Topics - Silver Star Citations submitted to KWE
Names Starting with "Y"

 
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Yacker, Everett J.

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 88 - 5 June 1954

First Lieutenant Everett J. Yacker, 059153, Infantry, Company "F", 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the morning and afternoon of 30 January 1951, in the vicinity of Tolwol-Li, Korea, Lieutenant Yacker was a platoon leader with the mission of occupying commanding ground near enemy-held Hill "262". As Lieutenant Yacker led his men toward the objective, the platoon was subjected to sporadic small arms and automatic weapons fire which steadily increased in intensity. Courageously climbing the steep slope, the force then began receiving heavy enemy mortar fire concentrations and sustained many casualties. Disregarding the intense bombardment, Lieutenant Yacker immediately supervised the treatment of casualties and then, with a force of 10 men, continued the attack. As he moved up the hill, he called in accurate artillery fire on the enemy positions and skillfully led the remaining platoon members to the objective. Lieutenant Yacker's aggressive leadership and sound judgment in securing this vital position enabled his company to successfully flank, assault and overrun the strategically valuable Hill "262". Lieutenant Yacker's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal Service from the District of Columbia.

Yackley, Edward C.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Hospitalman Corpsman Second Class Edward C. Yackley (NSN: 3218761), United States Naval Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Artillery Battery of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 December 1950. Hospitalman Corpsman Second Class Yackley, serving as a Corpsman, was with his battalion in convoy during the displacement from Yudam-ni to Hagaru-ri. On two occasions his convoy was attacked by numerically superior enemy forces, employing small arms, machine gun, mortar and grenade fire. Heedless of his own personal safety he fearlessly exposed himself to enemy fire, and in company with another Corpsman moved among the casualties to administer first aid and assist in the evacuation to covered positions. Though he was wounded during the action, he courageously refused medical attention for himself and continued seeking out the casualties. As he found the more seriously wounded, he assisted in carrying them to covered positions and administering aid. Working his way back and forth over approximately 200 yards of enemy fire-swept area on three different occasions, he gave first aid and assistance to almost all of the casualties suffered during the attacks. His actions were an inspiration to all members of his battalion and undoubtedly saved many wounded Marines from receiving further wounds. Hospitalman Corpsman Second Class Yackley's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commanding General, 1st Marine Division (Reinforced) FMF: 2735 (January 25, 1951).

Yaquinto, Anthony

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Anthony Yaquinto (MCSN: 1137319), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Platoon Guide of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 27 October 1952. When a numerically superior enemy force attacked a friendly outpost well forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Yaquinto effectively positioned his men to direct maximum effective fire upon the enemy and, after an enemy mortar and artillery barrage struck the outpost, causing numerous casualties, reorganized the remaining Marines to defend the area. Armed with a carbine and a rifle, he personally killed two attackers and wounded at least four others. As the enemy withdrew, he fearlessly moved up and down the trench line to insure that all the wounded were placed in covered positions. When the enemy launched a second attack, he and several other Marines engaged the foe in hand-to-hand combat in the trenches until it became necessary to effect a withdrawal because of the impossibility of repelling the overwhelming hostile force. As the enemy began to penetrate the unit's defensive perimeter, he ordered the machine gunners to open fire and killed both of them, subsequently assuming a position at the entrance of the trench to prevent the enemy from entering. With a friendly artillery barrage finally forcing the enemy to withdraw, he once again checked the trench line to insure that no friendly casualties remained. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and indomitable fighting spirit in the face of enemy fire, Sergeant Yaquinto contributed materially to the successful defense of the outpost and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: San Francisco, California. Home Town: San Francisco, California.

Yancey, Dee R.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commissioned Warrant Officer Dee R. Yancey (MCSN: 0-39868), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Assistant Division Ordnance Officer of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 and 29 November 1950. Seriously wounded in the chest by enemy fire when the vehicle convoy to which he was attached was subjected to attack by an overwhelming hostile force during the advance from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri, Commissioned Warrant Officer Yancey expertly directed the collection of medical supplies and bandages for other casualties. Further exposing himself to the intense shellfire despite his own suffering, he organized a group of Republic of Korea soldiers, as well as United States Army and Marine personnel, and established a defense perimeter which successfully repulsed several attacks throughout the night. By his daring and aggressive leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and cool courage, Commissioned Warrant Officer Yancey served as an inspiration to all who observed him and his heroic actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: El Pasco, Arkansas. Home Town: Plumerville, Arkansas.

Yarborough, Robert H.

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Private First Class Robert H. Yarborough, RA24981624, Army Medical Service, United States Army, Medical Company, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Kumsong, Korea, on 12 December 1951.  A rifle squad patrolling in enemy territory was suddenly subjected to an intense concentration of fire from all sides.  One of the soldiers fell, seriously wounded, and was pulled into a nearby bunker.  Hearing cries for his services, Private Yarborough, medical aidman, raced through a hail of bullets to the position.  Despite his skillful administering, the injured soldier succumbed to his wounds.  A man was sent to contact the main body of friendly troops to obtain help.  Soon after he left, an enemy soldier crept up to the bunker and, without warning, fired a murderous burst into the hole, killing the man next to Private Yarborough.  Grabbing a rifle and a bandolier of ammunition, Private Yarborough killed the aggressor and exposing himself, began firing into approaching hostile hordes.  Ordering his comrades to withdraw and get help, he remained behind, determined to protect the bodies of his fellow soldiers until litter bearers could arrive and evacuate them.  Although is comrades strongly insisted that he come with them, he adamantly refused to abandon the two men and continued to fight off repeated enemy advances, killing six of the hostile troops.  Finally the platoon leader gave him a direct order to withdraw from his extremely dangerous position and he reluctantly moved out to rejoin the squad.  Private Yarborough's gallant actions, tenacious determination, and selfless devotion to his comrades reflect the highest credit on himself and the United States Army Medical Service.  Entered service from Charlotte, North Carolina. - 24th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 129 - 15 April 1952

Yates, Ervin W. Sr.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 209 - 29 October 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Ervin W. Yates, Sr. (ASN: RA-44111146), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Tank Company Medium, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action against the enemy near the Naktong River, Korea, on 6 August 1950. During an attack to relieve the encirclement by the enemy of friendly units, his tank, one of two supporting the infantry, was hit by anti-tank fire disabling it mechanically. Rather than abandon it, he continued his effective fire and destroyed much enemy equipment and personnel. Later when the accompanying tank was hit and forced to cease fire, Sergeant Yates, exposing himself to the withering enemy fire, moved to the tank, assumed command of its crew and renewed its effective fire on the enemy. Through his efforts the friendly troops were reached and under his protective tank fire, evacuated to the safety of their own lines. Through his courage and unhesitant devotion to duty the mission was successfully accomplished with a minimum number of casualties to the encircled troops. His gallant actions reflect the greatest credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Yates, George W. (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant George W. Yates (MCSN: 0-51368), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 23 - 24 February 1953. Assigned the hazardous night mission of occupying a position far in advance of the main line of resistance to protect tanks and to support another unit which was scheduled to raid an adjacent enemy position, First Lieutenant Yates assumed command of the tank-infantry team and expeditiously employed his men for the attack against the objective. When his position was assaulted from two sides by a numerically superior hostile force minutes after his defense was established and a furious battle ensued which lasted for a period of nearly four hours, First Lieutenant Yates continuously exposed himself to the intense enemy fire, shouting words of encouragement and directing the fire of his men and tanks. At one time during a particularly critical period, he personally manned a machine gun in an exposed position on top of a tank and, delivering accurate fire on the hostile forces, accounted for more than ten enemy dead. By his indomitable valor, inspiring leadership and zealous devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Yates served to inspire all who observed him and was instrumental in completely defeating the hostile forces, inflicting over two hundred casualties upon the enemy with only minor losses to his unit. His dauntless actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: September 8, 1929 at Columbia, Mississippi. Home Town: Mount Olive, Mississippi. Death: KIA: April 9, 1953.

Yatkauskas, CWO George J. (2ID)

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 27 - 27 December 1994

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Chief Warrant Officer [then Corporal] George J. Yatkauskas, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company C, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division on or about 5 September 1951 in Korea.

Yeakey, Albert W.

Headquarters 25th Division
General Orders No. 44 9 - 29 November 1950

The Silver Star is awarded to Sergeant Albert W. Yeakey, Army Medical Service, Medical Company, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army.  On 5 and 6 September 1950 near Hoeman, Korea, the unit which Sergeant Yeakey served as aidman was subjected to repeated fanatic hostile attacks which cut off supply routes,  Having set up an emergency aid station within the perimeter, he moved about the area, heedless of the intense hostile action, to render first aid and remove wounded to the aid station.  By his expert care and bold courage, he saved numerous lives.  Sergeant Yeakey's valorous devotion to duty and notable professional skill reflect great credit on himself and the Army Medical Service.  Entered the military service from Iowa.

Yedlowski, Mario E.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Mario E. Yedlowski (MCSN: 660229), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Runner of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 September 1950. During the night, when a well-coordinated enemy tank-infantry attack penetrated the battalion forward defense positions and pressed through to his company area, Private First Class Yedlowski voluntarily exposed himself to intense hostile fire, moving to a position approximately five yards from the lead vehicle of the motor column. Observing that the lead vehicle was an ammunition truck, he unhesitatingly tossed a hand grenade, which resulted in the destruction of the truck and the subsequent illumination of the entire area, giving friendly troops the opportunity to observe their targets and launch a successful counterattack. By his daring initiative, he contributed materially to the resultant destruction of two enemy tanks and the rout of the hostile troops with severe casualties. Private First Class Yedlowski's outstanding courage and loyal devotion to duty in the face of grave personal risk were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: New York, New York. Home Town: New York, New York.

Yetsko, Charles R. (Posthumous)

Headquarters 3d Infantry Division
General Orders No. 179 - 11 June 1953

Private Charles R. Yetsco, US52219316, Infantry, Medical Company, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, United States Army. During the early morning hours of 16 May 1953, a concentration of hostile mortar and artillery fire landed on a friendly ammunition supply point and adjacent bunker at the base of Outpost "Harry", in the vicinity of Songnae-dong, Korea. Several men, who were in the area, became casualties from the shell bursts. Private Yetsco, a medical aid man, voluntarily moved from his position on the main line of resistance through the intense shelling to give aid and evacuate these men. He returned twice to bring the wounded men to the comparative safety of the friendly lines. In an effort to speed up the evacuation of the remaining casualties, he drove a litter truck to the shelled area. While he was preparing a casualty to be placed in the truck, a mortar round came in. Private Yetsco immediately threw himself on the man in an effort to protect him from further injury. As a result of this courageous act, private Yetsco was mortally wounded by the impact of the exploding round. Private Yetsco's outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. Entered the Federal service from Maryland.

Yeust, Carl W.

Corporal Carl W. Yeust, US56094236 (then Private First Class), Army Medical Service, United States Army, Medical Company, 31st Infantry, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Kunja-ri, Korea, on 24 May 1951.  On this date, Corporal Yeust, a collecting point ambulance driver, was attached to an infantry company which was pinned down by heavy enemy fire from emplacements concealed on a densely wooded hill.  The evacuation of the wounded had become a serious problem due to the enemy controlling the pass which was the only route to the aid station.  The hostile fire prevented any litter bearers from performing their duties.  Corporal Yeust volunteered to drive his vehicle into the pass to reach the wounded.  With complete disregard for his personal safety, he made his way through the pass, although the enemy concentrated their fire on him and bullets struck the vehicle and shattered the windshield.  Picking up several wounded, he drove back to the aid station.  Again he returned through the pass and once through it, he laid down a base of fire with his rifle, allowing the litter bearers to reach the aid station.  The heroic action of Corporal Yeust was directly responsible for saving the lives of many wounded who would have perished without the prompt medical attention they received as a result of this deed.  The gallantry displayed by Corporal Yeust reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.  Entered the military service from the State of Oregon. [General Orders Number 374, 1 August 1951]

Yorde, John Y.

Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 285 - 23 December 1950

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers) John J. Yorde (ASN: 0-2212092), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Company C, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. During the assault crossing of the Naktong River his company was assigned the mission of transporting the assault troops and supplies across the fire-swept stream. As his men reached the beach preparatory to launching their boats the enemy opened with automatic weapons and mortar fire. With utter disregard for his own safety Lieutenant Yorde moved through a hail of withering fire, rallying his men and assisting in the launching operations. Completely unmindful of the intense fire he repeatedly exposed himself in order to better direct his platoon in their most vital operations. His continued presence on the fire-swept beach served well to inspire his men and aided materially in the successful accomplishment of his unit's mission. Lieutenant Yorde's gallant action and outstanding leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Engineer Corps.  Home Town: Columbus, Ohio.

News Clipping:

"Gallant leadership" and bravery have won a Silver Star for Lt. John Y. Yorde in Korea.  His wife here reports that he won the decoration Dec. 23 for "courageous action" Sept. 19.  The citation said Lieutenant Yorde was leading troops across the Naktong river and: "With utter disregard for his own safety, Yorde moved through a hail of withering fire, rallying his men and assisting in the launching operations.  Completely unmindful of the intense fire, he repeatedly exposed himself in order to better direct his platoon in their most vital operations.  His continued presence on the fire-swept beach served well to inspire his men... Yorde's gallant action and outstanding leadership reflect the greatest credit on himself..." - Independent Record, 7 January 1951

York, Ronald G.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Private First Class Ronald G. York (MCSN: 1132873), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Imdang-ni, Korea, on 11 June 1951. As fire team leader of a rifle platoon, Private York was on reconnaissance patrol with the platoon when the leading elements were subjected to intense grenade and automatic weapons fire from well concealed enemy positions. Without regard for his personal safety, he led his fire team through the hail of fire, and skillfully directed their fire on the enemy. Although seriously wounded by grenade fragments, Private York refused evacuation and remained in an exposed position directing his men until the enemy force had been repulsed. The gallantry, courage, and high devotion to duty displayed by Private York on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 181 (August 16, 1951). Entered Service From Idaho.

Yoshihara, Elmer J. (posthumous)

Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division
General Orders No. 206 - 27 September 1950

Private First Class Elmer J. Yoshihara, RA36908084, Infantry, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 27th Infantry, United States Army.  On 25 August 1950 elements of the regiment were starting an attack near Taegu, Korea, when an enemy minefield was encountered.  Since delay meant endangering the mission, Private First Class Yoshihara volunteered to assist in removing the mines.  Moving forward under intense direct hostile small arms fire, he was killed when the enemy suddenly lay a mortar barrage on the area.  Private First Class Yoshihara's gallant devotion to duty and to the service of his country was an inspiration to his fellow soldiers and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.  Entered the military service from the Philippine Islands.

Yost, Donald Keith

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Donald Keith Yost (MCSN: 0-5453), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Flight Leader and Pilot of a Plane in Headquarters Squadron Twelve in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 July 1951. Assigned the mission of leading a thirty-plane strike on heavily fortified military installations in the hostile capital of Pyongyang, Korea, Lieutenant Colonel Yost skillfully conducted the flight to the target area despite adverse flying conditions. In the face of intense and accurate, radar controlled anti-aircraft fire, he pressed home dangerous, low-level attacks to inflict maximum destruction on the enemy and, by his courageous example and leadership, inspired the members of the flight to carry out bold runs on the hostile positions. Skillfully employing offensive as well as defensive tactics while coordinating the fire power of his group, he was primarily responsible for demolishing the enemy's radio station and an adjacent power plant with minimum damage to the aircraft in his group. An aggressive and daring airman, Lieutenant Colonel Yost, by his indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty, inflicted great damage on the enemy before leading the planes safely to base, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Bethesda, Pennsylvania. Home Town: Princeton, New Jersey.

Young, Clarence

Citation not yet found.

"Clarence Young, 5th RCT, was awarded the Silver Star on May 29,2005. The citation read in part that Young volunteered to stay back and cover his unit’s withdrawal, thus enabling many to avoid capture."

Young, Clifford Lee (1st citation) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Clifford Lee Young (MCSN: 1232906), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 6 October 1952. Participating as a member of a reinforcing element which was separated into two groups when subjected to intense enemy fire while approaching the outpost forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Young unhesitatingly assumed control of the cut off rear element, set up a perimeter defense and effected the removal of the wounded Marines to safety within the perimeter. After the casualties had been given first aid, he directed the withdrawal of the unit to the main lines and personally remained behind, armed with two rifles, to provide covering fire until his ammunition was exhausted. By his outstanding courage, forceful initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, Private First Class Young was greatly instrumental in saving the lives of many Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Young, Clifford Lee (2nd citation) (posthumous)

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Clifford Lee Young (MCSN: 1232906), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Rifleman of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 October 1952. Although seriously wounded after crossing the line of departure while leading a fire team in an assault to recapture an enemy-held hill, Private First Class Young refused medical aid and charged forward in the face of hostile fire, shouting words of encouragement to his comrades and urging them on to the objective. Continuing to advance until physically unable to proceed further, he attempted to assist the wounded Marines near him until he was struck by enemy artillery fragments and fell, mortally wounded. By his outstanding courage, fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty, Private First Class Young served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. Born: July 31, 1929 at Winter Park, Florida. Home Town: Tuckahoe, New York. Death: KIA: October 27, 1952.

Young, Frank P.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Frank P. Young (MCSN: 505841), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the First Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea, on 3 November 1950. Serving as a Fire Team Leader, Private First Class Young exhibited outstanding qualities of leadership and performed his duties in an exceptional manner. At Hill 698, his fire team was the first to reach the company objective which was found to be defended by a large force of well-entrenched enemy. With other members of his fire team passing grenades to him from the rear, Private First Class Young, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, fearlessly assaulted the enemy positions alone with hand grenades and from his exposed position continued to do so until his entire supply was exhausted. His gallant and resourceful actions were a source of inspiration to his comrades and was directly responsible for the successful attainment of his company's objective. Private First Class Young's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Young, Leonard R.

Headquarters, Eighth United States Army Kroea (EUSAK)
General Orders No. 160 - 13 November 1950

Master Sergeant Leonard R. Young, 254876, United States Marine Corps, a member of B Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy four and one-half miles west of Yongsan, Korea, on 5 September 1950.  On this date, B Company had attacked and seized a hill in the forenoon and were ordered to organize a hasty defense.  The hill although occupied by B Company, was under enfilading fire from automatic weapons emplaced on high ground to the front and flanks.  At 1430 hours the enemy launched a strong counterattack supported by mortars, high velocity weapons, artillery and tanks.  Sergeant Young, First Sergeant of B Company, with utter disregard for his own personal safety and while exposed to a withering fire, walked upright back and forth along the length of the defense line scouting out and placing men in advantageous firing positions, directing their fire for maximum effectiveness, giving encouragement to the men and aid to the wounded.  During the latter part of the counterattack, Sergeant Young was critically wounded but remained in action directing men back to their positions in order that front line fire power could be maintained.  His actions directly assisted in repulsing the counterattack with heavy enemy losses.  His fearless display of calm courage served as a source of inspiration to the men of the company and his heroic action reflects great credit on himself and the naval service.  Entered the naval service from Oklahoma.

Young, Richard O.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Commander [then Lieutenant] Richard O. Young (NSN: 0-161967), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Pledge (AM-277), while engaged in mine sweeping operations in densely mined waters off Wonsan, Korea and in areas subjected to heavy gunfire from enemy shore batteries during the period 10 to 12 October 1950. His inspiring leadership and professional ability contributed directly to the efficient operation of his ship and to the successful clearance of mine free channels and anchorage areas off Wonsan. His loyalty and steadfast devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 1260 (December 26, 1950).

Young, Tracy H.

Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Division
General Orders No. 147 - 15 June 1951

Sergeant Tracy H. Young, RA31318400, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company A, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 10 March 1951 in the vicinity of Takpak-kol, Korea.  Company A had the mission of attacking and securing an enemy-held hill.  When heavy enemy fire halted the advance, it was imperative that the company have artillery support.  Since the rugged terrain made it impossible for forward observers to identify enemy positions, there was danger of artillery fire falling into friendly positions.  Sergeant Young voluntarily advanced through the withering hail of enemy fire to a prominent point in front of his company's positions, and spread a large panel on the ground to mark friendly positions for the artillery observers.  Supporting fire was laid down and the Company was able to advance as a result of Sergeant Young's actions.  The gallant conduct displayed by Sergeant Young reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.  Entered the military service from Maine.

Yundt, Gary L.

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Gary L. Yundt (MCSN: 0-53775), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 6 - 7 October 1952. When the enemy commenced a thirty minute artillery and mortar barrage while he was preparing to occupy and defend a friendly outpost well forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Yundt refused to take cover and assisted in removing the wounded to safety. After the enemy launched an attack with a numerically superior force which overran the outpost, he fearlessly remained in the trenches to lead the defense, engaging the foe in close combat until painfully wounded by an exploding grenade. Carried into the command post bunker, he continued to direct his men and, although immobilized from the waist down, called and adjusted friendly artillery fire throughout the night, thereby holding the enemy at bay until a rescue force recaptured the position the following morning. By his outstanding courage, gallant leadership and indomitable fighting spirit in the face of heavy odds, Second Lieutenant Yundt served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Born: Omaha, Nebraska. Home Town: Gunnison, Colorado.

 

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