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Topics - Silver Star Recipients - Foreign

 
This page of the Korean War Educator is available to our readers to post names and citations of non-Americans who received the Silver Star for Gallantry in Action in the Korean War.  It is not a definitive list of all the heroic servicemen who deserved and received this distinguished award in Korea.  If any of our readers have the names of recipients and the citations that accompanied the medal, please contact Lynnita Brown to include the award text in the citations section.

Page Contents:

  • Australian Silver Star Recipients
  • Belgian United Nations Organization Forces Silver Star Recipients
  • British Silver Star Recipients
  • Colombian Army Silver Star Recipients
  • Ethiopian Expeditionary Forces Silver Star Recipients
  • French Army Silver Star Recipients
  • Greek Expeditionary Forces Silver Star Recipients
  • Netherlands Battalion Silver Star Recipients
  • Philippine Expeditionary Forces Silver Star Recipients
  • South Korean Silver Star Recipients
  • Thailand Army Silver Star Recipients
  • Turkish Silver Star Recipients

Back Page Contents

Australian Silver Star Recipients

Butler, Lt. David M.

3rd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment

Green, Lt. Col. Charles Hercules

Citation not yet found.

Col. Green joined AIF (Australian Imperial Force) on 13/10/1939 with commissioned rank of Lieutenant and served with 2/2 Bn AIF until promoted to C.O. 2/11th on 9/3/1945.  Col. Green was appointed to the initial command of 3 Bn, RAR for Korea on 12/9/1950 3 RAR joined the 27th British Commonwealth Brigade under the command of Brigadier Aubrey Coad when 3 Bn arrived in Korea on 28/9/1950. In his 33-day operational command Green led 3 RAR in 3 important battles: the battalion's "blooding" at Apple Orchard on 22/10/1950 while engaged in relief of US 187th Airborne Regiment; Broken Bridge on 26/10/1950 and at Chongju, on 29/10/1950 after the battalion had "marched 31 miles in 12 hours to deal the enemy [a] disastrous blow."  Col Green died of wounds sustained at Chongju on 1/11/1950 (age 30). Chongju was the farthest point in North Korea where the US 8th Army operated successfully."

Jones, Cpl. Jeffrey

Patch, Sgt. Harold E.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 26 - 3 April 1954

T/Corporal Harold E. Patch, Infantry, Australian Army, a member of the 1st Battalion, 1st Royal Australian Regiment, Australian Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Kangso-ri, Korea, on 2 July 1952.  As patrol leader of a raiding party sent forward to neutralize a heavily fortified hostile emplacement which threatened the success of friendly efforts in this area, he moved forward with enthusiasm and determination which inspired his companions.  Quickly maneuvering up the steep slope toward the enemy bunkers and ignoring intense hostile fire, Corporal Patch organized his men for the final assault.  Without hesitation, he led his patrol in a spirited charge through heavy machine-gun fire to the first of the enemy bunkers.  Upon reaching its entrance, he discovered that the opening was only large enough for one man to enter at a time.  When a comrade attempted to crawl into the tunnel-like entrance, he provided supporting fire.  Suddenly, a burst of automatic-weapons fire from within the bunker wounded Corporal Patch and his companion.  Disregarding his wound, he succeeded in pulling his companion from the opening and moved back inside to engage the enemy.  Despite a second wound received in this action, he continued with his mission until the position was neutralized.  The courageous and aggressive action and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Patch reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Stafford, Pvt. John H.


Belgian United Nations Organization Forces Silver Star Recipients

Lochs, Jacques "Jack"

[Note from Jack Lochs' grandson: "In your list of recipients of the Silver Star, I found Mr. Jack Lochs.  Mr. Lochs was my grandfather and I did some research to find the citation that came with the medal.  First of all, Mr. Lochs was a Belgian Korea veteran, but he received the Silver Star for Gallantry while serving in Korea as a UN volunteer.  Today, a photocopy of his personal file was sent to me, more specific the "Order of the day", mentioning the citation.  Here is the text."]

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 12 - 22 January 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by act of Congress July 9, 1918, has awarded the Silver Star to: First Sergeant Jack (sic) LOCHS, Infantry, Belgian Army, for gallantry in action:

First Sergeant Jacques Lochs, Infantry, Belgian Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Idong, Korea, on 23 April 1952. Voluntarily joining a friendly assaulting force to regain yielded terrain, he utilized his rifle, bayonet and grenades in such an effective manner that the enemy was routed and the key area secured. Although wounded in this encounter, Sergeant Lochs remained with his unit and assaulted two hostile machine-gun positions, neutralizing the weapons, and killing the crews with his bayonet.  Leaping over a barbed wire entanglement, he killed several more hostile soldiers with his grenades and bayonet and, wounded a second time by grenade fragments and out of ammunition, he was ordered to withdraw. Observing a wounded officer caught in the barbed wire, he ran through the impact area to extricate and carry the officer to safety. His courageous actions and fighting spirit contributed significantly in stemming the enemy onslaught, and his gallantry reflects great credit upon himself, the Belgian United Nations Organization Forces, and the Armed Forces of his native land.

[P.S. from Chris Wouters of Brussels, Belgium: "My grandfather died in 1977. By then he was serving as Major in the Belgian Para-Commando Regiment.  I'm the only grandson that followed in his footsteps by choosing a military career. One remark, the (sic) after "Jack" in the Citation was put there by me, because, although the Citation says "Jack", his real first name was Jacques.  All the best from Belgium."]


British Silver Star Recipients

Brodie, Brigadier Thomas

29th Independent Infantry Brigade Group

Buchanan, CAPT C.N.A. (MIA)

Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders

Coad, Brigadier B.A.

Eilson, LT COL G.L.

Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders

Fisher-Noch, Major Terrence V.

170th Independent Mortar Battery, Royal Artillery

Gilties, MAJ J.B.

Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders

Muir, MAJ Kenneth (1st Argylls) (posthumous)

For action on Hill 282 on September 23, 1950

Rickford, MAJ Gerald P., D.S.O.

1st Battalion, Royal Ulster Rifles

Stafford, J.H.

White, 2nd Lieutenant G.A. (posthumous)

Royal Army Ordnance Corps

Withers, Major Henry Clements

45th Field Regiment, Royal Artillery

Young, Lieutenant Colonel Maris Theo

45th Field Regiment, Royal Artillery

Younger, Major Allan Elton

55th Independent Field Squadron, Royal Artillery


Colombian Army Silver Star Recipients

Martinez, Alejandro R.

General Orders: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 988 (1953)

Polania-Puyo, Jaime

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 106 - 28 November 1952

Lieutenant Colonel Jaime Polania-Puyo, Colombian Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Kumsong, Korea, on 20 October 1951.  As commanding officer of the Colombian Battalion attached to the 21st Infantry Regiment of the 24th Infantry Division, he established an observation post well forward in order to observe an assault which was being launched by his battalion on a well-fortified enemy position.  Having gained important information about the enemy and his runner having been wounded while attempting to return with the information to his command post, Colonel Polania-Puyo returned over the dangerous route and was seriously wounded while doing so, but refused to be evacuated until he had insured that proper measures had been taken to meet the obstacles confronting his battalion.

Ruiz, Jorge M.J.

General Orders: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 268 (1952)


Ethiopian Expeditionary Forces

Habtewold, Lt Mamo

3rd Kagnew Battalion

[Source: "An Ethiopian Hero of the Korean War" by Alex Last, BBC World Service, 24 September 2012.]

"Some of the hills had nicknames: Old Baldy, T-bone and, most famously, Pork Chop Hill. Defence of this area was assigned to the US 7th Division, which included the Ethiopian Kagnew battalion. One night in May 1953, Mamo led a small patrol down from his hilltop outpost to scout out the land below. What he didn't know was that his patrol was about to be enveloped in a major Chinese army assault. 'We were 14 Ethiopians and one American in our patrol. It was written later that we were fighting 300 Chinese soldiers - one man against 20,' he remembers.

Four members of the patrol were killed, including the American corporal. Everyone else was wounded. 'They tried to take my radio operator prisoner, but I killed the Chinese soldier and saved that man. And one time they came to finish us when we were all wounded, and I was left with one hand grenade and I killed them. It was very hard.'"

The fighting continued on and off through the night. Cut off, his men wounded, Mamo feared they could not hold out much longer. "I was wounded several times, I was tired, exhausted and I fell unconscious twice. The most important thing was to find a radio to contact the American artillery. But my three radios were destroyed. 'I gave one soldier my pistol to cover me while I went looking for a radio. I fainted again, and I was afraid I might be captured, I wanted to kill myself. But when I ordered the soldier to give me my pistol back, he refused, and the other soldiers said 'Don't give it to him!'

So Mamo decided to fight on, after all. 'I just looked for a weapon from one of the dead men, and when the Chinese attacked I would shoot, and when it was quiet, I would look for a radio,' he says.

In the end he did find a radio. He called in American artillery which halted the Chinese attacks. Reinforcements got through and under the cover of smoke he and his wounded soldiers were withdrawn. Back at base, Mamo was the only one of his patrol left standing. 'They all went to hospital. I was the only one who went back to the bunker. It's like a man who is living with his family, and all the family is dead and he returns to an empty house - that is how I felt. I was so sorry. I was very depressed.'  For his actions, he was awarded Ethiopia's highest military honour. The Americans also gave him a Silver Star for gallantry in action."

Shitta, Woldeyohannes

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - 9 July 1954

Lieutenant Colonel Woldeyohannes Shitta, Infantry, Ethiopian Army, Commander, Ethiopian Expeditionary Force in Korea, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Chorwon, Korea, on 20 May 1953.  The enemy made a two-company attack on the battalion, in the "Outpost Yoke" sector defended by a company of Ethiopian Infantry.  Realizing that the enemy attack was of an intense nature, Colonel Shitta personally took command of the sector.  He supervised and organized all organic supporting weapons.  In addition he requested and adjusted artillery fire, at one time bringing barrages on his own position.  Throughout the period of battle Colonel Shitta was in view of the enemy and was fired on numerous times.  His presence in the area and his clear thinking under heavy enemy fire was a source of great inspiration to all members of his command.  Encouragement was radiated by him, not only by his words but by his active participation in the defense of the assaulted area.  His personal command and steadying influence was a major factor in the successful repulse of the enemy attack.  The gallantry displayed by Colonel Shitta reflects the greatest credit on himself and the military service of the Empire of Ethiopia.

Waldetensye, Tefera

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 75 - 6 August 1953

Captain Tefera Waldetensye, Infantry, Ethiopian Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action as commanding officer, 1st Company, Kagnew Battalion, Ethiopian Expeditionary Force, United Nations Forces, near Sanyang-ni, Korea, on 21 September 1951.  Committed to attack Hill 602, to inflict as many casualties as possible, and to withdraw when ordered, his unit came under heavy hostile machine-gun and mortar fire from well-fortified bunkers located on commanding ground.  Spearheading the assault, he was struck by an enemy bullet which hampered the use of his right arm.  Refusing evacuation to the rear, he relentlessly pressed the assault throughout more than 8 hours of bitter conflict.  Inspired by his courageous action, his troops inflicted numerous enemy casualties before being ordered to withdraw.  Captain Waldetensye again refused medical aid until his entire company had withdrawn to its original position.  His superb leadership and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the Armed Forces of his native land.


French Army Silver Star Recipients

Dumoncel, Henri

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 107 - 14 December 1951

Colonel Henri Dumoncel (then lieutenant colonel), Artillery, Army of the Republic of France, as temporary commanding officer of the French Ground Forces of the United Nations, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy in Korea from 7 January to 31 May 1951.  During the successive battles at Wonju, he was constantly in the thick of battle at the most forward elements of his forces, directing fire support and centering accurate artillery fire on the strong enemy fortifications.  His superior direction of supporting fires was a major contributing factor to the success of friendly forces at Wonju.  Again at Twin Tunnels, Chipyong-ni, his display of personal courage and heroic leadership was a source of great inspiration and encouragement to all who served under him and spurred the men of his command to take their objectives at any cost.  He gave impetus to the French Forces in the attack on the heavily defended Hill 1037, in the offensive actions which took place from Munbang-Ni to Pass 255, from Pass 255 to Umyang-ni to Inje.  The gallant conduct of Colonel Dumoncel throughout this period reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Goupil, Robert (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 18 - 18 February 1953

Captain Robert Goupil, Infantry, Army of the Republic of France, a member of the Second Company, French Battalion, attached to the 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Chipyong-ni, Korea, on 1 February 1951.  He was commanding the French Republic of Korea Company situated in the center of the French Battalion sector of the perimeter defense at "Twin Tunnels."  Under the tremendous pressure of fanatical enemy attacks, the Third Company, directly to his north, had become critically weakened.  Many of the Third Company officers had become casualties and a portion of the company was cut off from the main body.  Upon observing this situation, Captain Goupil immediately led one of his platoons through intense enemy fire to aid the beleaguered unit.  With disregard for his personal safety, he moved from position to position, inspiring the troops to hold.  He skillfully reorganized his men in the midst of fierce hand-to-hand fighting, leading them to a successful counterattack which routed the enemy and secured the defense perimeter.  The selfless devotion to duty and personal courage displayed by Captain Goupil reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with th highest traditions of the Army of the Republic of France.

Laroche, Jean

Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 294 (1951)

Misseri, Louis

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 12 - January 22, 1953

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Sergeant Louis Misseri, Army of France, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the Third Company, French Battalion, attached to the 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d U.S. Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces at Pia-ri, Korea on 26 September 1951. As a squad leader in an attack on "Heartbreak Ridge," Sergeant Misseri led his squad through an intense barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire to the slope on which enemy bunkers were located. Dividing his squad into two sections, he personally led one section of three men in an assault upon the bunkers. While his comrades covered his advance, he moved forward alone through a hail of fire, attacked the first bunker, and silenced it. He continued his assault until the way had been cleared for his squad to advance and reorganize. When the enemy launched a counterattack, Sergeant Misseri, although seriously wounded, drove them back, inflicting fifteen casualties with is rifle. When this position became untenable and he was ordered to withdraw, he sent his men back one by one while he covered their withdrawal. The last man to leave the hill, except for one other who helped him because of his wounded condition, he would not allow himself to be evacuated until he had made a complete report of his mission. One of the very few men to each to top of "Heartbreak Ridge" during this costly attack, Sergeant Misseri's gallantry and extraordinary devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on him and uphold the finest traditions of the Army and the Republic of France.

Sandre, Capt. Robert

Received for charging a bunker, destroying the position, and annihilating a weapons crew.

Serre, Leon

General Orders: Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 88 (1951)

Ullmann, Bernard [CIVILIAN]

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 12 - 22 January 1953

Bernard Ullmann, French civilian, French Correspondent, Agence France Presse, attached to Company B, 7th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations near Ongion-dong, Korea, on 23 April 1951.  Advancing over rugged, mountainous terrain to the crest of the hill objective, Company B came under vicious machine-gun and rifle fire at approximately 2000 hours and suffered numerous casualties.  Fully aware of the danger involved, Mr. Ullmann left his place of comparative safety and repeatedly crossed open, fire-swept terrain to aid and evacuate the wounded from the path of the rapidly advancing enemy.  After darkness had descended and upon orders to withdraw, Mr. Ullmann continued to pursue his heroic, self-imposed task until all the wounded had been removed from the area.  Mr. Ullmann's intrepid actions saved the lives of many wounded, and his unflinching courage and consummate concern for his fellow men reflect the highest credit on himself and the members of his profession.

Vuillermet, Georges

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 92 - 7 December 1953

Caporal Chef Georges Vuillermet, Infantry, Army of the Republic of France, a member of First Company, French Battalion, attached to the 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d United States Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Sat'ae-ri, Korea, on the night of 11 and 12 October 1951.  His platoon was issued a flame thrower for a night attack on Hill 851, the last remaining concentration of enemy strength on Heartbreak Ridge.  Caporal Chef Vuillermet moved out with the flame-thrower operator to the fanatically defended hostile positions, where two enemy bunkers were quickly eliminated.  Although wounded during this action, he returned with the flame-thrower operator, now out of fuel, and led his squad in the assault against the second enemy line of resistance on Hill 851.  He charged ahead through intense enemy fire into a trench occupied by squad of enemy troops.  Despite the tremendous odds against him, Caporal Chef Vuillermet engaged the foe in close combat, utilizing hand grenades to completely annihilate the enemy.  His courageous and inspiring actions materially contributed to the success of his platoon in securing its objective with a minimum of casualties.  The selfless devotion to duty and courage displayed by Caporal Chef Vuillermet reflect great credit on himself and the Army of the Republic of France.


Greek Expeditionary Forces Silver Star Recipients

Anemoyannis, Chahalambos

Headquarters, IX Corps, General Orders No. 121 (1951)

Bekiaris, Fotios Vassilios (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 3 - 20 January 1954

First Lieutenant Fotios Vassilios Bekiaris, Greek Expeditionary Forces, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Song-Yiong-Si, Korea, on 28 September 1952.  The 2d Company, Greek Expeditionary Forces Battalion, had the mission of seizing and securing hill "Big Nori".  Lieutenant Bekiaris, a platoon leader spearheading the attack, courageously led his platoon through intense artillery and mortar fire and quickly secured the objective.  Hostile forces immediately shelled the newly won position with mortar and artillery fire.  Following closely behind, hostile forces launched a determined counterattack in an attempt to drive friendly forces off the hill.  Although wounded, Lieutenant Bekiaris moved about the shell-torn terrain giving instructions to his men as they repulsed the enemy and inflicted heavy casualties.  He so inspired his men that they successfully repulsed two hostile counterattacks.  He was preparing his platoon to meet a third attack when he was mortally wounded by mortar fire.  Lieutenant Bekiaris' gallantry, aggressive action, and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service.

Spilioupolous, Kyriakos

Lt. Colonel Spilioupolous was CO of the Greek UN Battalion, attached to the 65th.

Stathias, Apostolos E. (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 12 - 22 January 1953

Second Lieutenant Apostolos E. Stathias, 5104, Greek Expeditionary Forces, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Ichon, Korea, on 30 January 1951.  Under cover of darkness, a numerically superior enemy force attacked Greek positions on a steep ridge and subjected his platoon to intense mortar, grenade, and small-arms fire.  Despite the suddenness of the attack, Lieutenant Stathias rapidly reorganized his unit and moved from position to position, encouraging his men and directing their fire against assaulting troops.  His courageous action and complete disregard for his safety so inspired his men that they successfully repelled the initial attempt by the enemy to break through their perimeter.  Lieutenant Stathias then fearlessly proceeded to the command post to obtain further orders from the company commander and, while returning to his platoon, was mortally wounded by hostile fire.  The singular bravery, consummate devotion to duty, and aggressive leadership shown by Lieutenant Stathias reflect great credit on himself and the Greek Expeditionary Forces of the United Nations Command.

Tombras, Constantine Demetrios

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 1953

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Constantine Demetrios Tombras, Foreign, for gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Koyangdae, Korea, on 2 March 1952. Leading a group of seven men in an attack against a series of heavily fortified enemy bunkers located on top of Kelly Hill, Lieutenant Tombras and his men were driven back by heavy small-arms, automatic weapons, and artillery fire. After rallying his small group, Lieutenant Tombras renewed the attack and again met a murderous hail of fire. Although five of his men were wounded, he led them to the top of the hill, forced the enemy from their position, and held the hill until ordered to withdraw. The outstanding heroism and leadership by Lieutenant Tombras are in accordance with the finest traditions of the military service. Entered Service From Greece.

Vlases, George C.

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - 8 September 1955

Brigadier General George C. Vlases, Greek Army, Chief of Greek Liaison Group, United Nations and Far East Commands, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Surang-ni, Korea, on 18 June 1953.  While inspecting the elements of the Greek Expeditionary Forces Battalion in their most forward positions in defense of critical terrain, the enemy opened an intensive artillery and mortar barrage on outpost "Harry."  After a careful evaluation of the situation General Vlases coordinated the activities of his units and prepared for a probable enemy attack.  He moved throughout the impact area assisting unit commanders, steadying and encouraging the troops by his inspiring example and insuring proper and speedy evacuation of the wounded.  Without regard for his own safety, constantly exposed to heavy fire, he continued his visits from unit to unit stressing the importance of their mission and coordinating defensive measures.  After strong friendly artillery and mortar fire succeeded in silencing hostile fire and when he was convinced that the outpost was secure from attack he returned to the Battalion Command Post.  His presence in the forward area provided a strong, steadying influence which imbued the troops with indomitable resolution and determination.  General Vlases' courage, outstanding leadership and untiring devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the Greek Royal Armed Forces.

Tombras, Constantine Demetrios

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 49 - 9 June 1953

First Lieutenant Constantine Demetrios Tombras, Greek Expeditionary Forces, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Koyangdae, Korea, on 2 March 1952.  Leading a group of seven men in an attack against a series of heavily fortified enemy bunkers located on top of Kelly Hill, Lieutenant Tombras and his men were driven back by heavy small-arms, automatic-weapons, and artillery fire.  After rallying his small group, Lieutenant Tombras renewed the attack and again met a murderous hail of fire.  Although five of his men were wounded, he led them to the top of the hill, forced the enemy from their position, and held the hill until ordered to withdraw.  The outstanding heroism and leadership demonstrated by Lieutenant Tombras are in accordance with the finest traditions of the military service.


Netherlands Battalion

Christan, Gerardus H.

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel Gerardus H. Christan, Royal Netherlands Army, Commanding Officer, Netherlands Battalion, attached to the 38th Infantry Regiment, for gallantry in action on 18 February 1952, near Mirok-Tong, Korea. Committed to attack and destroy hostile emplacements on Star Hill, a dominant terrain feature tenaciously defended by a fanatical foe, Colonel Christan fearlessly led his command up the rugged slope and engaged the enemy. When a platoon leader and his assistant were wounded in the initial phase of the action, leaving the unit disorganized and without command, Colonel Christan rallied and regrouped the troops and, vulnerable to withering fire and armed only with a pistol, led them in a daring charge which overran hostile positions and carried to the crest of the hill. Quickly readying defense positions against imminent counterattack, Colonel Christan directed his mine platoon to destroy remaining enemy emplacements and lay anti-personnel mines. After completing the mission with minimum casualties, he led his men back to friendly lines. Colonel Christan's inspirational leadership and intrepid actions reflect great credit upon himself and uphold the honored traditions of military service.

Jansen, Dirk A.C.

General Orders: Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 156 (1951)

Leuring, Carel Mathija Cornelis

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Second Lieutenant Carel Mathija Cornelis Leuring, Netherlands Army, a member of the Netherlands Expeditionary Force to Korea, for gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Kumwa, Korea. On 22 December 1941, Lieutenant Leuring led his men forward in an attack on strategically located enemy positions. Displaying aggressive leadership, he skillfully directed their fire as they seized one enemy emplacement, and then moved in the forefront of the assault as the friendly troops charged a second more heavily-fortified position located on commanding ground. The hostile force resisted fanatically, showering hand grenades on the attacking troops and calling in a murderous mortar bombardment which inflicted several casualties. Disorganized by the ferocious resistance, the friendly platoon fell back to the previously captured position. Although he had been painfully wounded in the attack, Lieutenant Leuring skillfully reorganized his men and led them forward again in a sweeping assault. Only when his platoon's mission had been accomplished did he allow himself to be evacuated for medical treatment. The heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Leuring on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the Netherlands Army.


Philippine Expeditionary Forces Silver Star Recipients

Agustin, Pfc. Aquilino

"Aggressive patrols into enemy territory sparked short but vicious close quarter combats. During one such patrol, a squad under Staff Sgt. Ponciano Agno of “C” Company rescued another squad trapped by the Chinese. One of the men rescued, Pfc. Aquilino Agustin, was captured by the Chinese and only escaped by selflessly exploding two grenades in the face of his captors. The explosion killed the Chinese and riddled Agustin’s armored vest and helmet with shrapnel. Agustin received the US Silver Star for this heroic act. After two months at the front during which it lost four men KIA and 27 WIA, the battalion was relieved by units of the US 45th Infantry Division."

[Source: The Philippines in the Korean War: 14th BCT PEFTOK]

Danipog, PFC Loreto Torres

Tank (Special Weapons) Company

DeGuzman, SGT Andres L.

Tank (Special Weapons) Company, 10th Battalion Combat Team

Fernandez, PFC Sulpicio Diaz

Tank (Special Weapons) Company, 10th Battalion Combat Team

Gallardo, 1LT Francisco

Headquarters, Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - 9 July 1954

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant [then Second Lieutenant] Francisco M. Gallardo, Philippine Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding officer, 93d Signal Platoon, attached to the 91st Division, Philippine Army, in action against the enemy near Saysain, Bagac, Bataan, on or about 27 January 1952. He led a detail of 10 men on a special mission along the Bagac-Moron road, ahead of the Main line of Resistance, to recover telephone wire and to evacuate bodies of comrades killed in action. Suddenly enemy aircraft appeared, and dive-bombed the area wounding 2 of his men, After directing the immediate evacuation of the wounded, Lieutenant Gallardo continued on and successfully completed the assigned mission, despite heavy fire delivered against his detail by the enemy. Lieutenant Gallardo’s courageous action, outstanding leadership, and devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the military service. Entered Service from Philippine Islands.

Mahusay, SSGT Nicholas L.

Company A, 10th Battalion Combat Team

Peason, CPL Isidro

Company B, 10th Battalion Combat Team

Serrano, 1LT Bonny

Headquarters Company, 10th Battalion Combat Team

Sibunga, PFC Amando S.

Tank (Special Weapons) Company, 10th Battalion Combat Team

Tadina, PFC Leon Tadina

Tank (Special Weapons) Company, 10th Battalion Combat Tam


South Korean Silver Star Recipients

Bak Chan Kang

Lt. Colonel, 9th ROK - for leading his command in hand-to-hand combat on October 10 & 11, 1953.

Chang Do Young

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 37- 29 April 1953

Brigadier General Chang Do Young, Republic of Korea Army, Commanding General, 6th Republic of Korea Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Chipsil-Il, Korea, on 18 October 1951.  Committed to secure key terrain, his command was engaged in an attempt to dislodge hostile forces from tenaciously defended positions on the slopes of two strategic hills and was being subjected to heavy mortar and artillery fire.  Electing to move forward to an open vantage point to better observe developments and determine the course of action, General Chang, despite vicious hostile fire, remained exposed to constant danger and ordered and implemented an ingenious double-envelopment maneuver against the enemy emplacements.  Maintaining close liaison with forward elements and personally directing the subsequent action, he so inspired his subordinate commanders and the troops by his presence that the enemy was routed from the commanding ground and numerous casualties wee inflicted on the hostile force during the encounter.  General Chang's superb leadership and valorous conduct during the peak of the bitterest fighting reflect marked credit on himself and the Armed Forces of the Republic of Korea.

Che, Koon Shin

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - 23 September 1953

Captain Che Koon Shin, (then first lieutenant), Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, a member of the 7th Company, 17th Regiment, 2d Republic of Korea Army Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in the vicinity of Kumwha, Korea, on 21 and 22 October 1952.  His company was employed in the defense of "Snipers' Ridge" when a battalion-size enemy attack routed other friendly elements from their positions.  The numerically superior enemy force encircled his company and then attempted to crush its perimeter defense.  Unable to contact other elements of his regiment, after communications were broken by intensive artillery barrages, he encouraged his men to hold their position.  During this action, enemy artillery and mortar fire was greatly increased in intensity, but by exercising outstanding leadership and professional ability, Captain Cho maintained control of his company.  with disregard for his safety, he moved from man to man, inspiring and encouraging them to stand fast.  After many of the weapons of his company became inoperative, he seized a shovel and met the enemy in close hand-to-hand combat.  Inspired by his display of courage, his comrades also picked up shovels, bayonets, and picks and engaged the enemy in close combat.  Although wounded during this engagement, Captain Che continued his valiant action and his unit succeeded in holding the position until friendly reinforcements arrived and drove the enemy off the ridge.  Captain Che's indomitable courage, inspirational leadership, and consummate devotion to duty reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Cho, Myong Whan

Headquarters, IX Corps, General Orders No. 204 (1951)

Cho, 2LT Tong Suk (5th ROK DIV)

Choi, Chang Un

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 35 - 13 May 1954

Brigadier General Choi Chang Un, 10095, Republic of Korea Army, Commanding General of the Capitol Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in the vicinity of Kumsong, Korea, on 14 July 1953.  Without regard for his personal safety, he continually visited the fire-swept forward battle positions and personally directed and supervised the evacuation of the wounded.  He encouraged disheartened troops and refused to leave the danger area when encouraged to do so by subordinate commanders.  The bravery and gallantry displayed by General Choi under enemy artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire inspired his men and gave them greater confidence.  As a result of his courageous action, the Capitol Division was able to stop the enemy and stabilize a line behind which the 3d United States Division organized anew main battle position.  General Choi's gallantry in action and brilliant leadership reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Choi, CDR Yong Nam (ROKN)

Choung, Jin

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 28 - 13 March 1953

Colonel Jin Choung, Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action as commanding officer of the 3d Regiment, 7th Korean Division, in the vicinity of Amsudong, Korea, on 16 and 17 May 1951.  His regiment, engaged in a delaying action against two divisions of the 20th Chinese Communist Corps, became subjected on several occasions to extreme pressure from the enemy.  Completely disregarding grave danger to himself, he constantly moved about in forward positions and, in many instances, personally directed the fire of crew-served weapons.  On one occasion, when ordering a third counter-attack to clear an enemy road-block, he was with one of the battalions of his unit which had been surrounded by the hostile forces.  Displaying brilliant leadership and professional skill, he successfully led the battalion in breaking out of this encirclement.  Always present at the point of most serious threat, his fearless behavior and resolute determination so inspired his officers and men that they fought successful delaying actions against numerically superior forces in seven different positions in their mission of assisting in the protection of the right flank of X Corps.  The gallantry, tenacity, and brilliant leadership displayed by Colonel Choung in this critical and decisive action reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Chung, Il Kwon

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 28 - 13 March 1953

Lieutenant General Chung Il Kwon, 10005 (then major general), Chief of Staff, Republic of Korea Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations near Pohang, Korea, on 10 September 1950.  Learning that the Republic of Korea 3d Division was heavily engaged and the enemy was attempting a break-through toward the vital supply base at Pusan, General Chung traveled by aircraft to Pohang to assume personal control of the critical situation.  Fully aware that the Pohang air-strip had been abandoned by friendly forces and realizing the aircraft would attract hostile action, General Chung fearlessly proceeded and, upon landing, the area was immediately subjected to intense artillery fire.  Making his way to a waiting jeep and scorning hits on the vehicle, General Chung drove through a barrage of bursting shells to the division command post.  After a short briefing, General Chung went forward and, constantly vulnerable to hostile fire, moved among his foremost elements to direct operations.  His safety was further imperiled by the enemy's knowledge of his presence but, undaunted, he continued to maintain close liaison with front-line units.  General Chung, dominating and controlling the critical situation through sheer force of his heroic example, inspired both officers and men to hold during 6 hours of bitter fighting under constant, heavy shelling.  After the attack was contained, General Chung returned to the air-strip where he was pinned down for more than 1 hour by heavy concentrations of artillery fire.  Despite the withering fire, General Chung was preparing to depart when he observed a pilot attempting to evacuate a small aircraft and insisted that the pilot be allowed take-off priority.  As the pilot was becoming airborne, an artillery burst blew off a wheel, disabling the aircraft.  After assuring himself that the pilot was uninjured, General Chung braved the hazard of becoming airborne and was successfully flown from the area.  General Chung's unflinching courage under fire, inspirational leadership, and intrepid, aggressive actions reflect utmost credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Chung, Sup Moon

General Orders: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 322 (1953)

Ham, Jin Oh

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 92 - 7 December 1953

First Lieutenant Ham Jin Oh, Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in the vicinity of Kumwha, Korea, on 30 and 31 October 1952.  His company was ordered to counterattack Hill 598 and restore the friendly lines.  The crest of the hill was under direct enemy observation and was well zeroed in by enemy guns.  But despite heavy enemy fire and the large number of casualties which it inflicted upon the company, Lieutenant Ham, exhibiting extraordinary leadership, inspired his men to make determined efforts to gain the objective.  Reaching the crest of the hill, he reorganized his men, and since three of his platoon leaders were killed and the other wounded, he took command of three platoons and ordered his executive officer to lead the other.  Supported by heavy artillery fire, fresh enemy troops stormed their positions and engaged in hand-to-hand combat with the stubborn defenders.  Although the morale of his troops was steadily decreasing because of heavy casualties and enemy superiority in strength, they continued to fight determinedly, inspired by the selfless and gallant acts of Lieutenant Ham.  Despite wounds received during this action, he again joined in the attack, hurling grenades at the enemy and moving through the area encouraging his men until the explosion of an enemy shell rendered him unconscious and his company was ordered to withdraw.  The selfless devotion to duty, outstanding leadership, and persistent courage displayed by Lieutenant Ham reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Ham, Myong Su

Lieutenant Commander

Hwan, Pak Te

Department of the Army
General Orders Nol. 17 - 8 March 1954

Private First Class Hwan Pak Te, Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, attached to Company G, 179th Infantry, 45th Infantry Division, United States Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Taebanggok, Korea, on 4 November 1952.  A 12-man patrol crossed the main line of resistance to locate and contact the enemy, and as it approached the hostile position, it was halted by sporadic fire from machine-gun positions on both flanks.  Private Hwan moved forward to assist his squad leader and to furnish covering fire as he moved from position to position, checking his men and controlling their fire.  When an enemy hand grenade fell near the leader, Private Hwan forced his companion aside attempting to shield him from injury from the exploding grenade.  Although seriously wounded during this action, he continued to deliver accurate fire against the hostile forces.  When the patrol was ordered to withdraw, he remained in position providing effective covering fire until after his unit had successfully completed its withdrawal.  Private Hwan's devotion to duty and courageous actions reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Im, Soung Do

SN 1st Class, ROKN

Inn, Hwan Song

Civilian.  He received this award for taking a burst of small-arms fire intended for a staff officer of the 38th Infantry Regiment near Taegu on September 22, 1950.

Jae, Lee Moon

General Orders: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 475 (1953)

Jong, Moon Sung

General Orders: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 308 (1953)

Kang, Too Hyang

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - 23 September 1953

Major Kang Too Hyang, Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, infantry battalion commander of the 17th Regiment, 2d Republic of Korea Army Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Kumwha, Korea, on 15 and 16 October 1952.  His battalion was committed to the defense of "Objective A" on "Sniper's Ridge", against a strong enemy counter-attack.  He was observing the action of his battalion approximately 300 yards ahead of the main line of resistance, where he directed artillery fire in support of his troops.  The accurate supporting fires enabled the unit to hold the position for approximately 8 hours, after which increased enemy pressure forced a withdrawal.  Major Kang returned to the battalion and, utilizing a reserve company, committed one platoon to a counterattack.  The platoon advanced and met stiff enemy resistance near the objective where the enemy had established strong defensive positions.  In this action, the platoon became disorganized and the leader was wounded and evacuated.  In an effort to reinforce the assault platoon, Major Kang prepared another platoon, which he personally led.  On reaching the position where the platoon was pinned down, he provided support and encouragement for the assault squad.  Exposed to enemy small-arms fire and artillery and mortar shelling, he courageously engaged the enemy and killed at least five of them with pistol and grenades.  His presence with the assaulting unit greatly inspired his troops.  They fought with renewed vigor and determination and successfully secured the objective.  Major Kang's persistent courage, tenacity, and inspirational leadership reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Kang, Yoon Cho

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 72 - 23 September 1953

Second Lieutenant Kang Yoon Cho, Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, a member of 5th Company, 17th Infantry Regiment, 2d Republic of Korea Army Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Kumwha, Korea, on 18 November 1952.  His company was assigned the mission of capturing and holding "Rocky Point" on "Sniper's Ridge," an area bitterly contested for several days.  After the company gained possession of the position, the enemy launched an attack forcing the company to withdraw.  During the action, the company commander lost  his life and Lieutenant Kang reorganized the troops preparatory to initiating a counterattack to regain the position.  He valiantly led his men in a determined attack, successfully overcoming the enemy.  Before he could reorganize and consolidate his gain, the enemy whirled back, again forcing a withdrawal to the reverse slope of the hill.  Because of the serious losses sustained in the series of actions, his company was reinforced by other units and he immediately led them in another counterattack.  Despite determined efforts to push forward under intensive enemy fire, the company was pinned down just short of the objective.  Refusing to take cover and continuing his charge against heavy enemy resistance, his men, so inspired by his courage, followed him up the slope and engaged in hand-to-hand combat with the enemy.  Although wounded during this action, Lieutenant Kang continued to fight with his bayonet, and personally eliminated approximately one squad of enemy.  The selfless devotion to duty, outstanding courage, and aggressive determination displayed by Lieutenant Kang contributed greatly to the successful accomplishment of the assigned mission and reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Kim, Chum Kon

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 5 - 15 January 1952

Colonel Kim Chum Kon, Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Nopo-dong, Korea, from 22 to 25 April 1951.  Commanding the 12th Regiment, 1st Republic of Korea Division, through superb leadership and tactical knowledge, he capably directed the successful defense of his sector in the Imjin River area for 3 days against repeated attacks by numerically superior, hostile forces before complying with orders to withdraw.  He fearlessly led elements of his regiment on 23 April to a counterattack, inflicting numerous casualties on the enemy and disorganizing and halting their offensive.  Launching another attack on 25 April, his unit inflicted heavy destruction on opposing forces, advanced approximately 3,000 yards, succeeded in liberating 43 members of the 29th British Brigade, and provided cover for the withdrawal of the 15th Regiment.  Despite fanatical attacks by hostile troops who gained high ground in rear of friendly battalions and raked the regimental observation post with vicious automatic-weapons and mortar fire, Colonel Kim coolly maintained order, supervised the destruction of radio equipment, and personally led his men through enemy-held territory to safety.  Colonel Kim's courage, devotion to duty, and gallant leadership reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Kim, Sgt. Choong Yul (5ROK)

Kim, Kyong Jin (posthumous)

Maj. Kim was with the 9th ROK.  He received the Silver star for leading his battalion against elements of two Red divisions on high ground near Chorwon on October 11, 1952.

Kim, Sgt. Sang Won (with US 7th ID)

Kim, Yong Kuk (posthumous)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 18 - 18 February 1953

First Lieutenant Kim Yong Kuk, Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, a member of Company G, 32d Regiment, 2d Republic of Korea Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Kumwha-Kun, Korea.  On the night of 1-2 September 1951, his company was defending a critically important hill on the division outpost line.  At 2000 hours, after a devastating artillery and mortar barrage, the enemy penetrated friendly positions and Lieutenant Kim's company was reduced to six effectives.  Refusing to withdraw, Lieutenant Kim retained the key point of the hill until reinforcements arrived.  The undaunted commander again led a counterattack which drove the enemy from the hill.  Lieutenant Kim was killed as the action ended.  The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Kim on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Kim, Young Oak

Ko, Baik Kyn

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 5 - 15 January 1952

Colonel Ko Baik Kyn, Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action as commanding officer of the 29th Regiment, 9th Korean Division, near Chinbu Myon, Korea, on 8 February 1951.  Spearheading an attack on Hajinbu-ri, the advanced battalion of his unit became pinned down by intense mortar, machine-gun, and small-arms fire from hostile elements emplaced on high ground.  Disregarding this vicious fire, Colonel Ko fearlessly reconnoitered the situation to the front, then deployed another battalion around the right flank of the enemy.  Inspired by his courage and aggressiveness, despite lack of communications and a shortage of ammunition and food, his regiment killed 299 enemy troops, captured 24, and completely routed the remaining force. Colonel Ko's consistent exposure to hostile fire and his determination, gallantry, and superb leadership reflect the highest credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Ko, Jae Il

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 3 - 20 January 1954

Captain Ko Jae Il, Republic of Korea Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in the vicinity of Kumwha, Korea, on 31 October 1952.  His company was committed in defense of the steep, rocky Hill 598.  The enemy, from commanding terrain, placed devastating artillery and automatic-weapons fire on the defensive positions.  With continued heavy, supporting fire, the enemy launched a strong and determined attack in an effort to dislodge friendly defense elements from the hill.  Waves of hostile troops moved up the steep slopes delivering heavy small-arms fire and hurling grenades.  When the defensive lines were penetrated, Captain Ko immediately reorganized his men and personally directed their action in forcing the attackers from the position, while he joined in the hand-to-hand combat.  The enemy fought ferociously, many times effecting a breakthrough, but each time they were driven back by the tenacious defenders under the dynamic leadership and determination of Captain Ko.  When ordered to withdraw, he elected to stand fast to prevent exposure of the left flank of friendly units to enemy attack.  He remained directing artillery and heavy-weapons fire until attacking forces were repelled, at which time he withdrew.  The gallantry, aggressive determination, and devotion to duty displayed by Captain Ko reflect the highest credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Lee, Chung Il

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 106 - 28 November 1952

Brigadier General Lee Chung Il, Republic of Korea Army, while serving as Commanding General, 7th Republic of Korea Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Palmal, Korea, 0n 23 September 1951.  When, during an assault on Hill 1142, the attacking elements of his division were halted, General Lee proceeded to the regimental observation post despite enemy mortar fire falling into the area.  Upon his arrival, he personally took charge of the operation and remained with the forward elements with complete disregard for his safety.  His enthusiasm and aggressive direction of the operation and his coolness under enemy fire, which caused heavy casualties in the immediate area, inspired his leaders to renew their efforts to accomplish their mission.  The gallantry displayed by General Lee is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Lee, Han Lim

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 53 - 9 July 1954

Major General Lee Han Lim, Republic of Korea Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations near Pcktong-ni, Korea, on 14 June 1953.  Learning that friendly forces defending the "Boomerang" outpost area were heavily engaged with the enemy, he left the comparative safety of his observation post and traversed rugged mountainous terrain to the most forward elements of his command to evaluate the situation, and to plan and coordinate the defense.  Constantly vulnerable to intense artillery, machine-gun, and small-arms fire, General Lee moved throughout the impact area, assisting unit commanders and steadying and encouraging the men.  Inspired by the courage of their valiant leader, the command drove forward with relentless determination, repulsed the assault, and routed the enemy from the commanding ground with heavy casualties.  After the attack was contained, he remained on the position and directed reorganization of division units until the battle line was completely stabilized.  General Lee's outstanding leadership, unflinching courage, and valorous actions reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Lee, Heung Koon

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 84 - 3 November 1953

Lieutenant General Lee Heung Koon, Republic of Korea Army, Commanding General, I Republic of Korea Army Corps, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Hill 361, Korea, on 10 July 1952.  Repeated assaults on Hill 351, a key terrain feature in the Corps sector, failed to dislodge the determined enemy from strongly fortified positions.  General Lee, realizing the seriousness of the situation and the necessity for immediate action, moved from a position of relative safety and personally directed the reorganization of two companies.  Without regard for intense enemy artillery and mortar fire, he unhesitatingly proceeded to forward areas to supervise proper and adequate preparation and combat readiness for a renewed attack.  Sensing the deterioration in leadership and morale as a result of increasing numbers of casualties in the command, General Lee remained in the forward areas and his presence during critical stages of combat provided a strong, steadying influence on his troops and inspired them to strike the enemy with vigorous force.  As a result of his professional skill, aggressive actions, and enthusiasm, the attack was pressed with relentless determination and intensity, which successfully forced the enemy from their positions.  General Lee's indomitable courage, inspirational leadership, and consummate devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

O, Myong Sin

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1051 (1953)

Oh, Duk Jun

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 42 - 23 April 1952

Brigadier General Oh Duk Jun, Republic of Korea Army, Commanding General, 11th Republic of Korea Army Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations near Sachon-ni, Korea, on 21 August 1951.  The 1st and 2d Battalions, heavily engaged against a numerically superior hostile force, suffered numerous casualties, and rainy weather and low-hanging clouds precluded employing air support and added to the hazards of battle. Learning that his troops were falling back in the face of overwhelming enemy action and the commanding officer of the 1st Battalion had been wounded and evacuated, General Oh braved intense small-arms and mortar fire and moved over rugged, mountainous terrain, through treacherous enemy-infiltrated areas, and, upon arrival at the attacking battalion observation post, found the unit disorganized and without command.  Dominating the critical situation through sheer force of his heroic example, General Oh reorganized the withdrawing elements, directed establishment of a new perimeter, assisted in the evacuation of the wounded, and, through his calm demeanor and unflinching courage under fire, inspired his command to contain the enemy until reinforcements arrived.  As a result of General Oh's intrepid conduct and aggressive actions, the objective was subsequently secured, with a heavy toll in enemy dead and tremendous losses of materiel.  His superb leadership and consummate devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Pack, PFC Ryoung Zoon

General Orders: Headquarters, I Corps, General Orders No. 65 (1951)

Paik, Kwon Nam

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 28 - 13 March 1953

Colonel Paik Nam Kwon, Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, as commanding officer of the 2d Battalion, Cavalry Regiment, Republic of Korea Capitol Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action, near Wonsan, Korea, on 10 October 1950.  Deployed as an advance guard, his battalion suddenly came under vicious, hostile fire from three camouflaged tanks flanked by well-entrenched riflemen.  Moving constantly under intense fire to regroup his unit, Colonel Paik then led a counterattack which overran hostile positions and resulted in 40 enemy troops killed and five 76-mm guns captured.  Colonel Paik's daring action so inspired his men with confidence and renewed courage that the battalion later played an important part in the capture of Wonsan.  The resolute determination, consummate courage, and superb leadership demonstrated by Colonel Paik reflect great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Pak, Myong Chae

General Orders: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 720 (1952)

Pak, Myong Kyong

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1010 (1951)

Pak, Sun Yup

Headquarters, Eighth United States Army Korea
General Orders No. 160 - 13 November 1950

Brigadier General Pak Sun Yup, 10054, Army of the Republic of Korea, Commanding General, 1st Republic of Korea Infantry Division, displayed gallantry in action against an armed enemy in the Kumwi-Tabudong area, Korea, during the period 19 September to 22 September 1950.  When one of the regiments of his Division, which had been given the mission of completing the encirclement of the "Walled City", encountered heavy enemy resistance, General Pak joined the forward elements of that regiment and without regard for personal safety, and in the face of intense enemy mortar and small arms fire, personally led them in an attack which overcame the enemy resistance and successfully effected a junction with elements of the 1st United States Cavalry Division.  As a result of General Pak's fearless and exemplary actions, great numbers of the enemy were destroyed or captured.  General Pak's gallant actions reflects great credit on himself and the Army of the Republic of Korea.

Rhee, Tae Choul

Major and Division Battalion Commander with the 9th ROKs.  He received this award for exposing himself to intense enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire in order to lead his troops. 

Rhee, Yun Ee

Sergeant with the 9th ROKs.  He received this award for inspiring his men so that they killed more than 90 enemy without themselves receiving a single casualty.

Seo, Chul Jung (1st Oak Leaf Cluster)

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 28 - 13 March 1953

Colonel Seo Jung Chul, Infantry, Republic of Korea Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action near Yangyang, Korea, on 27 March 1951.  The 26th Regiment, Republic of Korea Capitol Division, was attacking two battalions of strongly entrenched enemy.  The 2d Battalion, leading the attack, had advanced across the Huchon River to the reverse side of a 15-foot dike, where they were pinned down by intense enemy fire.  Colonel Seo, as commanding officer of the 26th Regiment, observed that the battalion was suffering heavy casualties and unable to advance.  Exposing himself to enemy fire, he moved from his observation post, made his way across open, exposed terrain, and plunged recklessly through the river to where the battalion was held up.  He moved up and down the line, in the face of fierce enemy fire, directing the actions of his men.  Then, without regard for his personal safety, he jumped on top of the dike, fully exposed to the enemy, and led the battalion in the attack.  Inspired by his example of aggressive leadership and outstanding courage, the battalion, following their regimental commander, charged the enemy, overran hostile positions, killed 70, captured 3, and forced the remainder to withdraw, disorganized.  Colonel Seo's intrepidity reflects great credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Shin, Kum Suk

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 11 - 8 February 1955

Captain Shin Kum Suk, Infantry, Republic of Korea, Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations Command in the area of "M-1 Hill" in Korea on 19 June 1953.  After several attempts to recapture this important outpost had failed due to stubborn enemy resistance, Captain Shin personally set out at the head of two of his squads at 0300 hours in another attempt to accomplish his unit's mission of retaking "M-1 Hill".  Proceeding up the hill, they encountered heavy machine gun fire that was particularly damaging.  Carefully observing and studying the situation, Captain Shin sent one squad to neutralize this heavy machine gun while he encircled the machine gun bunker and approached from the flank.  Upon reaching the position, he immediately joined his men whom he found already engaged in hand to h and combat with the enemy.  Despite the fact that he was wounded in the foot by an exploding enemy grenade, he rushed the machine gun bunker from which the grenade had been thrown.  As the enemy attempted to flee, Captain Shin threw a hand grenade into their midst and the exploding grenade resulted in the death of two of the enemy and led to the capture of a third.  The courageous and inspiring leadership demonstrated by Captain Shim contributed greatly in the successful accomplishment of his unit's mission and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.

Song, Inn Hwan (CIVILIAN)

Department of the Army, General Orders No. 18 (1953)

Song, Kap Saing

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 43 - 24 June 1955

Corporal Song Kap Saing, (then Private First Class), Republic of Korea Army, a member of the 11th Company, 62d Regiment, 20th Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy in Korea on 17 June 1953.  While participating with his platoon in an attack on "Hill M-1". Corporal Song suddenly dashed up the west side of the hill and destroyed a bunker with hand grenades, killing nine of its defenders.  In eliminating this strong-point he captured a light machine gun and two submachine guns and pressed his attack on the remainder of the demoralized and fleeing enemy to inflict additional casualties.  Inspired by Corporal Song's heroic and aggressive action, the platoon swept up the hill to rout the remaining enemy defenders and secure the objective.  The gallantry and spirited determination demonstrated by Corporal Song in this action reflects the utmost credit on himself and the Republic of Korea Army.

Won, Kim Sang

Headquarters, 8th Army
General Orders No. 998 - 1953

"With U.S. 7th Div., Korea, Dec. 2 - A Korean soldier, veteran of more than 300 combat patrols, recently received the first Silver star ever to be awarded a KATUSA of his division's 17th Regiment.  Sgt. Kim Sang Won was presented the medal by Maj. Gen. Lionel C. McGarr, division commander, after he had served with the division since its arrival in Korea.  The award was for gallantry in action during one of his numerous patrols.  The veteran of 39 months of duty with the regiment credits his patrol success to his knowledge of the terrain and fighting habits of the enemy, but his American friends insist that it is his "fighting spirit and courage" which led him to compile his outstanding record.  Kim has participated in every major fight, involving the "Buffaloes," including the drive to the Yalu River in late 1950."

[Source: Pacific Stars & Stripes, December 3, 1953.]

Yang, Myong Chin

Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 155 (1953)


Thailand Army Silver Star Recipients

Kichprachoom, Chuerak

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 35 - 13 May 1954

Private Chuerak Kichprachoom, Infantry, Thailand Army, a member of Company A, Thailand Battalion, attached to the 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 1 November 1952.  While manning a heavy machine gun on the "Pork Chop" outpost, he was wounded, his gun knocked out of action, and his bunker destroyed when it received a direct hit by an enemy mortar shell.  Despite his wound, he delivered the damaged gun to his unit and with disregard for continued heavy enemy fire, returned to his position and provided effective fire with his carbine.  Later, Private Kichprachoom volunteered to join his comrades at new positions where heavy enemy assaults were in progress.  Upon locating another heavy machine gun, he disassembled the gun and, making several trips alone, reassembled the weapon on a destroyed bunker and poured devastating fire into the ranks of advancing enemy troops.  His fearless behavior and resolute determination greatly inspired his comrades who rallied to the task of halting the threatening hostile attacks.  Private Kichprochoom's determined and courageous actions reflect great credit on himself and the military service.


Turkish Silver Star Recipients

Avei, PVT Ahmed (10th Co., 241st Inf. Rgt.)

Dora, Celal

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 91 - 24 October 1951

Colonel Celal Dora, Infantry, Turkish Army, distinguished himself by gallantry in action as commanding officer of the 241st Infantry Regiment, Turkish Armed Forces Command, in the vicinity of Suwon, Korea, from 20 January to 6 February 1951.  His regiment had been assigned the mission of attacking and occupying several enemy strong points situation on Hill 156 and were then fiercely engaging a numerically superior and stubborn foe.  Repeatedly exposing himself to deadly hostile fire, Colonel Dora remained with the most advance elements of his unit to direct tactical operations.  His presence during critical stages of combat provided a strong, steadying influence on his troops and inspired them to destroy the enemy at all costs.  The superb leadership, fearlessness under fire, and devotion to duty displayed by Colonel Dora contributed a great deal in the successful accomplishments of his regiment and reflect great credit on himself and the Turkish Army.

Fregemen, 1LT Selahattin (2d Co., 241st Inf. Rgt.) (posthumous)

Gencebay,SR LT Arifi (7th Co., 241st Inf. Rgt.)

Goral, 1LT Osman (10th Co., 241st Inf. Rgt.) (posthumous)

Gunay, CAPT Becir (6th Co., 241st Inf. Rgt.)

Gurel, Sukru

Department of the Army
General Orders No. 17 - 8 March 1954

First Lieutenant Sukru Gurel, Turkish Army, a platoon leader of the 6th Company, 2d Battalion, Turkish Armed Forces Command, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy near Sanggorangp'o Korea, on 29 May 1953.  His unit was ordered to reinforce Outpost Elko, which had been under continuous and determined enemy attack.  Upon arrival at the outpost, Lieutenant Gurel quickly deployed his unit for defense of the position.  Constantly moving around the friendly positions and exposing himself to devastating mortar and artillery barrages and small-arms fire, he was an inspiration to his men.  Fighting with hand grenades and any weapon he could obtain, he killed an estimated 40 enemy during the night and the next morning.  Despite severe wounds received during this action, he continued encouraging his men, directing fire, and actively engaged in the fire fight which denied the enemy access to the critical position.  Lieutenant Gurel's aggressive courage, determined devotion to duty, and outstanding leadership reflect great credit on himself and the Turkish Army.

Huseyin, SGT Gul (5th Co., 241st Inf. Rgt.)

Kaara, PVT Satilmis (4th Co., 241st Inf. Rgt.)

Olhon, CAPT Cevat (5th Co., 241st Inf. Regt.) (posthumous)

Orhan, 2LT Ozcan (9th Co., 241st Inf. Rgt.)

Yacisi, GEN Takoin (Commander, Turkish Brigade)

Yildiz, PVT Recep (7th Co., 241st Inf. Rgt.)

Yontem, SGT Nuri (5th Co., 241st Inf. Rgt.)

 

 

 

 

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