter where there were no guards stationed for protection. In the withdrawal he followed the unprotected convoy on foot through withering enemy fire, and made continuous rounds from vehicle to vehicle giving encouragement and nursing the wounded. On several occasions, he carried wounded men upon his back until transportation could be found. The undaunted courage and gallantry displayed by Sergeant Wagoner on these occasions reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Wagonhurst, Arland H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 43 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant] Arland H. Wagonhurst (ASN: 0-2203704), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division (then Commanding Officer of Company K, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division) near Tosang-Kogae, Korea, on 23 April 1951. His company, holding defensive positions, was savagely attacked by a large enemy force supported by intensely concentrated artillery fire. The friendly forces, however, were thoroughly prepared for the assault and swept the enemy mass with devastating streams of fire. Captain Wagonhurst continually moved throughout the area, exposing himself repeatedly to the murderous enemy fire as he directed the deployment of his men and pointed out strategic targets to them. He personally directed the evacuation of the wounded, displaying complete disregard for his own safety as he exposed himself to enemy fire to do so. Captain Wagonhurst's courageous action, exemplary leadership and selfless performance of duty throughout the action reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Bechteleville, Pennsylvania.

Waldrop, Otis R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Otis R. Waldrop (MCSN: 0-33686), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 June 1951. Assigned the mission of attacking and seizing a high ridge which was well defended by a series of fortified enemy emplacements, Captain Waldrop courageously led his men up a narrow, exposed cliff in the face of fierce enemy automatic weapons and mortar fire. Repeatedly exposing himself to the hostile fire to deploy his platoons, he moved forward of the assault echelons several times to select a better route of approach for his platoons and launched an extremely vigorous attack which engulfed the position and completely routed the enemy. By his courageous leadership, daring initiative and valiant fighting spirit, Captain Waldrop served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Davidson, Oklahoma. Home Town: Davidson, Oklahoma.

Walker, Emile Alan (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Emile Alan Walker (MCSN: 0-51845), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as an Artillery Aerial Observer of the Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 September 1952. Although keenly aware that the area of operation was infested with hostile anti-aircraft positions, Second Lieutenant Walker unhesitatingly volunteered to participate as aerial observer in a slow, unarmed observation plane during a search for a friendly aircraft which was downed behind enemy lines. Despite persistent hostile antiaircraft and small arms fire, he continued to search for the objective at extremely low altitudes until his plane was shot down by the enemy. By his outstanding courage, selfless efforts in behalf of others and unswerving devotion to the fulfillment of a vital mission, Second Lieutenant Walker upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: December 23, 1926 at Donaldsville, Georgia. Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia. Death: MIA: September 9, 1952.

Walker, Porter

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 157 - 3 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Porter Walker (ASN: RA-14004218), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery A, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. During a withdrawal of his unit along a road completely covered by enemy small arms fire he drove a tracked prime mover. Seeing that abandoned vehicles blocked the route he unhesitatingly moved his vehicle forward. Time after time, in the face of withering fire and with complete disregard for his own safety he cleared a path for the battalion's movement. During the movement he halted again and again, and carried wounded men to the comparative safety of his vehicle. By his courageous actions he was responsible for the safe withdrawal of his unit and the evacuation of 15 of his comrades. His gallant example reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Whitmore, South Carolina.

Walker, Robert M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Robert M. Walker (MCSN: 1169414), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 October 1952. Participating with the assault platoon in counterattacking a well-entrenched enemy hill position, Corporal Walker aggressively led his men forward through an intense barrage of hostile grenade and small arms fire. When the platoon was pinned down by an enemy machine gun, he unhesitatingly moved his fire team through a ban of barbed wire entanglements into the enemy trench line and succeeded in silencing the weapon. Although subjected to small arms and grenade fire, he fearlessly continued to clear the trench line of all opposition and personally accounted for an estimated six enemy dead. Rejoining his unit on the forward slope of the objective, he vigorously engaged the enemy until rendered unconscious by a hostile grenade and evacuated. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Walker served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Roxbury, Massachusetts. Home Town: Dorchester, Massachusetts.

Walker, Sam S.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 277 - 21 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant] Sam S. Walker (ASN: 0-28197), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as Commanding Officer of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Captain Walker distinguished himself by courageous action near Sonju, Korea, on 23 September 1950. After a forced march over twenty miles, during his battalion's advance, his company was assigned the mission of clearing large enemy forces form the left position of the town. As the company entered, the enemy swept the area with intense mortar and small arms fire. With utter disregard for his own safety, Captain Walker moved among his men placing them in positions from which they could obtain maximum fire power and urging them on to greater efforts. During the furious fight he repeatedly exposed himself to withering fire in order to better direct his command in its assault against the well dug-in enemy. His fearless example served well to inspire his men who went on to secure their objective, inflicting heavy casualties among the enemy force and destroying or capturing many guns and other equipment. Captain Walker's courageous actions, devotion to duty and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Belton, Texas.

Wall, Maxey H. Jr.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 373 - July 30, 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Maxey H. Wall, Jr. (AFSN: 0-708351), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as a Pilot, 35th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 8th Fighter-Bomber Group, Fifth Air Force, while on a rescue mission over North Korea on 20 April 1952. Having already flown more than the normal number of missions for one day, Lieutenant Wall volunteered in the late afternoon to return to a remote area and cover a downed pilot. Upon reaching the pilot, Lieutenant Wall's flight encountered an intense barrage of small arms and automatic weapons fire. Realizing that effectiveness of the cover depended upon the absence of ground fire, Lieutenant Wall initiated a series of strafing passes which silenced several of the guns. When all other members of his flight had exhausted their ammunition, Lieutenant Wall sighted a gun still firing on the flight, and immediately attacked. During the attack in which he destroyed the gun position, Lieutenant Wall's aircraft was hit and he was forced to bail out. Lieutenant Wall, by his superior airmanship and gallantry in the face of enemy fire, reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Wallace, Charles A. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 224 - 19 November 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Charles A. Wallace (ASN: RA-14287676), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Battery A, 13th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division in action near Taejon, Korea, on 16 July 1950. The infantry unit to which he was attached as a member of a Forward Observer Section, was under extremely intense attack by overwhelming enemy forces. Manning a machine gun in defense of the position he poured a volume of accurate fire into the enemy ranks. With utter disregard for his personal safety he remained in his position when the infantry company was ordered to withdraw and continued to fire until his position was overrun by the advancing enemy. In this gallant action Private Wallace was killed. His heroic action and complete devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Artillery. Home Town: Hastings, Florida.

Wallace, Charles M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Charles M. Wallace, Jr. (MCSN: 0-45673), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 December 1952. Participating in a naval gunfire spotting mission against enemy shore installations near Pungaan when he was informed that a member of his squadron had been shot down and had parachuted into the icy waters of the Taedong estuary, Captain Wallace requested permission to join in the rescue effort and, accompanied by another member of his flight, immediately proceeded to the scene of the downed pilot to establish a high protective cover over him. When a flight of hostile jet interceptors approached at high speed to harass friendly helicopters and surface craft engaged in the rescue operation, he quickly maneuvered his plane to meet this threat and deliberately engaged the vastly superior fighters in head-on firing runs, successfully diverting the enemy attack on the defenseless helicopters. In the ensuing aerial duel, he aggressively participated with his fellow airmen to thwart repeated enemy attempts to interrupt the rescue, and assisted in forcing the hostile fighters to disengage. Subsequently, with the friendly surface craft subjected to intense enemy anti-aircraft and shore battery fire, he immediately carried out a low dive to strafe the weapons and, when his supply of ammunition was exhausted, continued simulated runs which effectively suppressed the hostile fire. Although his fuel reserve had reached a dangerously low level, he fearlessly continued his threatening attacks until other friendly aircraft arrived on the scene, and then safely returned to his carrier base. His indomitable fighting spirit, superb airmanship and courageous efforts in behalf of another reflect great credit upon Captain Wallace and the United States Naval Service. Born: Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Home Town: Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

Wallace, John W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant John W. Wallace (MCSN: 814688), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 December 1950. Unable to utilize his machine guns due to the terrain and the proximity of friendly troops, Sergeant Wallace skillfully organized his unit and courageously led his men up a steep hill to relieve the pressure on assaulting elements pinned down by fierce enemy fire. Surprising the hostile troops, he initiated a vigorous attack with grenades and close range small arms fire and personally accounted for five enemy dead, completely routing the attackers and overrunning the objective. By his outstanding bravery, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, Sergeant Wallace served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Nashville, Tennessee. Home Town: Nashville, Tennessee.

Wallin, Gordon L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 20 - 25 January 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant First Class Gordon L. Wallin, RA37776600, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company I, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 16 September 1950 in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea. On that date he was leading his squad in an attack against strongly defended enemy positions. During the assault on a hill he was severely wounded and was hurled half way down the slope by the force of an exploding shell. Realizing the importance of retaining control of his men, he made his way forward to his squad and continued to lead them in the attack. With complete disregard for his personal safety he advanced under the intense hostile fire until he was once more wounded and was ordered to be evacuated. His intrepid leadership inspired his squad to such an extent that they closed with the enemy, overrunning and seizing the hostile positions. The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed on this occasion by Sergeant Wallin reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the fine traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from New Folden, Minnesota. GO 20, 25 Jan 1951.

Walling, William C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant William C. Walling (MCSN: 563146), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 September 1951. With his platoon preparing for an attack against a heavily defended enemy position, Staff Sergeant Walling moved from one squad to another and effectively briefed his men on final details, pointing out specific hostile strongholds. Bravely moving forward with the assault units, he skillfully assisted in directing his squad's maneuvers. Although painfully wounded by shrapnel as his unit encountered a hail of enemy fire, he quickly regained his feet and joined a nearby squad, directing its fire and encouraging the men to advance. Submitting to medical aid after the objective had been overrun and secured, he refused evacuation and continued to aid his platoon in the pursuit of the enemy, greatly assisting in the consolidation of the newly won positions. By his determination, marked courage and outstanding leadership, Staff Sergeant Walling served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Marshalltown, Iowa. Home Town: Des Moines, Iowa.

Walls, Jackson B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Jackson B. Walls (MCSN: 1307406), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1952. With his company engaged in an assault to retake a vitally important hill position, Private First Class Walls bravely charged up the steep slope in the face of intense hostile artillery and mortar fire to a vantage point and delivered devastating fire upon the enemy, thereby permitting his comrades to advance into the hostile trenches. Moving into the trenches, he vigorously led the fight to rid the sector of enemy soldiers, personally accounting for approximately twenty enemy dead and assisting in capturing two of the hostile soldiers. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and inspiring devotion to duty, Private First Class Walls contributed materially to the successful recapture of the position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Henrietta, Texas. Home Town: Fort Worth, Texas.

Walters, Harry E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Harry E. Walters (MCSN: 452628), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader of the Air and Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, First Signal Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 and 29 November 1950. Accompanying a reinforced provisional platoon of forty Marines in carrying out an assignment to prevent an enemy breakthrough of friendly lines, Sergeant Walters fearlessly proceeded through the friendly system of antipersonnel mines, trip flares and wire entanglements and advanced for a distance of approximately three hundred yards in front of friendly lines where, under enemy fire, he succeeded in locating and observing hostile positions. Returning to his own unit under intense small arms, machine gun and white phosphorous mortar fire, he quickly redeployed his squad and directed accurate and effective fire which destroyed the position and annihilated the surrounding enemy. By his daring initiative, bold and aggressive leadership and heroic actions at great personal risk, Sergeant Walters contributed materially to the successful repulse of the enemy penetration, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Salem, New Jersey. Home Town: Deepwater, New Jersey.

Walz, Fred L.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Fred L. Walz (MCSN: 666583), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy while serving with the First Provisional Marine Brigade, near Chingdong-ni, Korea, on 7 August 1950. On this date, Private First Class Walz, a rifleman, with complete disregard for his personal safety, repeatedly exposed himself to the enemy thereby drawing their fire so that he and members of a machinegun squad could locate enemy positions. As a direct result of his courage the machinegun squad was able to destroy two enemy machineguns and four automatic weapons. Repeatedly Private Walz crawled through enemy fire to the edge of a ridge to throw hand grenades down upon the enemy positions. While so engaged he was wounded but remained cool and crawled out under heavy machinegun fire to seek medical attention at the aid station. The gallantry displayed by Private Walz reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, EUSAK, General Orders 162 (November 8, 1950). Entered Service From Washington.

Waples, Charles L. (posthumous)

First Lieutenant Charles L. Waples, 02212059, (then Second Lieutenant), Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Company K, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 19 November 1950 in the vicinity of Samin-ni, Korea.  Lieutenant Waples led his platoon to the assistance of a two platoon patrol which had been ambushed by the enemy.  The patrol was completely surrounded and under severe automatic weapons and small arms fire.  Lieutenant Waples exposed himself to enemy fire to make a reconnaissance of the situation.  Having estimated the tactical situation, he remained in an exposed position to direct his men along the right flank of the enemy and directly into hostile fire.  When his platoon had punctured the enemy lines, Lieutenant Waples directed the surrounded men through to safety.  Lieutenant Waples personally accounted for ten enemy dead while his platoon suffered only one casualty.  The gallant conduct displayed by Lieutenant Waples reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Tennessee.

Ward, Albert (2nd award - 1st one received in World War II)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 186 - 15 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Albert Ward (ASN: 0-32491), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, 2d Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Chunshen, Korea, on 24 September 1950. During an attack, the forward elements of his battalion were held up by intense enemy machine gun and small arms fire. Seeing that his troops were being disorganized, he made his way to the front, and with complete disregard for his own safety, led the assault. The men, inspired by his gallant example, overran the position and continued their advance. Colonel Ward's fearless action reflects the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered Service From Maryland.

Ward, Charles C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Charles C. Ward (MCSN: 0-30663), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of an unarmed Helicopter in Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. Unhesitatingly volunteering to attempt the rescue of a downed Marine fighter pilot in enemy infested territory ten miles north of the Chosin Reservoir, First Lieutenant Ward arrived at the scene of the crash shortly after sundown and found a second Marine fighter pilot had crash-landed near the first downed plane and was attempting to extricate the injured pilot from his pinned-in-position. With the plane burning fiercely and expected to explode at any minute, he worked desperately to free the pilot whose leg was caught in the wreckage and, when it became evident that there was no possible way of saving him, and with darkness rapidly closing in, was forced to pick up the second pilot and return to his base. His daring initiative, cool courage and grave concern for another at great risk to his own life reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Ward and the United States Naval Service. Born: Troy, Alabama. Home Town: Troy, Alabama.

Ward, John C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant John C. Ward (MCSN: 571710), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 and 29 November 1950. With his machine guns positioned in a flat valley, directly in the path of concentrated fierce enemy attacks and with no covered rout of supply or evacuation, Sergeant Ward fearlessly exposed himself to blistering hostile fire throughout the night to control and direct effective return fire, to obtain and supervise the re-supply of ammunition and to direct the treatment and evacuation of wounded personnel. When two of his ammunition carriers were wounded, he unhesitatingly left his position to find a Corpsman, traveling through approximately two hundred yards of open, fire-swept terrain to secure help and, after the casualties had been treated, personally assisted in evacuating them to an aid station. By his daring initiative, courageous leadership and valiant efforts in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Ward served as an inspiration to all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: McComb, Mississippi. Home Town: McComb, Mississippi.

Warda, Joseph John Jr. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 341 - 17 November 1952

Private First Class Joseph J. Warda, Jr., US55209823, Infantry, Company “E”, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 25 July 1952, a volunteer squad of Company “E” was given the mission of taking up positions on a hill known as “OP Kelly”, near Koyang-dae, Korea, to protect the outpost against possible enemy attacks. For tactical reasons the squad was divided into two groups with one group advancing one hundred yards in front of the outpost to serve as a listening post. Private Warda, serving as squad leader, remained with the outpost group. That night a fanatical group of the enemy threatened to overrun the listening post as they attacked with deadly small arms and grenade fire. Sensing the eminent danger, he immediately began gathering his men and advancing toward the listening post so that they might assist in defending it. Upon arriving there and finding that the post was being overrun and that the foe were rapidly advancing in his direction, Private Warda fearlessly subjected himself to the devastating enemy fire as he directed his men into defensive positions. When the situation became more critical he ordered his men to move to the rear and as they did so he covered them with such an accurate base of fire that they were able to evacuate the wounded. Private Warda's superb gallantry and inspirational leadership reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the federal service from Michigan.

Warner, Robert E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert E. Warner (MCSN: 0-44497), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Executive Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. While receiving medical attention for facial wounds sustained in an initial enemy mortar barrage during a company attack against the enemy, First Lieutenant Warner was further stunned by another exploding mortar shell which seriously wounded the company commander and several other men. Although suffering intense pain, he assumed command of the unit and moved forward to advance with the assault platoon. Repeatedly exposing himself to the hostile fire, he directed the assaulting platoon in a successful attack on the enemy positions, overrunning them and inflicting numerous casualties upon the hostile troops. By his outstanding courage, determination and gallant devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Warner contributed materially to the success of his company and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Deer River, Minnesota.

Warner, Volney Frank

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 247 - 10 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Volney F. Warner (ASN: 0-62620), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while a member of Company L, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry division, in action near Hakugyoku-do, Korea, on 26 September 1950. On that date, Lieutenant Warner's company leading the advance to the city, was halted by heavy artillery, mortar and automatic weapons. Signaling his platoon to follow, he advanced through a hail of deadly fire until a position, from which small arms fire could be directed on the enemy's artillery, was reached. Determined to eliminate this obstacle to the advance, he led his platoon in a full bayonet assault, and the men, inspired by his gallant example, overran the position and captured four field pieces. Regrouping his platoon after this fight, he again led a frontal assault against an estimated force of company strength which broke and withdrew in complete disorder. Lieutenant Warner's fearless actions and superior leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Woonsocket, South Dakota.

Warner, William L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal William L. Warner (MCSN: 1195450), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Wireman of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1952. While assisting in the establishment of a defensive perimeter on a prominent terrain feature affording protection for a friendly outpost, Corporal Warner's unit was attacked by a large enemy force. When the enemy was caught in the deadly cross fire of both the outpost and defense perimeter and forced to divert a large number of the attacking troops toward the perimeter position, Corporal Warner fearlessly positioned himself at a vantage point to protect a nearby machine gun crew and delivered a continuous hail of accurate fire which prevented the enemy from overrunning the machine gun position. Immediately after the enemy attack had receded, he moved toward the outpost to repair the communication line and succeeded in completing the hazardous mission before a second assault was launched by the enemy from a different direction. Quickly moving into the outpost trench line, he participated in combating the assault and, when a severe enemy mortar and artillery barrage landed on the position, carried his wounded comrades to the outpost tunnel works, remaining at the entrance to fire his weapon and repel any attackers. When the enemy withdrew, he moved through heavy enemy fire and skillfully repaired the communications between the outpost and his unit. By his exceptional courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Warner served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of his unit, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Shelton, Nebraska. Home Town: Loup City, Nebraska.

Warren, Guy G. Sr.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 112 - September 29, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant [then Sergeant First Class] Guy G. Warren, Sr. (ASN: RA-6251332), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company E, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 30 July 1950, at Ichon, Korea. Company E made its initial contact with the enemy when the hostile forces launched a frontal assault supported by strong mortar, tank and machinegun fire uphill against the company positions. Heavy casualties were inflicted upon the third platoon. Master Sergeant Warren, acting as Platoon Leader, reorganized his men and placed them in positions where they could fire effectively upon the enemy. He carried ammunition to crew served weapons and encouraged his men to hold their line. Without regard for his own safety and under heavy small arms and machine gun fire he carried many wounded men to a safer place on the other side of the hill. Due largely to his courage and leadership the enemy attack was repulsed. Master Sergeant Warren's gallant actions reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Washington, Charles E. Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 102 - 26 March 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Charles E. Washington, Jr. (ASN: US-52092675), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company A, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kyoam-san, Korea, on 28 October 1951. In the early morning his platoon set out on a patrol which took it far into enemy territory. A short time later the riflemen were caught in a murderous assault of fire from automatic weapons, small arms, mortars and grenades, which inflicted several casualties among them. During the ensuing fire fight, the squad leader of the second squad was wounded, leaving the men in disorganized confusion. Private Washington, Machine Gunner, realizing the danger of the situation, skillfully regrouped the men and led them in an attack up the rugged slope with his weapon blazing. When the machine gun failed, he continued his assault with hand grenades. Charging far ahead of his comrades, he continually exposed himself to the intense enemy fire and fought with indomitable aggressiveness until the order to withdraw as received. He then voluntarily remained behind to cover his squad as it moved out. Threatened with encirclement by the enemy, he unloaded a devastating barrage of grenades upon the hostile hordes, inflicting severe casualties, and finally left his position only as he was about to be overrun. As a result of his tenacious determination, his comrades were able to withdraw unharmed. Private Washington's gallant actions, intrepid fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered Service From Maryland.

Watkins, Jack G. (posthumous)

Headquarters 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 72 - 17 January 1951

By direction of the President, the Silver Star is awarded posthumously to Master Sergeant Jack G. Watkins, RA18243513, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company C, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Kunu-ri, Korea, on 3 November 1950. During an attack on enemy high ground positions, the platoon on his flank was pinned down by intense machine gun and automatic weapons fire. Seeing that the entire attack was being disorganized by this fire, he left his position of relative safety and made his way, through a hail of withering fire, in an attempt to rally the beleaguered troops. Taking command of one of the squads, he led it, under heavy fire, in a flanking movement in an attempt to eliminate the source of the enemy’s fire. While proceeding up a small draw the squad was ambushed by a large enemy force and in the ensuing fire fight, Sergeant Watkins was killed. His courageous actions, unhesitant devotion to duty and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Entered military service from Sherman, Texas.

Watkins, Robert B.

Corporal Robert B. Watkins, RA34875329, Infantry, United States Army, a member of 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 19 July 1950 at Taejon, Korea. While his platoon was being engaged in a light frontal attack, the enemy is two groups of approximately 200 each, attacked from both flanks simultaneously. Corporal Watkins in the lead vehicle, from an exposed position, remained to cover the withdrawal of his platoon to a more advantageous location. While in this position, Corporal Watkins fire destroyed approximately 50 of the enemy and in its new position the platoon was able to kill at least 300 of the attackers. The courage and leadership displayed by Corporal Watkins reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service. GO 95, Aug 16 1950. He entered the service from Union, MS.

Watson, Alexander

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Alexander Watson (MCSN: 0-32510), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Pilot in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twelve (VMA-312), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 December 1952. Participating in a naval gunfire spotting mission against enemy shore installations near Pungsan when he was informed that a member of his squadron had been shot down and had parachuted into the icy waters of the Taedong estuary, Captain Watson requested permission to join in the rescue effort and, accompanied by another member of his flight, immediately proceeded to the scene of the downed pilot to establish a high protective cover over him. When a flight of hostile jet interceptors approached at high speed to harass friendly helicopters and surface craft engaged in the rescue operation, he quickly maneuvered his plane to meet this threat and deliberately engaged the vastly superior fighters in head-on firing runs, successfully diverting the enemy attack on the defenseless helicopters. In the ensuing air duel, he aggressively participated with his fellow airmen to thwart repeated enemy attempts to interrupt the rescue, and assisted in forcing the hostile fighters to disengage. Subsequently, with the friendly surface craft subjected to intense enemy anti-aircraft and shore battery fire, he immediately carried out a low dive to strafe the weapons and, when his supply of ammunition was exhausted, continued simulated runs which effectively suppressed the hostile fire. Although his fuel reserve had reached a dangerously low level, he fearlessly continued his threatening attacks until other friendly aircraft arrived on the scene, and then safely returned to his carrier base. His indomitable fighting spirit, superb airmanship and courageous efforts in behalf of another reflect great credit upon Captain Watson and the United States Naval Service. Born: Salt Lake City, Utah. Home Town: Salt Lake City, Utah.

Watson, Charles L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 125 - 31 may 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Captain Charles L. Watson, 02017153, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. The enemy had established a series of roadblocks in an attempt to trap and destroy the motorized column of two friendly battalions withdrawing to the south. Captain Watson's unit was to secure the withdrawal of a battalion of artillery along the road. When intense enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire separated Captain Watson from his organization, he immediately organized a group of stragglers and, in the face of withering fire, led them in repeated assaults on hostile machine gun emplacements, thus drawing the enemy fire away from the vehicular column. When he had succeeded in fighting his way past the roadblocks, Captain Watson returned to the area of heaviest fire in order to aid others in their escape. The gallant conduct and aggressive leadership displayed by Captain Watson reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Florida.

Watson, Charles L. (1st Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 16 June 1951

Captain Charles L. Watson, 02017153, Infantry, Army of the United States, commanding Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself in action against an armed enemy of 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Kunmul-gol, Korea.  On that date, a strong enemy force penetrated friendly units and attacked the rear command post of the battalion.  Captain Watson, utterly disregarding his own safety, left his command post and organized his troops in a perimeter defense, constantly moving from one position to another, encouraging the men and directing their fire, while under heavy fire from enemy small arms, automatic weapons, and mortars.  Several hours later, when it became increasingly apparent that to remain in the area would mean annihilation, Captain Watson gave orders to charge the enemy.  His absolute actions were credited with saving numerous lives, while inflicting maximum number of casualties on the enemy.  The gallantry in action and outstanding leadership demonstrated by Captain Watson on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Florida.

Watson, George Richard (MIA) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class George Richard Watson (MCSN: 661916), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner of a 155-mm. Howitzer of Battery K, Fourth Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. With an infantry aid station under heavy enemy attack, Private First Class Watson unhesitatingly volunteered to assist in evacuating wounded Marines from the danger area. Fearlessly proceeding through heavy enemy small arms and grenade fire, he succeeded in reaching the stricken men and in bringing them to the artillery area, continuing his valiant efforts until he himself was wounded by hostile fire. By his daring initiative, prompt and courageous action and grave concern for others at great personal risk, Private First Class Watson contributed to the saving of many lives and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: January 18, 1931 at Watertown, Massachusetts. Home Town: Westfield, Massachusetts. Death: MIA: November 30, 1950.

Watson, James R. (1st citation)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 192 - 7 August 1951

For gallantry in action against the enemy on 24 July 1950, near Yongdong, Korea.  When a numerically superior enemy force attacked the exposed right flank of Company A, the company commander was wounded.  Lieutenant Watson immediately took command of the unit under intense enemy automatic weapons, small arms and mortar fire, and reorganized the company so as to repulse several attacks.  Throughout the ensuing action, Lieutenant Watson continuously exposed himself to the enemy in order to deploy his men effectively.  When orders were received to withdraw, Lieutenant Watson, risking death and capture by the hostile forces, remained behind establishing a new defense line to insure the safe evacuation of the wounded.  Lieutenant Watson's gallantry and courageous leadership reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the federal service from Alabama.

Watson, James R. (2nd citation)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 211 - 15 August 1951

For gallantry in action against the enemy on 31 July 1950, near Charye, Korea.  While Company A was surrounded by a numerically superior enemy force, a section of machine guns attached to another company was captured by the enemy and were being used to place fire on the friendly troops.  Lieutenant Watson, with disregard for his personal safety, led a grenade attack through withering enemy machine gun fire and silenced the captured emplacement.  Although wounded in the attack, he crawled back to the command post to reorganize one of his platoons which was withdrawing under a vicious assault.  Lieutenant Watson's gallantry and outstanding leadership reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered federal service from Alabama.

Watterson, Donald E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Donald E. Watterson (MCSN: 0-41686), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on 25 September 1950. While his company was under attack by heavy sniper and automatic weapons fire from three separate enemy positions, First Lieutenant Watterson immediately started to reorganize his company preparatory to launching an assault and, coordinating the fire of his unit with that from artillery and mortar weapons in the area, assisted materially in the seizure of the objective. When the hostile forces, estimated at 200 launched a fierce counterattack, he skillfully conducted his company in repelling the enemy with mortar, small arms and grenade fire and, although bleeding profusely from a head wound sustained during this action, continued to direct his men while receiving first aid from the company Corpsman. Ordered to withdraw to a more tenable position, he insured the evacuation of all dead and wounded before effecting the withdrawal of his company without losing a single man. His inspiring leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and aggressive devotion to duty reflect great credit upon First Lieutenant Watterson and the United States Naval Service. Born: Maywood, Illinois. Home Town: Maywood, Illinois.

Wawrzyniak, Stanley J.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Staff Sergeant Stanley J. Wawrzyniak (MCSN: 636571), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hoegol, Korea, on 28 May 1951. On that date, Sergeant Wawrzyniak voluntarily accompanied a rifle platoon in an assault against a well-defended enemy position. Without regard for his personal welfare and under heavy enemy fire, he moved forward shouting words of encouragement to the men as they advanced against the hail of enemy mortar and small arms fire to gain the enemy position. Although painfully wounded, Sergeant Wawrzyniak refused first aid in order that he might remain to supervise the evacuation of the wounded. His close supervision resulted in the successful evacuation of all wounded personnel to a position of relative safety. The initiative and aggressiveness displayed by Sergeant Wawrzyniak reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 179 (August 16, 1951). Born: Gary, West Virginia. Home Town: Buffalo, New York.

Weaver, Claude W. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Claude W. Weaver, Jr. (MCSN: 1162513), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 March 1953. While moving toward a check point far forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Weaver's unit was subjected to devastating enemy artillery fire which caused all the personnel to take immediate cover. Receiving word that one of the men had been wounded and was lying unprotected and helpless, he quickly rushed to the stricken man and carried him to a covered position. While performing this heroic act, Sergeant Weaver was painfully wounded and subsequently evacuated. By his outstanding leadership, indomitable courage and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Sergeant Weaver served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Greensboro, North Carolina. Home Town: Greensboro, North Carolina.

Webb, Billy D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Billy D. Webb (MCSN: 551715), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. Skillfully employing his men, Corporal Webb was responsible for repelling four strong enemy attacks which penetrated to within a thirty yard range of his positions. Courageously directing his team's fire and constantly encouraging them during the engagements, he served to inspire them to heroic efforts in defense of their positions and in the successful destruction of a large number of the enemy. During the fourth hostile assault, he boldly left his foxhole, crawled forward approximately seventy-five yards and killed the enemy leader who was shouting orders for the fresh attack. By his exceptional leadership, aggressive determination and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk, Corporal Webb upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Tulsa, Oklahoma. Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Webb, John Bailey (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class John Bailey Webb (MCSN: 1080567), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Ammunition Carrier of an Anti-tank Assault Platoon of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea. With his unit subjected to heavy automatic weapons fire from a strong enemy roadblock south of Hagaru-ri during the early morning of 4 December 1950, Private First Class Webb observed that the ammunition supply of a near-by machine gun unit was dangerously low. Unhesitatingly leaving his relatively safe position, he made repeated trips across the fire-swept terrain to replenish the supply, continuing his valiant efforts until fatally struck down by enemy fire. By his daring initiative, heroic actions and indomitable courage, at great risk to his own life, Private First Class Webb contributed to the success of the machine gun section in reducing the roadblock and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: October 8, 1931 at Paoli, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Paoli, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: December 4, 1950 - Buried at: Church of God Samaritan Cemetery - Paoli, Pennsylvania.

Webb, Richard F.

Citation not yet found.

"Cpl. Richard f. Webb's new medals are admired by his wife Jean after Webb received the Silver Star and Purple Heart in ceremony at Washington's Bolling Field.  The 19-year-old Korean veteran was a forward ground observer with an air control unit when attacked by Reds and survived because of a metal plate in his forehead.  A Red bullet fired point-blank at his head richocheted off the metal plate put in after a skull fracture 4 years ago.  Reds bayoneted Webb and left him for dead but he made his way to UN lines." - Kalispell, Montana, Tuesday, August 28, 1951

Webber, Leroy F.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 305 - 7 August 1953

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal Leroy F. Webber, ER 37752279, Infantry, United States Army, Company B, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 3 March 1951, in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea. On that date, enemy forces attempting to overrun positions held by Company B engaged them with deadly small arms fire, hand grenades and hand-to-hand combat. As Squad Leader, Corporal Webber, with complete disregard for personal safety, exposed himself to the bitter enemy fire to better observe the enemy positions and direct the fire of friendly machine guns. In the darkness of night and confusion of combat he moved from one exposed position to another to better observe the movement of the attacking force, and with grenades and pistol fire aided in repulsing three enemy assaults. By his accurate direction of machine gun fire and active participation in the defense of the machine gun emplacement, he greatly aided in preventing the enemy from overrunning friendly positions. The gallantry in action displayed by Corporal Webber reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Weber, John E. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John E. Weber, Jr., United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 February 1951. Moving with a platoon on a combat patrol when leading elements were pinned down by intense enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire from well-camouflaged positions on a ridge line to their front, Private First Class Weber, serving as an automatic rifleman, rushed forward through the hostile fire to a completely exposed position from which he could bring effective fire to bear on the enemy. By remaining in this exposed area and pouring withering fire on the foe until he was seriously wounded, Private First Class Weber enabled his comrades to move forward and neutralize the enemy position. His courageous and selfless actions in the face of intense hostile fire inspired all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: May 19, 1930 at Leadwood, Missouri. Home Town: Bonne Terre, Missouri.

Webster, Warren III (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 17 - 8 March 1954

First Lieutenant Warren Webster, III, Infantry, United States Army, commanding officer of Company E, 17th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Haugae, Korea, on 2 February 1953.  He was leader of a combat patrol which, under cover of darkness, advanced deep into enemy territory to gain information and to capture an enemy soldier.  Separating part of his patrol into a support group and placing it in ambush, he and five comrades advanced within 100 yards of an enemy-held hill in an attempt to lure enemy troops into a trap.  Suddenly the group was attacked by a large force which had moved up and in between the two friendly patrol groups.  Sensing the seriousness of the situation and the necessity for immediate action in order to permit the support group time to counterattack, Lieutenant Webster fearlessly charged forward, encouraging his men to follow.  With deadly accuracy, he poured machine-gun fire into the assailants, which inflicted heavy casualties and threw the enemy into chaos.  Although wounded in the onslaught, he gallantly continued to return fire with his pistol and simultaneously urged his men to strike the enemy with vigorous force.  He and several others were mortally wounded before the enemy was forced to withdraw.  Lieutenant Webster's resolute determination, inspirational leadership, and consummate devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Home of Record: Camden, NJ.

Wedworth, Cecil (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Cecil Wedworth (MCSN: 1076734), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving in Weapons Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 21 September 1950. As a member of an eight-man patrol whose mission was to silence guns within an enemy cave, Private First Class Wedworth daringly crawled forward to a position where he could more effectively direct heavy fire from his weapon against two hostile automatic weapons which were firing at the patrol. Successful in silencing one enemy gun, he was later fatally wounded. By his courage, initiative and loyal devotion to duty, Private First Class Wedworth assisted materially in enabling his patrol to complete its mission successfully, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: June 2, 1927 at Bloomington, Illinois. Home Town: Tehachapi, California. Death: KIA: September 21, 1950.

Weeks, Joseph W.

2nd Lieutenant Joseph W. Weeks, 21st AAA AW Battalion (SP). On 23-24 April 1951 friendly forces were under strong hostile attack in the vicinity of Unsan, Korea. Although the enemy had secured the commanding ground on the left flank he moved his three half-tracks into a blocking position to deny entrance into the valley. After inflicting heavy casualties on the attacking force, he attached all valuable equipment to his vehicles before rejoining the infantry on the new line of resistance. On the following day, when friendly forces were again ordered to disengage, he held his vehicles in place to impede future enemy advances until more tenable positions could be firmly secured. Lieutenant Weeks' exemplary courage, resolute leadership and unwavering devotion to duty ore in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army. Entered the military service from Florida.

Weidmann, Maynard E.

Headquarters 3D Infantry Division
General Orders No. 210 - 21 June 1951

First Lieutenant Maynard E. Weidmann, 01540879, Infantry, Company "K", 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 27 April 1951, while acting as a blocking force near Hongbok, Korea, Company "K" was cut off from the battalion by a numerically superior enemy. Lieutenant Weidmann, First Platoon Leader, was given the mission of delivering a flank attack coordinated with a frontal assault by the remainder of the company. Ordering his men to fix bayonets Lieutenant Weidmann courageously led the attack. Inspired by his leadership, the platoon struck the enemy with such fierceness that the breakthrough was effected and the enemy routed. Having broken through the hostile encirclement, he returned to search the sector for wounded. The gallantry and aggressive leadership displayed by Lieutenant Weidmann reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from the State of Alabama.

Weiry, James J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant James J. Weiry (MCSN: 0-53748), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 13 to 15 August 1952. With the platoon assigned the mission of defending a vital sector in the center of the company zone, Second Lieutenant Weiry, arriving on position during a heavy enemy mortar concentration and with his men weak from heat exhaustion, labored untiringly to skillfully place his men in positions and to supervise the supplying of his unit amidst constant enemy sniping and shelling, frequently acting as stretcher bearer to carry the wounded to the company aid station and bringing critical supplies back to his men. When his sector was fanatically attacked by a numerically superior hostile force during the hours of darkness, he courageously exposed himself to the enemy fire, moving up and down the area shouting words of encouragement to his men and controlling fire until the enemy had been repelled and forced to retreat with many casualties. By his outstanding courage, leadership and selfless devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Weiry served to inspire all who observed him and contributed greatly to the success of the company's mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: Rhinelander, Wisconsin.

Weitzel, William

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William Weitzel (MCSN: 1335831), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 19 March 1953. During a six-man reconnaissance patrol forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Weitzel's unit maneuvered near an outpost position where it met the brunt of an enemy company-size attack that was directed at the outpost. Although painfully wounded during the engagement, he delivered devastating and accurate fire on the enemy to assist in covering the patrol's withdrawal to the outpost. After clearing a path through the protective wire of the outpost, he carried a wounded comrade to the friendly trench line and then continued to deliver withering fire on the enemy. When his weapon became inoperative, he fearlessly engaged several hostile soldiers in hand-to-hand combat to protect his wounded comrade. After the enemy withdrew, he refused medical aid until all other casualties had been treated and, despite his painful condition, walked to the main line of resistance in order that other casualties could be carried on stretchers. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and fortitude, Private First Class Weitzel served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Spring Township, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Sinking Springs, Pennsylvania.

Welch, Claude Herman

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Claude Herman Welch (MCSN: 0-7164), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Twelve (VMF-212), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 11 March to 31 July 1951. During this time Lieutenant Colonel Welch's leadership, devotion to duty, and determined application of his professional skill was responsible for the welding of an efficient fighting team whose mission it was to provide close air support to United States Forces in Korea. Despite heavy enemy ground fire, hazardous terrain, adverse weather conditions and personal and logistical difficulties his squadron completed its assigned mission in an outstanding manner. With a high degree of courage, skill, determination and leadership. Lieutenant Colonel Welch personally led his squadron in combat, and despite heavy enemy ground fire, marginal weather and dangerous terrain he repeatedly, by experienced and skillful observation and inspired flying detected enemy positions, and without regard for his own safety led his squadron in the attack to destroy those positions, thereby making possible the successful prosecution of battle by our ground forces. On one occasion he led his squadron on a twelve-plane strike against the enemy stronghold of Fyongyang as part of a force of 300 planes striking the city and industrial area. Despite intense anti-aircraft fire, he aggressively launched attacks on the squadron's assigned target destroying the enemy communication center. His courage, devotion to duty and outstanding leadership during the above period so inspired his officers and men that their own performances were outstanding. Lieutenant Colonel Welch's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: October 31, 1917 at Melder, Louisiana. Home Town: Houston, Texas. Death: December 14, 1996.

Welch, David Fife

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Commander David Fife Welch (NSN: 0-97926), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Commanding Officer of Underwater Demolition Team One, a part of the raiding forces in a Special Operations Group of Amphibious Group One, Pacific Fleet which conducted a series of successful night demolition raids and beach reconnaissance missions in the coastal waters of enemy-held Korea during the period 12 through 25 August 1950. Lieutenant Commander Welch expertly planned and skillfully organized and trained his Underwater Demolition Team for each of these demolition and beach reconnaissance missions. Under the Landing Force Commander he personally led and directed the night hydrographic survey of three beaches. He conducted his command with skill and courage. Under his determined leadership the surveys were successfully completed despite the fact that on the last night heavy enemy opposition was encountered and the reconnaissance party was forced to withdraw under fire. His leadership, skill, and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander Naval Forces Far East: Serial 7371 (December 15, 1950).

Welcher, James W.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 133 - 3 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant James W. Welcher, 01688440, (then Second Lieutenant), Corps of Engineers, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters and Service Company (then Company C), 2d Engineer Combat Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 9 September 1950 in the vicinity of Wollyong-ni, Korea. As the patrol leader of a volunteer twenty-six man patrol that had the mission of locating any enemy in the general area, Lieutenant Welcher was leading his patrol through rice paddies in normal infantry formation. The patrol was suddenly fired upon with machine gun and small arms fire by the enemy from high ground and well camouflaged positions. The initial volley hit the lead scout and two other men. Ordering his men to establish a firing line, Lieutenant Welcher ran forward, picked up the wounded scout, and carried him back to the firing line. During the fierce fight that followed, an unknown number of the enemy was killed. As the patrol’s ammunition supply became low, Lieutenant Welcher returned them to the company area. He had obtained information about the enemy’s positions, weapons, and strength. The gallantry and initiative displayed by Lieutenant Welcher reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Iowa.

Weller, Frank P. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) (Posthumously) to Corporal Frank P. Weller (MCSN: 1079060), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea. On 3 September 1950, his company had participated in the assault and seizure of heavily defended, well-entrenched enemy positions on a ridge near Yongsan. Corporal Weller, a fire team leader, was deploying his men in defensive positions when he saw his squad leader, who was crawling forward of the lines in an attempt to locate heavy enemy machine gun fire, fall wounded. Displaying great courage, Corporal Weller, despite the heavy enemy fire, moved across the ridge to his fallen comrade and was attempting to evacuate him when he, himself, was mortally wounded. The heroism of Corporal Weller, who gave his own life in an attempt to save the life of a comrade, reflected great credit upon himself and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 123 (March 6, 1951). Born: November 14, 1928. Home Town: Coronado, California. Death: KIA: September 3, 1950 - Buried at: Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery - San Diego, California.

Wells, Elmer R.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 37- 29 April 1953

Private First class Elmer R. Wells, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company B, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Kojannabri, Korea, on 20 August 1952.  While participating in a night assault on key enemy positions, the spearheading elements of the patrol came under heavy enemy grenade and small-arms fire.  Private Wells, a member of the patrol, was struck by a grenade which fell to the ground.  In the subsequent explosion, he was wounded.  Despite painful wounds and realizing that an outcry would alert the enemy and reveal the squad's position, he crawled to the base of the hill and patiently waited for medical attention.  His comrades, inspired by this action, fought with increased determination, inflicted many casualties on the enemy, and successfully accomplished the patrol's mission.  Private Wells' courageous actions and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.  Home of Record: St. Francois City, MO.

Welsh, James B.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 202 - 19 June 1951

First Lieutenant James B. Welsh, 01823674, Armor, Tank Company, 65th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On 18 April 1951, near Yur-hyon, Korea, Lieutenant Welsh was on a mission to retrieve three disabled tanks. When the armored column reached the vicinity of those vehicles, it came under severe small arms and machine gun fire from enemy troops entrenched on ridges around the area. Completely disregarding his own safety, Lieutenant Welsh exposed himself to enemy fire by sitting on top of the tank's turret and firing the heavy machine gun to point out the foe's positions to his platoon. After being wounded when the overtaxed weapon exploded, he withdrew from the action to seek medical attention and then returned to his post, enabling one tank to be retrieved. During a second enemy assault on his unit, Lieutenant Welsh was again wounded as he fearlessly led the platoon in defense of its position. Seeing his commander wounded, the tank driver became confused and began to reverse the vehicle, backing his tank toward a bank with at least a ten foot drop. Though seriously wounded Lieutenant Welsh, by courageous determination, reached the driver and stopped him in time to avert the loss of the tank and its crew. The gallantry and bravery displayed by Lieutenant Welsh reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from the State of New Jersey.

Welsh, Robert T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert T. Welsh (MCSN: 614742), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 November 1950. Alerted for a possible hostile attack when his company positions were assaulted by a numerically superior enemy force, Private First Class Welsh volunteered to go to the aid of a wounded Marine who was reported to be lying about 250 yards in front of friendly lines. Instructing his fire team to cover him, he fearlessly advanced through heavy and accurate hostile sniper and machine gun fire to the side of the casualty and carried him through the enemy barrage to the aid station. By his courageous initiative, unselfishness and daring action, Private First Class Welsh aided the wounded Marine in receiving prompt medical attention and inspired all who served with him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: North Canaan, Connecticut. Home Town: New London, Connecticut.

Wenner, Ward R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Ward R. Wenner (MCSN: 0-52205), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Forward Observer of Battery C, First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 April 1952. When the outpost was subjected to an intense and accurate mortar and artillery barrage, destroying his communication wires, Second Lieutenant Wenner unhesitatingly left the comparative safety of his bunker to set up his radio in a location to communicate with the artillery battalion and fearlessly continued to call in destructive fire upon the enemy until his radio was destroyed by fragments of an exploding shell. Although painfully wounded as the enemy infantry advanced and forced his team to withdraw a few yards to join friendly forces, he retained control of his men and kept them together as a unit, insuring their safety before seeking cover for himself. By his inspiring leadership, outstanding courage and steadfast devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Wenner was instrumental in preventing the complete loss and destruction of the friendly position, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Roseau, Minnesota. Home Town: Roseau, Minnesota.

Wentzel, Dave W. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 413 - December 11, 1951

The Silver Star is posthumously awarded to Sergeant First Class Dave W. Wentzel, RA37550994, (then Sergeant), Infantry, U.S. Army, Company F, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, who is cited for gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 31 October (to 1 November) 1951 near Pokkae, Korea. When the first wave of troops attacked one sector of the defensive perimeter, Sergeant Wentzel, although not stationed at this point of the line, saw the need for additional firepower and immediately moved to the stricken area. He skillfully delivered a large volume of fire on the attackers that was instrumental in alleviating the great pressure the enemy was exerting. Disregarding his personal safety, Sergeant Wentzel moved from foxhole to foxhole amidst the hostil fire, replacing the wounded men and instructing those capable of carrying on the battle. His dauntless courage and aggressive leadership inspired the men to greater efforts. Sergeant Wentzel’s gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Minnesota.

Werner, Harold R.

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 197 - 19 June 1953

Private Harold R. Werner, RA12395872, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 16 May 1953, Company "G", holding a defensive position on Outpost "Harry", in the vicinity of Surang-ni, Korea, was subjected to an intense artillery and mortar shelling prior to a hostile attack. Private Werner, a machine gunner, occupied an exposed observation position which was under continual enemy fire and attack. Private WERNER'S emplacement was struck by an artillery shell, destroying the position but not harming him or the machine gun. Completely disregarding his personal safety, he positioned his weapon on top of the exposed trenches and continued firing and maintaining the security of his sector. Although wounded by the fragment of another enemy mortar shell, he remained at his post, effectively firing his weapon. His courageous actions contributed materially to repelling the enemy attack. Private Werner's outstanding heroism and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from New York.

Wescott, William H.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 317 - 26 June 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major William H. Wescott, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as a member of the 25th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 51st Fighter-Interceptor Group, FIFTH Air Force, on 1 April 1952. Leading a flight of four F-86 type aircraft acting as a screening force for fighter-bombers, Major Wescott encountered a numerically superior force of enemy aircraft attempting to attack the friendly aircraft. He immediately attacked the enemy force, at the risk of his own life, completely disregarding the enemy's efforts to deter him. Major Wescott's initial attack resulted in the destruction of one of the enemy. He then attacked another flight of the enemy force and succeeded in destroying a second aircraft. During these attacks, he was at all times under fire from other elements of the enemy. Major Wescott's destruction of the two aircraft effectively diverted the enemy attack and prevented interference with the fighter-bomber mission. Through his high personal courage, aggressive airmanship and devotion to duty, Major Wescott reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Weske, John W. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 41

Sergeant First Class John W. Weske, RA17285573, Infantry, Company "I", 7th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 22 November, 1951, near Kayaphari-sanmel, Korea, as the weapons platoon of Company "I", under the leadership of Sergeant Weske, was relieving units of the British Commonwealth forces, it became subjected to an intense hostile mortar and artillery barrage, which inflicted numerous casualties upon the platoon.  Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Sergeant Weske courageously left a position of comparative safety and, completely exposing himself to the withering enemy fire, selected a place for the establishment of the mortars which enabled them to return the fire upon the foe.  While moving among his men shouting encouragement, a direct hit by a round of enemy artillery mortally wounded Sergeant Weske, but his superb leadership was directly responsible for placing the mortar section into action and completing the mission assigned to Company "I".  Sergeant Weske's heroic and selfless performance of duty reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Minnesota.

West, Radford Carter (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Lieutenant Colonel Radford Carter West (MCSN: 0-5570), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Tactical Air Coordinator of Marine Aircraft Group Thirty-Three, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 October 1950. Assigned the mission of executing deep air support attacks against assembled enemy installations in the vicinity of P'yongyang, Lieutenant Colonel West skillfully directed the attack from an extremely low altitude and personally made numerous passes while subjected to fierce hostile anti-aircraft fire. By his courageous leadership, professional skill and steadfast devotion to duty, he aided directly in destroying three enemy tanks repair buildings, seven vehicles and three tanks and in damaging other hostile installations and equipment, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: August 22, 1913 at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Home Town: New York, New York. Death: DNB: February 8, 1951 - Buried at: Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia.

Westa, Gilbert M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Gilbert M. Westa (MCSN: 0-49396), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. Leading his men up a steep slope in the face of devastating hostile mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire during an attack against a strongly fortified enemy hill position, First Lieutenant Westa moved well ahead of the platoon in order to seek routes of advance and to gain points from which he could observe the enemy positions and direct his unit's fire. Expertly maneuvering his men to gain fire superiority over the enemy, he led the unit in a vicious assault on the positions and, despite a severe wound sustained while moving in the attack, refused medical aid until the position had been overrun and the entrenched hostile forces had been routed with heavy losses. By his outstanding leadership, daring initiative and selfless devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Westa contributed materially to the success of the mission and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Lombard, Illinois.

Westerfield, Frank B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Frank B. Westerfield (MCSN: 1153595), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Gunner of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 12 - 13 September 1951. Although sustaining severe and painful wounds on three separate occasions during a series of night-long enemy counterattacks launched against the company's defensive positions, Corporal Westerfield continued to deliver devastating fire upon the enemy. Shouting words of encouragement to his comrades throughout the night, he submitted to evacuation only after the hostile counterattacks had ceased on the following morning. By his outstanding courage, determination and selfless devotion to duty in the face of intense enemy fire, he served to inspire all who observed him and contributed greatly to the successful defense of the company's positions. Corporal Westerfield's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Cago, Texas. Home Town: McGregor, Texas.

Westerman, Frank J.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 262 - May 26, 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Frank J. Westerman (AFSN: AO-697077), United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy as a Pilot, 6167th Air Base Group, Fifth Air Force, on 27 March 1953. On that date, Captain Westerman flew an unarmed helicopter on a rescue mission in the deepest penetration by helicopter into enemy-held Korean territory up to that date. Taking off from a forward island base during pre-dawn darkness, Captain Westerman flew to a point off the enemy's coast line where he encountered intense ground fire. He then orbited until dawn, before proceeding into the target area. With utter disregard for his personal safety, and with grim determination to locate the downed airman, Captain Westerman began his search, remaining in enemy territory under intense ground fire for a period of one hour and fifteen minutes at altitudes ranging from fifty to seven hundred feet, in an area only twenty-six miles from the enemy's Yalu River airfield complex. Although he was unsuccessful in locating the downed pilot, Captain Westerman's determined attempt at great risk to his life was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Weston, Logan E.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 175 - 22 September 1950

Captain Logan E. Weston, 01795021, Infantry, Company A, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  During an all-day attack by the enemy near Hong-yong, Korea, on 24 July 1950, Captain Weston led his unit with notable courage and skill.  Despite the heavy artillery, machine gun and small arms fire, he personally led a patrol to stop them.  Covering a tank with rifle fire, he kept it closed while a rocket could be fired to immobilize it.  When one of the tanks located the position and it laid direct fire from a range of 25 yards, a near-hit stunned and deafened Captain Weston.  He stood up in face of the fire to operate a launcher which, however, was put out of action by several hits before he could fire it.  Having sent for more rockets, he kept the tanks pinned down until the rockets could be launched.  He then personally closed on and set fire to the tanks.  Only after he had rallied his men and effected their safe withdrawal, did he submit to treatment of is wounds which together with temporary loss of hearing necessitated his evacuation.  Captain Weston's exceptionally heroic and vigorous leadership, remarkable stamina, and dauntless will to fight are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Pennsylvania.

Weston, Tony (posthumous)

The award of the Silver Star was made on General Orders No. 144, dated April 5, 1952, Headquarters of the 7th Infantry division. The citation reads in part,

"By direction of the President, the Silver Star is awarded posthumously for gallantry in action to the following enlisted man:

Master Sergeant Tony Weston, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company F. 17th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself gallantly, in action near Hawasoho, Korea. On January 4, 1952, while on a combat patrol Sgt. Weston observed that the squad leader was headed in the wrong direction. As he approached the leader to advise him of this, Sgt. Weston heard the sound of an enemy mine becoming armed. With complete disregard for his own safety, he hurled himself upon the patrol leader and shielded him from the blast with his own body. In the resulting explosion, Sgt. Weston was mortally wounded. The outstanding personal courage of Sgt. Weston in giving his life to save another, is worthy of highest commendation. His gallantry reflects great credit on him and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army."

Weymer, William G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman William G. Weymer (NSN: 7196211), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company, First Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 5 and 6 September 1952. Accompanying a relief detail to an outpost which had been heavily hit the previous night and was still under enemy artillery and mortar fire, Hospitalman Weymer continually exposed himself to the hostile fire to administer first aid to the wounded and contributed materially to the saving of many lives. Carrying out two trips to the forward slope in the face of heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire, he succeeded in rescuing seriously wounded Marines and, although knocked down when several hostile shells landed near him, continued his duties until relieved. By his courageous initiative, outstanding skill and steadfast devotion to duty, Hospitalman Weymer served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Whaley, Elwin Irving

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army
General Orders No. 336 - May 24, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Infantry) Elwin Irving Whaley (ASN: 0-453764), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of the United States Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea, in action against the enemy near Hoengsong, Korea. On the night of 11 - 12 February 1951, the 10th Regiment, 8th Republic of Korea Division, while advancing toward Hongchon, Korea, was attacked by elements of two Chinese Communist divisions. Major Whaley, Senior United States Advisor with the regiment, immediately went to the front to assist and advise the combat unit commanders in the deployment of their troops. Without regard for his personal safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to the intense hostile fire in order to direct and coordinate the fire of friendly forces more effectively. Fully aware that Chinese Communist Forces had penetrated other units and were operating in rear areas, Major Whaley, by personal example of courageousness and intrepidity, instilled in the Republic of Korea troops the will to hold their positions at all costs, despite the overwhelming odds against them. While under heavy small arms and mortar fire, he established collecting points for stragglers, organized them into fighting units and directed their efforts against the enemy. The regiment continued its gallant stand until the preponderance of enemy strength broke the defense lines and the regimental positions were overrun. When last seen on 13 February, Major Whaley was directing the efforts of a group of Korean and American soldiers in trying to establish a new defense line approximately four miles north of Hoengsong. The gallantry displayed by Major Whaley reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Wheeler, Calvin W.

February 11, 1953

Award of the Silver Star, By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918, and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to the following named enlisted man:

Private First Class Calvin W. Wheeler, US55154101, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company I, 17th Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Kumhwa, Korea. On 18 October 1952, Private Wheeler, acting as a point man, was the foremost man in an assault against a strategic enemy-held hill. When the contact was made with the enemy forces and the assault elements were subjected to an intense barrage of enemy artillery, mortar, grenade and small-arms fire, Private Wheeler, with complete disregard for his personal safety, remained in his exposed position, firing his automatic-rifle from his hip, inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy, disorganized them, and forcing them to retreat to more covered positions, Private Wheeler continued his fire until his wounded comrades had been evacuated and the assaulting forces were able to withdraw without suffering further casualties. The courageous devotion to duty and coolness under fire demonstrated by Private Wheeler on this occasion were great sources of inspiration to all who witnessed and contributed greatly to the success of the combat mission of his organization. The gallantry displayed by Private Wheeler reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the federal service from Michigan.

Whipple, Robert A.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 265 - 17 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Robert A. Whipple (ASN: 0-2018805), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company B, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. During the establishment of the Naktong River beachhead his platoon was subjected to intense mortar, machine gun and small arms fire and its advance halted. Determined to take his assigned objective Lieutenant Whipple assaulted the enemy position, and the men, inspired by his fearless example joined him in his courageous action and overran the position. When friendly aircraft unwittingly strafed the newly won position the platoon was forced to withdraw. Realizing that they position was vital to the success of the entire operation Lieutenant Whipple again rallied his men and led them through a hail of withering fire, to the objective. His gallant actions, complete devotion to duty and superior leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Olean, New York.

Whiston, Stephen A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Stephen A. Whiston (MCSN: 1151147), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 July 1952. When his squad was separated from the remainder of the platoon during a raid against well-fortified enemy hill positions forward of the main line of resistance, Corporal Whiston skillfully reorganized his men and again led them up the steep hill in the face of withering hostile small arms fire to inflict numerous casualties upon the enemy forces. A courageous and daring leader, he aggressively led his squad four times against the hostile positions and, although seriously wounded in the arm and leg during the final assault, continued to direct his men in the attack and assist in the evacuation of the other casualties until wounded a third time and forced to be evacuated. By his outstanding courage, indomitable fighting spirit and resolute determination, Corporal Whiston served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Waterbury, Connecticut. Home Town: Meridan, Connecticut.

Whitacre, Hugh Douglas

Headquarters, EUSAK
General Orders No. 186 - April 4, 1951

Master Sergeant Hugh D. Whitacre, RA33635489, Chemical Corps, United States Army.  On 26 November 1950, Company C, 2d Chemical Mortar Battalion, was supporting the 9th Infantry Regiment in action against the enemy near Sinjang, Korea.  Sergeant Whitacre, as Platoon Leader of the Mortar Platoon of Company C, was directing the fire of his platoon when he detected the enemy closing in on his position.  Seizing a .50 caliber machine gun, he delivered devastating fire on the approaching enemy, inflicting numerous casualties and momentarily slowing their advance.  When the platoon was ordered to withdraw, he supervised the destruction of his mortars and equipment and courageously led his beleaguered platoon to safety.  With complete disregard for his personal safety, he returned to the abandoned position to search for and remove wounded men of his platoon.  The gallant leadership and heroism displayed by Sergeant Whitacre was a source of inspiration to the men of his platoon and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the federal service from Virginia.  [Home of record: Gore, Virginia]

White, B.F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal "B" "F" White (MCSN: 605002), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fie Team Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 1 March 1951. When the company was hit by savage small arms and machine gun fire from well entrenched hostile positions and forced to seek cover during an attack against the enemy up steep, snow-covered slopes, Corporal White, after positioning his men, noticed a Marine who was wounded in both legs and bleeding profusely lying about 150 yards in front of the enemy lines. Moving through withering enemy fire to the side of the wounded man, he applied tourniquets to his legs and dragged him back to a covered position. After the casualty was treated by a Corpsman who had crawled to the spot, Corporal White carried the man the remainder of the way to friendly lines. By his exceptional courage, superior skill and inspiring devotion to duty, Corporal White undoubtedly saved the life of his wounded comrade and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Prairieville, Louisiana. Home Town: Denham Springs, Louisiana.

White, Billie E.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 63 - 22 March 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Corporal Billie E. White, RA13332728, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company C, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 12 February 1951 in the vicinity of Saemal, Korea. The 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry, which was attempting to penetrate an enemy roadblock, was subjected to intense hostile machine gun fire delivered from commanding ground overlooking the escape route. Company C was committed in an effort to dislodge the enemy. Corporal White was assisting in laying down a strong base of fire when he realized that fire power alone would not neutralize the enemy because of heavy machine gun fire delivered from a cleverly concealed emplacement. Displaying complete disregard for his safety, Corporal White left his position and dashed forward in a singlehanded assault of the enemy emplacement and succeeded in killing the hostile crew of four with his rifle fire. His outstanding courage so inspired his comrades that they forthwith followed him in the attack and quickly gained their objective. The gallantry displayed by Corporal White reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from West Virginia.

White, David John (posthumous)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 106 - August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant David John White (ASN: RA-20315204), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Battery B, 13th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 6 August 1950, near Kwan-gok, on the Naktong River, Korea. On 6 August 1950, along the Naktong River when his unit was pinned down by enemy mortar and machine gun fire for a period of four hours, Sergeant White remained with his section directing artillery and small arms fire on enemy infantry positions, who had succeeded in partially surrounding the battery positions. When the order was given to withdraw, Sergeant White refused to withdraw without first recovering the equipment of his section. In order to recover the equipment it was necessary for him to move through heavy enemy mortar and small arms fire and in attempting to recover the equipment he was killed by enemy fire. The act of gallantry displayed by Sergeant White reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Born: 1923. Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Death: KIA: August 6, 1950.

"Sgt. David John White, Philadelphia, of the 24th Infantry Division, received the Silver Star medal posthumously.  White was killed while moving through heavy enemy mortar and small arms fire to recover equipment of his section after receiving an order to withdraw when the enemy partially surrounded his battery." - Morning Avalanche, September 12, 1950, Lubbock, Texas.

White, David L.

Headquarters, 40th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 68 - 22 February 1953

First Lieutenant David L. White, 0987493, Infantry, United States Army, 160th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sat'ae-Ri Korea on 3 November and 4 November 1952. During the hours of darkness Lieutenant White led an ambush patrol deep into enemy territory where they engaged the enemy. In the ensuing fire fight, Lieutenant White killed one enemy and the fire of his patrol drove back the remainder of the foe. Lieutenant White then set up a perimeter of defense and sent word back for a litter bearer to carry back the body of the enemy soldier. The enemy then opened up a devastating attack with artillery, mortar and small arms fire. Lieutenant White observed the enemy moving up on both sides of him and thus began to withdraw. Under Lieutenant White's calm, efficient and courageous supervision, the patrol moved back to the main line of resistance without a casualty. The alerting of the men on the main line of resistance saved many lives, as it eliminated the element of surprise from the vicious enemy attack. Lieutenant White then resumed leadership of his platoon and repelled the attack of a numerically superior and fanatical enemy force. During the action Lieutenant White was wounded in both legs and feet but fearlessly and with disregard for his own personal safety, refused to leave the line and though not being able to stand up, directed his men's fire and that of the mortars. Not until the attack ended and the wounded men of his platoon had been evacuated, did Lieutenant White agree to be carried to the aid station. Lieutenant White's inspiring leadership, courage and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army. Entered the Federal Service from Massachusetts.

White, Frank M. (POW)

Captain Frank M. White, 02033271, Corps of Engineers, Army of the United States, Commanding Officer, Company B, 2d Engineer Combat Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an enemy on 27 November 1950 in the vicinity of Kujang-dong, Korea.  On the night of that date his company was on a hill forward of the other friendly forces with the mission of defending the hill against the enemy.  Although one of his platoons was overrun and many killed by the superior numbers of enemy, he personally reestablished the line of defense, thus preventing the enemy from overrunning and overtaking a company to the rear.  His inspiring leadership and fearless conduct under fire gave is men an example of courage that enabled them to repulse the fierce enemy attack for nearly seven hours until his company's ammunition supply was nearly exhausted.  When this happened he successfully directed the withdrawal of his company to another defensive area.  Here his unit acted as a rearguard for the successful withdrawal of the other unit.  He organized his company and withdrew them through a virtual hail of enemy fire across the Chongchon River, where ice was frozen so hard that a path was broken with weapons, for the wounded men.  The enemy followed and fired at the company across the river and almost five hundred yards from the river to the main supply route road.  Later he waded the icy waters of the river to rescue two wounded men of his company.  His gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Colorado.

[KWE Note: Captain Frank M. White was subsequently made prisoner and died 15 February 1951.]

White, George A.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal George A. White (MCSN: 1156447), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 April 1952. Although painfully wounded when his squad's forward outpost was subjected to a night attack and surrounded by a numerically superior enemy force employing heavy grenade and small arms fire, Corporal White immediately assumed command when his squad leader was one of the many casualties and rallied the few remaining men. Realizing the position was untenable, he quickly organized the unit for a withdrawal and began the difficult struggle back to the outpost line of resistance. Despite the intense pain of his wounds, he supported a seriously wounded comrade and led three other wounded Marines through enemy troop positions and heavy mortar fire, returning safely to the platoon positions. By his skilled leadership, outstanding courage and marked fortitude, Corporal White served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Lewiston, Maine. Home Town: North Turner, Maine.

White, Quitman

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 208 - 28 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Quitman White (ASN: 0-2037108), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company L, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near Maechon-Dong, Korea, on 18 August 1950. During an attack on a well defended hill-top enemy position, his company suffered heavy casualties from the accurate small arms, mortar and artillery fire. Although exposed to the intensive enemy fire, he unhesitatingly assumed command of the two rifle platoons, reorganized them into an effective fighting unit and through his superior leadership and courage, succeeded in taking the assigned objective. His gallant actions and devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Infantry.

White, Robert

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Robert White (MCSN: 558935), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 - 27 October 1952. When an enemy attack overran a portion of the main line of resistance to the right of his platoon's sector, Technical Sergeant White skillfully assisted in reorganizing the defense and in repelling the enemy. Throughout the night, he constantly remained on watch, manning the inter-platoon communications and coordinating the defenses. When the unit was ordered to counterattack, he unhesitatingly assumed the duties of platoon sergeant and aggressively pressed the assault to within hand grenade distance of the enemy. Although painfully wounded during the ensuing action, he returned to his post when enemy fire forced the unit to withdraw and remained at his position throughout the night until relieved the following morning for evacuation. By his outstanding leadership, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Technical Sergeant White served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: St. Bernard, Ohio.

White, Stewart E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Stewart E. White (MCSN: 1242019), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 26 - 27 October 1952. When the enemy launched a vicious assault against an outpost position while his platoon was establishing a defense perimeter on a critical terrain feature which protected the outpost, Private First Class White participated in the ensuing fire fight which caught the enemy between a deadly cross fire. With the enemy forced to divert a portion of its troops to attack the platoon position, and concurrently launching a mortar and artillery barrage which inflicted many casualties, a bitter hand-to-hand struggle took place on the trench line. Wounded a second time while removing the casualty back to the trench, he refused medical treatment upon reaching his destination and proceeded to move among his wounded comrades, offering them words of encouragement. Throughout the action, he continually left his position in order to search for other casualties who might have fallen unobserved during the fierce encounter. When the unit disengaged from the enemy and withdrew, he walked most of the way back to the main line of resistance before allowing himself to be placed on a stretcher. By his indomitable fighting spirit, marked fortitude and courageous initiative, Private First Class White served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: January 1934 at Portland, Oregon. Home Town: Eatonville, Washington.

White, William D. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant William D. White (MCSN: 0-55973), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 - 29 March 1953. When his rifle company was assigned the hazardous mission of effecting the night relief of a company which had suffered many casualties on a bitterly contested outpost far in advance of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant White led his men through a devastating barrage of mortar and artillery fire and over unfamiliar and mine-infested routes to the objective. After effecting the relief in his assigned platoon sector, he immediately proceeded to establish the defense of the strategic position. Despite the increasingly intense enemy mortar and artillery fire, he repeatedly moved from position to position, shouting words of encouragement to his men and assigning fields of fire to cover enemy avenues of approach. Instantly killed by hostile mortar fire during these actions, Second Lieutenant White, by his inspiring leadership, cool courage and resolute determination throughout, contributed materially to the success of his company in repulsing the savage enemy attacks and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 25, 1928 at Teaneck, New Jersey. Home Town: Englewood, New Jersey. Death: KIA: March 29, 1953.

White, William J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant William J. White (MCSN: 0-49174), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Observation Squadron SIX (VMO-6) in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 May 1952. Piloting a tactical air observer on a patrol mission deep in enemy territory, First Lieutenant White skillfully maneuvered his slow, unarmed aircraft dangerously close to hostile mortar positions, which were inflicting casualties on the patrol, in an effort to distract the enemy and allow the observer to call in counterfire from friendly mortars. Aware that the patrol was still receiving casualties, he requested air support and guided the planes to the area by radio. Braving intense enemy machine gun fire, he carried out repeated passes at extremely low altitude to mark the enemy positions with smoke grenades and continued to control the air strike within range of the heavy enemy fire, thereby greatly aiding in the complete destruction of the hostile positions and in the successful resumption of the patrol. By his superb airmanship, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty, First Lieutenant White served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: March 24, 1925 at New York, New York. Home Town: Gardiner, Maine.

Whited, Edward W.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 204 - 24 June 1953

Sergeant Edward W. Whited, RA18408450, Company "G", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the early morning of 16 May 1953, Sergeant Whited was a squad leader of Company "G", which was occupying defensive positions on Outpost "Harry", in the vicinity of Songnae-dong, Korea, The outpost was subjected to intense enemy artillery and mortar fire followed by a numerically superior hostile attack. During the height of the attack, Sergeant Whited exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to locate the main enemy force and direct his squad's fire on them. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he constantly moved through the open trenches to insure the proper deployment of his men and to offer encouragement to them. Sergeant Whited's continual alertness and capable leadership were largely responsible for the successful defense of his platoon's sector. Sergeant Whited's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Louisiana.

Whiteside, Harold

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 195 - 19 June 1953

Private First Class Harold Whiteside, RA14461378, Infantry, Company "G", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 16 May 1953, Outpost "Harry", in the vicinity of Songnae-dong, Korea, after being subjected to intense artillery and mortar fire, was attacked by a reinforced company strength hostile force. Private Whiteside was assistant squad leader when the squad's sector on the outpost came under enemy fire. In the ensuing action, the squad leader was mortally wounded by an incoming mortar round. Private Whiteside immediately took charge of the squad. Without regard for his personal safety, he continually moved from one exposed position to another, checking the security of his area. Although wounded, he refused to be evacuated until assured that his sector of responsibility was secure from the enemy probe. As a result of his inspirational actions, the members of his squad increased their determination and intensified their volume of accurate fire, which was a major contributing factor in the successful defense of the position. Private Whiteside's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from North Carolina.

Whitham, Keith W. (2nd award)

Headquarters, 24ID
General Orders No. 272 - 20 December 1950

The 1st Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a second Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant Keith W. Whitham, 01342223, Armor, U.S. Army, a member of Tank Company, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by courageous action near Kumchon, Korea on 22 September 1950. He was in command of the leading element during his battalion’s advance. Completely disregarding his own safety he led his men again and again in their successful assaults against strong enemy defenses. Constantly exposed to heavy enemy fire, he continued to press the attack. So swift was his advance that his small force liberated 45 allied prisoners of war whose captors were routed before the onslaught of his attack. In the course of this gallant action many casualties were inflicted among the enemy and over 100 of this troops captured. Lieutenant Whitham’s courageous action, fearless example and outstanding leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Armor. Entered military service from Cook, Nebraska.

Whiting, Roger

Lieutenant Colonel (then Major) Roger Whiting, 032577, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 14 June 1953, it was learned through intelligence sources that the enemy was preparing to attack the 2d Battalion front in the vicinity of Chat-Kol, Korea. In spite of the fact that the enemy was bombarding the entire area with heavy mortar and artillery fire, preparatory to the attack, Colonel Whiting 2d Battalion Commander, disregarding his safety, traveled over the zeroed in road to Company "F:", which according to his calculations would bear the brunt of the attack. He remained in the Company "F" area for about an hour, informing the men of the anticipated attack and inspiring them with his presence of mind and military bearing during the intense enemy shelling. After leaving the company, he returned to the Battalion command post from which he followed the action. The Battalion was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. He immediately alerted his reserve companies despite the heavy artillery and mortar fire which blanketed the command post area. Refusing to obtain the protection afforded by the command post bunker, he spent most of the time in the open communication trench from which he could send and receive messages with maximum efficiency. Before the final outcome of the battle was definite, he went to the company "F" area, inspected it and observing the necessity for quick treatment of the wounded, he ordered the Battalion Aid Station moved to the company. His courageous actions throughout the period, which lasted till the early morning hours, enabled the Battalion to resist the numerically superior enemy, insured an adequate supply of vital equipment, and alleviated the suffering of the wounded. Colonel Whiting's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from New York.

Whitman, CPL Fred S. Jr.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 106 - September 25, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal [then Private] Fred S. Whitman, Jr. (ASN: RA-3934047), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against he enemy on 17 August 1950 at Waegwan, Korea. When his unit launched a counterattack against the enemy, Corporal Whitman picked up a machine gun and with the aid of a South Korean Soldier, charged up a hill under heavy enemy automatic weapons fire and captured the top of the hill. When his unit was forced to withdraw due to the enemy being reinforced, Corporal Whitman stayed on the hill, and with complete disregard for his own safety, continued to fire his machine gun until the ammunition was exhausted. He then fired his carbine into the face of the charging enemy until its ammunition was exhausted. Only then did Corporal Whitman return under heavy fire to his unit. His gallant action greatly assisted the withdrawal of his unit and the evacuation of the wounded, and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.

Whitsel, Ralph E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 28 - 14 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class [then Sergeant] Ralph E. Whitsel (ASN: US-52040723), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company D, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 21 October 1951. As they advanced in support of infantry elements attacking enemy positions, friendly tanks were halted by a concentrated enemy mile field blocking a strategically important valley. Sergeant Whitsel led his squad in clearing a path through this mine field and also neutralized a road beyond the field. Although constantly subjected to intense enemy small arms and mortar fire, he never faltered in his mission but worked calmly and systematically, fully aware of the extreme danger involved. Under his skillful leadership, his men cleared the area quickly and without sustaining casualties. The tanks were then able to advance and provide effective fire support which contributed immeasurably to the successful capture of the objective. Sergeant Whitsel's courageous action, exceptional proficiency and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Corps of Engineers. Home Town: Mapleton Depot, Pennsylvania.

Wiard, Laurence Jr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 277 - 21 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Master Sergeant Laurence Wiard, Jr. (ASN: RA-19295306), United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Company C, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Wiard distinguished himself by courageous action near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. During the assault crossing of the Naktong River he was responsible for loading and launching of the boats on the fire-swept beach. When the boat crews were pinned down by intense fire he unhesitatingly rushed to the scene, rallying the men and urging them on to greater efforts. Before communications were established he made repeated trips through areas swept by mortar fire to maintain liaison with his company command post. His continued presence on the beach, with utter disregard for his own safety, served well to inspire his men, who, under his direction continued the flow of men and supplies to the far shore. Sergeant Wiard's courageous actions, devotion to duty and outstanding leadership reflect great credit on himself and the United States Engineer Corps. Home Town: Sacramento, California.

Wickson, Lawrence N.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Lawrence N. Wickson (NSN: 7198627), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 July 1952. Hospitalman Wickson, serving as a Corpsman, displayed outstanding gallantry, professional skill and devotion to duty. When the company was engaged in an assault on a strongly fortified enemy hill position the leading platoon was pinned down. Realizing that three Marines were lying wounded within fifteen yards of the enemy machine gun position, without regard for his personal safety he unhesitatingly ran into the lines of fire of the enemy position, picked up one man and carried him back to the perimeter of defense. Again he dauntlessly ran forward through a hail of enemy small arms and grenade fire and carried back a second Marine. Although physically exhausted he organized a stretcher party and was responsible for the rescue of the other man. By his courageous actions he personally saved the lives of the three Marines. Hospitalman Wickson's gallantry, concern for his comrades and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 26978 (September 9, 1952).

Wieder, Ernest H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 102 - 26 March 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class [then Corporal] Ernest H. Wieder (ASN: US-55044287), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 18 October 1951. His squad, participating in an intensified assault upon an enemy occupied hill, was suddenly pinned down by a tremendous volume of concentrated automatic weapons and grenade fire. Seeing that one key enemy bunker was responsible for the deadly hail, Sergeant Wieder fearlessly crawled forward to a strategic position and, although exposed to extreme physical danger, hurled two grenades into the emplacement, silencing the enemy guns. As the smoke cleared he observed a hostile soldier trying to escape and gave chase. In the fierce duel that followed, he succeeded in wounding the man and took him prisoner. Sergeant Wieder's gallant action, aggressive fighting skill and selfless devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Highland Park, Illinois.

Wigley, Wilburn H.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 43 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant [then Corporal] Wilburn H. Wigley (ASN: RA-14362438), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, near Yongon-ni, Korea, on 20 October 1951. His company had secured its objective for the night, but in the late hours was subjected to a savage counterattack by determined enemy forces. Due to the intensity of the enemy mortar and small arms fire, the friendly unit was forced to withdraw to more strategic defensive positions. Sergeant Wigley, Automatic Rifleman, fearlessly remained in his forward and exposed position. Firing with devastating accuracy into the hostile masses, he inflicted severe casualties on them, affording his comrades sufficient time to evacuate the wounded. Not until all friendly elements had withdrawn to safety did he leave his position and join friendly lines. Sergeant Wigley's courageous action, unswerving determination and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Bentonia, Mississippi.

Wild, Charles B.

Wild Wondering How He Escaped Being Wounded
By Jean Strong, Gazette Feature Writer

"Capt. Charles B. Wild Jr. can't figure out how he got through 13 months of fighting in Korea without being wounded. But he did. And now he's reunited with his wife and sons at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Wild, [Cedar Rapids]. He had never seen his younger son, Michael, who was born the day after he shipped out for Korea 15 months ago.

Tracing his activities after he arrived in Korea November 9, 1950 Captain Wild fought at Wonsan, Hungnam, and Pusan where his outfit moved north to stop the Chinese. "We did, too," he said, "and were one of the forces that helped recapture Seoul for the second time." He also participated in the famous midnight ride (120 miles) of the Third division when it was moved from the west to the east following the Chinese breakthrough last May 16.

There's no mistaking the justifiable pride Capt. Wild has in the Third division. As rifle company commander in the First battalion, Fifteenth Infantry, Third division, the 30-year-old captain was impressed with the fighting ability of the enemy. He said they use all types of weapons—British, American, German, Italian. "We were amazed that they could supply themselves with ammunition—but they did. He told how in an enemy squad of 10 men, only six would nave rifles. Men without rifles would rely on picking up one.

Capt. Wild received the Silver Star for action near the town of Suso-ri. The citation which accompanied it praised him for "able employment of his smaller force and fine leadership while his patrol held off the enemy for eight hours until a tank force arrived." His patrol had been completely surrounded by a Chinese regiment.

An army veteran of nine years, the captain wears the American theater, Japanese occupation and Philippine Liberation ribbons in addition to the Korean ribbon with three battle stars. After he was graduated from Wilson high school In 1939, he attended Coe college for a time before entering service in 1942. His wife and their sons, Charles III, 4, and Michael, 15 months, have been living with her parents in Story City. They will accompany Capt. Wild to Fort Benning, Ga., Jan. 3, where he has been assigned to the infantry school. “It will be like going home," Mrs. Wild concluded. "We lived there before Charles was shipped out." Cedar Rapids Gazette. Dec 9, 1951

Wilder, James O.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman James O. Wilder (NSN: 2285678), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 - 11 September 1952. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospitalman Wilder displayed exceptional courage and professional skill. During the relief of a position forward of the main line of resistance, his company and the relieving company were subjected to an intense mortar and artillery barrage that inflicted heavy friendly casualties. Without regard for his own personal safety, he rushed into the area being shelled and in doing so, was seriously wounded. Disregarding his own injuries, he continued to help another casualty, administering lifesaving aid and then carrying the wounded man to the safety of a bunker. He then returned to give aid and carry another wounded man to the bunker. When he had determined that there were not other casualties, he allowed himself to be treated and evacuated. His outstanding calmness under fire and devotion to duty served as an inspiration to all who observed him. Hospitalman Wilder's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 37899 (December 12, 1952).

Wilder, MSGT Johnie S.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 83 - 30 October 1950

Master Sergeant Johnie S. Wilder, RA35124450, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company D, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 2 September 1950 in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea.  On that date, Sergeant Wilder was a member of a security group for the lead tank in a combined tank-infantry assault upon the town of Yongsan.  The tank was attacked by four enemy soldiers hurling anti-tank grenades.  Sergeant Wilder, displaying complete indifference for his personal safety, leaned to the top of the tank and, disregarding the intense hostile fire, manned its .50 caliber machine gun with such deadly accuracy that he killed the four attacking enemy soldiers and inflicted further casualties upon the enemy.  In this gallant action, in which he saved the lives of the crew members and prevented the destruction of the tank, he was severely wounded.  The intrepidity displayed by Sergeant Wilder on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from Kentucky.

Wilder, Raymond L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Raymond L. Wilder (MCSN: 1347955), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 - 25 July 1953. With his bunker destroyed by murderous enemy mortar and artillery fire during a vicious hostile attack on the company's sector of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Wilder quickly repaired his damaged machine gun and placed it on the parapet of the exposed trench line, continuing to deliver deadly fire on the onrushing hordes of hostile troops. When an enemy grenade destroyed his machine gun, he unhesitatingly picked up a nearby rifle and brought devastating fire to bear on the enemy until he was painfully wounded. Although not capable of firing a weapon because of his severe wounds, he refused evacuation and courageously moved throughout the trench line to assist in the evacuation of the more seriously wounded. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked fortitude and selfless devotion to duty, Private First Class Wilder served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Coldwater, Michigan. Home Town: Coldwater, Michigan.

Wilder, Theodore R.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 314 - 10 November 1950

The Silver Star is awarded Corporal Theodore R. Wilder, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 27th Infantry Regiment, United States Army.  On 21 September 1950 Corporal Wilder accompanied the Intelligence and Reconnaissance platoon on a mission near Chindong-ni Korea.  As the platoon advanced up a hill the enemy opened fire from well concealed positions.  Although carrying a radio set and wounded in one foot at the start of the action, Corporal Wilder refused to withdraw, but continued to operate his radio to keep contact with supporting weapons.  Only after he had been painfully wounded in the other foot and when the entire platoon displaced, did he return to his vehicle with his equipment.  Corporal Wilder's outstanding fortitude and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself in the United States Army.  Enter the military service from Iowa.

Wilker, Dean

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Dean Wilker (MCSN: 0-27567), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron Five Hundred  Thirteen (VMF(AW)-513), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 September 1951. Despite the grave hazards presented by a combination of darkness, haze and mountainous terrain during a night intruder mission in the Singye Area, Captain Wilker continued to reconnoiter his assigned sector until he discovered a large group of enemy vehicles and immediately initiated a determined attack on the objective. Undaunted by the intense anti-aircraft fire directed at his plane, he pressed home a series of daring napalm, bombing and strafing runs on the target and, despite damage to his aircraft by hostile ground fire, persisted in his attacks until his ordnance was expended, completely destroying a large enemy fuel dump and ten loaded trucks and inflicting extensive damage on eight other vehicles. By his outstanding courage, superb airmanship and unswerving devotion to duty, Captain Wilker was directly instrumental in dealing a damaging blow to the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Grace, Idaho. Home Town: Ogden, Utah.

Wilkerson, Charles W.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 267 - 18 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Charles W. Wilkerson (ASN: RA-15380548), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Kumchon, Korea, on 23 September 1950. During an attack, his company was pinned down by heavy enemy automatic weapons fire. With utter disregard for his own safety, he exposed himself, drawing the full fury of the enemy's fire in order to locate the source of fire and then fearlessly assaulted the position single-handedly. His accurate rifle fire killed the entire crew of one gun and advancing further he destroyed another gun with grenades. Signaling his men to follow he continued to press the attack until the enemy was completely routed. Sergeant Wilkerson's courageous actions, unhesitant devotion to duty and exemplary leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Louisville, Kentucky.

Wilkins, Clarence Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Clarence Wilkins, Jr. (MCSN: 628288), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 October 1952. Although struck down by enemy fire during the early phases of an assault to retake an outpost that had been previously overrun by the enemy, Sergeant Wilkins quickly regained his feet and continued in the attack. Painfully wounded again as he reached the crest of the enemy hill, he refused medical treatment and fearlessly moved about the squad's zone of action, effectively directing his men until the enemy had been driven back from the position. Skillfully reorganizing his men, he placed them in vantage positions to ward off further hostile attacks and, upon completion of the reorganization, submitted himself to medical aid and subsequent evacuation to the rear area medical unit. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked fortitude and courageous initiative, Sergeant Wilkins served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of the platoon's mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hartford, Connecticut. Home Town: Hartford, Connecticut.

Wilkinson, Olin C.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 107 - 17 December 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Master Sergeant Olin C. Wilkinson, RA39710773, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action on 24 September 1950 in the vicinity of Hyopchon, Korea. On that date his regiment, supported by tanks, had the mission of crossing the Hwang River and securing the town of Hyopchon. Elements of the regiment had succeeded in crossing the river and had seized command ground. The tanks were deployed along the river and were supporting the infantry on the opposite side. Suddenly enemy fire was directed from the rear upon the tanks and the regimental command group, of which Sergeant Wilkinson was a member. Enemy machine gun and small arms fire, delivered by an estimated force of 200 enemy, was steadily growing in severity. Attempts were made to inform our tankers of the situation, but because of the noise and the fact that the tank guns were all pointed across the river, fire could not be placed upon the enemy. Realizing the critical situation, Sergeant Wilkinson left his position of comparative safety and dashed across the exposed terrain. Climbing aboard a tank, he commenced to deliver fire against the enemy with the .50 caliber machine gun mounted on the tank’s rear deck. Following his actions, the tanks directed their guns against the enemy positions, destroying and dispersing the enemy and enabling the regiment to successfully accomplish its mission. The gallantry and initiative under fire displayed by Sergeant Wilkinson reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States. Entered the military service from Nebraska.

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News Clipping ....

"I haven't exactly been on a Sunday School picnic," said the sergeant as he put the newspaper down.  He had just read of a Defense department proposal to give "hazardous pay" to soldiers and Marines who were "in front of regimental headquarters" in the Korean War.  Under this plan, Master Sergeant Olin Wilkinson of Port Townsend, Washington and San Diego, California, would receive no such battle bonus, for he is with the headquarters company of the 23rd Infantry Regiment of the 2nd Division.  Yet the regimental command post where Wilkinson serves as operations sergeant has been under repeated attack in Korea and he has won both the Silver Star and the Bronze Star for valor in combat.  Furthermore, the command post has suffered 40 percent combat casualties since the division landed in Korea in August.  "Maybe that doesn't add up to hazardous duty," Wilkinson said, "but I don't think any of those bullets that were flying around us were kidding.  Last august our regimental CP was in the very front line defense of Taegu.  On August 31 four enemy divisions overran the 2nd Division on the Naktong River and 150 members of the CP were in the thick of the battle.  In another sector of that same front all the cooks, clerks and supply people were assigned to front line positions.  We stopped 17 Communist attacks in 15 days.  Then on September 29 at Hyopchon our regimental command post was again on the front lines."  Sergeant Wilkinson won the Silver Star in the engagement.  He ran under heavy fire to an American tank, manned its guns and killed 50 North Koreans single-handed.  "But we had our biggest excitement later in November when our CP was the most northerly advance unit of the entire Eighth Army," said the five-foot-six-inch, 130-pound sergeant.  "They came right into the tent and shot the place up.  They shot holes in the chairs and even shot the map off the wall.  They killed or wounded 17 officers and men of the CP.  I feel the fellows in our CP should draw some of that hazard pay.  Personally, I won't feel safe until I'm back in the United States."

Willard, Blair J.

First Lieutenant Blair J. Willard, 0489064, Infantry, United States Army, Company I, 31st Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Hwachon, Korea, on 5 June 1951.  On this date, Lieutenant Willard was leading his platoon in an attack on a well-defended enemy hill when the commander of the company was wounded by enemy fire.  Being the only remaining officer, Lieutenant Willard immediately assumed command and directed the company's actions against the enemy which had launched a powerful counterattack.  With complete disregard for his personal safety, he continually exposed himself to the enemy small arms and mortar fire to move from position to position, commanding the actions of the defensive perimeter.  The great personal example of Lieutenant Willard encouraged the men and enabled the unit to defend itself against repeated enemy attacks.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Willard reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of California. [General Orders Number 374, 1 August 1951]


Blair J. Willard when he was on the MLR in Korea in 1951
(Click picture for a larger view)


Official Army photo taken during a lull on the MLR at the time he received the medal.
(Click picture for a larger view)

Willard, Donald W.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Donald W. Willard (MCSN: 588975), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of an Infantry Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sachon, Korea. On 12 August 1950, Corporal Willard was participating in an attack when elements of the United Nations force were pinned down by enemy automatic weapons fire from both flanks. When the radios of the tank liaison party in which he was serving were damaged beyond repair, Corporal Willard voluntarily proceeded some 200 yards under heavy enemy fire to join the forward elements. Upon arrival at the scene, Corporal Willard administered first aid to a wounded comrade and then, employing the fallen man's automatic weapon, he constantly exposed himself to draw enemy fire in an effort to locate the hidden machine guns. Corporal Willard, through his complete disregard for his own safety, succeeded in destroying the hostile weapons and enabled the allied force to advance. The gallantry exhibited by Corporal Willard on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 195 (April 8, 1954). Entered Service From Texas.

Willcox, David R.

Headquarters, 7ID
General Orders No. 815 - 3 December 1953

First Lieutenant David R. Willcox, 01925861 (then Second Lieutenant), Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 17th Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Sokkogae, Korea.  During the period 6 July 1953 to 8 July 1953, Lieutenant Willcox and his company were engaged in an intense fire fight with the enemy forces.  Having been notified that one of his machine gun positions had been damaged, Lieutenant Willcox left his position of comparative safety to personally reconnoiter the situation.  While moving through the exposed terrain, Lieutenant Willcox and one of his men were assaulted by a large hostile force.  In the ensuing fire fight Lieutenant Willcox personally accounted for six enemy soldiers.  While Lieutenant Willcox was attempting to reload his weapon, he was assaulted by one of the enemy.  Not only did Lieutenant Willcox subdue the man with his knife and stand off the attack but on the return trip to the machine gun emplacement, he disposed of six more of the enemy.  Disregarding his own personal safety, Lieutenant Willcox continually exposed himself to devastating fire outside the bunker position and directed fire into enemy positions.  Although Lieutenant Willcox was wounded he continually aided the friendly forces in any way possible.  The small group continued to hold back the numerically superior enemy forces until Lieutenant Willcox gave the order to withdraw to a new position further down the trench where he remained with his men until evacuated.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Willcox reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from New York.

Willett, Donald P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Donald P. Willett (MCSN: 1129323), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 October 1952. When the platoon's defense perimeter of the outpost was penetrated by numerically superior enemy troops, forcing the unit to begin a withdrawal to the main line of resistance under a fierce barrage of hostile artillery, grenade and small arms fire, Corporal Willett courageously removed his machine gun from its mount and carried it in his bare hands to positions where he could bring devastating fire to bear on the fanatical enemy. Although completely exposed to hostile fire, and suffering painful hand burns from the overheated machine gun, he steadfastly remained in his hazardous position to cover the withdrawal of the platoon, inflicting numerous casualties upon the hostile troops until he, himself, was wounded and forced to leave with the rear guard. His outstanding leadership, skill and cool courage in the face of overwhelming odds reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Willett and the United States Naval Service. Born: Collinsville, Illinois. Home Town: Collinsville, Illinois.

Williams, Bruce F. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Bruce F. Williams (MCSN: 0-16592), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 25 September 1950. Voluntarily exposing himself to the intense hostile fire directed on his company by a well-concealed enemy force, Captain Williams courageously moved from tank to tank and, contacting his crews by infantry telephone, skillfully directed their fire against the enemy. When the infantry telephones failed to operate, he further exposed himself to the hostile fire by mounting each tank to communicate with its commander in the turret. Killing three of the enemy confronting a noncommissioned officer whose gun had jammed, Captain Williams was responsible for saving the man's life and, personally supervising the removal of the wounded to safety, contributed materially to saving their lives as well. By his daring initiative, inspiring leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave danger, Captain Williams aided directly in the successful repulse of the enemy and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Williams, Bruce F. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Bruce F. Williams (MCSN: 0-16592), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. Captain Williams was assigned the mission of escorting the rear elements of a motor convoy. When the road became blocked with stalled vehicles, and he had been ordered to return to the starting point, he quickly made an estimate of the situation and personally directed the extremely difficult maneuver of burning the remaining vehicles of the convoy. Ordering the rear-most tank to cover the withdrawal of the convoy, he directed the recovery of Marine casualties, and fearlessly exposing himself to enemy fire, moved among the positions recently occupied by members of his convoy to insure that all casualties were recovered. When the leading tank of the return group became inoperative and blocked the road, he organized and directed a perimeter defense around the convoy and from his tank called down and adjusted friendly artillery fire inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. Working throughout the remainder of the night, he supervised the cleaning of the road and successfully reached his destination. His display of leadership and actions were an inspiration to all members of the convoy and contributed materially to the successful return of the convoy to its starting point. Captain Williams heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Americus, Georgia. Home Town: Blakely, Georgia.

Williams, Claude R.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 100 (1951)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class [then Sergeant] Claude R. Williams, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company C, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 3 February 1951 near Wanggok, Korea. During an attack on an enemy held hill, Company C met very heavy fire from well emplaced positions. As the 1st Platoon neared the crest of the hill and assaulted the enemy with marching fire, Sergeant Williams moved far out in front on the right flank of the platoon, and on his own initiative went over to the reverse slope of the razorback ridge. There, he advanced aggressively among the hostile positions killing the enemy soldiers in their foxholes. As his platoon advanced over the ridge, Sergeant Williams continued to kill others who retreated down the reverse slope towards him after leaving their positions on the forward slope. Upon encountering many of the enemy, he did not have time to reload his rifle after firing a second clip, but drew his pistol and continued to fire as he advanced fearlessly among the fleeing Chinese. By his heroic action and fighting spirit he accounted for approximately 25 enemy killed. Sergeant Williams' heroism reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Williams, Edward D. (1st citation)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 27 - 13 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class [then Sergeant] Edward D. Williams (ASN: RA-13297914), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Pyong-Sen-ni, Korea, on 15 October 1951. Sergeant First Class Williams' company had the mission of attacking and securing a ridgeline leading to a major objective. His Assistant Platoon Sergeant volunteered to lead the assault squad. The only avenue of approach was cross an open field that was completely exposed to enemy mortar and artillery fire. Sergeant Williams skillfully maneuvered his squad through this fire, although he himself was hit by shell fragments, to the base of the objective. Disregarding the pain of his wounds, he continued to lead his men as they ascended the hill. They had easily advanced three-quarters of the way up the objective, when the enemy, in a pair of bunkers to the squad's right, placed them under rifle fire and a barrage of hand grenades. Sergeant Williams, realizing that these positions must be eliminated before the squad could advance further, crawled several yards to the front of his squad. Completely disregarding his own safety as he exposed himself to the enemy fire, he hurled a grenade into the opening of the first bunker. He then leaped to his feet and charged inside the bunker, spraying the four occupants with a lethal burst from his automatic carbine. Motioning for his men to follow, he again exposed himself to enemy fire, and advanced on the next bunker, killing one occupant and capturing two others. His fearless action resulted in five enemy killed and two captured and allowed his squad to continue its assault. Only when his platoon's portion of the mission was completed did he consent to medical aid. Sergeant First Class Williams' courageous action, aggressive initiative and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

Williams, Edward D. (2nd citation)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 68 - 1 February 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Edward D. Williams (ASN: RA-13297914), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Chipsil-Li, Korea, on 16 October 1951. His platoon had the mission of securing an enemy-held objective. Sergeant Williams had just returned from the hospital and was advised not to join in any attack, but as he saw his comrades heading for the heavily defended enemy hill, he picked up his rifle and raced after them. Upon joining them, he led the assault as point man. The friendly riflemen nearly exhausted their ammunition in driving the hostile troops from their well prepared positions on the hill's forward slope. Therefore the situation became perilous when the numerically superior enemy counterattacked, throwing many hand grenades and swarming over the top of the hill. The men were ordered to withdraw to more tenable positions as they could not be resupplied with ammunition in time to hold. Sergeant Williams realized the platoon would be overrun unless someone delayed the enemy charge. He had his comrades leave their ammunition and an automatic rifle as they withdrew. Then, with complete disregard for his own safety, he established himself in a strategic but exposed position and swept the enemy hordes with devastatingly accurate bursts of fire, killing two, wounding many others and halting the attack, thus enabling his comrades to withdraw safely. Sergeant Williams' courageous action, tenacious determination and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Scranton, Pennsylvania.

Williams, Elmer Royce

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Elmer Royce Williams (NSN: 0-463056), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while leading in aerial flight a division of three jet fighter planes attached to Fighter Squadron Seven Hundred Eighty-One (VF-781), embarked in the U.S.S. Oriskany (CVA-34), in Korea, on 18 November 1952. While flying a combat patrol mission over Task Force 77 in the northeastern coastal waters of enemy-held North Korea, Lieutenant Williams demonstrated outstanding courage by placing himself and his accompanying planes between the Task Force and an attacking group of seven enemy MiG-15 aircraft, thereby protecting the Task Force from enemy attack. Having repelled the initial attack of enemy aircraft, he skillfully maneuvered his plane into position where he was able to make two firing passes on one of the enemy fighters. Breaking away after the second pass, he saw the enemy aircraft spiral into the sea. On a subsequent run he inflicted heavy damage to another enemy aircraft which was seen to smoke badly and retire immediately from action. Although his own plane was severely damaged by a direct 23-mm. hit from one enemy MiG-15 aircraft, he maneuvered to escape yet continued his direction of the engagement until he reached cloud cover in which he dodged the enemy and returned his almost uncontrollable aircraft on board the parent carrier. This skill and daring exhibited by Lieutenant Williams and his completer disregard for his own personal safety materially aided the accomplishment of the mission of the Task Force. His courageous actions were at all times in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 835 (May 7, 1953). Home Town: Corpus Christi, Texas.

Williams, Ernest M.

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 255 - 28 October 1950

First Lieutenant Ernest M. Williams, 01310328, Infantry, Company H, 24th Infantry, United States Army.  Receiving word at his observation post that a section of his machine gun platoon in the vicinity of Haman, Korea was being attacked by enemy forces early in the morning of 19 August 1950, Lieutenant Williams immediately joined his men just as they were about to withdraw.  Joining in the fire fight he killed three enemy with his carbine, then manning a machine gun, fired into the oncoming horde until seriously wounded.  Seeing Lieutenant Williams' cool display of courage, his men returned to their positions and repelled the attack.  Lieutenant Williams' courageous leadership is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from California.

Williams, Furman Jr.

FULL CITATION NOT YET FOUND.

On September 7, 1951, while occupying defensive positions on Hill 284 near Chorwon, Korea, Company L was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force of estimated battalion strength.  After the first and second attacks had failed, the enemy launched a third which, by sheer weight of numbers, penetrated sectors of the defenses.  In one of the overwhelmed sectors, the weapon of an automatic rifleman failed.  Corporal Williams, occupying the adjacent position, unhesitatingly left the comparative safety of his dug-in position and attacked the onrushing enemy with grenades and rifle fire.  Disregarding the enemy fire directed at him, Corporal Williams succeeded in disbursing the nearest group of hostile soldiers by killing two and wounding one.  This courageous action enabled his comrades to repair the weapon and bring its firepower to bear on the foe, contributing greatly to the successful defense of the perimeter.

[KWE Note: Historian/researcher Clifford Davids wrote two blogs about the life of Corporal Williams.  Click here to view them: (1) http://ashevilleoralhistoryproject.com/2013/03/06/a-full-and-true-orphan/ and (2) http://ashevilleoralhistoryproject.com/2013/01/28/938/.]

Williams, George Murphy Jr. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal George Murphy Williams, Jr. (MCSN: 654716), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader in Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Observing a seriously wounded member of his fire team lying helpless in an exposed position during a fierce assault against the enemy, Corporal Williams although struck in the chest by hostile small arms fire, unhesitatingly ran forward to reach the casualty and succeeded in dragging him to safety before he himself fell, succumbing to his wounds. By his heroic initiative, valiant determination and selfless devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Williams served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: November 25, 1929 at La Grange, Georgia. Home Town: La Grange, Georgia. Death: KIA: June 10, 1951.

Williams, Hubert Anderson (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Hubert Anderson Williams (MCSN: 495176), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifle Platoon Sergeant and Assistant Outpost Commander of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 April 1953. When a numerically superior enemy force, supported by a devastating mortar and artillery barrage, attacked his platoon's outpost position far forward of the main line of resistance, Staff Sergeant Williams, although painfully wounded in the leg by the hostile fire, bravely moved about the garrison, offering words of encouragement to the men and checking positions to insure the tactical integrity of the outpost. Although his platoon succeeded in repelling one element of the enemy force which was assaulting both flanks of the outpost position, the enemy reinforced its other flank attack and partially overran the perimeter of the outpost. Realizing the need for reorganization, Staff Sergeant Williams expeditiously and effectively checked the remaining positions to insure that the necessary adjustments had been accomplished to meet the enemy's renewed effort. Learning that a Corpsman was missing as a portion of the command post group was forced to withdraw to a more advantageous defensive position in the trenchline, he voluntarily and fearlessly accompanied a comrade in the face of withering hostile fire to search for the missing Marine. Mortally wounded when he was struck by fragments from an exploding shell, Staff Sergeant Williams, by his indomitable courage, tactical ability and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of another, served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: March 26, 1925 at Atlanta, Georgia. Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia. Death: KIA: April 9, 1953.

Williams, John O. Jr.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Second Lieutenant John O. Williams, Jr. (MCSN: 0-49705), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea. On 18 August 1950, Lieutenant Williams, serving as a Rifle Platoon Commander, was given the mission of seizing and securing a steep hill near Yongsan, Korea, which was strongly defended by a well-entrenched enemy. Displaying outstanding leadership, he led his platoon up the hill, fearlessly exposing himself to direct enemy fire in order to coordinate and direct the attack. During the final phase of the assault, the enemy mounted a fanatical counterattack, employing hand grenades and intense automatic-weapons fire. Despite the intensity of the enemy fire, he moved to a position well forward of his platoon and directed his men to pass him hand grenades, which he used with such accuracy that the enemy was pinned down, thereby enabling his platoon to overrun the enemy positions. The aggressive leadership and gallant actions of Lieutenant Williams reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Headquarters, XIII U.S. Army Korea, General Orders No. 207 (April 14, 1951). Entered Service From Tennessee.

Williams, Lloyd Orval

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major Lloyd Orval Williams (MCSN: 0-7456), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the First Ordnance Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 December 1950. When it became apparent that large stocks of ammunition and fuel would have to be destroyed to prevent their falling into enemy hands during the movement of the division from Koto-ri to Hungnam, Major Williams volunteered to prepare the various dumps for destruction. Although continually exposed to hostile fire, he boldly ignited the fuses of the demolition changes and set the necessary fires, thereby denying valuable supplies to the enemy. By his marked courage, professional skill and unswerving devotion to duty, Major Williams served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Guthrie, Oklahoma. Home Town: Quantico, Virginia.

Williams, Louis M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Louis M. Williams (MCSN: 1118011), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a member of the Intelligence Section of the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 May 1951. Voluntarily leading a patrol on a search for a cache of arms and ammunition which was reportedly buried by the enemy, Private First Class Williams and his party succeeded in locating two large caches of supplies. Detailing most of the unit to remain on guard, he and a small group returned to the battalion in order to obtain sufficient personnel to transport the valuable supplies to safety. When his group was subjected to withering fire from concealed hostile positions while proceeding toward the battalion, Private First Class Williams quickly organized his men to deliver counterfire and carried out a flanking movement with another Marine which resulted in the killing of three of the enemy and the capture of four others. By his daring initiative, aggressive leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Williams served to inspire all who observed him and aided materially in the success of friendly operations, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Austin, Texas. Home Town: San Antonio, Texas.

Williams, Marshall

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 256 - 28 October 1950

Corporal Marshall Williams, RA13306499, Infantry, Company G, 35th Infantry, United States Army.  When the 2d Battalion launched an attack in the vicinity of Chungam-ni, Korea on 7 August 1950, Corporal Williams volunteered to man a 50 calibre machine gun which was mounted on one of the tanks supporting the attacking unit.  As the tank rounded a curve, an enemy antitank gun opened fire, scoring four hits on the tank.  Remaining in his precarious position Corporal Williams delivered withering machine gun fire on the anti-tank crew; after the antitank gun had been destroyed Corporal Williams, annihilated the crew as they attempted to escape.  Corporal Williams' conspicuous courage, determination and staunch devotion to duty greatly facilitated the advance of the battalion and reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army.  Entered the military service from Virginia.

Williams, Orville W.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 269 - 1950

By direction of the President, Corporal Orville W. Williams, RA16277371, Infantry, U.S. Army, a member of Company D, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for courageous action near Anju, Korea, on 4 November 1950. His battalion was engaged in holding open a strategic road net to cover the withdrawal of friendly units to more tenable positions. Shortly after the last unit passed through the battalion, the numerically superior enemy launched a furious attack. With utter disregard for his own safety, he left his position of relative security and moved to an exposed position, in full view of the enemy, where he manned an 81mm mortar. Under constant fire, he succeeded in bringing accurate fire on the advancing enemy. His deadly fire slowed the advance sufficiently to enable the battalion to withdraw to new defensive positions, and he evacuated his forward and exposed position only when his ammunition was exhausted. Corporal William’s courageous action and unhesitant devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the U.S. Infantry. Entered service from Broken, Bow, Nebraska.

Williams, Samuel Tankersley (2nd award - 1st was received in WWII)

Headquarters, I Corps
General Orders No. 146 - 27 June 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Major General Samuel Tankersley Williams (ASN: 0-8472), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding General, 25th Infantry Division, near Munsan-ni, Korea. During the period 5 May to 29 May 1953, his Division was committed to the defense of an extremely wide front which demanded the highest perfection in the details of the organization and fortification of each position on this long line. In the face of heavy daily mortar and artillery fire falling in an unpredictable pattern on the front lines, and with complete disregard for his personal safety, General Williams visited every front line position and important combat post and fighting position. The information gained by his repeated personal visits to the front lines and outposts enabled General Williams to coordinate the disposition of troops and improve the deployment of fire power and to inspire his subordinate commanders and soldiers to a heroic labor in fortification which greatly increased the strength and security of the Division's positions. General Williams' gallant conduct and superior professional ability displayed during many contacts with officers and soldiers in front line trenches and on the outposts with utter disregard for his personal safety, was an inspiration to his officers and soldiers and created in them the utmost confidence in their fighting ability. This strong confidence enabled elements of the Division to repel strong enemy attacks on its lines on 16 May 1953 and again on 28 - 29 May 1953, and inflicted two severe defeats on large enemy forces with minimum loss to friendly troops. His gallantry reflected great credit upon himself and was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Williams, Thomas

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Thomas Williams (MCSN: 1276435), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 November 1952. When a platoon was designated to capture prisoners and destroy enemy fortifications and equipment, Private First Class Williams voluntarily accompanied the infantry unit to a position approximately thirty yards from the objective where the enemy opened fire with an intense barrage of small arms and grenades. Despite the hostile fire, he continued to advance with the assaulting elements to the trench line until his group was pinned down by devastating fire from a bunker on commanding ground. Racing up the hill in the face of the deadly fire, he placed a satchel charge against the bunker and quickly moved back down the hill. When the charge failed to explode, he unhesitatingly seized another one from a nearby Marine, again advanced single-handedly up the slope and succeeded in destroying the bunker before he was painfully wounded by enemy fire. By his indomitable fighting spirit, exceptional courage and resolute determination in the face of heavy odds, Private First Class Williams served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Newnan, Georgia. Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio.

Williams, Thomas L.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 104 - 9 June 1951

Master Sergeant Thomas L. Williams (then Sergeant First Class), RA18337370, Infantry, United States Army, Company F, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 25 January 1951, near Yangji, Korea.  When a numerically superior enemy force launched a strong attack against the company defensive positions, a machine gun was abandoned by friendly troops, forcing defending elements to withdraw.  Realizing the seriousness of losing the valuable weapon, Sergeant Williams, with three comrades, volunteered to attempt to regain the machine gun position.  Advancing through heavy fire, Sergeant Williams leaped forward and engaged the hostile soldiers in hand-to-hand combat.  During this encounter,

Williamson, Charles T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Charles T. Williamson (MCSN: 0-53822), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 April 1952. When a swift attack by a numerically superior enemy force overran one of his outposts and pinned the remainder of his platoon down with intense enemy small arms and supporting fire, Second Lieutenant Williamson quickly called in accurate friendly fire to cover the withdrawal of the men in the besieged position. Courageously exposing himself to fierce hostile artillery, mortar and automatic weapons fire, he began checking each of his platoon positions and, though wounded several times and suffering from the concussion of an enemy shell, refused to take cover until assured that his unit was prepared to meet any further enemy attempt at penetration. When the hostile fire lifted, Second Lieutenant Williamson immediately went forward leading a four-man patrol and, despite complete darkness and the probable presence of the enemy, reconnoitered the area forward of his platoon sector. The following morning, he bravely led a patrol forward to retake the lost outpost. By his outstanding courage, initiative and unyielding devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Williamson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Moundsville, West Virginia. Home Town: Providence, Rhode Island.

Williamson, Harold Powell

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Harold Powell Williamson (MCSN: 0-15658), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 1 to 4 December 1950. Assigned the mission of attacking along the right side of the main supply route leading from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri, and of reducing and eliminating successive enemy objectives until a juncture could be made with friendly forces to secure the route for use by other advancing units, Captain Williamson courageously led his company in a three day attack against a strong and determined enemy. Repeatedly braving intense and accurate hostile automatic weapons, small arms and hand grenade fire, he inspired his unit in aggressively sweeping the enemy from the zone of advance and in reducing several hostile strongpoints on commanding ground overlooking the main supply route. Moving constantly with the assaulting elements, he quickly and skillfully reorganized his company after the seizure of each intermediate objective, carrying the attack forward day and night until a successful connection was subsequently made with friendly forces. By his personal courage, skillful leadership and indomitable devotion to duty, Captain Williamson, although suffering from fatigue and severe frostbite in bitter, sub-zero temperatures throughout this period, was responsible for the successful completion of the assigned mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Monroeville, Alabama. Home Town: Eulonia, Georgia.

Williamson, Harvey B.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 111 - 30 August 1950

Corporal Harvey B. Williamson, RA1834115?, Infantry, United States Army, a member of the 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for action at Yongsan, Korea on 11 August 1950. On this date while at Yongsan, Korea, the 24th Reconnaissance Company was subjected to heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire and one of the rounds landed near the ammunition truck setting it on fire and wounding three men. With complete disregard for his own safety and under continuous enemy fire, Corporal Williamson dragged the three men to safety and then went back and extinguished the fire in the ammunition truck. This act of conspicuous gallantry on the part of Corporal Williamson reflects the highest possible credit on himself and the military service. Entered the service from Earlsboro, Oklahoma.

Willis, Harold C.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 151 - November 11, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Harold C. Willis (ASN: RA-6938478), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company G, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 12 October 1950 near Kimchon, Korea. While advancing against the enemy at Kimchon, Company G was pinned down by heavy sniper fire in an enemy delaying action. Sergeant Willis, as Platoon Sergeant, displaying fearless leadership, and without regard for his own safety, stood up, rallied his platoon and led them forward to attack the sniper positions. When his company had passed the sniper-infested area and resumed its advance, Sergeant Willis learned that a severely wounded man had been left behind. With selfless courage, he returned through the fire of the remaining enemy snipers to carry the wounded man back to safety, thereby saving his life. His heroism and exemplary leadership provided an inspiring example to his associates and encouraged the company to continue its advance. Sergeant Willis' gallant actions reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Wills, Daniel

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Daniel Wills (MCSN: 0-56035), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 13 January 1953. When the unit he was leading in a night raid on a strongly defended enemy hill position was subjected to intense hostile small arms and grenade fire while approaching the line of departure, Second Lieutenant Wills immediately called in friendly mortar fire and fearlessly led his assault squads through the enemy fire to the objective. Although painfully wounded during the action and unable to carry on in command, he instructed his platoon sergeant to take charge of the unit and continued to give words of encouragement and advice to his subordinates, refusing evacuation until all other casualties had been removed from the area. By his outstanding courage, marked fortitude and indomitable fighting spirit, Second Lieutenant Wills served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Los Angeles, California. Home Town: Santa Clara, California.

Wilshire, Raymond K.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Third Class Raymond K. Wilshire (NSN: 2260723), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 22 and 23 September 1950. During a defensive mission the forward companies were receiving intense enemy machine gun, mortar and tank fire. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Wilshire displayed outstanding courage and complete disregard for his own personal safety by moving from wounded to wounded through the intense enemy fire to administer aid and supervise their evacuation. Whenever a man was wounded, he unhesitatingly and fearlessly went to his side and administered aid. Though Hospital Corpsman Third Class Wilshire was assigned as Corpsman for a platoon, he attended the wounded of adjacent platoons. In the course of this action, he attended twenty wounded which resulted in aid being administered more quickly than would otherwise have been possible. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Wilshire's devotion to duty and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 17632 (November 2, 1950).

Wilson, Benton F.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Corporal Benton F. Wilson (MCSN: 1070636), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 June 1951. On that date, Corporal Wilson, a member of a rifle squad, was participating in an attack on Hill 721, strongly defended by a large, well entrenched enemy force. During the attack, the unit was subjected to devastating automatic weapons fire, which resulted in the squad leader and nine men becoming casualties. Unhesitatingly, Corporal Wilson reorganized the remaining members of the squad, and led a charge against the enemy position. Despite the intense fire, his courage so inspired his men that the position was quickly secured and the enemy forced to withdraw in disorder. The gallantry and leadership displayed by Corporal Wilson on this occasion contributed immeasurably to the success of his unit's mission and reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 180 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Louisiana.

Wilson, Edward L.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 509 - 1 November 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Edward L. Wilson, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations on the night of 6 July 1951 as pilot of a B-26 attack bomber on a night bombing mission over North Korea. Upon completion of his bombing, Colonel Wilson brought under fire with fifty caliber guns, an enemy vehicle convoy consisting of approximately fifty trucks, three tanks, four half tracks and numerous oxen-drawn wagons, destroying at least ten trucks and damaging fifteen. Although his aircraft was damaged by the enemy's return fire, he pressed his assaults at extremely low altitude and in the confines of a narrow valley. His aircraft was riddled with three hundred holes, and an electrical fire smoldered in the bomb bay; intermittent smoke and fire trailed from the left engine; the left aileron control was completely destroyed; the hydraulic system was shot out; and a four foot hole was smashed through the left wing. Unable to climb, Colonel Wilson returned at low altitude through narrow valleys to a forward Korean air base, where he made an excellent wheels-up crash landing. Colonel Wilson's gallantry and technical skill were in keeping with the highest tradition of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Wilson, Floyd J.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 45 - 19 January 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Floyd J. Wilson (ASN: US-55072929), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company L, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, near Kumsong, Korea, on 20 October 1951. His company had the mission of attacking and securing two enemy-held objectives. The attack had succeeded to the extent of forcing back the enemy some 50 yards when the hostile forces suddenly initiated a savage counterattack, deploying intense small arms and automatic weapons fire. Despite this heavy fire, Private Wilson moved his machine gun to an exposed position from which he could observe enemy movements, and began firing. He succeeded in knocking out two enemy machine gun positions and maintained such devastatingly accurate fire that he killed or wounded an estimated 20 enemy soldiers. His highly effective fire robbed the enemy masses of their potential power and forced them to withdraw in confusion. As a result, the friendly unit was able to resume its assault and complete the mission with outstanding success. Private Wilson's courageous action, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty reflects the highest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

Wilson, George M.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant George M. Wilson (MCSN: 0-57038), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 July 1953. With the platoon sergeant among the many casualties inflicted on the garrison during an intense enemy mortar and artillery barrage followed by a three-sided assault by a numerically superior hostile force, Second Lieutenant Wilson unhesitatingly traversed the trenches of the position and shouted words of encouragement to his men while reorganizing their fields of fire. At one point, he re-emplaced a light machine gun and quickly manned the weapon, single- handedly repulsing a column of enemy soldiers assaulting the flank of his position. Although painfully wounded, he organized the seven survivors of his platoon when the enemy gained control of the outpost, and then fearlessly led his men in an attack through the surrounding hostile force to friendly positions. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Wilson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Paulsboro, New Jersey. Home Town: Paulsboro, New Jersey.

Wilson, Houser C.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 560 - 6 November 1952

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Houser C. Wilson, United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United Nations as Pilot, 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group, on 11 July 1952. On that date, Major Wilson volunteered to fly an unarmed RF-80 aircraft on a low-level mission at Pyongyang, North Korea, which at the time was under aerial bombardment by United Nations Air Forces. Immediately after take-off, Major Wilson's aircraft began to vibrate, the engine developing only ninety percent power. As time element preventing a replacement aircraft to cover the strike, Major Wilson elected to complete the mission, despite reduced power. Arriving at the heavily defended target, Major Wilson made four minimum altitude runs on his assigned targets, withdrew for thirty-five minutes, then returned to make four additional passes. On all passes, Major Wilson was subjected to intense ground fire and secondary explosions. Through his high personal courage and exemplary devotion to duty, Major Wilson reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Wilson, James C.

Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea (EUSAK)
General Orders No. 49 - 27 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Lieutenant Commander James C. Wilson (NSN: 0-199529), United States Navy, for gallantry in action while serving as Commander of a Task Element of LST's during the assault landing on the enemy beaches of Inchon, Korea, on 15 September 1950. Lieutenant Commander Wilson led the task element which he was commanding to the beach during the assault and when the task element was within two hundred yards of the beach the enemy placed heavy machine gun and mortar fire upon the ships under his command. Commander Wilson noticed that the heavy enemy fire had also retarded the advance of the first wave of troops upon the beach. He unswervingly continued the advance of his ships toward the beach acting as a decoy to divert fire from the troops ashore and personally directed effective counter-battery fire from the LST batteries. This determined effort, under trying conditions and heavy enemy fire that was inflicting casualties on the members of his command, enabled the troops to continue their advance. Lieutenant Commander Wilson also landed, from his ships, ammunition, gasoline, supplies, and equipment that were vitally needed ashore. His conspicuous gallantry in action were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Military Service.

Wilson, Joe J.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 171 - 16 June 1951

Sergeant Joe J. Wilson, RA14342858, Artillery, United States Army, a member of Battery A, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 23 May 1951 in the vicinity of Tappung-ni, Korea.  On that date he was reconnaissance Sergeant on an Artillery Observer Team, attached to an Infantry Company.  The Forward Observer Team had advanced to a new position for observation so that Artillery fire could be brought against the enemy.  The observer and an Infantry Platoon were pinned down by enemy fire.  Sergeant Wilson was located approximately one hundred yards behind the observer and was carrying the radio used for communications with the battery.  Without regard for his own safety, Sergeant Wilson ran forward under heavy enemy fire to get the radio to the observer.  As a result of his action, Artillery fire was brought upon the enemy, causing the enemy positions to become neutralized and enabled the infantry company to move forward.  Sergeant Wilson's courage and devotion to duty on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Georgia.

Wilson, John

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal John Wilson (MCSN: 1169096), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1952. When the only means of communication with the main line of resistance was destroyed by intense enemy small arms, mortar and artillery fire during a company attack on a vital hill mass which had been previously overrun by the enemy, Corporal Wilson unhesitatingly assumed the duties of runner and maintained contact with the elements on the main lines. As the hostile bombardment increased in intensity and the attacking unit was forced to seek cover, he fearlessly continued to move about the exposed terrain to carry messages. When one of the machine gunners was wounded, he immediately manned the weapon and delivered devastating fire until another member of the squad could relieve him. Throughout the entire action he carried his wounded comrades to cover and administered aid to them. Although painfully wounded himself, he continued to assist others until he fell from exhaustion and was subsequently evacuated. By his resourceful initiative, marked courage and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Wilson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Newark, New Jersey. Home Town: East Orange, New Jersey.

Wilson, Lee D.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Lee D. Wilson (MCSN: 616176), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. When hostile troops, located on a rocky crag overlooking the position, cut off his company from friendly units and inflicted heavy casualties in his platoon, Private First Class Wilson volunteered to accompany another Marine in an attempt to drive off the enemy. Working his way forward about 200 yards under continuous intense hostile fire, he delivered accurate counterfire which diverted the enemy's aim, enabling him to reach a strategic position within grenade range where he assisted in assaulting the hostile emplacements and in killing fifteen of the enemy before returning to his unit. By his courageous initiative and skilled marksmanship, he contributed materially in eliminating the threat to his platoon and to the success of his company in holding its position against overwhelming odds for a period of five days in sub-zero weather. His indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Private First Class Wilson and the United States Naval Service. Born: Columbus, Mississippi. Home Town: South Birmingham, Alabama.

Wilson, Robert Francis (posthumous)

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 154 - November 14, 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Robert Francis Wilson (ASN: RA-20728234), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Company I, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against the enemy on 18 September 1950 near Taegu, Korea. When the enemy, who had succeeded in effecting a penetration of his company's defensive perimeter, attacked with hand grenades at very close range, Sergeant Wilson aggressively led his mortar section forward to plug the gap. Although the enemy had numerical superiority, Sergeant Wilson's fearless conduct and exemplary leadership instilled such fury in his men that they hurled the enemy back. Then turning his attention to the wounded, Sergeant Wilson began to administer medical aid. When the enemy began placing mortar fire into the area, he remained with the wounded although his foxhole was only five yards away. It was while he was trying to comfort and save his wounded comrades that Sergeant Wilson was hit and killed instantly. Sergeant Wilson's conspicuous gallantry and selfless consideration of others, at the cost of his own life, reflected great credit upon himself and his actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Wilson, Wesley C.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 114 - 31 August 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Wesley C. Wilson (ASN: 0-17725), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action on 2 August 1950 in the vicinity of Obangsan, Korea. The enemy estimated at two regiments, launched a vigorous attack against the 19th Regimental Combat Team and the First Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment soon after the First Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment crossed the line of departure to attack the enemy east of Chingju. Four lead tanks and four armored cars were promptly knocked out and the protective infantry was killed, wounded or dispersed. When his troops became dispersed and intermingled with the 19th Regimental Combat Team, Colonel Wilson, with complete disregard for personal safety, led platoons and small groups from his battalion, under intense fire and placed them in defensive positions. He led a short counterattack to determine the conditions around the immobilized tanks and to recover the wounded. Many times during the day he walked about under fire to positions to steady groups of men. His gallantry, fearlessness and disregard for his personal safety was an inspiration to men both from his own unit and the 19th Regimental Combat Team, contributing materially to beating off the enemy attack while inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. His outstanding courage and fearless example reflect high credit on himself and the military service. Entered Service From Michigan.

Wimpee, Lealon C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Lealon C. Wimpee, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Dog Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines east of Hill 722 in the Republic of Korea on 23 April 1951.  Serving as rear guard for the battalion, Second Lieutenant Wimpee accurately assessed the enemy preparing to ambush the withdrawing Fox Company.  Seeing the gravity of the situation, he led a squad down the hill to eliminate the threat.  After an exchange of grenade throwing, Second Lieutenant Wimpee leaped into the trench and bunker with the other Marines following; the enemy position was taken with numerous Chinese killed and several prisoners taken.  Second Lieutenant Wimpee then continued the attack to the next Chinese position throwing grenades and firing into the trench and bunker, clearing all resistance.  By his outstanding bravery, inspiring initiative, and courageous devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Wimpee saved the lives of fellow Marines; thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Winans, John R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John R. Winans (MCSN: 1104036), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 April 1953. Observing a fellow Marine who apparently was in difficulty and was drifting across a river in a boat toward enemy positions, Private First Class Winans, along with three Koreans, immediately left the shore in a small craft and headed toward the helpless Marine despite heavy machine gun fire from hostile emplacements on the opposite shore. After overtaking the drifting boat approximately twenty-five hundred yards from shore, he leaped into it, directed the occupant to lie on the bottom of the craft and, exposing himself to the enemy fire, quickly began to row toward the friendly shore. When the boat was mistaken as hostile by friendly machine gun emplacements which started firing, wounding one of the Koreans who leaped into the craft with him, Private First Class Winans tied a rope around himself and slid into the extremely cold water, swimming toward shore while towing the boat behind him. Reaching the friendly shore after swimming for approximately two hours, he collapsed from exposure to the icy water. By his courage, determination and selfless efforts in behalf of others at great personal risk, Private First Class Winans upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Sacramento, California. Home Town: Stockton, California.

Windom, Franklin C.

Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 107 - 31 December 1950

Sergeant Franklin C. Windom, RA70008305, Infantry, Company "C", 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 29 November 1950, near Majon-Ni, Korea, when his unit was on a mission of opening a route for the passage of a vehicle convoy from Tongyong to Majon-Ni, Korea, the convoy came under heavy fire from superior enemy forces on surrounding hills.  This action by the enemy succeeded in wounding many personnel and disabling many vehicles, resulting in blocking the narrow mountainous road over which the convoy was traveling.  When Company "C" was given the order to withdraw for the purpose of reorganization, Sergeant Windom volunteered to remain behind in order to evacuate the wounded and clear the road of disabled vehicles.  He assisted in organizing work crews to clear the road.  Under continuous heavy enemy fire he located a tank with which he caused a serviceable 2 1/2 ton truck to be pulled out of the ditch.  Sergeant Windom then assisted in loading wounded on the truck which evacuated them.   Sergeant Windom's heroism, forceful leadership, and courage reflects great credit upon himself and upon the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Alabama.

Windsor, Billie W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Billie W. Windsor (MCSN: 578695), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Weapons Company and temporarily serving as Gunnery Sergeant of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 December 1950. When he was informed that three wounded Marines and an Army officer were in an isolated position where the enemy was pressing the attack, Staff Sergeant Windsor immediately organized and skillfully deployed a small force to evacuate the wounded from their perilous position. Fearlessly advancing through a devastating barrage of enemy grenade fire, he succeeded in reaching the first casualty and, although suffering intense pain as a result of wounds received during his advance, attempted to drag his comrade to the comparative safety of a small depression. Although he was wounded again by the hostile small arms fire and incapacitated for further action, the evacuation mission was subsequently completed by the rescue force he had organized and led. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of intense enemy fire, Staff Sergeant Windsor served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Wheelock, Texas. Home Town: Kerrville, Texas.

Winner, James L.

Headquarters 8th Army
General Orders No. 153 - 8 November 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant James L. Winner (then Private First Class), Army Medical Service, United States Army, and member of Medical Company, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Infantry), displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy near Kasan, Korea, during the period of 3 September to 5 September 1950.  During a withdrawal Sergeant Winner, who was assisting two wounded men up a hill, left them temporarily in the custody of others to administer aid to men wounded in the withdrawal.  Completing this, Sergeant Winner returned to evacuate his previous patients, saving the life of one who requested to be left behind.  On 5 September, while serving as the only aid man left in two companies in the Walled City engagement, Sergeant Winner moved back and forth between the companies' areas, 300 yards of territory actually occupied by the enemy and under heavy fire.  With complete disregard for his own safety and often fighting his way to various positions, Sergeant Winner made possible the first aid treatment and safe evacuation of many of the wounded.  The gallantry and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Winner reflects great credit on himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Davenport, Iowa.

Winter, Robert M. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Second Lieutenant Robert M. Winter (MCSN: 0-42117), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy near Yongsan, Korea, on 3 September 1950. On this date, Lieutenant Winter, Platoon Commander of a Marine tank platoon which was supporting the attack of the First Provisional Marine Brigade, placed his tanks in position on a commanding hill in order to give the maximum effective fire support to the advancing infantry. Frequent and intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons, and anti-tank fire was directed on this hill. Despite this intense fire and with absolute disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Winter fearlessly made his way back and forth between his tanks in order to point out targets and direct fire. He was directly instrumental in causing the destruction of two enemy tanks and two anti-tank guns. While pointing out a target to one of his tanks from an exposed position he was seriously wounded. Lieutenant Winter's heroic actions and aggressive leadership throughout gave inspiration to his men. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Winger reflects great credit on himself and the naval service.

Winter, Robert M. (2nd citation)

Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army, Korea (EUSAK), General Orders No. 151 (November 1, 1950)
The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Robert M. Winter (MCSN: 0-42117), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Tank Company of the First Provisional Marine Brigade (Reinforced), near Seoul, Korea on 23 September 1950. As Platoon Commander of a tank platoon in support of a Marine Infantry Battalion, Second Lieutenant Winter's platoon was advancing along the main line of resistance when the lead tank stalled and blocked the forward movement of the remainder of his platoon. With a high degree of courage and skill, Second Lieutenant Winter immediately dismounted form his tank, and under intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, attached a tow cable to the stalled tank. When the stalled tank failed to start with this assistance he promptly maneuvered it into such a position as to clear a path for the advance of the remaining tanks. When enemy fire destroyed tank communications, he proceeded on foot from tank to tank, directing fire and informing his tank commanders of plans for continuing the attack. Upon occasion when the infantry telephones on the rear of the tanks failed to function, he further exposed himself to enemy observation and fire by mounting the tank to contact the tank commander in the turret. His initiative, aggressive leadership and inspiration to his troops resulted in the prompt destruction of an anti-tank gun which was laying fire on the stalled tank, and decimation of enemy emplacements which were holding up the advance of the infantry, Second Lieutenant Winter's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Entered Service From California.

Wintrow, Charles F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Charles F. Wintrow (MCSN: 1209990), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 9 July 1953. The first to observe a force of numerically superior hostile troops attacking a forward outpost under cover of a murderous enemy mortar and artillery barrage, Corporal Wintrow immediately alerted the entire outpost and, allowing the enemy to approach dangerously close to his position, delivered a withering hail of fire to inflict heavy casualties on the attackers and force them to withdraw. Informed that the platoon commander was mortally wounded and lying in an exposed position, he courageously proceeded forward in an attempt to rescue the casualty. Discovering the body of another Marine, he marked the position and continued the search for his leader. Forced to return to friendly lines due to the increasing enemy action, he volunteered to recover the bodies on the following night and, in company with four comrades, successfully returned the casualties to friendly positions. By his resourcefulness, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Wintrow served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Akron, Ohio. Home Town: Akron, Ohio.

Wirt, Claude L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Claude L. Wirt (MCSN: 1350576), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gunner of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 - 25 July 1953. When his squad leader was killed during a savage mortar barrage on a critical sector of the main line of resistance, followed by an attack by a numerically superior enemy force, Private First Class Wirt immediately assumed command of the machine gun squad and skillfully directed fire upon the onrushing hordes of hostile troops. Although painfully wounded, he refused evacuation in order to remain with his squad in combat. When a fellow Marine's weapon was knocked from his hands and he was being overpowered by two enemy soldiers during the ensuing hand-to-hand fighting in the trench line, he rushed to the aid of his comrade and killed both of the enemy with his pistol. Despite the intense enemy mortar, artillery and small arms fire, he moved about the position to assist in the evacuation of casualties. By his aggressive fighting spirit, courageous initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Wirt served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Somerville, Tennessee. Home Town: Raleigh, Tennessee.

Wirth, Russell D.L. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Russell D. L. Wirth, Jr. (MCSN: 0-51902), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 December 1952. Although painfully wounded by enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire while leading a reinforced squad in a night raid against an enemy-held hill, First Lieutenant Wirth continued to advance, shouting words of encouragement to his men and delivering effective fire on the hostile troops closing in on both flanks of the patrol. Maintaining close control over his men, he directed the withdrawal of the unit, instructing his men to move back to higher ground while he endeavored to carry a critically wounded Marine to safety. With a great display of stamina, he simultaneously covered the withdrawal and carried the casualty until joined by two other members of the patrol who continued the evacuation. Despite the intense pain of his wounds, he refused medical treatment until assured of the safe return of his men to the main line of resistance. By his outstanding courage, marked fortitude and unyielding devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Wirth served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Wishart, John W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal John W. Wishart (MCSN: 595710), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Squad Leader of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 June 1951. With the platoon attacking a strongly fortified and heavily defended enemy position, Corporal Wishart skillfully maneuvered his squad forward over fire-swept terrain and vigorously pressed the attack against numerous log and earth bunkers. Crawling through withering hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire, he removed wounded comrades from within a few feet of enemy positions and personally accounted for four enemy dead with accurate rifle and hand grenade fire. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, Corporal Wishart contributed materially to the success of his company in seizing the strategic ground and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Summit, New Jersey. Home Town: Westfield, New Jersey.

Witt, Henry J.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Henry J. Witt (MCSN: 1136800), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as an Assistant Gunner of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 19 October 1951. When the combat patrol he was accompanying was subjected to devastating automatic weapons fire from enemy positions on commanding ground, Private First Class Witt fearlessly charged forward over open ground in the face of the deadly fire. Armed with only a pistol, he initiated a daring assault against a hostile bunker and succeeded in killing two of the enemy. By his aggressive fighting spirit, inspiring courage and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Witt contributed materially to the success of his patrol's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Home Town: Hooker, Oklahoma Born: Hooker, Oklahoma.

Wolfe, Charles F.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 214 - 1 May 1952

By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918 (WD Bul. 43, 1918), and pursuant to authority contained in Air Force Regulation 30-14, 22 August 1950 and Section VII, General Orders Number 63, Department of the Air Force, 19 September 1950, the Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to Captain Charles F. Wolfe, United States Air Force.

Captain Wolfe distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States as Pilot of a B-26 attack bomber, 13th Bombardment Squadron, 3d Bombardment Group, on the night of 15 February 1952. Captain Wolfe's primary mission was to employ and evaluate new tactics designed to increase the effectiveness of night interdiction. Between Namsi-dong and Sonch'on, Korea, he pressed repeated bombing and strafing attacks under flares dropped to illuminate a moving train. Despite accurate anti-aircraft fire which inflicted thirty-five holes in his aircraft, he continued his attacks at extremely low altitude in order to accurately evaluate his tactics. Disregarding personal safety, and extremely heavy battle damage, Captain Wolfe capably demonstrated the destructive power of his aircraft's armament by destroying a live locomotive, nine boxcars and two anti-aircraft batteries. Captain Wolfe's gallant action and skillful airmanship were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force. Sergeant Edward J. Gorney, United States Army 20 September 1950 to 10 January 1952

Wolfe, Jerry D. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Ensign Jerry D. Wolfe (NSN: 0-507907), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity a Pilot of an attack bomber in Attack Squadron One Hundred Fifteen (VA-115), attached to U.S.S. Philippine Sea (CV-47), during action against enemy forces in the hostile area of central North Korea, on 7 February 1952. During a mission directed against enemy rail installations North of Yangdok, Ensign Wolfe, having expended all bombs on previous runs, bravely repeated his attack by strafing to draw and divert an intense concentration of anti-aircraft fire from his flight leader. This coordinated action assisted in the destruction of an important and heavily defended railroad bridge and resulted in his own death by enemy gun fire. By his outstanding bravery Ensign Wolfe contributed materially to the safety of the remainder of the flight and to the success of the attack. His relentless fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty, maintained with complete disregard for his own personal safety, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Board Serial 772 (September 10, 1952). Born: January 16, 1929. Home Town: Lima, Ohio. Death: KIA: February 7, 1952.

Wolford, James T.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James T. Wolford (MCSN: 1341723), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 19 - 20 March 1953. When the six-man reconnaissance patrol in which he was participating sustained four casualties after encountering a company-size enemy force moving into position to attack a friendly outpost, Private First Class Wolford, one of the two Marines escaping injury, helped to drag the casualties to the safety of a trench where he fearlessly moved form one position to another, firing on the enemy and assisting the wounded Marines. With several of the attackers invading the trench, he engaged them in hand-to-hand combat and inflicted severe and numerous casualties. Repeatedly exposing himself to hostile mortar and small arms fire while moving through the trenches, he rendered invaluable assistance in strengthening portions of the line where the enemy threatened to penetrate. By his exceptional courage, initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, Private First Class Wolford served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Merrimac, West Virginia. Home Town: Emmett, West Virginia.

Wood, Fred Weymouth

Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 351 - 30 November 1952

First Lieutenant Fred W. Wood, 0955394, Infantry, Company "A", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. On the night of 20 July 1952 a platoon of Company "A" was assigned the mission of making contact with the opposing forces in the vicinity of Chokko-ri, Korea. Constant enemy flares made the mission hazardous and the friendly unit was forced to advance slowly and with extreme caution. Lieutenant Wood was preceding his unit when the entire area was subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage and the fierce fire of three hostile machine gun emplacements. Although sustaining a severe wound, he continued on the mission and established a perimeter of defense. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Lieutenant Wood repeatedly exposed himself to the lethal enemy fire as he assaulted hostile positions and shouted words of encouragement to his men, While leading a squad in destroying the nearest enemy machine gun emplacement he was mortally wounded. Lieutenant Wood's intrepid leadership and gallantry under enemy fire enabled the friendly force to successfully complete its mission with a minimum number of casualties and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Maine.

Wood, John S.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman John S. Wood (NSN: 3475991), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Tank Platoon in support of a Marine Infantry Battalion of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 1 December 1950. When positions on a ridge of the southern perimeter, held by a United States Army Engineer Company, had been overrun by the enemy, Hospitalman Wood proceeded forward with Marine elements to recapture a portion of the ridge and volunteered to assist in the care and evacuation of the wounded of the United States Army Engineer Company, who had occupied this position. While exposed to direct enemy observation and small arms fire, he, with a high degree of courage and skill, moved from man to man to administer first aid. During this period he administered first aid to at least thirty casualties. On several occasions he covered the bodies of the casualties at the risk of his own life to protect them from small arms fire and flying grenade fragments, and on one occasion while protecting a casualty was wounded by grenade fragments in the face. Although painfully wounded about the head and face, and suffering from severely frostbitten feet, he courageously refused to be evacuated and remained with the unit until it was withdrawn. Hospitalman Wood's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 9978 (March 15, 1951).

Wood, Leonard E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Leonard E. Wood (MCSN: 0-54062), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 3 July 1952. Leading a combat patrol deep into hostile territory on a mission to capture enemy prisoners, Second Lieutenant Wood courageously set up a base of fire and directed two assaults against superior numbers of hostile troops while continually exposed to overwhelming enemy small arms and grenade fire. Although seriously wounded by a hostile mortar shell while directing the subsequent withdrawal, he refused medical attention and continued to lead his men to friendly lines. By his exceptional courage, coolness under fire and unyielding devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Wood served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Minneapolis, Minnesota. Home Town: Portland, Oregon.

Wood, Robert L.

Source: www.korea50.mil

Soldier Receives Silver Star at Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, DC

"A Korean War veteran will receive the Silver Star Tuesday at 9 a.m., at one of our nation's most hallowed places. Robert Wood, 50 years after the United Nation's fight to stop the spread of communism in Korea, will receive the award at Arlington National Cemetery. Despite his heroic actions all those years ago, the Army sergeant remains humble.

"I did what I had to do. I don't consider myself to be a hero, but my family thinks I am," the Point Pleasant, W.Va., native said. "I would not be receiving the Silver Star without help from the men in my section. The privilege of receiving this honor I owe to the others with whom I served."

The Silver Star is awarded to America's service members who display distinguished gallantry and heroism. It is the third highest military award for combat. Established in 1918 as the Citation Star, in 1932 it was redesignated as a medal with a retroactive provision that allowed servicemen as far back as the Spanish-American War to receive it.

On Feb. 11, 1951, Wood, a serving as section leader of Battery D, 82nd Anti- Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, moved a wounded soldier to safety while under a heavy Chinese attack. The next day he directed heavy machine gun fire against enemy forces attempting to surround his unit, saving more lives of his comrades.

"The situation was worse than I ever thought it could be," Wood said. "I expected to do what I had to do to survive and to protect my men under me. Leaders could not show fear or weakness. They could not fall apart. My being awarded this medal brings attention to all of the forgotten veterans of the Korean War."

Wood will also receive the Republic of Korea - Korean Service Medal from retired Republic of Korea Gen. Paik Sun Yup, commander of South Korean forces during the war. More than 1.8 million service members who fought in the Korean War are eligible for the medal.

For more information on the event contact Ms. Mary Beth Brayboy at (703) 602-2130 or Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael Dorsey at (703) 602-5793. For more information on the Korean War Commemoration visit or call toll free (866) Korea50."

Woodbury, George B.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain George B. Woodbury (MCSN: 0-7141), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Pilot of a Plane in Marine Attack Squadron Three Hundred Twenty-Three (VMA-323), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 August 1952. Participating as Section Leader of a Rescue Combat Air Patrol assigned the mission of providing cover for a helicopter in picking up a downed pilot deep in enemy territory, Captain Woodbury courageously maintained an extremely low orbit under adverse weather conditions and, despite intense and sustained automatic weapons and small arms fire, kept the downed airman in sight until the helicopter arrived and completed the rescue approximately twenty minutes later. Despite continued enemy fire, impending darkness and the threat of the almost exhausted fuel supply of the helicopter, he successfully escorted the rescue plane to safety. By his superb airmanship and tenacious devotion to duty in the face of hazardous flying conditions and strong enemy opposition, Captain Woodbury greatly aided in the success of the mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Greeley, Colorado. Home Town: Mountain Home, Arkansas.

Woods, William C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman William C. Woods (NSN: 2781398), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 December 1952. Serving as a Corpsman assigned the mission of assisting and evacuating wounded Marines, Hospitalman Woods displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When one of his comrades was seriously wounded and lying in an exposed position, he unhesitatingly advanced up the steep slope in the face of intense enemy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire to treat his wounds and evacuate him to friendly lines. During the evacuation, he noticed another Marine casualty lying in hostile territory. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he immediately went to the man's rescue and when he found it was impossible to move him alone, he summoned another Marines. As they dragged the casualty across a rice paddy, a distance of approximately two hundred and fifty yards under constant and devastating enemy mortar and machine gun fire, Hospitalman Woods lost one of his thermo boots. Although suffering frostbite as a result of the extreme cold, he continued with his mission until he was evacuated. Hospitalman Woods' gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: Serial 15414 (May 9, 1953).

Woodyard, Jean K.

Headquarters, Far East Air Forces
General Orders No. 350 - 27 July 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Jean K. Woodyard, Jr., United States Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy in Korea, as a pilot of the 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group, in action on 6 July 1951. On that date, Major Woodyard voluntarily flew an extremely dangerous photo reconnaissance mission over enemy airfields fully cognizant of the danger involved. Despite the presence of a large number of enemy aircraft Major Woodyard completed his important mission with unswerving determination and his relentless perseverance was not deterred by lack of the predicted overcast. The valuable information obtained through his indomitable courage and devotion to duty was of tremendous aid to the United Nations planning agencies. His keen planning and professional skill was a material contribution to the high success of the mission. Major Woodyard's exceptional performance, ability, and daring were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

Woodyard, Stanley O.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Stanley O. Woodyard (MCSN: 1195495), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Forward Observer of Headquarters Battery, Eleventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 October 1952. When the observation post bunker was destroyed by an intense enemy artillery and mortar barrage, Sergeant Woodyard quickly carried the vital equipment through the exposed area to a living bunker. When that bunker was also destroyed by the devastating fire, he evacuated his men to another nearby shelter and immediately returned to the demolished position to salvage the damaged equipment. Although painfully wounded while leading his men to new positions in a trench line, he remained with his unit until the area became untenable and evacuated his men through an enemy barrage to defensive positions on the next hill. Subsequently ordered to an aid station for medical treatment, he assumed command of a stretcher party and fearlessly led them through hostile artillery and mortar fire to a transportation point, refusing medical aid until all the wounded had reached safety. By his marked fortitude, aggressive fighting spirit and courageous initiative, Sergeant Woodyard served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fort Collins, Colorado. Home Town: Fort Collins, Colorado.

Woolever, Neil F. (POW)

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 111 - 30 August 1950

First Lieutenant Neil F. Woolever, 01177252, Field Artillery, United States Army, a member of Headquarters Battery, 63rd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, is awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action on 8 and 9 July 1950 at Chonan, Korea. Lieutenant Woolever volunteered to leave the infantry battalion command post where he was doing duty as liaison officer to go forward as an observer to adjust artillery fire upon the enemy. On 8 July he repeatedly exposed himself to small arms fire in order to accurately adjust artillery fire which contributed greatly to an orderly withdrawal of the infantry battalion from Chonan. He then volunteered to accompany the Regimental Commander to a forward position where the entire party of which he was a member was isolated by enemy tanks and infantry. In this position he assisted in destroying a motorcycle patrol that attempted to force his position. In spite of being pinned down for several hours by intense small arms fire, he and the forward observer party under his control remained in position. Displaying great skill he called for friendly artillery around his position as a protective screen to afford the withdrawal of his party and the supporting infantry troops. By his coolness and daring under fire he was instrumental in destroying approximately four platoons of the enemy and the orderly evacuation of an infantry battalion. His action reflects great credit on himself and the armed forces. Entered the service from Alpina, Michigan.

Woosley, Robert L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Robert L. Woosley (MCSN: 669187), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company C, First Tank Battalion, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 11 June 1951. When his own tank became mechanically disabled during a patrol mission, Sergeant Woosley unhesitatingly volunteered to replace a wounded driver of another tank and continue the mission. Observing an infantry platoon pinned down in an exposed position by devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire, he skillfully maneuvered the tank to take the hard-pressed men aboard and carry them across a river to sheltered positions. Although he knew that the river bed was infested with mines and that his tank would be constantly exposed to deadly mortar and anti-tank fire, he bravely carried out three trips across the river. Seriously wounded when the tank struck a mine while he was attempting a fourth trip, Sergeant Woosley, by his outstanding courage, initiative and selfless efforts, aided materially in saving the lives of his comrades and served to inspire all who observed him, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Louisville, Kentucky. Home Town: Louisville, Kentucky.

Woolsey, William F.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 208 - 21 June 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Master Sergeant William F. Woolsey, RA3707417, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company H, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 18 May 1951 in the vicinity of Kunmul-gol, Korea. On the morning of that date a numerically superior enemy force had attacked with full force and penetrated the battalion command post area. Sergeant Woolsey was acting platoon leader of a recoilless 75mm rifle platoon. In the confusion of the battle his men became disorganized and failed to halt the enemy. Sergeant Woolsey at that critical point un-hesitantly left his position and, exposing himself to the hostile fire, regrouped his men into a defensive perimeter around the battalion command post. Under the cover of his fire, the command post group was able to withdraw to friendly lines. Meanwhile the enemy penetrated the rear of his perimeter. Sergeant Woolsey, undaunted by the heavy odds, led his men in a bayonet charge with such force that the platoon was able to break through the encirclement, inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy. The gallantry and outstanding leadership displayed by Sergeant Woolsey reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from Nebraska.

Work, Robert G.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Robert G. Work (MCSN: 0-48878), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 April 1951. When three of his men were wounded by hostile fire while guarding the rear of the company in a battalion attack to break out of an enemy encirclement, First Lieutenant Work skillfully maneuvered his platoon to protect the fallen Marines and the Corpsman aiding them. As the company on his flank moved beyond his position, exposing his platoon to an intense hostile small arms and automatic weapons barrage, he expertly deployed his men in the face of the devastating enemy fire, personally assisting in the evacuation of the wounded. During this most critical stage of the operations, he also directed the movement of the rear elements of other units of the battalion, aiding immeasurably in the successful battalion attack. By his outstanding courage, exemplary leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Work served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Chicago, Illinois. Home Town: Chicago, Illinois.

Worley, Ralph F.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Ralph F. Worley (MCSN: 405730), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader of Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 27 - 28 November 1950. At the outset of a fierce hostile attack through a roadblock on the rifle company's right flank while the company itself was under assault, Sergeant Worley cunningly placed sleeping bags around a campfire at his original position to deceive the enemy, and skillfully located his guns approximately fifty yards distant. Withholding all action until hostile troops attacked his previous position en masse, he opened point-blank fire which disorganized the enemy flanks and destroyed most of the hostile assailants, thereby preventing them from getting in behind the rifle company and forcing them to retreat. Although suffering acutely from frostbitten feet throughout this engagement, he steadfastly refused to be evacuated until his section was relieved of its mission and, by his strategy and indomitable fighting spirit, was primarily responsible for the destruction of forty-six of the enemy. His bold initiative and aggressive devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Sergeant Worley and the United States Naval Service. Born: Dunganmon, Virginia. Home Town: Dante, Virginia.

Wray, Robert P. (1st citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Robert P. Wray (MCSN: 0-24942), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 24 February 1951. Personally leading a tank-infantry force across the Arnul River into the communications center of Hoengsong to determine the strength and disposition of the enemy, Captain Wray calmly and skillfully directed the attack against bitterly defending delaying forces in the face of constant heavy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire from concealed positions on the high ground dominating the town. When his leading element was temporarily halted by withering machine gun fire from the ruins of houses, he fearlessly moved forward across an exposed rice paddy to encourage his men to close with the enemy, and to direct tanks to positions where effective fire could be delivered on the emplacements. Through his inspirational and aggressive leadership, his men liberated five captive friendly soldiers, killed an estimated fifty of the enemy, and successfully returned to their base with a minimum of casualties and much valuable information vital to the continuation of the attack. His resourceful initiative, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Captain Wray and the United States Naval Service.

Wray, Robert P. (2nd citation)

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Captain Robert P. Wray (MCSN: 0-24942), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 and 24 April 1951. When his right flank platoon was overrun during a series of fierce night attacks by numerically superior enemy forces while the company was defending a vital sector on a high hill dominating the battalion perimeter, Captain Wray bravely exposed himself to withering hostile automatic weapons, mortar and small arms fire to direct the re-establishment of a defense line and thereby limited the enemy penetration. Throughout the remainder of the night, he constantly moved from one position to another along the lines under heavy fire, encouraging his men and skillfully directing the defense and the evacuation of the wounded and, at dawn, executed a daring holding action in the face of devastating hostile fire while other friendly elements attacked from the rear to break through the enemy encirclement. By his inspiring leadership, exceptional courage and unswerving devotion to the fulfillment of his mission, Captain Wray served to inspire all who observed him and contributed immeasurably to the success achieved by the battalion, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Corvallis, Oregon. Home Town: Salinas, California.

Wretlind, Clayton L.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 81 - 28 October 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant Clayton L. Wretlind, 060931, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 30 September 1950 in the vicinity of Chonju, Korea. On that date he was assigned the mission of leading a patrol into enemy-held territory to determine road conditions and enemy activity. Through his skillful tactics and audacity, the patrol successfully penetrated the enemy lines and proceeded 40 miles into enemy-held territory. Here they encountered a numerically superior enemy force and engaged them in close combat. In the ensuing engagement the patrol, acting under the inspirational leadership and personal examples of courage of Lieutenant Wretlind, completely defeated the enemy, killing approximately 75 and capturing 15 prisoners. Lieutenant Wretlind’s gallantry and heroic leadership reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. Entered the military service from North Dakota.

[KWE Note: 1Lieutenant Wretlind was born in 1923 in Minnesota. In 1930\ he lived in Fergus Falls, Minnesota. In 1939-1940, he was going to Central High in Fargo. He entered the North Dakota National Guard in 1942 from Dunn County, North Dakota. He died in 2004 in Billings, Montana.]

Wright, Edwin M. Jr.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Edwin M. Wright, Jr. (MCSN: 565597), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 12 and 13 August 1952. Repeatedly exposing himself to intense enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire, Technical Sergeant Wright stationed his platoon in position on the company perimeter of the forward outpost and, during the hours of darkness, returned to the main line of resistance through suspected enemy positions to guide a battalion reconnaissance unit to posts on the exposed flank of the company. Throughout the night, he repeatedly covered the entire platoon front, directing fire, covering gaps in his final protective line and encouraging his men. On the following morning, he led part of the platoon on an extremely dangerous attack against a strongly entrenched enemy and, although wounded by a hostile grenade, maneuvered his men into an enemy trench where they overpowered the enemy in hand-to-hand fighting. After the attack had been successfully completed, he remained behind to provide effective covering fire until all of his men had safely returned to friendly lines. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and unyielding devotion to duty, Technical Sergeant Wright served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Fairfax, Vermont. Home Town: Montreal, Canada.

Wright, Fitch

Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 94 - 4 March 1953

Sergeant First Class Fitch Wright, RA11103843, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company E, 32d Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Pokkae, Korea.  On 24 January 1953, Sergeant Wright, acting as platoon leader, directed his men in maintaining a blocking position to the rear of a friendly assault platoon.  Shortly after contact with the enemy, Sergeant Wright, although severely wounded, refused medical aid, and led his men in taking up the assault position.  Despite the intensity of the enemy fire, Sergeant Wright, with complete disregard for his personal safety, continually exposed himself to lead and direct his men to the successful completion of their mission.  The gallantry displayed by Sergeant Wright reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the Federal service from Wisconsin.

Wright, Harvey

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Harvey Wright (MCSN: 536392), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 May 1952. Skillfully leading his platoon through an enemy mine field and personally cutting paths through several wire entanglements, Staff Sergeant Wright deployed his men into positions for a night assault on a hostile strong point. Hurling a grenade into a bunker to initiate the assault, he vigorously led his men through the trenches and personally killed six of the enemy. When the platoon was subjected to intense machine gun and mortar fire from another enemy position, he braved the devastating barrage to direct the reorganization of the platoon and to supervise the treatment of the wounded before coordinating the successful withdrawal of his unit to friendly lines. By his aggressive fighting spirit, marked courage and unwavering devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Wright served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success of his platoon's mission, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Norwalk, Connecticut. Home Town: Norwalk, Connecticut.

Wright, William G.

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army
General Orders No. 481 - June 30, 1951

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal William G. Wright (ASN: RA-15260709), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Yongbyon, Korea. On 20 November 1950, a motorized reconnaissance patrol of 24 men had dismounted from their vehicles to search houses in a small village when they were subjected to heavy enemy fire. Corporal Wright, a member of the patrol, moved across open ground to man a machine gun mounted on one of the vehicles and deliver return fire on the hostile positions. Although fully exposed, he continued to fire on the enemy, thereby enabling his comrades to withdraw to the vehicles and prepare to move out. As the hostile troops closed in to point-blank range, Corporal Wright continued to fire until he was wounded and fell from his moving vehicle. The gallant and intrepid actions of Corporal Wright saved his comrades from possible annihilation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army. [REVOKED under Section V, HQ EUSAK General Orders No. 524, 1951]

Wroblewski, Lewis C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technical Sergeant Lewis C. Wroblewski (MCSN: 266904), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Platoon Sergeant of the Anti-tank Company, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 September 1950. Assigned the mission of delivering supporting fire for a unit of Korean Marines who were assaulting well-defended enemy hill positions, Technical Sergeant Wroblewski skillfully led his men directly behind the advancing unit until his fire was masked by an intervening village. When the assault unit was forced to withdraw to more favorable terrain to the rear of his platoon, he expertly shifted his men to higher ground and again set up his guns to fire on the hostile force. Overcoming the language barrier existing between his men and those of the friendly assault unit, he coordinated the plan of attack and, when one of his guns was disabled, rearmed the crew with rifles and machine guns to provide uninterrupted fire support. Leaving the same crew with elements of a mortar company to hold this ground, he led the remainder of the platoon through heavy enemy fire to another firing position. Resolutely continuing his support, he delivered constant fire until a new unit, which had relieved the Korean Marines, attacked and secured the objective. By his inspiring leadership, outstanding courage and loyal devotion to duty in the face of grave danger, Technical Sergeant Wroblewski upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Hatfield, Massachusetts. Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland.

Wuorinen, William V. (awarded in 2013)

The President of the United States has awarded the Silver Star to Private First Class William V. Wuorinen for gallantry in action 16 and 17 March 1953 as an infantryman assigned to 1st platoon, company L, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division in the Republic of Korea. PFC Wuorinen’s heroic actions during combat operation contributed to the overwhelming success of the Command’s mission to drive Chinese forces from Hill 355 in the vicinity of Un-Dong in North Korea. In the course of the battle, PFC Wuorinen’s position came under intense attack by hostile forces. He and another soldier dragged a wounded senior officer into a bunker, simultaneously providing life-saving treatment to his wounds while holding off an attacking force of Chinese soldiers until reinforcements and medical personnel arrived. His actions saved the life of the officer while engaged in an intense eight-hour battle that resulted in the deaths of eight enemy soldiers. PFC Wuorinen’s bravery is in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflects credit upon himself, this command and the United States Army. - Signed the Honorable John W. McHugh, Secretary of the Army

Wurst, Howard C.

Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division
General Orders No. 277 - September 14, 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to Master Sergeant Howard C. Wurst (Enlisted Reserve), Infantry, U.S. Army, Company A, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, who is cited for gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 14 July 1951 near Chung-myon, Korea. Sergeant Wurst was placed in charge of a night ambush patrol with a mission of checking any enemy attempts to attack the battalion’s patrol base. During the early morning hours, a squad of hostile troops launched a surprise attack and succeeded in overrunning the patrol’s machine gun emplacement. Observing the nearby action, Sergeant Wurst fearlessly charged the enemy with his carbine and grenades, forcing the foe to withdraw. Then, braving the heavy concentrated fire, Sergeant Wurst organized a small group to place the machine gun back into operation, while he continued to direct the remainder of the patrol to advantageous positions. His skillful leadership and dauntless courage inspired his men to greater efforts and was instrumental in saving the patrol from capture and possible annihilation by the enemy. Sergeant Wurst’s gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the military service. Entered federal service from Minnesota.

Wyatt, Thomas C.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 870 - 21 December 1951

The Silver Star is awarded to First Lieutenant Thomas C. Wyatt, 0958704, Infantry, Army of the United States, a member of Headquarters Company, (then Company F), 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 13 and 14 September 1951 in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea. On these dates, Lieutenant Wyatt’s company was engaged in a fierce fire fight with a numerically superior enemy force. During this encounter, his unit was ordered to withdraw to more tenable positions. Lieutenant Wyatt, with complete disregard for his personal safety, placed himself at the head of the friendly elements who were assigned to fight a rear guard action. Although the enemy fire was directed on his group, Lieutenant Wyatt courageously crossed the fire-swept area to deploy and encourage his men. Although stunned by a hand grenade burst, Lieutenant Wyatt reorganized his company and led them in a successful counterattack. His resolute determination and great courage materially aided in the successful completion of their mission. The gallantry in action displayed by Lieutenant Wyatt reflects great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the military service from (possibly Des Moines) Iowa.

Wyczawski, Richard W.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Richard W. Wyczawski (MCSN: 0-6714), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Twelve (VMF-212), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 19 September 1950 to 10 March 1951. During the amphibious landing at Inchon, Lieutenant Colonel Wyczawski personally led repeated attacks in support of friendly forces and, on one occasion, crash-landed his flaming aircraft at Kimpo Airfield. Although severely burned during this action, he subsequently returned to his command and skillfully directed his squadron in attacking hostile troops which had completely encircled our forces at the Chosin Reservoir. Cool and courageous throughout each attack, Lieutenant Colonel Wyczawski inspired his officers and men to maximum efforts in achieving outstanding success in both shore and carrier based operations. His professional ability, superb leadership and exemplary devotion to duty in the face of grave hazards reflect great credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Wyczawski and the United States Naval Service.  Born: LaPorte, Indiana. Home Town: LaPorte, Indiana.

Wyrick, William E.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 267 - 18 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Infantry) William E. Wyrick (ASN: 0-1334393), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, Company C, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Pohang-dong, Korea, on 3 - 4 September 1950. His company was subjected to fierce attacks by a fanatic enemy intent on breaking through his positions. Time and time again he exposed himself to intense artillery, mortar and small arms fire in directing his command's actions. On several occasions he advanced to a point where it was impossible for his men to furnish support fire in order to direct and lead small groups of his troops. All during the night he moved among his men encouraging and advising them in the defense of their positions. The enemy launched three savage attacks under the cover of darkness, but in each attempt he was defeated with heavy losses. Captain Wyrick's courageous actions and outstanding leadership served well to inspire his men in their gallant stand against overwhelming odds and reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry. Home Town: Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Wyscarver, Richard Lee

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal Richard Lee Wyscarver (MCSN: 1065887), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 November 1950. Defending his position with a fellow Marine when enemy forces penetrated his sector during a furious attack and both he and his companion were wounded, Corporal Wyscarver fearlessly remained in position under direct fire from small arms and machine guns and engaged the enemy in bitter hand-to-hand combat, fighting desperately to defend his sector and protect his companion. Although suffering extreme pain from multiple wounds, he staunchly remained in position, directing the fire of the remainder of his team and inspiring them to hold fast despite the heavy odds. By his aggressive and determined leadership, daring tactics and cool courage in the face of grave peril. Corporal Wyscarver served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed to the success achieved by his company. His heroic efforts were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.  Born: August 20, 1931 at Zanesville, Ohio. Home Town: Akron, Ohio. Death: August 2, 2002 - Buried at: Oakwood Cemetery - Cuyahoga Falls, OH.

 

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